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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Boats pass under the LaSalle St. Bridge in downtown Chicago. Scientists at Argonne are partnering with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to catalogue the microbe population of the Chicago River. Click to enlarge.

2

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Carson has built a successful and Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

3

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

4

Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Facility Southside Water Reclamation Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Bernalillo County, New Mexico Coordinates 35.0177854°, -106.6291304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0177854,"lon":-106.6291304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Precipitation Variability and Surface-Mine Reclamation in the Green, Powder and San Juan River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal and state legislation requires the reclamation of surface-mined lands. Reclamation usually involves landscape shaping and revegetation. In arid and semiarid regions, climate exerts considerable influence on revegetation facility. This ...

Terrence J. Toy

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Water for energy. Missouri River reservoirs: Pick--Sloan Missouri Basin Program. Draft environmental statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Reclamation proposes to make available for energy related industrial purposes up to 1.0 million acre-feet of water annually from main-stem Missouri River reservoirs. The anticipated areas of water use include eastern Montana, western North Dakota, parts of western and central South Dakota, and northeastern Wyoming. Water service contracts would be issued for 40 years or less, with water delivery terminating no later than the year 2035. A summary of the environmental impact and adverse environmental effects postulated is presented.

McPhail, R.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reclamation Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reclamation Act (Nebraska) Reclamation Act (Nebraska) Reclamation Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources This section establishes Reclamation Districts to conserve, develop, and stabilize supplies of water for domestic, irrigation, power, manufacturing and other beneficial uses. Reclamation Districts are established by

9

Think water : reconditioning the Malden River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Reclamation of Cleaning Water Using Ultrafiltration and Double Pass Reverse Osmosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the production of electrodeposition primers, water is used as the primary cleaning agent. The dirty water that is generated contains residual contaminants from the primer production equipment, which requires that the water be disposed of as a hazardous waste. These contaminants are typically pigments and solvents. Because of the commitment to minimize process generated wastes, an integrated ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) system was installed to reclaim the cleaning water at the PPG Industries, Inc. (PPG) Cleveland, Ohio plant. The recovered water is then reused for cleaning in the primer manufacturing process. The integrated ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis system operates to reclaim 80 to 85% of the cleaning water. The system effectively removes 100% of the pigments and resins and 98% of the solvents and heavy metals. The quality of the final reclaimed water at the end of the process actually meets local sanitary water system discharge limits.

Neuman, T.; Long, G.; Tinter, M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation  

SciTech Connect

A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

Shchedrin, V. N. [Russian Academy of Agriculture Sciences (Russian Federation); Kosichenko, Yu. M. [FGNU RocNIIPM, Novocherkassk (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

13

Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Loan Program (North Carolina...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Program (North Carolina) Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Loan Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water...

14

Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program (North...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program (North Carolina) Lumbee River EMC - Solar Water Heating Rebate Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water...

15

High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality Characterization Using Rapidly Deployable Networked Infomechanical Systems (NIMS RD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Quality1594. High Resolution River Hydraulic and Water Qualityobserving spatiotemporal hydraulic and chemical properties

Thomas C. Harmon; Richard F. Ambrose; Robert M. Gilbert; Jason C. Fisher; Michael Stealey; William J. Kaiser

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Colorado River Water Conservation District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many decades, the oil shale resources of the Western United States have been considered possible contributors to the Nations liquid fuel supply. This volume reviews several paths to development of these resources and the likely consequences of following these paths. A chapter providing background information about the nature of oil shale is followed by an evaluation of technologies for recovery of shale oil. The economics and finances of establishing an industry of various sizes are analyzed. The fact that much of the best shale is located on Federal land is examined in light of the desire to increase use of the resources. The consequences of shale development in terms of impact on the physical and social environments, and a discussion of the availability of water complete the report. Policy options addressing barriers that could hinder the establishment of the industry are presented. These options, designed primarily for Congressional consideration, are limited to the obstacles OTA identified as currently existing. Other issues, of equal importance for the protection of the environment and the communities, but not constraints to development, are discussed in the body of the report.

John H Gibbons; James Boyd; William Brennan; Roland C. Fischer; John D. Haun; Carolyn A. Johnson; Estella B. Leopold

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Water Budget of the Kuparuk River Basin, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A water budget study that considers precipitation, river runoff, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture for the Kuparuk River basin on the North Slope of Alaska is presented. Numerical simulations of hydrologic processes using the NASA Catchment-...

Stephen J. Dry; Marc Stieglitz; sa K. Rennermalm; Eric F. Wood

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

19

Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Reclamation Division of the Public Service Commission is tasked with administering the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation. Specific regulations can be found in article 69-05.2 of...

20

RECOVERY OF DEGRADED HEAVY WATER AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented on purification and reconcentration of heavy water at the Savannah River Plant. Process and equipment descriptions, typical operating costs, procedures for control of health hazards, standard analytical methods, and specifications for receipt of degraded heavy water for recovery at the Savannah River Plant are included. (auth)

Scotten, W.C.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company  

SciTech Connect

Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

22

Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness...

23

Demonstrating Market Approach to Reclamation of Mined Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

202-293-7516 jmahoney@epri.com Environmental and Water Resources Demonstrating market approach to reclamation of mineD lanDs Background Many years of coal mining in the...

24

9th Annual North American Waste to Energy Conference WATER RECLAMATION PRACTICES AT THE PINELLAS COUNTY (FL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 million gallons per day (MGD) of makeup water for the cooling tower and up to 200 thousand gallons per day in the cooling towers. Reclaimed water for boiler makeup will require membrane treatment followed by ion exchange cooling is achieved by a circulating water system through a five (5) cell mechanical draft cooling tower

Columbia University

25

Energy and water development appropriations for 1994. Hearings before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Part 3  

SciTech Connect

This document of part 3 of the hearings for the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 1994. This document contains the testimony of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Bureau of Reclamation, the Secretary of the Interior, Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Delaware River Basin Commission, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Tennessee Valley Authority, and Appalachian Regional Commission.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

South River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

South River Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is providing rebates to encourage their customers to install solar water heating systems. To be eligible for the rebate solar collectors must have...

27

Reclamations Mead Substation  

SciTech Connect

This 35 million dollar facility will be a vital part of the Pacific Northwest-Southwest Intertie. It will be one of the four terminals in the project, involving ehv direct current transmission of power. After site preparation, construction began July 25 on the Bureau of Reclamations Mead Substation. This is a key dc, ac terminal of the Pacific Northwest-Southwest Intertie. The entire Mead Substation, fully equipped with both ac and dc facilities, is scheduled for completion by September 1971.

Bennet, N.B.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

(DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05): Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, 10/17/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 17, 2002 October 17, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05 memorandum Mark A. Jones Program Analyst - PGF-6 TO : Proposed Action: Boise River Diversion Dam - Amendment to Capital Investment Sub-Agreement, Contract Number DE-MS79-94BP94618 Proposed By: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) Location: Near Boise, in Ada County, Idaho Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund Reclamation's rehabilitation of the powerplant at the existing Boise River Diversion Dam (Diversion Dam) to use the water resource at Diversion Dam for electrical power production. Analysis: The Diversion Dam is located about 7 miles southeast of Boise, Idaho on the Boise River, about

29

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian RiverEuropean Water Framework Directive to the Russian River 7.0of the Water Framework Directive at the end of 2004. A

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Land Reclamation Act (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reclamation Act (Missouri) Land Reclamation Act (Missouri) Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government MunicipalPublic...

31

Safe river water: A ubiquitous and collaborative water quality monitoring solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water quality is vital to human life and economy. However, one sixth of the world's population suffers from lack of safe drinking and domestic water. Aiming to improve the capability of predicting and responding to river pollution disasters, this project ...

Bin Hu; Bo Hu; JiZheng Wan; Huilan Nie; Chongzhi Zhai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Joint Session: Air, Water, Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project managers in air, water, and climate programs are working together to address the complex, interrelated issues associated with water and air quality in the United States. This session provided background and told the story of the pilot effort in the Ohio River Basin to develop broad, nontraditional collaborations that will support multi-stakeholder programs for water quality trading, carbon trading, and ecosystem services protection. Through this pilot effo...

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

Beijing Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co.Ltd. Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100053 Product String representation "Beijing Haohua ... ulting Co. Ltd." is too long. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

ArcMine: A GIS extension to support mine reclamation planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new GIS extension, named ArcMine, developed to support reclamation planning in abandoned mining areas. ArcMine provides four tools to (a) assess mine subsidence hazards, (b) estimate the erosion of mine wastes, (c) analyze flow ... Keywords: GIS, Mine reclamation, Mine wastes, Mine water, Reforestation, Subsidence

Sung-Min Kim; Yosoon Choi; Jangwon Suh; Sungchan Oh; Hyeong-Dong Park; Suk-Ho Yoon; Wa-Ra Go

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

River Forecast Application for Water Management: Oil and Water?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing water resources generally and managing reservoir operations specifically have been touted as opportunities for applying forecasts to improve decision making. Previous studies have shown that the application of forecasts into water ...

Kevin Werner; Kristen Averyt; Gigi Owen

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Is the Water Temperature of the Danube River at Bratislava, Slovakia, Rising?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to reveal the annual regime, time series, and long-term water temperature trends of the Danube River at Bratislava, Slovakia, between the years 1926 and 2005. First, the main factors affecting the rivers water temperature were ...

Pavla Pekarova; Dana Halmova; Pavol Miklanek; Milan Onderka; Jan Pekar; Peter Skoda

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium  

SciTech Connect

The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

None Available

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

Water geochemistry of hydrothermal systems, Wood River District, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems of the Wood River District, central Idaho, have been studied by geologic mapping of thermal spring areas and geochemical investigations of thermal and non-thermal waters. This report summarizes the new geochemical data gathered during the study. Integration of the results of geological and geochemical studies has led to development of a target model for hydrothermal resources on the margin of the Idaho Batholith. Warfield Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 58/sup 0/C, flow from a major shear zone along the margin of an apophysis of the batholith. Hailey Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C, occur in an area of multiple thrust faults and newly recognized, closely spaced normal faults in the Paleozoic Milligen and Wood River Formations, 2.5 km from a highly brecciated batholith contact. Other Wood River district hydrothermal systems also occur along the margins of batholith apophyses or in adjacent highly fractured Paleozoic rocks, where there are indications of batholith rocks at shallow depths (100 to 300 m) in water wells.

Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.; Blackett, R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Two Rivers Water & Light | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water & Light Water & Light Jump to: navigation, search Name Two Rivers Water & Light Place Wisconsin Utility Id 19324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Business District Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting Business District Lighting- 200W HPS Lighting General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day- 7am-7pm Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day- 8am-8pm Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of Climate Variability on Water Storage in the Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the long-term (interannualdecadal) variability of water availability in river basins is paramount for water resources management. Here, the authors analyze time series of simulated terrestrial water storage components, observed ...

Ruud Hurkmans; Peter A. Troch; Remko Uijlenhoet; Paul Torfs; Matej Durcik

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Flows in the Colorado River Delta. Figure 7Cost of Minimum Flows in the Colorado River Delta. Figure 8and Ecological Health on the Colorado River Delta region."

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

James Bauder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This...

45

Bureau of Reclamation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Reclamation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Bureau of Reclamation Name Bureau of Reclamation Short Name BOR Address 1849 C Street Place Washington, DC References Reclamation Offices - Addresses and Contacts Name Bureau of Reclamation Address 1849 C Street NW Place Washington, DC Zip 20240-0001 Coordinates 38.8936749°, -77.0425236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8936749,"lon":-77.0425236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) This is the approved revision of...

47

Reclamation Practices and Procedures for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Carbon Sequestration Coordinator, Jim Burger, Virginia Tech Pamla Wood Clark Dorman Pennie DuBarry I. How can current reclamation practices be modified to enhance carbon...

48

Reclamation Practices and Procedures for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Carbon Sequestration Coordinator: Jim Burger Facilitators: Pamela Wood Clark Dorman Pennie DuBarry How can current reclamation practices be modified to enhance carbon storage...

49

Energy and Water Cycles in a High-Latitude, North-Flowing River System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MacKenzie Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Study, Phase 1, seeks to improve understanding of energy and water cycling in the Mackenzie River basin (MRB) and to initiate and test atmospheric, hydrologic, and coupled models that ...

W. R. Rouse; E. M. Blyth; R. W. Crawford; J. R. Gyakum; J. R. Janowicz; B. Kochtubajda; H. G. Leighton; P. Marsh; L. Martz; A. Pietroniro; H. Ritchie; W. M. Schertzer; E. D. Soulis; R. E. Stewart; G. S. Strong; M. K. Woo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Comparison of in Situ, Reanalysis, and Satellite Water Budgets over the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ, reanalysis, and satellite-derived datasets, surface and atmospheric water budgets of the Upper Colorado River basin are analyzed. All datasets capture the seasonal cycle for each water budget component. For precipitation, all ...

Rebecca A. Smith; Christian D. Kummerow

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication details the results of a survey of elected city officials and water managers in the Rio Grande River Basin of Texas and New Mexico. The participants ranked water conservation strategies for their communities.

Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease...

53

Virginia Coal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation implements the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act and establishes a statewide regulatory program for reclamation following coal surface mining activities. The...

54

Changes related to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas)" Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act...

55

Pages that link to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas)" Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act...

56

Pages that link to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) Jump to:...

57

Changes related to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)" Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) Jump to:...

58

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

59

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

60

RECLAMATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t a N o r t h N o r t h D a k o t a D a k o t a Boise Austin Topeka Pierre Helena Phoenix Lincoln Olympia Santa Fe Cheyenne Sacramento Des Moines Carson City Salt Lake City AE Comm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Performance of memory reclamation for lockless synchronization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving high performance for concurrent applications on modern multiprocessors remains challenging. Many programmers avoid locking to improve performance, while others replace locks with non-blocking synchronization to protect against deadlock, priority inversion, and convoying. In both cases, dynamic data structures that avoid locking require a memory reclamation scheme that reclaims elements once they are no longer in use. The performance of existing memory reclamation schemes has not been thoroughly evaluated. We conduct the first fair and comprehensive comparison of three recent schemesquiescent-state-based reclamation, epoch-based reclamation, and hazard-pointer-based reclamationusing a flexible microbenchmark. Our results show that there is no globally optimal scheme. When evaluating lockless synchronization, programmers and algorithm designers should thus carefully consider the data structure, the workload, and the execution environment, each of which can dramatically affect the memory reclamation performance. We discuss the consequences of our results for programmers and algorithm designers. Finally, we describe the use of one scheme, quiescentstate-based reclamation, in the context of an OS kernelan execution environment which is well suited to this scheme.

Thomas E. Hart; Paul E. McKenney; Angela Demke Brown; Jonathan Walpole

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydrologic and Water-Quality Conditions During Restoration of the Wood River Wetland,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Geological Survey #12;Front Cover: Aerial view of the lower Wood River Valley showing the Wood River Wetland.S. Geological Survey, January 2003. #12;Hydrologic and Water-Quality Conditions During Restoration of the Wood­5004 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;U.S. Department of the Interior KEN

63

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells

64

Interannual Variability of Summer Water Balance Components in Three Major River Basins of Northern Eurasia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated water balance components in the three major river basins of Siberia (the Lena, Yenisey, and Ob) based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison ...

Yoshiki Fukutomi; Hiromichi Igarashi; Kooiti Masuda; Tetsuzo Yasunari

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

66

Effects of Land Cover Change on the Energy and Water Balance of the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land cover change on the energy and water balance of the Mississippi River basin are analyzed using the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) model. Results of a simulated conversion from complete forest cover to crop cover over a ...

Tracy E. Twine; Christopher J. Kucharik; Jonathan A. Foley

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Planning Investments in Water Resources by Mixed-Integer Programming: The Vardar-Axios River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mixed integer programming model for planning water resources investments is presented. The model is a sequencing model applied to the Vardar-Axios river basin in Yugoslavia and Greece. The structure of the model is ...

Elliot, Dorothy P.

68

Surface Energy and Water Balance for the ArkansasRed River Basin from the ECMWF Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average surface energy and water budgets, subsurface variables, and atmospheric profiles were computed online with an hourly timescale from the ECMWF reanalysis for five subbasins of the Mississippi River from 198593. The results for the ...

Alan K. Betts; Pedro Viterbo; Eric Wood

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

On Factors Controlling AirWater Gas Exchange in a Large Tidal River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Estuarine Research Federation 2011 Abstract Air­water gas exchange is an important process in aquatic Introduction In rivers and estuaries, knowledge of air­water gas exchange is important for evaluating how floating domes. The opportunistic gas method relies on gases in the water that either occurred naturally (e

Ho, David

70

The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or place limits on water intake, but in China they areto impose limits on the intake of water and to slow water

Zusman, Eric

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Atmospheric Water Vapor Transport in NCEPNCAR Reanalyses: Comparison with River Discharge in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors extract the water transport produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis for a 10-yr period, 198493, and compare its convergence into two river basins with an independent dataset, river discharge (...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Yibin Chen; Zekai tles

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Pay for Additional Transboundary Water Flows from the US.2001). "Improving California Water Management: Optimizingloss functions to value urban water scarcity in California."

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1091-1109. Banco de Mxico. (2006). "Indices de Precios alColorado River Delta in Mexico." Cohen, M. J. (2006). "TheEstadsticas del Agua en Mxico 2004." Comisin Nacional del

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ohio River Ecological Research Program: Economic Valuation of Impingement Losses at Cooling Water Intakes on the Ohio River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the economic value of fish impinged at 13 intake structures withdrawing cooling water from the Ohio River. The information is designed for permit applicants, environmental staff, and facility managers seeking to increase their understanding of the economic value of fish impinged at these intakes for comparison to the costs of installing intake alternatives that could reduce impingement mortality. This report is a companion to EPRI reports 1014337 and 1008473, which provi...

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Inspecting the Circulating Water System at Crystal River Unit 3 for Evidence of Microbial Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water line inspections at the Florida Power Company Crystal River unit 3 revealed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in welded regions of inlet piping. Recommendations for decreasing MIC in those regions include removal of inlet pipe girth welds, rewelding with high-nickel filler rods, and treating cooling water with biocides.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Methods for Quantifying Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in the Missouri River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of regulatory requirements for shallow-water habitat (SWH) restoration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completes periodic estimates of the quantity of SWH available throughout the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. To date, these estimates have been made by various methods that consider only the water depth criterion for SWH. The USACE has completed estimates of SWH availability based on both depth and velocity criteria at four river bends (hereafter called reference bends), encompassing approximately 8 river miles within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. These estimates were made from the results of hydraulic modeling of water depth and velocity throughout each bend. Hydraulic modeling of additional river bends is not expected to be completed for deriving estimates of available SWH. Instead, future estimates of SWH will be based on the water depth criterion. The objective of this project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the USACE Omaha District, was to develop geographic information system methods for estimating the quantity of available SWH based on water depth only. Knowing that only a limited amount of water depth and channel geometry data would be available for all the remaining bends within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River, the intent was to determine what information, if any, from the four reference bends could be used to develop methods for estimating SWH at the remaining bends. Specifically, we examined the relationship between cross-section channel morphology and relative differences between SWH estimates based on combined depth and velocity criteria and the depth-only criterion to determine if a correction factor could be applied to estimates of SWH based on the depth-only criterion. In developing these methods, we also explored the applicability of two commonly used geographic information system interpolation methods (TIN and ANUDEM) for estimating SWH using four different elevation data scenarios. Relative differences in SWH estimates among the four data scenarios were compared to illustrate estimation ranges.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Larson, Kyle B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

79

POWDER RIVER BASIN COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCED WATER...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recoverable PRB CBM Resources, by Partition . . 3-3 3.4 Estimating Gas and Water Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 4.0 COSTS OF...

80

Simulation of Water Sources and Precipitation Recycling for the MacKenzie, Mississippi, and Amazon River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric general circulation model simulation for 194897 of the water budgets for the MacKenzie, Mississippi, and Amazon River basins is presented. In addition to the water budget, passive tracers are included to identify the geographic ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Jiun-Dar Chern

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Numerical Modeling System of the Hydrological Cycle for Estimation of Water Fluxes in the Huaihe River Plain Region, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To analyze the water budget under human influences in the Huaihe River plain region in China, the authors have developed a numerical modeling system that integrates water flux algorithms into a platform created by coupling a soil moisture model ...

Xi Chen; Yongqin David Chen; Zhicai Zhang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Modelling the fate and transport of negatively buoyant storm-river water in small multi-basin lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of negatively buoyant river plumes in a small multi-basin kettle lake with steep bathymetry (Toolik Lake, AK) are simulated using a Cartesian hydrodynamic model based on the solution of the three-dimensional shallow water equations. To validate ... Keywords: Flow paths, Lakes, River, Shallow water models

Francisco J. Rueda; Sally MacIntyre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Designing a water leasing market for the Mimbres River, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop a conceptual framework for establishing water leasing markets in New Mexico using the Mimbres River as a test case. Given the past and growing stress over water in New Mexico and the Mimbres River in particular, this work will develop a mechanism for the short term, efficient, temporary transfer of water from one user to another while avoiding adverse effects on any user not directly involved in the transaction (i.e., third party effects). Toward establishing a water leasing market, five basic tasks were performed, (1) a series of stakeholder meetings were conducted to identify and address concerns and interests of basin residents, (2) several gauges were installed on irrigation ditches to aid in the monitoring and management of water resources in the basin, (3) the hydrologic/market model and decision support interface was extended to include the Middle and Lower reaches of the Mimbres River, (4) experiments were conducted to aid in design of the water leasing market, and (5) a set of rules governing a water leasing market was drafted for future adoption by basin residents and the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer.

Reno-Trujillo, Marissa Devan; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Broadbent, Craig [Illinois Wesleyan University; Brookshire, David [University of New Mexico; Coursey, Don [University of Chicago; Jackson, Charles. [New Mexico Office of the State Engineer; Polley, Adam [New Mexico Office of the State Engineer; Stevenson, Bryan [New Mexico Office of the State Engineer

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Verifying concurrent memory reclamation algorithms with grace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Memory management is one of the most complex aspects of modern concurrent algorithms, and various techniques proposed for it--such as hazard pointers, read-copy-update and epoch-based reclamation--have proved very challenging for formal reasoning. In ...

Alexey Gotsman; Noam Rinetzky; Hongseok Yang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Feedback mechanisms between water availability and water use in a semi-arid river basin: A spatially explicit multi-agent simulation approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the processes responsible for the distribution of water availability over space and time is of great importance to spatial planning in a semi-arid river basin. In this study the usefulness of a multi-agent simulation (MAS) approach for ... Keywords: Brazil, Irrigation, Multi-agent simulation, River basin, Semi-arid, Water availability

Pieter R. van Oel; Maarten S. Krol; Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Renzo R. Taddei

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act authorizes the state to develop, adopt, issue and amend rules and regulations pertaining to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. These regulations are consistent with, but no more restrictive that the federal regulations set forth in the Surface Mining and Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) Surface Mining and Reclamation Division (SMRD) is the authority under this act. Regulation No. 20 from the

87

The Atmospheric Water Balance over the Semiarid MurrayDarling River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric water balance over the semiarid MurrayDarling River basin in southeast Australia is analyzed based on a consecutive series of 3- to 24-h NWP forecasts from the Australian Bureau of Meteorologys Limited Area Prediction System (...

Clara Draper; Graham Mills

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Columbia River PUD - Water Heater Financing Program (Oregon)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

89

Columbia River PUD - Water Heater Rebate Program (Oregon) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

90

Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy [PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Wenatchee, WA

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Patterns of fish assemblage structure and dynamics in waters of the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study final report  

SciTech Connect

Research conducted as part of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) has elucidated many factors that are important to fish population and community dynamics in a variety of habitats on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Information gained from these studies is useful in predicting fish responses to SRP operations. The overall objective of the CCWS was (1) to determine the environmental effects of SRP cooling water withdrawals and discharges and (2) to determine the significance of the cooling water impacts on the environment. The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine the effects of thermal plumes on anadromous and resident fishes, including overwintering effects, in the SRP swamp and associated tributary streams; (2) assess fish spawning and locate nursery grounds on the SRP; (3) examine the level of use of the SRP by spawning fish from the Savannah River, this objective was shared with the Savannah River Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; and (4) determine impacts of cooling-water discharges on fish population and community attributes. Five studies were designed to address the above topics. The specific objectives and a summary of the findings of each study are presented.

Aho, J.M.; Anderson, C.S.; Floyd, K.B.; Negus, M.T.; Meador, M.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Process Optimization and Integration Strategies for Material Reclamation and Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities are characterized by the significant usage of natural resources and the massive discharge of waste materials. An effective strategy towards the sustainability of industrial processes is the conservation of natural resources through waste reclamation and recycles. Because of the numerous number of design alternatives, systematic procedures must be developed for the effective synthesis and screening of reclamation and recycle options. The objective of this work is to develop systematic and generally applicable procedures for the synthesis, design, and optimization of resource conservation networks. Focus is given to two important applications: material utilities (with water as an example) and spent products (with lube oil as an example). Traditionally, most of the previous research efforts in the area of designing direct-recycle water networks have considered the chemical composition as the basis for process constraints. However, there are many design problems that are not component-based; instead, they are property-based (e.g., pH, density, viscosity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), basic oxygen demand (BOD), toxicity). Additionally, thermal constraints (e.g., stream temperature) may be required to identify acceptable recycles. In this work, a novel approach is introduced to design material-utility (e.g., water) recycle networks that allows the simultaneous consideration of mass, thermal, and property constraints. Furthermore, the devised approach accounts for the heat of mixing and for the interdependence of properties. An optimization formulation is developed to embed all potential configurations of interest and to model the mass, thermal, and property characteristics of the targeted streams and units. Solution strategies are developed to identify stream allocation and targets for minimum fresh usage and waste discharge. A case study on water management is solved to illustrate the concept of the proposed approach and its computational aspects. Next, a systematic approach is developed for the selection of solvents, solvent blends, and system design in in extraction-based reclamation processes of spent lube oil Property-integration tools are employed for the systematic screening of solvents and solvent blends. The proposed approach identifies the main physical properties that influence solvent(s) performance in extracting additives and contaminants from used lubricating oils (i.e. solubility parameter (delta), viscosity (v), and vapor pressure (p)). The results of the theoretical approach are validated through comparison with experimental data for single solvents and for solvent blends. Next, an optimization formulation is developed and solved to identify system design and extraction solvent(s) by including techno-economic criteria. Two case studies are solved for identification of feasible blends and for the cost optimization of the system.

Kheireddine, Houssein

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells are not continuously pumped; thus, some wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These data are to be supplemented by establishing a series of monitor wells in the proposed geothermal withdrawal and injection area. These wells were to be located and designed to provide data necessary for evaluating and predicting the impact of geothermal development on the Shallow Aquifer system.

Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Dolenc, M.R.; Thurow, T.L.; Skiba, P.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Decision Support System for irrigation water allocation along the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin, Northwest China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the water resource management of the inland river basins of northwestern China, a Decision Support System (DSS) is developed to provide an operative computer platform for decision makers. The DSS is designed according to actual water resource ... Keywords: Decision Support System, GIS, Irrigation management, Irrigation water allocation, Water resource management

Yingchun Ge, Xin Li, Chunlin Huang, Zhuotong Nan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Agricultural implications of reduced water supplies in the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of the energy sector in the energy-rich but water-restricted Western US has presented a potential conflict with the irrigated agricultural sector. This study measures the direct impacts on farm income and employment resulting from the transfer of water from agriculture to energy in two specific geographical areas - the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins. We used a linear programming model to evaluate the impacts of reduced water supplies. Through the use of regional multipliers, we expanded our analysis to include regional impacts. Volume I provides the major analysis of these impacts. Volume II provides further technical data.

Lansford, R. R.; Roach, F.; Gollehon, N. R.; Creel, B. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Abatement of wetland loss through diversions of Mississippi River water using siphons  

SciTech Connect

The long-term maintenance and renewal of Louisiana's wetlands cannot be accomplished without diversion of sediment laden water from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Because of ramifications for flood control, navigation, and established estuarine resource uses, such diversions, at least initially, are likely to be limited to structures that permit flow to be taken from the upper part of the water column. To evaluate the potential benefits from such diversions in terms of sediment introduction into the wetlands, and the possibility of abatement of wetland loss through small structures that could be implemented at a local level, an existing diversion by means of a siphon was investigated. The investigation focused on the White's Ditch Siphon, in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Siphon operation was monitored for the 1989-1990 water year to determine water and sediment discharge characteristics and their relationship to those of the Mississippi River and to estuarine hydrology To determine sedimentation benefits to the adjacent marsh and the need for outfall management, sediment dispersal was evaluated and sediment deposition was compared for a site within the siphon outfall area and a control site. Results of the siphon monitoring are extended to larger scale diversions. On the basis of suspended load characteristics of the Mississippi River and the operational characteristics of a major structure, as related to the estuarine salinity regime and resource constraints, the extent to which such diversions are likely to offset subsidence and related wetland loss is evaluated.

Van Beek, J.L.; Roberts, D.W.; Fournet, S. (Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources The Indiana Department of Natural Resources implements and enforces the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, as well as a statewide program to protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of mining operations, and regulates coal mining operations to

99

Changes related to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts)" Coal Mining Regulatory and...

100

Pages that link to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts)" Coal Mining Regulatory and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

102

Reverse osmosis desalination and reclamation : control of colloidal and biofouling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this thesis work was on the fundamentals of colloidal and biofouling in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination and reclamation. A novel sodium chloride (more)

Chong, Tzyy Haur.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste Reclamation  

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have developed a highly efficient technology for the reclamation of waste heat in mechanical heat engines widely used in ...

104

PRODUCTION OF HEAVY WATER SAVANNAH RIVER AND DANA PLANTS. Technical Manual  

SciTech Connect

A summary is presented of the basic technical iniormation that pertains to processes that are used at the Dana and Savannah River Plants for the production of heavy water. The manual is intended primarily for plant operating and technical personnel and was prepared to supplement and provide technical support for detailed operating procedures. Introductory sections contain some background information on the history, uses, available processes, and analytical procedures for heavy water. They also include a general comparison of the design and laserformance of the two plants and an analysis of their differences. The technology of the heavy water separation processes used, namely hydrogen sulfide exchange, distillation of water, and electrolysis is discussed in detail. The manufacture and storage of hydrogen sulfide gas and the process water treatment facilities are also discussed. (auth)

Bebbington, W.P.; Thayer, V.R. eds.; Proctor, J.F. comp.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Barriers and Solutions for Farmer Participation in the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a multiyear collaborative effort, American Farmland Trust (AFT) convened six listening sessions with approximately 150 agricultural producers (farmers) in the Ohio River Basin (ORB) to determine their readiness to sell nutrient credits in a regional water quality trading (WQT) market. In a WQT market, municipal wastewater treatment plants, industrial manufacturing plants, and electric power companies can purchase nutrient credits to meet their regulatory requirements. They pay farmers to imple...

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

St. Johns River Water Management District 4049 Reid Street P.O. Box 1429 Palatka, FL 32178-1429  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ground or surface water and· water from public and private utilities. Additional information Irrigation withdrawn from ground or surface· water, from a private well or pump, or from a public or private utility or transient housing units, hotel and motel units, and public medians and rights-of-way. #12;St. Johns River

Watson, Craig A.

107

Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

Gensheimer, Robert James, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Locating Ground-Water Discharge in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bottom-contacting probe for measuring electrical conductivity at the sediment-water interface was used to scan the bed of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State during a 10-day investigation. Four river-sections, each about a kilometer in length, were scanned for variations in electrical conductivity. The probe was towed along the riverbed at a speed of 1 m/s and is position was recorded using a Global Positioning System. The bottom tows revealed several areas of elevated electrical conductivity. Where these anomalies were relatively easy to access, piezometers were driven into the riverbed and porewater electrical conductivity ranged from 111 to 150 uS/cm. The piezometers, placed in electrical conductivity hotspots, yielded chemical or isotopic data consistent with previous analyses of water taken from monitoring wells and visible shoreline seeps. Tritium, nitrate, and chromium exceeded water quality standards in some porewaters. The highest tritium and nitrate levels were found near the Old Hanford Townsite at 120,000 pCi/L (+ 5,880 pCi/L total propagated analytical uncertainty) and ug/L (+ 5,880 ug/L), respectively. The maximum chromium (total and hexavalent) levels were found near 100-H reactor area where unfiltered porewater total chromium was 1,900 ug/L (+ 798 ug/L) and hexavalent chromium was 20 ug/L. The electrical conductivity probe provided rapid, cost-effective reconnaissance for ground-water discharge areas when used in combination with conventional piezometers. It may be possible to obtain quantitative estimates of both natural and contaminated ground-water discharge in the Hanford Reach with more extensive surveys of river bottom.

Lee, D.R.; Geist, D.R.; Saldi, K.; Hartwig, D.; Cooper, T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Report contains results from utility scale analysis and site visits, as well as facility scale screening and site visits.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Van Geet, O.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of Management of Water Release for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Baseline fisheries and habitat data were gathered during 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental water releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir in improving the fisheries resource in the Bitterroot River. Discharge relationships among main stem gaging stations varied annually and seasonally. Flow relationships in the river were dependent upon rainfall events and the timing and duration of the irrigation season. Daily discharge monitored during the summers of 1983 and 1984 was greater than median values derived at the U.S.G.S. station near Darby. Supplemental water released from Painted Rocks Reservoir totaled 14,476 acre feet in 1983 and 13,958 acre feet in 1984. Approximately 63% of a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release of supplemental water conducted during April, 1984 was lost to irrigation withdrawals and natural phenomena before passing Bell Crossing. A similar loss occurred during a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release conducted in August, 1984. Daily maximum temperature monitored during 1984 in the Bitterroot River averaged 11.0, 12.5, 13.9 and 13.6 C at the Darby, Hamilton, Bell and McClay stations, respectively. Chemical parameters measured in the Bitterroot River were favorable to aquatic life. Population estimates conducted in the Fall, 1983 indicated densities of I+ and older rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were significantly greater in a control section than in a dewatered section (p < 0.20). Numbers of I+ and older brown trout (Salmo trutta) were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Population and biomass estimates for trout in the control section were 631/km and 154.4 kg/km. In the dewatered section, population and biomass estimates for trout were 253/km and 122.8 kg/km. The growth increments of back-calculated length for rainbow trout averaged 75.6 mm in the control section and 66.9mm in the dewatered section. The growth increments of back-calculated length for brown trout averaged 79.5 mm in the control section and 82.3mm in the dewatered section. Population estimates conducted in the Spring, 1984 indicated densities of mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) greater than 254 mm in total length were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Young of the year rainbow trout and brown trout per 10m of river edge electrofished during 1984 were more abundant in the control section than the dewatered section and were more abundant in side channel habitat than main channel habitat. Minimum flow recommendations obtained from wetted perimeter-discharge relationships averaged 8.5m{sup 3}/sec in the control section and 10.6m{sup 3}/sec in the dewatered section of the Bitterroot River. The quantity of supplemental water from Painted Rocks Reservoir needed to maintain minimum flow recommendations is discussed in the Draft Water Management Plan for the Proposed Purchase of Supplemental Water from Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana (Lere 1984).

Lere, Mark E. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Missoula, MT)

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates all surface mining activities for the extraction of coal. The Commission acts with the authority of the Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act, which establishes that the state of Texas has exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in the state, in accordance with the

112

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) Informational Meeting: Ohio Department of Natural Resou rces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Basin Trading Project is a first-of-a-kind interstate nutrient trading program that represents a comprehensive approach to designing and developing credit markets for nitrogen and phosphorus discharges. The intent of this trading program is to allow exchanges of water quality credits for nitrogen and phosphorus aimed at protecting and improving watersheds at lower overall costs in the Ohio River Basin. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is coordinating this project with support f...

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

Water quality trends in the Eerste River, Western Cape, 1990 - 2005.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Eerste River is a river system which has, over the years, been subjected to human interference. The purpose of this study was to (more)

Ngwenya, Faith

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Manual for training reclamation inspectors in the fundamentals of hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is intended to be a desk reference to help nonhydrologists achieve a basic understanding of hydrology as it relates to surface mining and reclamation. Surface coal mining and reclamation inspectors and other staff will find it useful in implementing regulatory programs. The handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The handbook can be used in the training of surface-mining and reclamation inspectors, both Federal and State, and as a basic reference for inspectors in carrying out their assigned duties. The handbook describes clues and indicators of potential problems, suggests ways to prevent or mitigate them, and discusses various observation and sampling techniques.

Curtis, W.R.; Dyer, K.L.; Williams, G.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

Atkinson, R.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Assessment of impacts from water level fluctuations on fish in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Observations on the effects of water level fluctuations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, were made in 1976 and 1977. The two years provided contrasting flow regimes: high water and fluctuations of greater magnitude prevailed in 1976; low water and higher temperatures prevailed in 1977. Situations where fish and other aquatic organisms were destroyed by changing water levels were observed and evaluated each year in three study areas: Hanford, F-Area, and White Bluffs sloughs. Losses primarily were due to stranding, entrapment (with or without complete dewatering), and predation. Juvenile fish were more susceptible to entrapment and stranding than were adult fish. Estimates of actual losses were biased and conservative because relatively few fish could be found after each decline of water level and dewatering. The most valued species of fish affected by water level fluctuations at Hanford were the anadromus fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and the resident smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui). Crucial periods for chinook salmon occurred during winter when incubating eggs were in the gravel of the main channel, and before and during seaward migration in the spring when fry were abundant in shoreline zones. The crucial period for smallmouth bass was during spring and early summer when adults were spawning in warmed sloughs and shoreline zones. Chinook salmon and smallmouth bass fry were vulnerable to stranding and entrapment, and smallmouth bass nests were susceptible to exposure and temperature changes resulting from repeated water level fluctuations. Thus, flow manipulation may be crucial to their survival. The extent to which other species of riverine fish were affected by water level fluctuations depended upon their use of shoreline zones for spawning and rearing young.

Becker, C.D.; Fickeisen, D.H.; Montgomery, J.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project. Annual report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The successful water flood of the Green River Formation in the Monument Butte unit was analyzed in detail in the last yearly report. It was shown that primary recovery and the water flood in the unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close its bubble point. The reservoir performance of the smaller Travis unit was also analyzed. The Monument Butte unit is currently producing at around 300 barrels per day of oil. Two of the new wells drilled in the unit had zones pressurized by the water flood. The third well produced from pressurized as well as from zones which were unaffected by the water flood. The water flood response of the Travis unit is slow possibly due to problems of reservoir continuity. Plans for water flooding the Boundary unit were drawn. Core description and Formation Micro Imaging log of well 14a-28 provided insight about the important Lower Douglas Creek sandstone. It was determined that this sandstone was extensively fractured and detailed fracture characteristics were obtained through comprehensive interpretation of the FMI log. Reservoir modeling and simulation studies of all the three units were also continued. A larger, more detailed model of the Monument Butte unit was built in order to study the performance of the new development wells being drilled. Three alternate models developed to explain the performance of the Travis flood revealed that intersecting hydraulic fractures may have also provided paths for water channeling observed in this unit. The reservoir characterization activities identified new reservoirs in the Travis unit. Reservoir simulations helped design an injection program in Travis, unit expansion plans on the west and north sides of the Monument Butte until and to evaluate the infill drilling. The reservoir simulations are being used to examine the role of the aquifer underlying the oil bearing D2 sandstone in Boundary on water flood strategies and injection patterns.

Lomax, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final Annual Report to BPA and NOAA Fisheries, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Project (ISEMP) program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the late spring 2007, PNW deployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. Data collection was seasonally interrupted by river ice in early December. Daily average pH did not exceed the water quality standard of 8.5 at any of the measurements sites. However, instantaneous values did exceed this standard near the mouth of the Entiat River during late summer-fall period. This suggested that in the lowest portion of the river peaks in pH may be occurring because of photosynthesis caused by high rates of periphyton productivity in response to increased sunlight, temperature, and possible nutrient enrichment. Conversely, dissolved oxygen reached annual low levels during this same late summer-fall period, in part because of increased water temperatures and increased biochemical oxygen demand.

Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Reclamation",7079 "2. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "3. Martin","Gas","Florida Power & Light Co",3695 "4. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power...

124

Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info Start Date 1995 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources These regulations describe standards relevant to reclamation that must be followed both during and after the completion of mining in a given area. An

125

Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas is the regulatory authority for uranium surface mining. Law authorizes the Commission to assure that reclamation of mining sites is possible, to protect land owners and the environment through regulation and permitting, and to ensure that mining is operated within the rules and regulations to prevent unreasonable degradation of

126

Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

127

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Facility Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Adams County, Colorado Coordinates 39.8398269°, -104.1930918° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398269,"lon":-104.1930918,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

Value creation in water allocation negotiations : lessons from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River and Lower Colorado River Basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intense water disputes in the United States are being caused by new and conflicting demands from many quarters and changes in water availability that appear to be caused by climate change. Projections of heightened water ...

Solis, Miriam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

130

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

ontanans use water in homes, on land, and in industries. We also use the state's streams, rivers, and lakes for recreation. When we  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we are using it offstream. When we use water for recreation or to produce hydroelectric power, we from rivers and reservoirs. The water consumed may produce livestock, crops, or manufactured goods during heating, water is evaporated off and condensed with cool water. The water produced provides

Dyer, Bill

132

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by PNNL that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall chinook salmon spawning areas. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The hydrologic regime during the 2002?2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, the results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only two sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude changes in discharge, these flux reversals had minimal effect on emergence timing estimates. Indeed, the emergence timing estimates at all sites was largely unaffected by the changes in river stage resulting from hydropower operations at Hells Canyon Dam. Our results indicate that the range of emergence timing estimates due to differences among the eggs from different females can be as large as or larger than the emergence timing estimates due to site differences (i.e., bed temperatures within and among sites). We conclude that during the 2002-2003 fall chinook salmon incubation period, hydropower operations of Hells Canyon Dam had an insignificant effect on fry emergence timing at the study sites. It appears that short-term (i.e., hourly to daily) manipulations of discharge from the Hells Canyon Complex during the incubation period would not substantially alter egg pocket incubation temperatures, and thus would not affect fry emergence timing at the study sites. However, the use of hydropower operational manipulations at the Hells Canyon Complex to accelerate egg incubation and fry emergence should not be ruled out on the basis of only one water year's worth of study. Further investigation of the incubation environment of Snake River fall chinook salmon is warranted based on the complexity of hyporheic zone characteristics and the variability of surface/subsurface interactions among dry, normal, and wet water years.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Abernethy, Cary S.

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

Installation of River and Drain Instrumentation Stations to Monitor Flow and Water Quality and Internet Data Sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last five years, the Paso del Norte Watershed Councils Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations and flood control. This report presents major components of the Project developed from August of 2005 through July of 2007 through funding provided by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) through the Water 2025 Challenge Grant Program to the El Paso Water Utilities, Texas A&M University, and New Mexico State University. Additional documentation of related Project activities is provided through final project reports being submitted by the City of Las Cruces (CLC) and Elephant Butte Irrigation District (EBID) for the work conducted through linked USBR-funded Projects. Tasks accomplished in the phase of work funded by the USBR include the following specific outcomes, which are detailed in later sections of the report: * Continued compilation and inclusion of new data sources identified as relevant by Project partners and users; * Installation and calibration of additional new monitoring stations and equipment and inclusion of these monitoring sites in web-based GIS map products to fill data gaps and provide additional real-time data; * Linking to additional monitoring sites being implemented by EBID through their Project work and inclusion of these sites and data in web-based GIS map products; * Development and implementation of a user needs survey focusing on new data sets of interest, enhanced access mechanisms, and other suggestions to improve the Project website; * Development and deployment of an online, downloadable Microsoft Access database of Project water resource data to provide search and query functions; * Development and deployment of an online help facility to make the site easier for users to navigate and use; * Exploration of new tools to enhance online data sharing and access; and * Implementation of suggestions compiled in the User Needs Assessment, including resolution of problems related to accessing the Project website using Firefox and Mozilla web browsers. Keywords: Paso del Norte watershed, water resources database, GIS map, ArcIMS, data sharing and transfer, user needs assessment, Rio Grande, Rio Grande Project, gage station, surface water flow, groundwater, downloadable Microsoft Access database.

Sheng, Z.; Brown, C.; Creel, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Michelsen, A.; Fahy, M. P.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Evaluation of Water Temperatures at Which Ohio River Fishes have been Collected, 1991-2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI-Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) Technical Brief can be used to identify the temperatures preferred, tolerated, and avoided by Ohio River fishes. These data result from long-term 19912011 ORERP electrofishing upstream and downstream of participating power plants as well as data collected by the Ohio River Valley Sanitation Commission from Ohio River navigation pools during the same period. A description of ORERP is provided in EPRI Technical Brief 1023292.

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

137

Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)  

SciTech Connect

Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mound Laboratory's Reclamation and Recycling Program  

SciTech Connect

In keeping with Mound Laboratory's tradition for innovation and forward-looking action, several studies were recently conducted to seek out alternatives to incineration and landfill of all nonradioactive solid waste. Efforts were directed towards reclamation, reuse, and recycling of solid wastes. These efforts resulted in a reclamation and recycling program which is being implemented in three separate phases: 1. Phase I provides for reclamation and recycling of IBM cards, printouts, and white paper. 2. Phase II is designed for reclamation, recycling, or off-site disposal of all wastes generated in buildings and areas where radioactive or explosive wastes are not contained. 3. Phase III provides for reclamation, recycling, or off-site disposal of the remaining wastes not included in Phases I and II. Implementatin would follow successful operation of Phases I and II and would only be implemented after a complete analysis of monitoring and segregation techniques have been established to assure against any possibility of off-site contamination.

Garbe, Yvonne M.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

H. R. 2427: A bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1992, and for other purposes, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, May 22, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Appropriations are provided for expenses necessary for the collection and study of basic information pertaining to river and harbor, flood control, and shore protection; for prosecuting work of flood control; for the preservation, operation, maintenance, and care of existing river and harbor, flood control, and related works; and for administration of laws pertaining to regulation of navigable waters and wetlands. Appropriations are detailed for the Department of Defense, Civil Department of the Army; Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Department of Energy for energy supply, research and development activities, general science and research activities, nuclear waste disposal fund, isotope production and distribution program fund, atomic energy defense activities, power marketing administrations, and minority participation in the superconducting super collider. Additional appropriations are described for the following agencies: Appalachian Regional Commission, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Delaware River Basin Commission, Interstate Commission of the Potomac River Basin, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, Susquehanna River Basin Commission, and Tennessee Valley Authority.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

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141

Processing Tritiated Water at the Savannah River Site: A Production-Scale Demonstration of a Palladium Membrane Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) process was installed in the Tritium Facilities at the Savannah River Site to perform a production-scale demonstration for the recovery of tritium from tritiated water adsorbed on molecular sieve (zeolite). Unlike the current recovery process that utilizes magnesium, the PMR offers a means to process tritiated water in a more cost effective and environmentally friendly manner. The design and installation of the large-scale PMR process was part of a collaborative effort between the Savannah River Site and Los Alamos National Laboratory.The PMR process operated at the Savannah River Site between May 2001 and April 2003. During the initial phase of operation the PMR processed thirty-four kilograms of tritiated water from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The water was processed in fifteen separate batches to yield approximately 34,400 liters (STP) of hydrogen isotopes. Each batch consisted of round-the-clock operations for approximately nine days. In April 2003 the reactor's palladium-silver membrane ruptured resulting in the shutdown of the PMR process. Reactor performance, process performance and operating experiences have been evaluated and documented. A performance comparison between PMR and current magnesium process is also documented.

Sessions, Kevin L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company (United States)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Foundry Sand Reclamation: CMP Report No. 90-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current environmental regulations have created a situation where the disposal of waste foundry sand has become difficult and expensive. One solution to this problem is the use of a sand reclamation system which "cleans" the sand to a sufficient degree to allow re-use of the sand in the foundry sand system. A large number of sand binder systems are in use for various reasons of cost and performance characteristics. There are also three main methods of sand reclamation and combinations of these. A basic un...

1991-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Water quality trends in the Blackwater River watershed Canaan Valley, West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Blackwater River, historically an excellent brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) fishery, has been affected by logging, fires, coal mining, acid rain, and land development. Trends (more)

Smith, Jessica M., M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Capacity of Freshwater Marsh to Process Nutrients in Diverted Mississippi River Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The loss of Louisiana's coastal wetlands has mandated the construction of diversion structures for reintroduction of a portion of the Mississippi River into Louisiana's coastal (more)

Johnson, Craig Bonya'

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Conjunctive management of groundwater and surface water resources in the Upper Ovens River Valley.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Regression analysis produced equations for relating Ovens River levels to groundwater levels with a high correlation. These equations can relate stream flow objectives to corresponding (more)

Lovell, Daniel Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Colorado river basin and climatic change. The sensitivity of streamflow and water supply to variations in temperature and precipitation  

SciTech Connect

Growing international concern about the greenhouse effect has led to increased interest in the regional implications of changes in temperature and precipitation patterns for a wide range of societal and natural systems, including agriculture, sea level, biodiversity, and water resources. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere due to human activities are likely to have significant, though still poorly understood, impacts on water quality and availability. One method developed over the last several years for determining how regional water resources might be affected by climatic change is to develop scenarios of changes in temperature and precipitation and to use hydrologic simulation models to study the impacts of these scenarios on runoff and water supply. In the paper the authors present the results of a multi-year study of the sensitivity of the hydrology and water resources systems in the Colorado River Basin to plausible climatic changes.

Nash, L.L.; Gleick, P.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Jackpile-Paguate Uranium Mine Reclamation Project, Laguna Indian Reservation, Cibola County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Approval of a reclamation plan is proposed for the Jackpile-Paguate uranium mine, located on three leases of Laguna Indian tribal lands in Cibola County, 40 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. The mine was operated by Anaconda Minerals Company from 1953 through early 1982. Of the total 7868 leased acres, 2656 acres were disturbed by mining. The disturbed areas include 3 open pits, 32 waste dumps, 23 protore (subgrade ore) stockpiles, 4 topsoil stockpiles, and 66 acres of buildings and roads. Three alternative plans are under consideration, involving different filling treatments of the open pits. Under Anaconda's proposal, the open pits would be backfilled to at least three feet above projected ground water recovery levels. The DOI plan would involve backfilling the pits with protore, excess material from waste dump resloping, and soil cover the elevations 40 to 70 feet higher than Anaconda's minimum. The pits then would remain as closed basins, or open channels would be constructed to convey runoff from the pit areas to the Rio Paguate. The Laguna proposal would consist of backfilling the pits seven feet above the DOI proposal. For all alternatives, highwall stability techniques would involve removal of loose material and buttressing with waste and overburden. Waste dump slopes would be reduced to between 2:1 and 3:1, and slopes could be terraced. Jackpile Sandstone exposed by resloping would be covered with four feet of overburden and one foot of topsoil. Mine site facilities would either be removed or cleaned up and left intact. All disturbed areas would be covered with topsoil and seeded. Reclamation would be considered complete when revegetated sites reached either 70% or 90% of that found on comparable reference sites. Post-reclamation monitoring periods would be 3, 5, or 10 years, depending on the alternative chosen. Cost estimates range from $54.2 million to $57.4 million.

Not Available

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Water Balance for the Ji-Paran River Basin, Western Amazon, Using a Simple Method through Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ThornthwaiteMather climatological model integrated into a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to simulate the monthly water balance for the Ji-Paran river basin, in the western Amazonian state of Rondnia (RO), from February 1995 ...

Danielde Castro Victoria; Alailson Venceslau Santiago; Maria Victoria Ramos Ballester; Antonio Roberto Pereira; Reynaldo Luiz Victoria; Jeffrey E. Richey

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Negotiating contentious claims to water : shifting institutional dynamics for the allocation of water between the Eel and Russian river basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Power Commission, Sonoma County Water Contractors, California State Water Resources Control Board, California Department of Water Resources, National MarinePower Commission, the US Army Corps of Engineers, the State Water Resources Control Board, the National Marine

Gilless, J. Keith; Langridge, Ruth

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reclamation of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have jointly developed a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCL, and MgCl/sub 2/ residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of /sup 241/Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved plutonium and up to 2 wt % americium. The overall objective was to develop a process to convert these residues to a pure plutonium metal product and discardable waste. To meet this objective a combination of pyrochemical and aqueous unit operations was used. The first step was to scrub the salt residue with a molten metal (aluminum and magnesium) to form a heterogeneous ''scrub alloy'' containing nominally 25 wt % plutonium. This unit operation, performed at RFP, effectively separated the actinides from the bulk of the chloride salts. After packaging in aluminum cans, the ''scrub alloy'' was then dissolved in a nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid - mercuric nitrate solution at SRP. Residual chloride was separated from the dissolver solution by precipitation with Hg/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ followed by centrifuging. Plutonium was then separated from the aluminum, americium and magnesium using the Purex solvent extraction system. The /sup 241/Am was diverted to the waste tank farm, but could be recovered if desired.

Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.; Holcomb, H.P.; Chostner, D.F.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reclamation and reuse of Freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have successfully demonstrated the use of a solvent recycling system to reclaim spent Freon solvent in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) analyses of radioactive samples. A wide variety of sample types including ground water, organics, laboratory waste, process control, sludge, soils, and others are received by our lab for total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. This paper demonstrates the successful use of a commercially available carbon bed recycle system which we modified to enable the recovery of 95-98 percent of the radioactive contaminated Freon. This system has been used successfully in our lab for the past three years.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Young, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall Chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period (mid- to late-summer) when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River Chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations (e.g., summer flow augmentation) to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile Chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall Chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. This was a pilot-scale study to evaluate these relationships under existing operations of Hells Canyon Dam (i.e., without any prescribed manipulations of river discharge) during the 2002-2003 water year. The project was initiated in the context of examining the potential for improving juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon survival by modifying the discharge operations of Hells Canyon Dam. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project at index sites throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The HCR extends from Hells Canyon Dam (river kilometer [rkm] 399) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude

Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of Reclamation dams ORISE has served as lead exercise planner for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation's Critical Infrastructure Exercise Program since its inception in 2003. Six of the dams operated by BOR are designated as National Critical Infrastructure facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. The program helps BOR answer an important question-are these massive dams secure in the event of a terrorist attack? Exercise programs for each of these critical facilities typically extend over a 12-month period during which ORISE facilitates a series of exercise events that test emergency response plans. ORISE guides the dam's staff,

156

Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site  

SciTech Connect

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An investigation of two homologous series of carboxylic acids in Black Trona Water from the Green River Basin  

SciTech Connect

Two series of carboxylic acids were identified in the dialysate from a sample of Black Trona Water from the Green River Basin of Wyoming. One of the series consists of straight-chain dicarboxylic acids ranging in carbon number from four to fourteen. This series had been observed by previous workers. The other series, much less abundant than the dicarboxylic acids, appears to be a series of homologous tricarboxylic acids that are derivatives of succinic acid. The structures of these compounds were determined by analysis of the mass spectra of their methyl esters and trideuteromethyl esters. Definitive biological precursors of this unusual class of compounds could not be assigned.

Branthaver, J.F.; Thomas, K.P.; Logan, E.R.; Barden, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Examination of the relationship of river water to occurrences of bottom water with reduced oxygen concentrations in the northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six years of comprehensive data sets collected over the northern continental shelf and upper slope of the Gulf of Mexico during the LATEX-A and NEGOM-COH programs showed that low-oxygen waters (Gulf show considerable differences in the occurrence of low-oxygen waters. Lowoxygen waters are observed almost exclusively in regions subject to large riverine influences: the Louisiana and Mississippi-Alabama shelves. Hypoxic waters (oxygen concentrations <1.4 mL?·L-1) are found only over the Louisiana shelf. No low-oxygen water is found over the Florida shelf which has minimum riverine influence. Lowoxygen water is found at only one station on the Texas shelf; this is during spring when the volume of low-salinity water is at maximum. The distributions of low-salinity water influenced the different distributions of low-oxygen and hypoxic waters in the four regions. Low-oxygen occurrences are clearly related to vertical stratification. Lowoxygen occurred only in stable water columns with maximum Brunt-V?¤is?¤l?¤ frequency (Nmax) greater than 40 cycles?·h-1. When Nmax exceeded 100 cycles?·h-1 in summer over the Louisiana shelf, oxygen concentrations dropped below 1.4 mL?·L-1, and the bottom waters became hypoxic. Salinity is more important than temperature in controlling vertical stratification. Locations where temperature influence was larger were found in summer in water depth greater than 20 m over the Louisiana shelf, along the near shore areas of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf west of 87?ºW, and in the inner shelf waters of the Texas shelf. The extent of oxygen removal at the bottom of these stable water columns is reflected in the amount of remineralized silicate. Silicate concentrations are highest closest to the Mississippi River Delta and decrease east and west of the Delta. EOF analyses show that more than 65% of the oxygen variance is explained by the first mode. The amplitude functions of the first EOF modes of bottom oxygen, water column Brunt- V?¤is?¤l?¤ maxima, and bottom silicate are well correlated, indicating that much of the variance in bottom oxygen is explained by water column stratification and bottom remineralization.

Belabbassi, Leila

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agency. The agencys financial statements are difficult toestimates, financial and budget statements of water service

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Metric concepts and implications in describing compositional changes for world river's water chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is designed to give the reader an outline that is useful for understanding the importance of distance, as a metric concept, and its implications when compositional (geochemical) data are managed from a statistical point of view in a given sample ... Keywords: Compositions, Distance, River geochemistry, Simplex space

A. Buccianti; R. Magli

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Influence of Soil Cap Depth and Vegetation on Reclamation of Phosphogypsum Stacks in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study quantified environmental parameters to develop reclamation strategies for phosphogypsum stacks. Research was conducted on phosphogypsum stack experimental plots established in 2006 (6 soil (more)

Turner, Elizabeth Lenore

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Thermal reclamation of used blast grit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four reclaimer feasibility tests were conducted with used blast grit from the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. The results of these tests revealed that the organic material component of the used grit was fully oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. Some of the metallic oxides of copper, zinc, titanium, and lead from the used grit were largely elutriated into a cyclonic collector. The calcined (reclaimable) fraction from this test work amounted to approximately 95% of the used grit charged. The major oxide and organic component analyses conducted revealed no significant general chemical difference between the virgin and reclaimed grit. Based on these results, a commercial plant can be designed to provide a reusable grit yield in excess of 80% within the general size specifications. 2 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Sandstrom, W.A.; Patel, J.G.

1988-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reclamation and reuse of freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

SciTech Connect

ADS is using a commercially available solvent reclamation system to recycle 95-97 percent of the Freon used in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses. ADS has further developed the commercially available solvent reclamation system to accommodate radioactive contaminated Freon. This report establishes the following: validity of the method; success of recycling; and effect of radionuclides in recycling radioactive contaminated Freon. The standard analysis method for determining total petroleum hydrocarbons (commonly known as oil and grease determination) involves solvent extraction of the hydrocarbons using Freon followed by quantitation using infrared detection. This has been the method of choice because it is simple, rugged, inexpensive, and applicable to both solid and liquid samples and to radioactive samples. Due to its deleterious effect on the ozone layer, the use of Freon and other chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs) has been greatly restricted. Freon has become very expensive (800$/liter) and will soon be unavailable entirely. Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon extraction method. These methods include solid-phase extraction, solvent extraction, and supercritical fluid extraction all of which use gravimetric determination or infrared analysis of the extracted hydrocarbons. These methods are not as precise or as sensitive as the Freon extraction method, and a larger amount of sample is therefore required due to the decreased sensitivity. The solid phase extraction method cannot accommodate solid samples. Supercritical fluid extraction requires expensive instrumentation. ADS opted to keep the existing Freon method and recycle the solvent. An inexpensive solvent reclamation system was procured to reclaim the spent Freon. This reclaimer removes hydrocarbons from the Freon solvent by passage through an activated carbon bed.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Peterson, S.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-point source pollution from land use activities, whichdiffuse pollution sources from land use activities (agland use Coyote Dam Abstractions for agricultural water use; industrial and urban pollution

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Program on Technology Innovation: Ohio River Water Quality Trading Pilot Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen discharges to surface waters from power plants are increasing as technologies such as selective catalytic reduction units, electrostatic precipitators, and flue gas desulfurization systems are installed to comply with more stringent air emission requirements. The nitrogen generated by these processes is being transferred to surface water discharges. Concurrently, water quality impairments by nitrogen, new instream nutrient criteria, and anticipated effluent limitations on total nitrogen discharg...

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

"1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250 "3. Gila River Power Station","Gas","Gila River Power Station LP",2060 "4. Springerville","Coal","Tucson Electric Power Co",1618 "5. Glen Canyon Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1312 "6. Santan","Gas","Salt River Project",1227 "7. Mesquite Generating Station","Gas","Mesquite Power LLC",1073 "8. Harquahala Generating Project","Gas","New Harquahala Generating Co, LLC",1054 "9. Hoover Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1040

170

A reaction-based river/stream water quality model Part I: Model development and numerical schemes  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the conceptual and mathematical development of a numerical model of sediment and reactive chemical transport in river/streams. The distribution of mobile suspended sediments and immobile bed sediments is controlled by hydrologic transport as well as erosion and deposition processes. The fate and transport of water quality constituents involving a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by a system of reaction equations for immobile constituents and advective-dispersive-reactive transport equations for constituents. To circumvent stiffness associated with equilibrium reactions, matrix decomposition is performed via Gauss-Jordan column reduction. After matrix decomposition, the system of water quality constituent reactive transport equations is transformed into a set of thermodynamic equations representing equilibrium reactions and a set of transport equations involving no equilibrium reactions. The decoupling of equilibrium and kinetic reactions enables robust numerical integration of the partial differential equations for non-equilibrium-variables. Solving non-equilibrium-variable transport equations instead of individual water quality constituent transport equations also reduces the number of PDEs. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the mixed differential and algebraic equations. Two verification examples are compared with analytical solutions to demonstrate the correctness of the code and to illustrate the importance of employing application-dependent numerical methods to solve specific problems.

Zhang, Fan [ORNL; Gour-Tsyh, Yeh [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

River Steamboats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Steamboats River Steamboats Nature Bulletin No. 628-A February 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RIVER STEAMBOATS The westward migration of the pioneer settlers and the rapid growth of agriculture, commerce and industry in the Middle West is in large part the story of water transportation on our inland waterways. The two main water routes were the chain of Great Lakes on the north and the Ohio River on the south. Sailing vessels carrying hundreds of tons were able to navigate on the Great Lakes almost as freely as on the ocean. Also, on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers heavy loads could be floated downstream from Pittsburgh to New Orleans -- almost 2000 miles. But boats had to be hauled back upstream by manpower -- grueling labor, stretching over weeks or months to move a few tons a few hundred miles. The coming of the steamboat a century and a half ago changed all this.

172

Information retrieval system: impacts of water-level changes on uses of federal storage reservoirs of the Columbia River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project undertaken to provide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with information needed to conduct environmental assessments and meet requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Regional Act) is described. Access to information on environmental effects would help BPA fulfill its responsibilities to coordinate power generation on the Columbia River system, protect uses of the river system (e.g., irrigation, recreation, navigation), and enhance fish and wildlife production. Staff members at BPA identified the need to compile and index information resources that would help answer environmental impact questions. A computer retrieval system that would provide ready access to the information was envisioned. This project was supported by BPA to provide an initial step toward a compilation of environmental impact information. Scientists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) identified, gathered, and evaluated information related to environmental effects of water level on uses of five study reservoirs and developed and implemented and environmental data retrieval system, which provides for automated storage and retrieval of annotated citations to published and unpublished information. The data retrieval system is operating on BPA's computer facility and includes the reservoir water-level environmental data. This project was divided into several tasks, some of which were conducted simultaneously to meet project deadlines. The tasks were to identify uses of the five study reservoirs, compile and evaluate reservoir information, develop a data entry and retrieval system, identify and analyze research needs, and document the data retrieval system and train users. Additional details of the project are described in several appendixes.

Fickeisen, D.H.; Cowley, P.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ensemble Evaluation of Hydrologically Enhanced Noah-LSM: Partitioning of the Water Balance in High-Resolution Simulations over the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of two versions of the Noah land surface model (LSM) to simulate the water cycle of the Little Washita River experimental watershed is evaluated. One version that uses the standard hydrological parameterizations of Noah 2.7 (STD) is ...

Enrique Rosero; Lindsey E. Gulden; Zong-Liang Yang; Luis G. De Goncalves; Guo-Yue Niu; Yasir H. Kaheil

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Willamette River Water Treatment Plant - Wilsonville, Oregon [EDRA / Places Awards, 20004 -- Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per-day drinking-water EDRA/Places Awards 2004 In this issuewe present the EDRA/ Places awards for 2004.These awards, in design, planning and research, highlight

Sensenig, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Inferring Changes in Terrestrial Water Storage Using ERA-40 Reanalysis Data: The Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial water storage is an essential part of the hydrological cycle, encompassing crucial elements of the climate system, such as soil moisture, groundwater, snow, and land ice. On a regional scale, it is however not a readily measured ...

Sonia I. Seneviratne; Pedro Viterbo; Daniel Lthi; Christoph Schr

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Water quality modelling for small river basins Stefano Marsili-Libelli*, Elisabetta Giusti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Experiments Design (OED) criteria (Fedorov, 1972; Atkinson and Donev, 1992) based on the Fisher and Donev, 1992; Versyck et al., 1998; Petersen, 2000; Insel et al., 2003; De Pauw, 2005; Checchi from continuous oxygen signals. Water Science and Technology 36, 43e51. Atkinson, A.C., Donev, A

178

Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project: Final report. [October 21, 1992-April, 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. Comprehensive reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations of the Monument Butte, Travis and Boundary units were presented in the two published project yearly reports. The primary and the secondary production from the Monument Butte unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close to its bubble point. The water flood in the smaller Travis unit appeared affected by natural and possibly by large interconnecting hydraulic fractures. Water flooding the boundary unit was considered more complicated due to the presence of an oil water contact in one of the wells. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter c ore, Formation Micro Imaging logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir characterization efforts identified new reservoirs in the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2000 barrels per day.

Deo, M.D. [Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US); Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc., Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (US); Nielson, D.L.; Lutz, S.J. [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Oaks South Croydon East Croydon Streatham Common West Norwood Gipsy Hill Crystal Palace Birkbeck Penge

Delmotte, Nausicaa

180

Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

Austin, B.A.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Federal-State Conflicts over the Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A RIVER No MORE: THE COLORADO RIVER AND THE WEST (1981). 3.agricultural use in the Colorado River Basin in California.and California's dispute over Colorado River water, spanning

Kaplan, David

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

184

Water information bulletin No. 30, part 13: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Preliminary geologic reconnaissance of the geothermal occurrences of the Wood River Drainage Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pre-tertiary sediments of the Milligen and Wood River Formations consisting primarily of argillite, quartzite, shale and dolomite are, for the most part, exposed throughout the area and are cut locally by outliers of the Idaho Batholith. At some locations, Tertiary-age Challis Volcanics overlay these formations. Structurally the area is complex with major folding and faulting visible in many exposures. Many of the stream drainages appear to be fault controlled. Hydrologic studies indicate hot spring occurrences are related to major structural trends, as rock permeabilities are generally low. Geochemical studies using stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the thermal water in the Wood River region to be depleted by about 10 0/00 in D and by 1 to 2 0/00 in /sup 18/0 relative to cold water. This suggests the water could be meteoric water that fell during the late Pleistocene. The geological data, as well as the chemical data, indicate the geothermal waters are heated at depth, and subsequently migrate along permeable structural zones. In almost all cases the chemical data suggest slightly different thermal histories and recharge areas for the water issuing from the hot springs. Sustained use of the thermal water at any of the identified springs is probably limited to flow rates approximating the existing spring discharge. 28 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Anderson, J.E.; Bideganeta, K.; Mitchell, J.C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land application of water treatment plant (WTP) sludge has been an unsolved problem. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate characteristics of organic polymer sludge, and (2) to determine the effects of the sludge on soil properties that influence utilization of the sludge as a soil amendment. Water treatment sludges were obtained from water utilities along the Neches Rivet-near Beaumont, Texas. They were mostly coagulated with organic polymers. Mineralogical composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), aggregate stability, Atterberg limits, hydraulic conductivity, dispersion, crust strength, adsorption characteristics, nitrogen content and mineralization potential of the sludge or sludge-amended soil were determined in this study. Mineralogical composition of organic polymer sludge was similar to local Beaumont clay soil. The major fraction of the sludge, the coarse clay, was estimated to be 40% kaolinite, 32% smectite, 20% quartz and 8% mica. However, XRD patterns of the sludge indicated that expansion of the smectite was inhibited by organic polymer coagulant added during water clarification, which also was confirmed by aggregate stability of the sludge. Cation exchange capacity of the bulk sludge samples ranged from 8 to 28 cmol kg-1. Quantitative mineralogical analyses showed that CEC of the sludge was reduced by blockage of cation exchange sites with organic polymers. SEM and TEM results indicated that the sludge was mostly fine aggregates of clay particles. Dried sludge aggregates were not prone to swell, due to their resistance to rewetting. The aggregate stability of dried sludge was above 90% after a 24 hours soaking period in water, compared to 7% aggregate stability of local Beaumont clay soil. Addition of 0 to 10% sludge to Boonville sandy loam soil increased the aggregate stability of the soil from 4 to 13%. Atterberg limit showed that wet sludge had wide ranges of moisture contents in semi-solid and plastic states, and shrunk greatly during drying. Shrinkage limit of the sludges ranged from 16 to 66%; plastic limit from 111 to 138%; and liquid limit from 208 to 320%, which suggested that the sludge was highly plastic and compressible. Addition of 0 to 10% sludge into Boonville sandy loam soil increased the infiltration rate of the soil two orders of magnitudes from 1.4 x 10-4 to 1. I X 10-2 CM / S, and reduced the dispersion of the soil significantly. Moreover, addition of from 0 to 10% sludge into Boonville sandy loam soil greatly reduced the crusting produced by rainfall, and the penetration resistance of the crust decreased from 53.1 to 14.4 kg / cm. Metal adsorbing ability of the Boonville sandy loam soil was reduced by addition of the sludge. Adsorption of Zn+2 decreased from 19.7 to 17.7 ug / g when the sludge was amended from 0 to 10%. Total nitrogen and exchangeable ammonium nitrogen (NH4+) contents of the sludge were four times and twenty times as high, respectively, as those of local Beaumont clay and Lake Charles clay soils. Organic polymer coagulants added during water treatment apparently increased nitrogen content of the sludge. Although the sludge contained considerable total nitrogen, incubation experiment of sludge-amended Beaumont clay or Lake Charles clay soil showed that nitrogen mineralization rate was not affected by the sludge addition. This study indicated that the sludge can improve soil physical properties significantly, e.g. soil aggregation, infiltration, dispersion and crusting. The low nitrogen mineralization rate of the sludge showed that the sludge had little fertility and would not produce a groundwater contamination problem.

Kan, Weiqun

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Report for the period October 1992--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The current project targeted three fluvial deltaic reservoirs in the Uinta Basin, Utah. In primary recovery, the performance of the Monument Butte unit was typical of an undersaturated reservoir whose initial pressure was close to the bubble point pressure. The unit was producing at a rate of 40 stb/day when the water flood was initiated. The unit has been producing at more than 300 stb/day for the past four years. The reservoir characteristics of Monument Butte were established in the geologic characterization study. The reservoir fluid properties were measured in the engineering study. Results of a comprehensive reservoir simulation study using these characteristics provided excellent match with the field production data. Extended predictions using the model showed that it would be possible to recover a total of 20--25% of the oil in place. In the Travis unit, logs from the newly drilled 14a-28 showed extensively fractured zones. A new reservoir was discovered and developed on the basis of the information provided by the formation micro imaging logs. This reservoir also behaved in a manner similar to undersaturated reservoirs with initial reservoir pressures close to the reservoir fluid bubble point. The water flood activity was enhanced in the Travis unit. Even through the reservoir continued to be gradually pressurized, the water flood in the Travis unit appeared to be significantly affected by existing or created fractures. A dual-porosity, dual permeability reservoir model provided a good match with the primary production history. The well drilled in the Boundary unit did not intersect any producible zones, once again illustrating the unique challenges to developing fluvial deltaic reservoirs.

Pennington, B.I.; Lomax, J.D. [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Neilson, D.L.; Deo, M.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: TODAM and FLESCOTs theories and mathematical formulations TODAM and FLESCOT model structures Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment EMSL tour Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

Onishi, Yasuo

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: TODAM and FLESCOTs theories and mathematical formulations TODAM and FLESCOT model structures Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment EMSL tour Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

Onishi, Yasuo

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultimately produced higher water prices because rates wereon Environment and Water ( which produced Dublin Principles

Cavelle, Jenna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Red waters of Myrionecta rubra are biogeochemical hotspots for the Columbia River estuary with impacts on primary/secondary productions and nutrient cycles  

SciTech Connect

The localized impact of blooms of the mixotrophic ciliate Myrionecta rubra in the Columbia River estuary during 2007-2010 was evaluated with biogeochemical, light microscopy, physiological and molecular data. M. rubra affected surrounding estuarine nutrient cycles, as indicated by high and low concentrations of organic nutrients and inorganic nitrogen, respectively, associated with red waters. M. rubra blooms also altered the energy transfer pattern in patches of the estuarine water that contain the ciliate by creating areas characterized by high primary production and elevated levels of fresh autochthonous particulate organic matter, therefore shifting the trophic status in emergent red water areas of the estuary from net heterotrophy towards autotrophy. The pelagic estuarine bacterial community structure was unaffected by M. rubra abundance, but red waters of the ciliate do offer a possible link between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes since they were associated with elevated dissolved organic matter and enhanced microbial secondary production. Taken together these findings suggest that M. rubra red waters are biogeochemical hotspots of the Columbia River estuary.

Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; McCue, Lee Ann; Needoba, Joe A.; Crump, Byron C.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Campbell, Victoria; Zuber, Peter A.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Development of a thermal reclamation system for spent blasting abrasive  

SciTech Connect

Abrasive blasting is the most economical method for paint removal from large surface areas such as the hulls and tanks of oceangoing vessels. Tens of thousands of tons of spent abrasive are generated annually by blasting operations in private and US Navy shipyards. Some of this material is classified as hazardous waste, and nearly all of it is currently being either stockpiled or disposed in landfills. The rapid decline in available landfill space and corresponding rise in landfill tipping fees pose a severe problem for shipyard operators throughout the US. This paper discusses the results of a research and development program initiated by the Institute of Gas Technology and supported by the US Navy to develop and test a fluidized-bed thermal reclamation system for spent abrasive waste minimization. Bench- and pilot-scale reclaimer tests and reclaimed abrasive performance tests are described along with the current status of a program to build and test a 5-ton/hour prototype reclaimer at a US Navy shipyard.

Bryan, B.B.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

193

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

194

Building the urban river edge : proposed connections to the water at the foot of Boston's Beacon Hill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The core of this investigation is based on the design of built form at the public urban river edge. It proposes the transformation of a portion of public park edge into public built edge. The Esplanade embankment at the ...

Gorini, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Role of Multimodel Climate Forecasts in Improving Water and Energy Management over the Tana River Basin, Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Masinga Reservoir located in the upper Tana River Basin, Kenya, is extremely important in supplying countrys hydropower and protecting downstream ecology. The Dam serves as the primary storage reservoir, controlling streamflow through a ...

C. Oludhe; Sankarasubramanian Arumugam; Tushar Sinha; Naresh Devineni; Upmanu Lall

196

Effects of El NioSouthern Oscillation on the Climate, Water Balance, and Streamflow of the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatic and hydrologic observations and results from a terrestrial ecosystem model coupled to a regional-scale river-routing algorithm are used to document the associations between the El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and anomalies ...

Tracy E. Twine; Christopher J. Kucharik; Jonathan A. Foley

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Design and installation of continuous flow and water quality monitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquin River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquinimprove water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquinan important real-time forecasting station for water quality

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

H. R. 5373: An Act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, June 23, 1992 and July 27, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1993[close quotes]. The purpose of this Act is to make appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. This document contains specifications under Title I for the following appropriations to be expended under the direction of the Secretary of the Army and the supervision of the Chief of Engineers or authorized civil functions of the Department of the Army pertaining to rivers and harbors, flood control, beach erosion, and related purposes. These appropriations are for general investigations, general construction, flood control (Mississippi River and tributaries, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee), general operation and maintenance, a regulatory program, flood control and coastal emergencies, general expenses, and administrative provisions. Provisions are made under Title II for carrying out the functions of the Bureau of Reclamation as provided in the Federal reclamation laws and other Acts applicable to that Bureau for general investigations, construction program, operation and maintenance, Bureau of Reclamation Loans program account, general administrative expenses, emergency fund, special funds, administrative provisions. Provisions under Title III for the Department of Energy are for energy supply, research and development activities; uranium supply and enrichment activities; general science and research activities; nuclear waste disposal fund; isotope production and distribution program fund; atomic energy defense activities and weapons activities; new production reactor; defense environmental restoration and waste management; materials production and other defense programs; defense nuclear waste disposal; departmental administration; and Office of the Inspector General. Title V is for general provisions.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not

202

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called {open_quotes}Acceptance Standards{close_quotes} is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (US); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called [open quotes]Acceptance Standards[close quotes] is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Use Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: Using reverse osmosis to superpurify water reduces bacterial growth and mineral build up, allowing the system to circulate water up to four times in the High-Performance Computing Center. LANSCE cooling towers circulate water for evaporative cooling. LANL is testing methods for decreased water and chemical use at this location. Gabriel C. Herrera of LANL checks gauges on piping inside the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF). Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: In an effort to reduce water consumption, the SERF was constructed to treat and process sanitary effluent water used for cooling the supercomputing facilities. Sandia Canyon: Water from the SERF is used to keep the wetlands healthy to transform hexavalent into trivalent chromium.

207

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

Energy and water development appropriations for 2000. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, March 25, 1999  

SciTech Connect

These hearings focus on what is happening in the Corps of Engineers and in the Bureau of Reclamation in regard to water supply and management issues in Florida, California, and Colorado. Details of the FY 2000 budget request for the Bureau of Reclamation are addressed. An estimated $2.2 billion will be provided in permanent appropriations.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Numerically Simulating the Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Environment for Migrating Salmon in the Lower Snake River, 2002-2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summer temperatures in the Lower Snake River can be altered by releasing cold waters that originate from deep depths within Dworshak Reservoir. These cold releases are used to lower temperatures in the Clearwater and Lower Snake Rivers and to improve hydrodynamic and water quality conditions for migrating aquatic species. This project monitored the complex three-dimensional hydrodynamic and thermal conditions at the Clearwater and Snake River confluence and the processes that led to stratification of Lower Granite Reservoir (LGR) during the late spring, summer, and fall of 2002. Hydrodynamic, water quality, and meteorological conditions around the reservoir were monitored at frequent intervals, and this effort is continuing in 2003. Monitoring of the reservoir is a multi-year endeavor, and this report spans only the first year of data collection. In addition to monitoring the LGR environment, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model has been applied. This model uses field data as boundary conditions and has been applied to the entire 2002 field season. Numerous data collection sites were within the model domain and serve as both calibration and validation locations for the numerical model. Errors between observed and simulated data varied in magnitude from location to location and from one time to another. Generally, errors were small and within expected ranges, although, as additional 2003 field data becomes available, model parameters may be improved to minimize differences between observed and simulated values. A two-dimensional, laterally-averaged hydrodynamic and water quality model was applied to the three reservoirs downstream of LGR (the pools behind Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor Dams). A two-dimensional model is appropriate for these reservoirs because observed lateral thermal variations during summer and fall 2002 were almost negligible; however, vertical thermal variations were quite large (see USACE 2003). The numerical model was applied to each reservoir independently to simulate the time period between May 1 and October 1, 2002. Differences between observed and simulated data were small, although improvements to model coefficients may be performed as additional thermal data, collected in the reservoirs during 2003, becomes available.

Cook, C.; Richmond, M.; Coleman, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System; 21Feb1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD) SUMMARY: The Columbia River System Operation Review (SOR) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assessed operations at the 14 Federal dams and reservoirs on the Columbia and lower Snake Rivers that have a major influence on the multiple purpose system operation, and for which power production is coordinated under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement. Lead agencies for this six-year process were the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

213

? U. S. Bureau of ReclamationPreface Preface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In California, water is precious, competition for water is fierce, and conservation is critical. The value that Californians place on water is reflected in a constitutional provision ensuring its reasonable and beneficial use. Article X, section 2 of the California Constitution prohibits the waste and unreasonable use of this precious resource. All water within the state is the property of the state, but the right to use water may be acquired under California law. To manage competition for scarce water supplies, California has an appropriative water right system that provides for the orderly development of the state's water resources while safeguarding against waste and unreasonable use. Despite constitutional provisions prohibiting waste and a system of water rights to manage allocations, water conservation has always been important. California has a long history of laws, policies and practices that promote water conservation. Conservation and efficiency of water usage are recognized least-cost strategies to help ensure a vital economy, a healthy environment, and a high standard of living. As our understanding, knowledge and technology improve, we have learned that our use of water for given purposes can also improve. Statutes and policies have been instituted that

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Impacts of operation of CVP regulating reservoirs on water temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets and transmits electric power throughout 15 western states. Western's Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (Sierra Nevada Region) markets approximately 1,480 megawatts (MW) of firm power (and 100 MW of seasonal peaking capacity) from the Central Valley Project (CVP) and other sources and markets available nonfirm power from the Washoe Project. Western's mission is to sell and deliver electricity generated from CVP powerplants. The hydroelectric facilities of the CVP are operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation). Reclamation manages and releases water in accordance with the various acts authorizing specific projects and with enabling legislation. Western's capacity and energy sales must be in conformance with the laws that govern its sale of electrical power. Further, Western's hydropower operations at each facility must comply with minimum and maximum flows and other constraints set by Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or other agencies, acting in accord with law or policy.

Vail, L.W.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 1, Sand reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile thermal foundry sand reclamation unit was designed and constructed. This unit consisted of thermal and mechanical sand reclamation equipment installed on the bed of a 50 foot low-boy trailer. It was transported to a number of Midwest foundries for on-site demonstration of the sand reclamation process. This allowed participating foundries to have their own refuse sand (10-100 tons) processed and then reused in production for evaluation. The purpose for building the unit was to demonstrate to foundries through ``hands on`` experience that refuse sands can be reclaimed and successfully reused particularly in regard to product quality. Most of the participating foundries indicated a high level of satisfaction with the reclaimed sand. Laboratory testing of samples of the used sand, before and after processing by the demonstration unit, verified the usability of the reclaimed sand. One of the foundries participating was a brass foundry, the sand from this foundry contained lead and is classified as a hazardous material. After reclamation the sand was no longer hazardous and could also be reused in the foundry.

Vondra, L.F.; Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DESIGN FEATURES AND OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE NEW BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY RADIATION LAUNDRY AND RECLAMATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Facilities and procedures for the decontamination, reclamation, or disposal of radioactively contaminated tools, equipment, and clothing are described. For safety and economy these operations are grouped in a facility with specially designed ventilation and controls under the supervision of a health physicist. (auth)

Pearsall, S.f Gemmell, L.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Influence of the Mushroom Compost Application on the Microorganism Quantity of Reclamated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mushroom compost which was produced from farm can be used to improving the quality of the reclamated soil. On the one hand, the question about environmental pollution made by the mushroom compost is solved, and on the other hand, it can improve the ... Keywords: mushroom material, micro-organisms, soil quality

Liu Xueran; Li Xinju; Li Bing

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-year (1994-98) project on using blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) and biosolids in agriculture, horticulture, and land reclamation was undertaken to assess agronomic value, environmental safety, and potential economic use of these materials.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

River Network Routing on the NHDPlus Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mapped rivers and streams of the contiguous United States are available in a geographic information system (GIS) dataset called National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus). This hydrographic dataset has about 3 million river and water body ...

Cdric H. David; David R. Maidment; Guo-Yue Niu; Zong-Liang Yang; Florence Habets; Victor Eijkhout

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Isotopes of helium, hydrogen, and carbon as groundwater tracers in aquifers along the Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1. Battle for Colorado River Water. Importance ofthat will be replaced by Colorado River water in Arizona,in Aquifers along the Colorado River A Thesis submitted in

Haber, Samuel Ainsworth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Green River formation water flood demonstration project, Unita Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to understand the successful water flood in the Monument Butte unit and apply it to other units and other reservoirs. Expanding the Monument Butte Water Flood was also one of the objectives. This report provides progress in the areas of field drilling and production results and modeling the boundary unit.

Lomax, J.D.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Lower Colorado River Authority LCRA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lower Colorado River Authority LCRA Lower Colorado River Authority LCRA Jump to: navigation, search Name Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) Place Austin, Texas Zip 78703 Product LCRA is a conservation and reclamation district created by the Texas Legislature in 1934. Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Ohio River Ecological Research Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2009 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) fish community sampling near 14 Ohio River power plants. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last row of each table to estimate costs for arid lands in general.

W. K. Ostler

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Regional Studies Program. Extraction of North Dakota lignite: environmental and reclamation issues  

SciTech Connect

This study, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, addresses the environmental implications of extraction of coal in North Dakota. These implications are supported by details of the geologic and historical background of the area of focus, the lignite resources in the Fort Union coalfield portion. The particular concentration is on the four-county area of Mercer, Dunn, McLean, and Oliver where substantial coal reserves exist and a potential gasification plant site has been identified. The purposes of this extensive study are to identify the land use and environmental problems and issues associated with extraction; to provide a base of information for assessing the impacts of various levels of extraction; to examine the economics and feasibility of reclamation; and to identify research that needs to be undertaken to evaluate and to improve reclamation practices. The study also includes a description of the physical and chemical soil characteristics and hydrological and climatic factors entailed in extraction, revegetation, and reclamation procedures.

LaFevers, J.R.; Johnson, D.O.; Dvorak, A.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Detecting atmospheric rivers in large climate datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme precipitation events on the western coast of North America are often traced to an unusual weather phenomenon known as atmospheric rivers. Although these storms may provide a significant fraction of the total water to the highly managed western ... Keywords: atmospheric rivers, automatic detection of atmospheric rivers, connected component labeling, extreme climate events

Surendra Byna; Prabhat; Michael F. Wehner; Kesheng John Wu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Field Evaluation of Debris Handling and Sediment Clogging of a 2.0-mm Fine-Mesh Traveling Water Screen at the Hawthorn Power Plant, Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an evaluation of the field performance of a fine-mesh (2.0-mm) traveling water screen (TWS) in a debris- and sediment-laden river. Fine-mesh overlay panels were installed on one intake screen at Kansas City Power and Light's Hawthorn Generating Station on the Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri. Its operation relative to an adjoining coarse-mesh (9.5-mm) screen was evaluated over a nearly 22-month period from December 2009 through August 2011.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Canadian River Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Canadian River Compact Commission The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by

236

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

237

Modeling the System: How Computers are Used in Columbia River Planning.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication describes the three computer models Federal agencies and the Northwest Power Pool use regularly to help plan hydro operations in the Columbia River Basin: HYSSR, HYDROSIM, and HYDREG. It is one of a series of booklets written for participants in the System Operation Review (SOR) being conducted jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and theBonneville Power Administration (BPA). A list of the other publications appears on the inside front cover. The SOR is the environmental analysis required to consider changes in Columbia River system operations related contract arrangements. Over the next few years, the agencies will develop a new multiple-use operation for the Columbia River. At the time, the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) and other contracts related to the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada will be renegotiated and renewed. Many alternative ways of operating individual projects and the river system as a whole will be considered in the SOR. To analyze how these changes would affect the system's ability to meet its multiple-use goals, various operating scenarios will be thoroughly evaluated. The three computer models, HYSSR, HYDROSIM, and HYDREG, will play an important role in this evaluation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army Corps of Engineers; United States. Bureau of Reclamation

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

Owen, M.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Guide to implementing reclamation processes at Department of Defense municipal solid waste and construction debris landfills. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis serves as a guide for implementing landfill reclamation techniques on municipal solid waste or construction debris landfills owned, operated, or used by the DoD. The research describes historical and current methods for disposing of solid waste including open dumping, sanitary landfilling, and the development of state-of-the-art sanitary landfill cell technology. The thesis also identifies the factors which have led to the need for new methods of managing municipal solid waste. The vast majority of the study is devoted to identifying actions which should be taken before, during, and after implementation of a landfill reclamation project. These actions include the development of health, safety, and contingency planning documents, the establishment of systems for characterizing and monitoring site conditions, and the identification of other procedures and processes necessary for performing successful operations. Finally, this study contains a model for analyzing under which conditions reclamation is economically feasible. The model examines economic feasibility in four separate conditions and shows that reclamation is economically feasible in a wide variety of markets. However, the model also shows that feasibility is directly associated with a continuance of normal landfilling operations. Landfill, Landfill reclamation, Landfill mining, Municipal solid waste, Recycling, Construction debris.

Tures, G.L.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended to serve as guidance, or to supplement EPA or other agency environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-1 Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended, it is an outline of practices which may or have been used for uranium site restoration. Mining reclamation for uranium mining sites. The existence of bonding requirements and/or financial guarantees in the cases where

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

H. R. 2959: a bill to amend making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1986, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, July 10, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The fiscal year 1986 appropriations bill for energy and water development covers projects of the Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of the Interior (DOI), the Department of Energy, and independent agencies. Title I funds the civilian work on rivers and harbors and for the control of floods and beach erosion performed under the Department of Defense, while Title II funds the Bureau of Reclamation and emergency funds used by DOI. Title III funds DOE activities in energy supply, research, and development, which includes uranium supply and enrichment, nuclear waste disposal, and atomic energy defense activities. It also covers the power marketing administrations, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and loan guarantee programs for geothermal and other energy development.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Our River  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

243

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

245

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

246

Program on Technology Innovation: Technology Research Opportunities for Efficient Water Treatment and Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides background information on the use of freshwater in the United States and the basic technologies employed to treat and utilize water. The connections between water use and energy consumption are also highlighted. Opportunities are discussed for improving water use efficiency through on-site water reuse, water reclamation, and water use reductions. Lastly, recommendations are provided for future action to advance specific technologies and market opportunities.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Potlatch River Watershed Restoration, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project's goal is to improve instream fish habitat in the Potlatch River and the lower Clearwater River through comprehensive watershed planning, implementation of best management practices and expanded water quality and fish habitat monitoring. This proposal has two primary objectives: (1) complete the Potlatch River watershed implementation plan; and, (2) augment existing monitoring efforts in the Potlatch River to broaden the water quality and fish resource data baseline.

Stinson, Kenneth

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2010 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River, and to investigate associations with hydrological, water ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostat: $15 Central AC: $25 - $50 Heat Pump: $60 - $195 Geothermal Heat Pump: $350 Water Heaters: $45 - $75 Heat Pump Water Heater: $425 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 - $75 Provider Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services.

252

Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Homes Heat Pump: $150 - $500 Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Electric Water Heater: $150 Existing Homes Heat Pump: $200 Gas to Electric Water Heater Conversion: $150 Provider Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association provides incentives through its Comfort Advantage Program to encourage energy efficiency within the

253

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Overview of Mississippi River - Louisiana State Study  

SciTech Connect

There are significant benefits to be obtained from providing deepdraft vessel access to the lower Mississippi River including savings in vessel transportation costs, increased export tonnage and consequent improvements of the U.S. balance of payments, increases in employment, and the opportunity for creation of marshlands and land reclamation in the river's eroding delta. The most effective course of action for the State of Louisiana to take is to plan and seek authorization to further deepen the channel in stages to 55 feet should actual increases in commerce equal the high level of commerce, but to dredge the present 40-foot channel to 45 feet initially from the Gulf via Southwest Pass to Mile 172 AHP to provide for two-way navigation of vessels. In addition, the State should encourage private interests to put into operation as soon as possible, facilities for loading and topping-off grain ships midstream and topping-off coal carriers in the Gulf in order to attract and establish patterns of trade in large ships.

Rosselli, A.T.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Understanding Uncertainties in Future Colorado River Streamflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado River is the primary water source for more than 30 million people in the U.S. and Mexico. Recent studies that project streamflow changes in the Colorado River all project annual declines, but the magnitude of the projected decreases range ...

Julie A. Vano; Bradley Udall; Daniel R. Cayan; Jonathan T. Overpeck; Levi D. Brekke; Tapash Das; Holly C. Hartmann; Hugo G. Hidalgo; Martin Hoerling; Gregory J. McCabe; Kiyomi Morino; Robert S. Webb; Kevin Werner; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

256

Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Changes in Flood Management along the Pajaro River: A Transition to Watershed Management Approaches and Lessons from the Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000). WaterFrameworkDirective. E. Parliment,Official2007). FloodRiskDirective. E. Parliment,Officialthe Water Framework Directive and Flood Directive Stacie

Jagger, Stacie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 12. Stable isotopic evaluation of thermal water occurrences in the Weiser and Little Salmon River drainage basins and adjacent areas, west-central Idaho with attendant gravity and magnetic data on the Weiser area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fifteen thermal springs, two thermal wells, and eight cold springs in the Weiser and Little Salmon river drainages were sampled for deuterium and oxygen-18 analysis during the fall of 1981. The straight-line fit of delta D and delta /sup 18/O versus latitude and longitude observed in the data is what would be expected if the recharge areas for the thermal and non-thermal waters were in close proximity to their respective discharge points. The discrete values of delta D and delta /sup 18/O for each thermal discharge suggest that none of the sampled thermal systems have common sources. The depleted deuterium and oxygen-18 contents of most thermal relative to non-thermal waters sampled suggests that the thermal waters might be Pleistocene age precipitation. The isotopic data suggest little or no evidence for mixing of thermal and non-thermal water for the sampled discharges. Thermal waters from Weiser, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, and White Licks hot springs show enrichment in oxygen-18 suggesting that these waters have been at elevated temperatures relative to other sampled thermal discharges in the area. Gravity and magnetic data gathered by the Idaho State University Geology Department in the Weiser Hot Springs area suggest that southeastward plunging synclinal-anticlinal couples, which underlie the hot springs, are cut south of the springs by a northeast trending boundary fault.

Mitchell, J.C.; Bideganeta, K.; Palmer, M.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Stretches of Upper Mississippi River near record-low levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As a result of last year's drought, stretches of the Upper Mississippi River have approached record lows. These low water levels have jeopardized commercial barge ...

260

River flow estimation using adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate estimation of River flow changes is a quite important problem for a wise and sustainable use. Such a problem is crucial to the works and decisions related to the water resources and management. In this study, an adaptive network-based fuzzy ... Keywords: ANFIS, ANN, Fuzzy logic, Great Menderes River, River flow estimation

Mahmut Firat; Mahmud Gngr

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An integrated modelling framework for regulated river systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of regulated water systems has become increasingly complex due to rapid socio-economic growth and environmental changes in river basins over recent decades. This paper introduces the Source Integrated Modelling System (IMS), and describes ... Keywords: Murray-Darling Basin, Rainfall-runoff modelling, River management and operations, River system modelling, Source IMS

Wendy D. Welsh; Jai Vaze; Dushmanta Dutta; David Rassam; Joel M. Rahman; Ian D. Jolly; Peter Wallbrink; Geoffrey M. Podger; Matthew Bethune; Matthew J. Hardy; Jin Teng; Julien Lerat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Predicting the Discharge of Global Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to simulate coupled energy and water fluxes over large continental river basins, in particular streamflow, was largely nonexistent a decade ago. Since then, macroscale hydrological models (MHMs) have been developed, which predict such ...

Bart Nijssen; Greg M. O'Donnell; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Dag Lohmann; Eric F. Wood

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

John Seaman | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and environmental research areas: the land application of animal waste and coal combustion by-products; solute and contaminant transport modeling; reclamation of Cr(VI)...

264

Faculty and Scientists | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SREL Research Professor of Biogeochemistry, UGA Land application of animal waste and coal combustion by-products; solutecontaminant transport modeling; reclamation of Cr(VI)...

265

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Great River Energy State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by measure and member cooperative offering. Provider Great River Energy Great River Energy, a generation and transmission cooperative which serves

266

Assessment of landfill reclamation and the effects of age on the combustion of recovered municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarized the Lancaster county Solid Waste Management Authorities`s (LCSWMA)landfill reclamation activities, ongoing since 1991. All aspects have been analyzed from the manpower and equipment requirements at the landfill to the operational impacts felt at the LCSWMA Resource Recovery Facility (RRF) where the material is delivered for processing. Characteristics of the reclaimed refuse and soil recovered from trommeling operations are discussed as are results of air monitoring performed at the landfill excavation site and the RRF. The report also discusses the energy value of the reclaimed material and compares this value with those obtained for significantly older reclaimed waste streams. The effects of waste age on the air emissions and ash residue quality at the RRF are also provided. The report concludes by summarizing the project benefits and provides recommendations for other landfill reclamation operations and areas requiring further research.

Forster, G.A. [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)] [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Smoky Hill and River Valleys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................3 - 13 Wind Energy and the Meridian Way Wind Farm County. This location is the site of a new wind farm development by Westar Energy, Horizon Wind EnergySmoky Hill and Republican River Valleys Water, Wind, and Economic Development 2008 Field Conference

Peterson, Blake R.

268

Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

L. C. Hulstrom

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Listening Workshops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2010, American Farmland Trust held two listening workshops in the Wabash River Watershed to provide information and collect feedback on the Ohio River Basin Trading Project. Each session began with a basic primer on water quality trading given by Jim Klang of Kieser Associates. The presentations were followed by facilitated discussions. Participants were prompted with several questions, developed from earlier listening sessions, addressing issues that producers will likely face in water quality ...

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Environmental flow for Monsoon Rivers in India: The Yamuna River as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the flows of Monsoon Rivers in India that will permit the river to perform all its natural functions. About 80% of the total flow for Indian rivers is during the monsoon and the remaining 20% is during the non monsoon period. By carrying out a case study of the river Yamuna in Delhi we find that at least 50% of the virgin monsoon (July to September) flow is required for the transport of the full spectrum of soil particles in the river sediment. A similar flow is needed for adequate recharge of the floodplain aquifers along river. For the non monsoon period (October to June) about 60% of the virgin flow is necessary to avoid the growth of still water algae and to support river biodiversity.

Soni, Vikram; Singh, Diwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N. [University of Maryland, Frostburg, MD (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2007 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2007 ORERP fish population sampling near 10 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1,000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 011 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2011 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies that were conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River and to investigate associations with hydrological, ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2006 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2006 ORERP fish population sampling near 12 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

275

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2005 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2005 ORERP fish population sampling near the Ohio River power stations. In 2005, the program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies near 17 electric generating stations that covered nearly the entire (~1000 mile) length of the river.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Raft River Geothermal Aquaculture Experiment. Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Channel catfish, tilapia and Malaysian prawns were cultured directly in geothermal water for approximately seven months at the Department of Energy, Raft River Geothermal Site, to evaluate the organisms throughout a grow-out cycle. Parameters evaluated included survival, growth, bioaccumulation of metals and fluoride, collagen synthesis, and bone calcium levels. Growth at Raft River was slightly lower than at a companion commercial facility at Buhl, Idaho, but was attributed to facility differences rather than an adverse impact of geothermal water. No significant differences were recorded between Raft River and Buhl fish for bone calcium or collagen concentrations. No significant accumulation of heavy metals by fish or prawns was recorded.

Campbell, D.K.; Rose, F.L.; Kent, J.C.; Watson, L.R.; Sullivan, J.F.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates and In Situ River Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage, evapotranspiration, and freshwater runoff to the ocean has a major influence on the terrestrial water and energy budgets and thereby on ...

R. Alkama; B. Decharme; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave; J. Sheffield; A. Voldoire; S. Tyteca; P. Le Moigne

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Water Desalination: Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This was a study on the history of the Colorado River, the water challenges of the Lower Basin states and the international water laws (more)

Kennedy, Clinton P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

280

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as outstanding...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Depth and temporal variations in water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In-situ measurements of the specific conductance and temperature of ground water in the Snake River Plain aquifer were collected in observation well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These parameters were monitored at various depths in the aquifer from October 1994 to August 1995. The specific conductance of ground water in well USGS-59, as measured in the borehole, ranged from about 450 to 900 {micro}S/cm at standard temperature (25 C). The pumping cycle of the production wells at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant causes changes in borehole circulation patterns, and as a result the specific conductance of ground water at some depths in the well varies by up to 50% over a period of about 14 hours. However, these variations were not observed at all depths, or during each pumping cycle. The temperature of ground water in the well was typically between 12.8 and 13.8 C. The results of this study indicate that temporal variations in specific conductance of the ground water at this location are caused by an external stress on the aquifer--pumping of a production well approximately 4,000 feet away. These variations are believed to result from vertical stratification of water quality in the aquifer and a subsequent change in intrawell flow related to pumping. When sampling techniques that do not induce a stress on the aquifer (i.e., thief sampling) are used, knowledge of external stresses on the system at the time of sampling may aid in the interpretation of geochemical data.

Frederick, D.B. [Idaho INEL Oversight Program, Boise, ID (United States); Johnson, G.S. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Velocity Measurements at Six Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, Summer 1988 : Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage facilities and fish protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The program provides offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin, and addresses natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. This report evaluates the flow characteristics of the screening facilities. Studies consisted of velocity measurements taken in front of the rotary drum screens and within the fish bypass systems during peak flows. Measurements of approach velocity and sweep velocity were emphasized in these studies; however, vertical velocity was also measured. 5 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energy and water-development appropriations for 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Part 3  

SciTech Connect

Secretary of the Interior James Watt's testimony in support of water-development projects opened part three of the hearing record. Also seeking funds to develop both needed water supplies and hydropower were representatives of the Bureau of Reclamation, the Corps of Engineers, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Appalachian Regional Commission. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Information retrieval system: impacts of water-level changes on uses of federal storage reservoirs of the Columbia River. Appendix F. RIVOPR user's manuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information relating to environmental effects of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) river operations is stored in a computer data base. The data is of two types: citations to sources of information and descriptions of specific impacts. The impacts are stored in the form of an impact matrix. A data base management system called DRS is used with BPA's VAX computer to access, select, and display portions of the data. This manual describes the use of DRS in conjunction with the River Operations (RIVOPR) data base. This manual teaches one how to use the RIVOPR data base. The manual is written specifically for the user. A user is any person who uses the computer as a tool. As a user, one is more concerned with how to use the computer than with how the computer works internally. The manual places special emphasis on understanding how data are stored and used. This manual includes general information about data bases and DRS language and commands. The manual also describes specific information about the RIVOPR system, including some examples of its use.

Cowley, P.J.; Simmons, M.A.; De Mier, W.V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1991 State Indiana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Wabash River Heritage Corridor Commission The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee

286

Zone of Interaction Between Hanford Site Groundwater and Adjacent Columbia River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the FY 2000 results of a Science and Technology investigation of the groundwater/river interface at the Hanford Site. The investigation focused on (1) a 2-D simulation of water flowpaths beneath the shoreline region under the influence of a transient river stage, and (2) mixing between groundwater and river water.

Peterson, Robert E.; Connelly, Michael P.

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

287

Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

naturally flows into Lake Michigan; all surface and ground-reversed, away from Lake Michigan, making the river thewater (extracted from Lake Michigan) per day. This water

Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

Dreher, G.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Energy and water development appropriations for 1985. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

Part 3 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Interior Secretary William Clark and witnesses from the Bureau of Reclamation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Appalachian Regional Commission. Clark cited the accomplishments of the Bureau of Reclamation during his first three months in office and described the reorganization of the Department's 10 bureaus. His testimony on water policy covers cost sharing for flood control, irrigation, and other water projects. Questions directed to Clark and the other witnesses also dealt with resource development, program management, and the status and level of appropriations for specific projects of concern to committee members.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

MHK Technologies/Microturbine River In Stream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microturbine River In Stream Microturbine River In Stream < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Microturbine River In Stream.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Whitestone Power Communications Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Microturbine River In Stream Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description HDPE blades are the only moving parts in the water.This gives the turbine high resistance to silty or salty water. Blades designed to survive impact of 1500 lb object. HDPE provides flexibility and strength. Blades penetrate water 24 inches allowing for deep and shallow operation. Mounting design allows for variable depth operation for varying river conditions.All submerged prime-mover parts constructed from HDPE. No underwater gearboxes, generators or electrical cables. Velocity of blades 50% of velocity of river current.

291

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Work is under way to decommission the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, which had been used to test experimental fuel assemblies for commercial heavy-water power reactors. SRS is scheduled to remove the dome of the reactor this month (January 2011). Workers also will displace the reactor vessel and steam generators, grout the remaining structure in place, and install a concrete cover over the reactor's footprint Work is under way to decommission the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, which had been used to test experimental fuel assemblies for commercial heavy-water power reactors. SRS is scheduled to remove the dome of the reactor this month (January 2011). Workers also will displace the reactor vessel and steam generators, grout the remaining structure in place, and

293

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Rappahannock River Basin Commission The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity

294

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Other Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type PACE Financing Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The program will also support the installation of energy efficiency measures in connection with a qualifying renewable energy project, provided that the renewable energy

295

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 "2. Chief Joseph","Hydroelectric","USCE-North Pacific Division",2456 "3. Transalta Centralia Generation","Coal","TransAlta Centralia Gen LLC",1596 "4. Rocky Reach","Hydroelectric","PUD No 1 of Chelan County",1254 "5. Columbia Generating Station","Nuclear","Energy Northwest",1097 "6. Wanapum","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",1059 "7. Boundary","Hydroelectric","Seattle City of",1040 "8. Priest Rapids","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",932

296

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell, Wellpinit, Washington, February 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Maintenance Program and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell Wellpinit, Washington February 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 01-06 Document Number S00204 DOE/Grand Junction Office Sherwood LTSP February 2001 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction............................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.2 Legal and Regulatory Requirements ........................................................................

297

Radionuclide transport in the Yenisei River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data characterizing the pollution of the Yenisei River (water and bottom sediment) by radionuclide resulting from the use of the river water for cooling industrial reactors in the Mining-Chemical Complex are presented. Studies have been made of the contamination of the river during the period when reactors with direct flow cooling were used and after these were shut down. Distinctive features of the migration of radionuclide in the Yenisei are noted, in particular, their distribution between the solid and liquid phases. The amounts of 137Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn, and 152Eu in the channel are determined from the effluent discharge site to Dudinka port. The rate of continuous self removal of 137Cs is estimated to be 0.19 1/year, corresponding to a half purification time of 3.6 years for a 600 km long segment of the river bed.

S. M. Vakulovsky; E. G. Tertyshnik; A. I. Kabanov

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Speeding up solar disinfection : effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli in Charles River water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunlight efficiently disinfects drinking water in plastic bottles over two days, but simple additives may show promise for reducing this time to several hours. This study found that adding up to 500 [micro]M hydrogen ...

Fisher, Michael Benjamin, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

300

Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pumps: Maximum of 10 tons for residential systems and 50 tons for commercial systems Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $50 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $750/ton Dual Fuel Air-source Heat Pumps: $150/ton Provider Cuivre River Electric Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control and Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water heaters. Water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

STATUS REPORT NO. 4 ON CLINCH RIVER STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The status of radioactive contamination of the Clinch and Tennessee River systems from Nov. 1961 to April 1962 is reviewed. Data are included from studies on the fate of radioactive materials discharged to the Clinch River by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the mechanisms of dispersion of radionuclides released to the river, the direct and indirect hazards of waste disposal practices during the period, an evaluation of the over-all usefulness of this river for radioactive disposal purposes, and an evaluation of long-term monitoring procedures. The management of liquid wastes at ORNL is discussed and results are reported from studies on the accumulation and movement of radionuclides in White Oak Creek basin, the contamination of river biota, hydrologic measurements and analyses, measurements of radioactivity in the river system and in community water systems downstream from the Clinch River, and calculation of estimated radiation dosages from drinking Clinch River and Tennessee River water or immersion in the water at various downstream points. Results are included from a preimpoundment study of ecological conditions of Melton Hill Lake and estimates of the effects of Melton Hill Lake and power releases from Melton Hill Dam on hydrologic conditions in the river system. (C.H.)

Morton, R.J. ed.

1963-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

302

STATUS REPORT NO. 1 ON CLINCH RIVER STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A study of the Clinch River below Oak Ridge National Laboratory was initiated in Feb. 1960 to obtain fundamental information on the physical, chemical, and biological dy namics of this fresh-water stream which receives large volumes of low-level radioactive wastes. The fate of radioactive materials discharged to the river, the mechanisms of dispersion of radionuclides released to the river, the direct and indirect hazards of current disposal practice in the river, and the over-all usefulness of this river for radioactive waste disposal purposes will be studied. In formation obtained will have important implications for problems involving large-scale environmental contamination such as the over- all diluent capacity of fresh-water environments for the continuous input of large volume low-level radioactive wastes and the long-term indirect impact of radioactive contamination on such an environment. White Oak Creek, which drains the site ot Oak National Laboratory, flows into the Clinch River, a tributary of the Tennessee River. The Clinch and Tennessee Rivers are described and available data on the physical, chemical, and biological conditions of the rivers are summarized. Data are included from preliminary studies on the properties of water and bottom sediments, studies on radionuclide interactions with minerals and river sediment, biological studies on plants and animals, and hydrologic studies. (C.H.)

Morton, R.J. ed.

1961-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Stream Water Temperature within th Entiat River Subbasin : January 2008 - October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a greater flexibility of data aggregation for multi-scale recovery planning assessments, and (2) Designing methods that: (a) Identify factors limiting fish production in watersheds; (b) Determine restoration actions to address these problems; (c) Implement actions as a large-scale experiment (e.g. Before After Control Impact, or BACI design), and (d) Implement intensive monitoring and research to evaluate the action's success. The intent of the ISEMP project is to design monitoring programs that can efficiently collect information to address multiple management objectives over a broad range of scales. This includes: Evaluating the status of anadromous salmonids and their habitat; Identifying opportunities to restore habitat function and fish performance, and Evaluating the benefits of the actions to the fish populations across the Columbia River Basin. The multi-scale nature of this goal requires the standardization of protocols and sampling designs that are statistically valid and powerful, properties that are currently inconsistent across the multiple monitoring programs in the region. Other aspects of the program will aid in the ability to extrapolate information beyond the study area, such as research to elucidate causal mechanisms, and a classification of watersheds throughout the Columbia River Basin. Obviously, the scale of the problem is immense and the ISEMP does not claim to be the only program working towards this goal. As such, ISEMP relies heavily on the basin's current monitoring infrastructure to test and develop monitoring strategies, while acting as a coordinating body and providing support for key elements such as data management and technical analyses. The ISEMP also ensures that monitoring programs can address large-scale management objectives (resulting largely from the ESA) through these local efforts. While the ISEMP maintains a regional focus it also returns the necessary information to aid in management at the smaller spatial scales (individual projects) where manipulations (e.g., habitat restoration actions) actually occur. The work captur

Dawson, Pierre

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

304

Development and application of an integrated ecological modelling framework to analyze the impact of wastewater discharges on the ecological water quality of rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling is an effective tool to investigate the ecological state of water resources. In developing countries, the impact of sanitation infrastructures (e.g. wastewater treatment plants) is typically assessed considering the achievement of legal physicochemical ... Keywords: Habitat suitability models, Information-theoretic approach, Integrated ecological modelling, MIKE 11, Multi-model inference

Javier E. Holguin-Gonzalez, Gert Everaert, Pieter Boets, Alberto Galvis, Peter L. M. Goethals

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Missouri River Basin state and Federal water and related land resource program: fiscal years 1979-1985. Volume 10. South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This report, Volume 10 in a series of 11, documents state and Federal water and related land resources planning, development, and management activities for the state of South Dakota. The other reports cover information on Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, and Montana. Many planning and study activities are discussed.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Groundwater protection EIS: Existing environment: Savannah River  

SciTech Connect

Per Groundwater Protection EIS commitments, a baseline of surface water hydrology and chemistry of each onsite stream is needed to define the existing environment of each watershed so that environmental impacts associated with the various waste site closure options can be assessed. This report summarizes the existing water quality of the Savannah River; lists the various waste sites encompassing this watershed; and summarizes the availability of surface water and floodplain sediment monitoring data, both radiochemical and physiochemical, collected from this watershed.

Stejskal, G.F.

1985-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Sabine River Compact Commission The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the

308

Ecology of the river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, in the Cinaruco River, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cinaruco River is a tributary of the Orinoco River, and forms the southern boundary of Venezuela's newest national park, Santos Luzardo. Like other rivers of this region, the Cinaruco River undergoes an extreme seasonal flood cycle. River dolphins were studied from November 1993 to June 1994 to gather baseline data regarding their ecology, including distribution, habitat affinity, group size, population composition, and prey availability. Transects from watercraft were used to count river dolphins, and observation effort was recorded. River dolphin habitat was characterized by broad hydrologic features (i.e., river, lagoon, side channel or confluence), structural composition (i.e., beach, rocks, cutbank, submerged vegetation) and complexity. Population composition by age class was determined according to size. Photo-identification was used to recognize individual dolphins. Potential preyfish availability within habitats was determined by using seine nets and gillnets. Dolphin diet was inferred from one stomach sample and the literature. Dolphins were seen most often during falling water, and least often during rising water. Dolphins were most often seen in confluence areas, and were seldom seen in side channels. The presence of rocks or beaches was associated with a greater frequency of dolphin sightings, and sightings increased with habitat complexity. Average group size for the 8-mo study was 2.0 (O?.05) dolphins, and was greatest during rising water. Greatest densities occurred during failing water, at 3.8 (+O.54) dolphins/km. Calves were first sighted at the end of the dry season and became more common as the waters rose. Six individuals were recognized and resighted by photo-identification; one of these was sighted 8 times over a period of 186 days. The fish diversity of the study area was high, and comprised at least 161 species. The stomach of one Inia contained 15 fish, representing at least 4 species.

McGuire, Tamara Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

310

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Savannah River National Laboratory  

At a glance Remote Electrical Throw Device Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory ... sufficient manufacturing capacity, established dist ...

312

Tucannon River Temperature Study, Prepared for : Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a temperature analysis of the Tucannon River completed for the WRIA 35 Planning Unit. The Tucannon River is located in southeastern Washington and flows approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) from the Blue Mountains to the Snake River. High water temperature in the Tucannon River has been identified as a limiting factor for salmonid fish habitat (Columbia Conservation District, 2004). Several segments of the Tucannon River are included on Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) 303(d) list of impaired waterbodies due to temperature. Ecology is currently conducting scoping for a temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study of the Tucannon River. The WRIA 35 Planning Unit retained HDR Engineering to evaluate water temperature in the Tucannon River. The project objectives are: (1) Review recent and historic data and studies to characterize temperature conditions in the river; (2) Perform field studies and analyses to identify and quantify heating and cooling processes in the river; (3) Develop and calibrate a computer temperature model to determine the sources of heat to the Tucannon River and to predict the temperature of the river that would occur with increased natural riparian shading assuming the current river morphology; (4) Evaluate differences in river temperatures between current and improved riparian shading during the 'critical' period - low river flows and high temperatures; and (5) Determine the potential benefits of riparian shading as a mechanism to decrease river temperature.

HDR Engineering.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Rainfall and Water Resources Variability in Sub-Saharan Africa during the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin rainfall series and extensive river flow records are used to characterize and improve understanding of spatial and temporal variability in sub-Saharan African water resources during the last century. Nine major international river ...

Declan Conway; Aurelie Persechino; Sandra Ardoin-Bardin; Hamisai Hamandawana; Claudine Dieulin; Gil Mah

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

Continental-Scale River Flow in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrologic cycle is a major part of the global climate system. There is an atmospheric flux of water from the ocean surface to the continents. The cycle is closed by return flow in rivers. In this paper a river routing model is developed to ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell; Guilherme Caliri

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer modeling systems that simulate the storage, flow, and diversion of water in a system of reservoirs and river reaches. Generalized means that a computer modeling system is designed for application to a range of concerns dealing with river basin systems of various configurations and locations, rather than being site-specific customized to a particular system. User-oriented implies the modeling system is designed for use by professional practitioners (model-users) other than the original model developers and is thoroughly tested and well documented. User-oriented generalized modeling systems should be convenient to obtain, understand, and use and should work correctly, completely, and efficiently. Modeling applications often involve a system of several simulation models, utility software products, and databases used in combination. A reservoir/river system model is itself a modeling system, which often serves as a component of a larger modeling system that may include watershed hydrology and river hydraulics models, water quality models, databases and various software tools for managing time series, spatial, and other types of data. Reservoir/river system models are based on volume-balance accounting procedures for tracking the movement of water through a system of reservoirs and river reaches. The model computes reservoir storage contents, evaporation, water supply withdrawals, hydroelectric energy generation, and river flows for specified system operating rules and input sequences of stream inflows and net evaporation rates. The hydrologic period-of-analysis and computational time step may vary greatly depending on the application. Storage and flow hydrograph ordinates for a flood event occurring over a few days may be determined at intervals of an hour or less. Water supply capabilities may be modeled with a monthly time step and several decade long period-of-analysis capturing the full range of fluctuating wet and dry periods including extended drought. Stream inflows are usually generated outside of the reservoir/river system model and provided as input to the model. However, reservoir/river system models may also include capabilities for modeling watershed precipitation-runoff processes to generate inflows to the river/reservoir system. Some reservoir/river system models simulate water quality constituents along with water quantities. Some models include features for economic evaluation of system performance based on cost and benefit functions expressed as a function of flow and storage.

Wurbs, Ralph A.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Coal-Combustion and Biomass-Pyrolysis Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov 04/2008 Carbon Sequestration Enhancing carbon SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS ProductS Background Terrestrial sequestration of carbon can occur by three mechanisms, all of which first require "capture" or fixation of atmospheric carbon by photosynthesis into plant tissues. If captured by herbaceous plants, much of the carbon is quickly

319

MORA: an Energy-Aware Slack Reclamation Scheme for Scheduling Sporadic Real-Time Tasks upon Multiprocessor Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the global and preemptive energy-aware scheduling problem of sporadic constrained-deadline tasks on DVFS-identical multiprocessor platforms. We propose an online slack reclamation scheme which profits from the discrepancy between the worst- and actual-case execution time of the tasks by slowing down the speed of the processors in order to save energy. Our algorithm called MORA takes into account the application-specific consumption profile of the tasks. We demonstrate that MORA does not jeopardize the system schedulability and we show by performing simulations that it can save up to 32% of energy (in average) compared to execution without using any energy-aware algorithm.

Nelis, Vincent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy and water appropriations, fiscal year 1999. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session  

SciTech Connect

These are hearings on H.R. 2203/S. 1004 an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998. Witnesses before the committee were from the US DOE for atomic energy defense activities, Office of Energy Research; US DOD, civil; US Corps of Engineers, civil; and US DOI, Bureau of Reclamation.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Energy and water development appropriations, fiscal year 1998. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, US Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

These are hearings on H.R. 2203/S. 1004 an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998. Witnesses before the committee were from the US DOE for atomic energy defense activities, the Bonneville Power Administration, environmental restoration and waste management; the US DOI, bureau of reclamation; US DOD, civil; and Corps of Engineers, civil.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity, (more)

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Systems Integrator Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1961 State Delaware Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Project Review Section The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New

325

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio River Greenway Commission

326

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Catawba Wateree River Basin Advisory Commission

327

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

328

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology Provider Missouri River Energy Solutions Bright Energy Solutions offers energy efficiency cash incentive programs to [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN170F&r... residential] and business customers of municipal utilities that are members

329

Forecasting the Anomalous Discharge of the Caron River, Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops methods for the extended-range forecasting of the FebruaryMarch minimum of water discharge of the Caron River in eastern Venezuela, a watershed providing more than 70% of the hydroelectric power for the country. The ...

Stefan Hastenrath; Lawrence Greischar; Esperanza Coln; Alfredo Gil

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Modernization in the National Weather Service River and Flood Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic forecasting is vital not only to the National Weather Service mission of saying lives and protecting property but also to our nation's water management decision makers. Since its inception, the River and Flood Program has continually ...

D.L. Fread; R.C. Shedd; G.F. Smith; R. Farnsworth; C.N. Hoffeditz; L.A. Wenzel; S.M. Wiele; J.A. Smith; G.N. Day

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hydrological climate-impact projections for the Rhine river: GCM-RCM uncertainty and separate temperature and precipitation effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change is expected to affect the hydrological cycle with considerable impacts on water resources. Climate induced changes in the hydrology of the Rhine river (Europe) are of major importance for the riparian countries, as the Rhine river ...

Thomas Bosshard; Sven Kotlarski; Massimiliano Zappa; Christoph Schr

332

Assessing the Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Mountain Snowpack in the St. Mary River Watershed, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The St. Mary River watershed is an important international watershed that supplies irrigation water to large portions of southern Alberta, Canada, and northern Montana. The St. Mary River is fully allocated and users on both sides of the border ...

Ryan J. MacDonald; James M. Byrne; Stefan W. Kienzle; Robert P. Larson

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Raft River condenser-tube examination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the program of development of a water treatment for the 5 MW Raft River power plants' carbon steel heat rejection system, four carbon steel tubes were analyzed in this batch. The results of visual and scanning electron microscope examination of the tubes are presented. (MHR)

Suciu, D.F.

1981-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

334

Reading Comprehension - The Water Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Water Cycle The Water Cycle Evaporation, Condensation and Precipitation The _________ moon sun water clouds evaporates _________ fish oceans rain water from lakes and oceans. As the air rises, it cools. The water vapor condenses into tiny droplets of _________ evaporation clouds water sunshine . The droplets crowd together and form a _________ cloud lake storm precipitation . Wind blows the _________ rain sun droplet cloud towards the land. The tiny droplets join together and fall as precipitation to the _________ river lake ground cloud . The water soaks into the ground and collects in _________ rivers and lakes oceans and clouds jars and cups plants and animals . The _________ storm cycle river house that never ends has started again! A water cycle diagram. Use the diagram to identify the different parts of the water cycle:

335

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Construction Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Ontario Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details regulations for the protection of persons and property by ensuring that dams are suitably located, constructed, operated and maintained and are of an appropriate nature. The

336

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as for the conservation,

337

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

338

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

339

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

340

Savannah River National Laboratory  

located in every town and city have the potential to be used as environmental ... Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC. SRNS is responsible for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Savannah River Remediation Procurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and procedures, rules and regulations, terms and conditions and the orders and directives under which Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) develops, issues, administers and...

342

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Field Sites SREL is supported largely by external funding. Major sources include DOE Environmental Management, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, USGS, US Department of the...

343

Savannah River National Laboratory  

The coupling also provided excellent response to impact. ... used as a means of remote camera and equipment, ... Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, ...

344

Savannah River National Laboratory  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC. SRNS is responsible for transferring its technologies to the private sector so that these technologies may have ...

345

Brief No. 9 WATER SECURITY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brief No. 9 WATER SECURITY, RISK & SOCIETY 1 of 4 Water Security and Federal Rivers March 2012 Australian National University Key messages · Water security in a hydroclimatic risk society. Climate risks interact with rapidly changing social, demographic and economic forces to position water security

New, Mark

346

Water Prism, Volume 2: Prototype Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Prism is a decision support system (DSS) that evaluates alternative management plans to obtain water resource sustainability at the regional, watershed, or local levels. It considers surface, ground, and impoundment waters and all water-using sectors (industrial, agricultural, municipal, electric power, and the environment). This technical update illustrates how Water Prism is used by applying it to two large watersheds: the Muskingum River Basin (Ohio) and the Green River Basin ...

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper...

349

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

350

about Savannah River National Laboratory  

S R N The Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and are managed and operated by Savannah River ...

351

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Savannah River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

352

RADIOACTIVITY IN SILT OF THE CLINCH AND TENNESSEE RIVERS  

SciTech Connect

Surveys of radioactivity in the Clinch and Tennessee rivers during 1954 through 1958 are summarized. It is concluded that no immediate hazard exists due to the reconcentration of radioactive materials in downstream bottom sediments, However, if the amount of radioactivity in the bottom sediment continues to increase for the next few years, it will be necessary to re-evaluate our present waste disposal policy in order to further restrict the release of ralioactive wastes to the Clinch River. The most probable effect of the radioactive sediment on industry would be an increased background counting rate if sand from the river bottom were used in making concrete for the construction of counting rooms of instrument laboratories. The problem ofthe radioactivity in solution in the river water would have to be considered before using the downstream water as process water in the manufacture of film emulsions or other photographic materials, (auth)

Cottrell, W.D.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources is responsible for maintaining a state water plan, intended to implement state policies for water management. A portion of the plan is reserved for rivers

354

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface E&WR - Water-Energy Interface Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation: A Modeling Framework The purpose of this study, conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center at West Virginia University, is to develop and demonstrate a framework for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects, and environmental benefits of using mine water for thermo-electric power generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering, and environmental factors to be considered and evaluated in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. Development and demonstration of the framework involves the following activities: A field investigation and case study conducted for the proposed Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. This 300 megawatt power plant has been proposed to burn coal refuse from the Champion coal refuse pile, which is the largest coal waste pile in Western Pennsylvania. The field study, based on previous mine pool research conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC), identifies mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2,000 to 3,000 gpm power plant water requirement.

355

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

356

from Savannah River National Laboratory  

operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. SRNL offers innovative solutions ... The decommissioning of F Area at the Savannah River Site involves long-term management

357

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Effects of the Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1984 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assessed the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. This report covers the 1983-84 field season concerning the effects of Hungry Horse operations on kokanee abundance and reproductive success in the upper Flathead River system. This report also addresses the projected recovery of the main stem kokanee run under the flow regime recommended by the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks and implemented by the Bureau of Reclamation and Bonneville Power Administration in 1982. An estimated 58,775 kokanee reached spawning grounds in the Flathead River System in 1983. The 1983 spawning run was composed of 92% age III + fish, as compared to an average of 80% from 1972-1983. A total of 6883 kokanee redds were enumerated in the main stem Flathead River in 1983. A total of 2366 man-days of angling pressure was estimated during the 1983 kokanee lure fishery in the Flathead River system. Estimated numbers of fry emigrating from McDonald Creek, the Whitefish River and Brenneman's Slough were 13,100,000, 66,254 and 37,198, yielding egg to fry survival rates of 76%, 10.4% and 19.2%.

Fraley, John J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.  

SciTech Connect

The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 20, 2012 July 20, 2012 CX-009070: Categorical Exclusion Determination A-Area Alternate Fire Water Supply CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/20/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 20, 2012 CX-009069: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove and Dispose of 107 A & B Tanks and Support Structure CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 07/20/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 20, 2012 CX-009068: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydrogen Charging Tritium Contaminated Metals CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/20/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 16, 2012 CX-009077: Categorical Exclusion Determination F-Area Infrasturcture Improvement CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07/16/2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 30, 2012 August 30, 2012 CX-009100: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cooling Tower Water Sampling and Analysis for Legionella Pneumophila Density CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 29, 2012 CX-009106: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle/Remove Vacuum System and Related Equipment in 772-F CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 29, 2012 CX-009105: Categorical Exclusion Determination 284-H Track Coal Hopper Pit Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 29, 2012 CX-009104: Categorical Exclusion Determination Infrastructure Modification for the Mobile Plutonium Facility (MPF) at the

362

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 CX-008639: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish Laydown Yard East of 281-3F CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 29, 2012 CX-008638: Categorical Exclusion Determination Excavate to Repair Underground Domestic Water Leak between Tanks 5 and 7 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 29, 2012 CX-008637: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operation and Maintenance of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Method in 773, B142 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 29, 2012 CX-008636: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Organic Species by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas

363

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 20, 2013 June 20, 2013 CX-010655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roof Repair on Crane Maintenance Area Roof CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/20/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 18, 2013 CX-010657: Categorical Exclusion Determination Western Sector Treatment System Soil Vapor Extraction Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 18, 2013 CX-010656: Categorical Exclusion Determination Stormwater Drainage Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 17, 2013 CX-010662: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reroute Diesel Water Cooling Line at 241-125H CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/17/2013

364

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 20, 2011 July 20, 2011 CX-006620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocate Hydroburst System from 238-H to 234-7H CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 07/20/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 18, 2011 CX-006619: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Seventeen Monitoring Wells Around 715-D CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/18/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 18, 2011 CX-006618: Categorical Exclusion Determination Disable F-Tank Farm (FTF) Air Compressor Sequencer CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/18/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 18, 2011 CX-006617: Categorical Exclusion Determination E Area Fire Water Extension CX(s) Applied: B1.15

365

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 20, 2011 June 20, 2011 CX-006372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Well Installations at R-Area Operable Unit CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 15, 2011 CX-006373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connect 735-11A to the Central Plant Chilled Water System CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/15/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 14, 2011 CX-006375: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Transfer Lines with Spare Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/14/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 14, 2011 CX-006374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

366

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 11, 2009 August 11, 2009 CX-000513: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cone Penetration Test sampling at ECODS (Early Construction and Operational Disposal Sites) B3 and B5 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/11/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Isolation of Domestic Water Line, 782-4G CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tree Removal and Chipping at P-Area Ash Basin and R-Area Ash Basin and P-007 Outfall Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

367

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 10, 2010 December 10, 2010 CX-004837: Categorical Exclusion Determination Measurement of Compressive Strength CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/10/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office December 7, 2010 CX-004826: Categorical Exclusion Determination Piezometer Well Installation for 1,4-Dioxane Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/07/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office December 7, 2010 CX-004824: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle and Remove Tank 6 Riser 7 for Waste Determination (WD) Sampling CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/07/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office December 7, 2010 CX-004823: Categorical Exclusion Determination Consolidation of K- and L-Area Heavy Water in C-Area

368

Historical river flow rates for dose calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

Carlton, W.H.

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reclamation of abandoned surface coal mined land using flue gas desulfurization products  

SciTech Connect

Details are given of a field-scale research project where the Fleming site, in Ohio, of highly degraded and acid-forming abandoned surface coal-mined land, was reclaimed using a dry flue gas desulfurization product from an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion burner at a General Motors plant Pontiac, MI, which burned eastern Ohio coal and used dolomitic limestone for desulfurization. Plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses, wheat and clover, in 1994 and soil and water samples were analysed in 1995 and in 2009. It was found that FGD-treated plots promoted good regenerative growth, similar to that in plots using more concentrated re-soil material. The FGD treatment also greatly improved overall water quality. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Chen, L.; Kost, D.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, OH (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

Matthews, R. A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Green River Mill Site (UT.0-01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Documents Related to Green River Mill Site Data Validation Package for the June 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site; LMS/GRN/S0609; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Green River, Utah, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Historic Fact Sheet: Green River Disposal Site Uranium ore was

372

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2008 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2008 ORERP fish community sampling near 11 Ohio River power plants. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Doe Water Cycle Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multilaboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the ...

N. L. Miller; A. W. King; M. A. Miller; E. P. Springer; M. L. Wesely; K. E. Bashford; M. E. Conrad; K. Costigan; P. N. Foster; H. K. Gibbs; J. Jin; J. Klazura; B. M. Lesht; M. V. Machavaram; F. Pan; J. Song; D. Troyan; R. A. Washington-Allen

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

HydroTrend v.3.0: A climate-driven hydrological transport model that simulates discharge and sediment load leaving a river system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HydroTrend v.3.0 is a climate-driven hydrological water balance and transport model that simulates water discharge and sediment load at a river outlet, by incorporating drainage basin properties (river networks, hypsometry, relief, reservoirs) together ... Keywords: Human impacts, Modeling distributary channels, River model, Sediment concentration, Sediment discharge

Albert J. Kettner; James P. M. Syvitski

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

National Smart Water Grid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

Beaulieu, R A

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

New courses for the Colorado River: Major issues for the next century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado River is the sole dependable water supply for a quarter million square miles in seven western states and Mexico. Its waters are truly a scarce resource in a dry land, and consequently the Colorado is the most intensively managed river of its size in the world. Yet as Governor Bruce Babbitt notes here, the basic accord governing the river-the Colorado River Compact of 1922-''provides little guidance on the major issues of the next century, namely equitable resolution of Indian claims and water quality.'' These issues and others are addressed fully by more than fifteen leading scholars who command a thorough working knowledge of the history of the river and the controversies that continue to surround its uses. This book addresses the issues surrounding the uses of the Colorado River since the 1922 compact.

Weatherford, G.D.; Brown, F.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting This legislation aims to preserve the Little Missouri River in its present, free-flowing natural condition. The Little Missouri River Commission is

379

New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead May 24, 2010 - 1:23pm Addthis Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Joshua DeLung Hydropower harnesses water power to create reliable, clean and plentiful renewable energy, but dams can have an unintended impact on wildlife --

380

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geochemical modeling at Raft River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical analysis of water from three depth regimes at the Raft River KGRA indicate the presence of at least two distinct hydrothermal fluids. One fluid predominates in the fracture system on the west side of the valley, known as the Bridge Fault. This fluid is characterized by low conductivity (2,000 to 3,000 ..mu..s) and 6 to 9 ..mu..g/ml F/sup -/. The second fluid, encountered in the center of the valley, appears to be associated with the Narrows Structure and is characterized by a conductivity of 6,000 to 11,000 ..mu..s and F/sup -/ of 3 to 6 ..mu..g/ml. Contour mapping of conductivity and Cl/sup -//F/sup -/ ratios indicates upwelling of both deep geothermal fluids into the shallow system. This recharge into the intermediate and shallow zones produces high-conductivity water which is used for irrigation. Application of a simple mixing model shows that all the water sampled in intermediate and deep zones can be described by mixtures of two nearly pure fluids. One mechanism, consistent with the known data, is deep upwelling of a highly mineralized fluid which is heated by the basement rock and then penetrates sediment layers through fractures. The second fluid is relatively recent meteoric water conductively heated by the basement rock.

Allen, C.A.; Chaney, R.E.; McAtee, R.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Influence of ENSO in the Flows of the Upper Paran River of South America over the Past 100 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Paran River is the main tributary of the La Plata River basin, the second largest in South America, contributing with an annual mean flow of 12 000 m3 s?1 to more than one-half of the total water flowing in the La Plata River system. ...

Guillermo J. Berri; Marcela A. Ghietto; Norberto O. Garca

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Investigation of contamination bearing algae in the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Recent discussions in the group have given rise to the problem of determining whether the beta contamination found in the Columbia River is carried by the algae which are found in the retention basin. The algae accumulate in the basin and apparently remain there longer than the retained water, and thus may be contaminated to a greater extent than the water itself.

Paas, H.J.

1947-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill, 1996. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 20, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The report addresses H.R. 1905 a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996. The bill supplies funds for water resources development programs and related activities of the Dept. of Army, Civil Functions - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Reclamation, and for certain Department of Energy`s energy research activities. The report includes comments on various programs.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

387

Unpaving the Way to Creek Restoration in Lower Sausal Creek Watershed: Applying the EU Water Framework Directive to a US Urban Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River. UCthe EU Water Framework Directive to a US Urban Watershed byUnion Water Framework Directive (WFD) provides a strategy

Li, Hong; Wardani, Jane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Chemical Logging Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To use new methods to assist geothermal well drilling. Notes Chemical logging resulted in the development of a technique to assist in geothermal well drilling and resource development. Calcium-alkalinity ratios plotted versus drill depth assisted in defining warm and hot water aquifers. Correlations between the calcium-alkalinity log and lithologic logs were used to determine aquifer types and detection of hot water zones

389

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

390

FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A quantitative evaluation of borehole-impeller flowmeter data leads to estimated field hydraulic conductivity. Data were obtained during an injection test of a geothermal well at the Raft River geothermal test site in Idaho. Both stationary and trolling calibrations of the flowmeter were made in the well. Methods were developed to adjust for variations in hole diameter, impeller speed, and trolling speed. These methods were applied to evaluate water losses into the formation as a function of depth. Application of the techniques is restricted to aquifers below the water

391

Members of the Carnarvon Water Allocation Advisory Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Groundwater Management Strategy has been prepared by the Water Allocation Branch and the Midwest/Gascoyne Region of the Water and Rivers Commission, with the assistance of the Carnarvon Water Allocation Advisory Committee. The Strategy development team consisted of:

Carnarvon Wa; Lower Gascoyne River; Ron Shepherd; Alan Bradley; Wayne Astill; Kevin Firth; Claire Thorstensen; Darryl Abbott; Rebecca Blyton; Phillip Kalaitzis; Bruce Teede; Bruce Munro; Marcus Holla; Paul Nevill; Bill Doble; Dale Rogers; Ron Copeland; Dave Bauer; Steve Greeve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Preliminary data summary for the used-oil reclamation and re-refining industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summaries contain data about industrial facilities in various industries discharging pollutants in their wastewaters and considers whether the EPA should pursue regulations to control such discharges. The summaries were prepared in order to allow EPA to respond to the mandate of Section 304(m) of the Clean Water Act. Summaries for categories already subject to rulemaking were developed for comparison purposes. The report is part of the process by which EPA is considering what management standards may be appropriate for the recycling of used oil, in response to the requirements mandated by these Acts. The study has attempted to characterize and profile the Oil Reclaimer/Re-Refining Industry. The goals of this preliminary effort were to: conduct a literature review, perform an industry profile, site visit re-refiners, screen sample re-refiners, and develop a Preliminary Data Summary.

Troy, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Scenic Rivers Energy Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scenic Rivers Energy Coop Scenic Rivers Energy Coop Place Wisconsin Utility Id 16740 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power Commercial Commercial Power with Water Heater Load Control Commercial Controlled Electric Loads- Controlled Electric Residential Controlled Electric Loads- Off-Peak Storage Residential Large Power Industrial Large Power with Water Heater Load Control Industrial Multiple Site Single Phase Rate Residential Peak Alert Commercial Residential and Small Commercial Service Residential

394

South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

395

Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of

396

Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Niobrara Council This act establishes the Niobrara Council, to assist in all aspects of the

397

MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In stream River Hydrokinetics In stream River Hydrokinetics < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description New Energy Corporation EnCurrent vertical axis turbine mounted on pontoon barge Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10:01.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/In_stream_River_Hydrokinetics&oldid=680959" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

398

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: rebate amounts cannot exceed 50% of the total project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Clothes Washers: $50 Gas, Oil or Propane Clothes Washers: $20 Refrigerators/Freezers: $15 Duct Sealing: $400 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,000 Air-source Heat Pumps: $700 - $1,100

399

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Shared Savings Program: $2,500 - $50,000 Energy Improvement Incentive: Varies, Contact WPPI RFP for Energy Efficiency: Varies, Contact WPPI Efficient Lighting Program: Will match Focus on Energy incentive to $5,000

400

Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources

402

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place Hudson, South Dakota Zip 57034 Product Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

403

Effects of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1979-1985 Final Research Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. Studies concerning operation of the dam on the Flathead River aquatic biota began in 1979 and continued to 1982 under Bureau of Reclamation funding. These studies resulted in flow recommendations for the aquatic biota in the main stem Flathead River, below the influence of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork. Studies concerned specifically with kokanee salmon have continued under Bonneville Power Administration funding since 1982. This completion report covers the entire study period (September 1979 to June 1985). Major results of this study were: (1) development and refinement of methods to assess hydropower impacts on spawning and incubation success of kokanee; (2) development of a model to predict kokanee year class strength from Flathead River flows; and (3) implementation of flows favorable for successful kokanee reproduction. A monitoring program has been developed which will assess the recovery of the kokanee population as it proceeds, and to recommend management strategies to maintain management goals for the kokanee fishery in the river system.

Clancy, Patrick

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Use of Irrigation to Extend the Seeding Window for Final Reclamation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to investigate the feasibility of various techniques for reclaiming lands disturbed during site characterization at Yucca Mountain. As part of this program, two studies were conducted in 1997 to assess the effects of combinations of seeding date (date that seeds are planted) and supplemental irrigation on densities of native plant species at Yucca Mountain. Study objectives were to (1) determine whether the traditional seeding window (October-December) could be extended through combinations of seeding date and irrigation date, (2) determine which combination of seeding date and irrigation was most successful, and (3) assess the effects of irrigation versus natural precipitation on seedling establishment. In the first study, a multi-species seed mix of 16 native species was sown into plots on four dates (12/96, 2/97, 3/97, and 4/97). Irrigation treatments were control (no irrigation) or addition of 80 mm of supplemental water applied over a one month period. Plant densities were sampled in August and again in October, 1997. In the second study, Larrea tridentata and Lycium andersonii, two species that are common at Yucca Mountain, but difficult to establish from seed, were sown together into plots in January and August, 1997. Half the plots were irrigated with approximately 250 mm of water between August 18 and September 11, while the remaining plots received no irrigation (control). Plant densities were sampled in October, 1997. The August census for the multi-species mix study showed irrigated plots that were sown in February, March and April had higher plant densities and more species than plots that were not irrigated. Irrigation had no effect on plant densities on plots that were seeded in December. Plots were used again in October following 18 mm of precipitation in September. Densities of three species, Ambrosia dumosa, Hymenoclea salsola, and L. tridentata, (warm-season species) were lower on irrigated plots sown in December, February, and March, and showed no response to irrigation on plots sown in April. Therefore, early spring irrigation did not facilitate establishment of warm-season species. These results suggest that these species are dependent upon precipitation while temperatures are warm in late summer or fall. However, control plots that were seeded in December had acceptable densities of these species. A more practical approach might be to avoid irrigation costs by seeding in December and waiting for fall precipitation. The remaining species (cool-season species) showed an opposite response to supplemental water with greater densities on irrigated plots sown in February, March, and April, and no response to irrigation on plots sown in December. While these results show that irrigation can extend the seeding window for cool-season species should it be necessary, it was also apparent that if seeds are sown by late December, irrigation is not necessary to achieve acceptable plant densities.

TRW Environmental Safety

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

Dreher, G.B.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Accounting for surface-groundwater interactions and their uncertainty in river and groundwater models: A case study in the Namoi River, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface-groundwater (SW-GW) interactions constitute a critical proportion of the surface and groundwater balance especially during dry conditions. Conjunctive management of surface and groundwater requires an explicit account of the exchange flux between ... Keywords: Groundwater model, Groundwater pumping, Nonstationarity of low flows, River low flow, River model, Surface-groundwater interaction, Uncertainty analysis, eWater Source

David W. Rassam, Luk Peeters, Trevor Pickett, Ian Jolly, Linda Holz

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reining in drought : how water limits influence conservation in Massachusetts towns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It's surprising to learn that the water-rich state of Massachusetts experiences incidences of water stress, where rivers go dry for stretches of the year and where municipalities struggle to meet water demand. Water ...

Brown, Anna L. (Anna Libby)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Public works for water and power development and energy research appropriations for fiscal year 1978. Part I. Corps of Engineers: Lower Mississippi Valley Division; Missouri River Division; North Central Division; Pacific Ocean Division; South Pacific Division; Southwestern Division. Hearings before a Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Fifth Congress, H. R. 7553  

SciTech Connect

Hearings on Public Works appropriations for fiscal year 1978 were conducted. On February 21, 1977, statements were heard from representatives of the Army Corps of Engineers in support of funds requested for water resources development projects in the Lower Mississippi Valley. On that same date, representatives from the North Central Division of the Corps of Engineers spoke in behalf of their request for funds for 1978. The area covers the north central U.S., from Montana to the St. Lawrence River, and from Canada to within 50 miles of St. Louis. On February 23, 1977, statements were heard from representatives of the South Pacific Division. This area encompasses the states of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and portions of the five adjoining states. The Pacific Ocean Division representatives appeared on that same date before the Senate subcommittee. That area extends over the Pacific Ocean from Hawaii to territories of American Samoa and Guam and the Division is responsible for certain regulatory functions in the navigable waters of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. On February 24, 1977, the subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations heard representatives of the Southwestern Division covering portions of 8 states. Also on that date, representatives of the Missouri River Division (Nebraska and parts of 9 other states) presented statements concerning the operation of that system in order to justify that request for funds. (MCW)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Groundwater Sampling Activity Date 1974 - 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Collect baseline chemical data Notes Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is

410

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures,...

411

Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of waters from the raft river geothermal area and environs, Cassia County, Idaho, Box Elder county, Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

412

River Protection.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cc: cc: DOE/IG-0506 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS I N S P E C T I O N O F SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM JUNE 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 June 14, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Selected Aspects of the Office of River Protection Performance-Based Incentive Program" BACKGROUND The Office of River Protection (ORP), which reports to the Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for remediation of the radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in the State of Washington. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2000, ORP established 26 performance-based contract

413

from Savannah River National Laboratory  

Operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy near Aiken, S.C. E from Savannah River National Laboratory PAGE 2 OF 2 ...

414

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC Permission to Publish KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned (hereinafter referred to

415

The politics of water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wars have been waged over oil and gold, but it is water that now poses the greatest potential for provoking conflict among nations-and the greatest need for new guarantees of cooperation. Athough water is a renewable resource, it is also a finite one. Nearly 40 percent of the world's population depends on river systems shared by two or more countries, leading to political hot spots, most critically in the middle east. This article describes in detail the water problems in the middle east, starting with the Jordan River basin, the Golan Heights, and the coastal aquifer, partly polluted. On the Sinai Peninsula the Nile River is the water source for nine countries, and the Tigris-Euphrates, although still providing water in relative abundance, is prey to the failure of Iraq, Syria, and Turkey to reach water-sharing agreements. Discussion includes the possibilities of turning the win-lose situations into win-win situations by appropriate water management and the problem of lack of a clear legal framework for settling disputes.

Postel, S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal springs 4 Crystal Sp WD bypass reach to overflow? ? 4 dog river 3 City of TD none 3 no infoAppendix B Aquatic Supplement Contents Hood River Subbasin Tables and Figures: Table 1. Current estimated peak summer withdrawals from the Hood River Table 2. Historic lake stocking and fish introductions

417

Awareness of sustainable development: why did the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project lead to the first national controversy over sustainable development in South Korea?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a list of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness in a society was made from a literature review of the history of sustainable development, theories and practices on sustainable development, and sustainable development in anthropology. An historical review of tideland reclamation in Korea and key informant interviews about the Saemangeum Tideland Reclamation Project were conducted. It was an effort to show that the Saemangeum Project became the first national controversy over sustainable development in South Korea by applying the list of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness. This study was carried out in an attempt to seek a way of studying sustainable development from an anthropological point of view. The results of this study indicated that the majority of aspects or characteristics of sustainable development awareness had emerged in the early and middle 1990s when the Saemangeum Project became a national controversy over the environment versus development. Broadening the research area of sustainable development by focusing on a human behavior, awareness, is the main contribution of this study to the anthropological study of development. The thesis concludes with the possibility of a comparative study between countries where mud-flats are a significant natural resource to deepen understanding sustainable development.

Choi, In Huck

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

H. R. 5373: An Act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, August 3, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1993[close quotes]. The purpose of this Act is to make appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, and for other purposes. Title I presents provisions for the Department of Defense--Civil Department of the Army; Title II for the Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Title III for the Department of Energy; and Title V for General Provisions.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 4, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report addresses H.R. 4506 a bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995. The bill supplies funds for water resources development programs and related activities of the Dept. of Army, Civil Functions - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program, the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Reclamation, and for certain Department of Energy`s energy research activities. The report includes comments on various programs.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

Holderman, Charles

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Irrigation Depletions 1928-1989 : 1990 Level of Irrigation, Snake Yakima and Deschutes River Basins.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The vast amount of irrigation in relation to the available water and extensive system of reservoirs located in the Snake River Basin above Brownlee reservoir precludes this area from using methods such as Blaney-Criddle for estimating irrigation depletions. Also the hydrology, irrigation growth patterns, and water supply problems are unique and complex. Therefore regulation studies were utilized to reflect the net effect on streamflow of the changes in irrigated acreage in terms of corresponding changes in storage regulation and in the amount of water depleted and diverted from and returned to the river system. The regulation study for 1990 conditions was conducted by the Idaho Department of Water Resources. The end product of the basin simulation is 61 years of regulated flows at various points in the river system that are based on 1990 conditions. Data used by the Idaho Department of Water Resources is presented in this section and includes natural gains to the river system and diversions from the river system based on a 1990 level of development and operation criteria. Additional information can be obtained for an Idaho Department of Water Resources Open-File Report ``Stream Flows in the Snake River Basin 1989 Conditions of Use and Management`` dated June 1991. Similar considerations apply to the Yakima and Deschutes river basins.

United States. Bonneville Power Administation; A.G. Crook Company

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; White River Bull Trout Enumeration Project Summary, Progress Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first year of a three-year bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on the White River and is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. The White River has been identified as an important bull trout spawning tributary of the upper Kootenay River in southeastern British Columbia. The objective was to collect information on the returning adult spawning population to the White River through the use of a fish fence and traps, and to conduct redd surveys at the conclusion of spawning to provide an index of spawning escapement and distribution. The fence was installed on September 9th, 2003 and was operated continuously (i.e. no high-water or breaching events) until the fence was removed on October 9th, 2003. Estimation of the spawning population of White River bull trout was incomplete. This was due to a larger and more protracted out-migration than expected. As a result, the bull trout spawning population of the White River was estimated to be somewhere above 899 fish. In comparison, this represents approximately one third the population estimate of the 2003 Wigwam River bull trout spawning population. Based on redd index data, the number of bull trout per redd was over twice that of the Wigwam River or Skookumchuck Creek. This was expected as the index sites on the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek cover the majority of the spawning area. This is not true on the White River. From previous redd counts, it is known that there are approximately twice as many redds in Blackfoot Creek as there are in the index site. Additionally, given the large size of the White River watershed and in particular, the large number of tributaries, there is a high likelihood that important bull trout spawning areas remain unidentified. Both floy tag and radio-telemetry data for the White River bull trout have identified extensive life history migrations. Similar data for the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek populations illustrate there is considerable overlap and mixing among these three local populations within their over-wintering and feeding habitat. The upper Kootenay River, Lake Koocanusa and the lower Bull River provide overwintering and feeding habitat for the White River, Skookumchuck Creek and Wigwam River bull trout. Recommendations to improve escapement estimates and spawning distribution are provided. An accurate population estimate is especially important to provide baseline for any potential impacts due to wildfire and subsequent salvage logging that is currently underway immediately adjacent to and upstream of important spawning and rearing habitat in the Middlefork of the White River. Identification of important spawning habitat is important to meet management objectives for the White River.

Cope, R.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State Interagency Missouri River Authority engages in comprehensive

424

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This interim report presents the results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well vicinity. Recommendations

425

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A discussion of the geology and the wellfield development at Raft River is presented. The geothermal resource is located in a downdropped and downwarped basin bordered on east, west, and south by mountain ranges that vary in both stratigraphy and structure. It is inferred that the geothermal resource occurs where hydrothermal water rises at the intersection of and along the Narrows Zone and the Bridge Fault. Three exploration wells, two development wells, and two injection wells were drilled. The basic strategy of field development was to drill deep production wells on the faulted

426

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting An association organized for the purpose of addressing issues on a specific lake or river, a lake improvement district, or a lake conservation district

427

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

50) 50) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1950 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Agricultural Wells Notes The geothermal resource at Raft River was discovered sometime prior to 1950 when two shallow agricultural wells, the Bridge and Crank wells, encountered boiling water. References Diek, A.; White, L.; Roegiers, J.-C.; Moore, J.; McLennan, J. D. (1 January 2012) BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1950)&oldid=473844

428

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6) 6) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine productive zones in the reservoir Notes Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water 1450C reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. References Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Kinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. (1 January 1976) Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conceptual_Model_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473821

429

Snake River Basin environmental program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Snake River Basin Environmental Program was designed to evaluate existing environmental data with respect to potential geothermal development in eight Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRAs) in Idaho. State and federal agencies, public interest groups, consulting groups, and universities participated in the DOE program. Final reports for the program are intended to be utilized as reference documents and planning tools for future environmental studies. Evaluation of the data indicated that the majority of the existing data base is adequate for small-scale direct-use developments. The potential impacts of development on water quality and water supply are the primary environmental concern. Preliminary data suggest that subsidence and induced seismicity may be a problem in several of the KGRAs. Sensitive animal species and habitats have been identified in each area; development in the Castle Creek KGRA may be restricted due to the Birds of Prey Natural Area. Two workshops provided public input on concerns and land use planning for geothermal development in Idaho. Based on the data evaluation and public input, a plan for supplementing the existing environmental data base was prepared.

Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

KBSLUA: A knowledge-based system applied in river land use assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of river land use is an important, but complex and time-consuming task that has to deal with a huge amount of data, domain regulations, legal aspects, and expert knowledge in terms of environmental protection, ecology, and water resource ... Keywords: Geographic information system, Knowledge-based system, River land use

Tzai-Zang Lee; Chien-Hsing Wu; Hsien-Hui Wei

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Reconstructed streamflow for Citarum River, Java, Indonesia: linkages to tropical climate dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconstructed streamflow for Citarum River, Java, Indonesia: linkages to tropical climate dynamics Abstract The Citarum river basin of western Java, Indonesia, which supplies water to 10 million residents in drought and flood prone regions of the globe (e.g. Boer 2007). In Indonesia, integrated action is needed

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

432

Variability and Predictability of Central Asia River Flows: Antecedent Winter Precipitation and Large-Scale Teleconnections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warm season river flows in central Asia, which play an important role in local water resources and agriculture, are shown to be closely related to the regional-scale climate variability of the preceding cold season. The peak river flows occur in ...

Mathew A. Barlow; Michael K. Tippett

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Understanding Controls on Historical River Discharge in the Worlds Largest Drainage Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term (20 yr) river discharge records from 30 of the worlds largest river basins have been used to characterize surface hydrologic flows in relation to net precipitation inputs, ocean climate teleconnections, and human land/water use ...

Christopher Potter; Pusheng Zhang; Steven Klooster; Vanessa Genovese; Shashi Shekhar; Vipin Kumar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hydrologic Sensitivities of Colorado River Runoff to Changes in Precipitation and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado River is the primary water source for much of the rapidly growing southwestern United States. Recent studies have projected reductions in Colorado River flows from less than 10% to almost 50% by midcentury because of climate changea ...

Julie A. Vano; Tapash Das; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Geology of Kuparuk River Oil Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Kuparuk River Oil Field is located on the Alaskan Arctic North Slope in the Colville-Prudhoe Trough ca. 25 miles west of the Prudhoe Bay Field. The 23 API crude is similar in type to that in the Prudhoe Bay Field. However, the Kuparuk Reservoir is in early Cretaceous clastics of the Kuparuk River Formation, stratigraphically higher than at Prudhoe. The origin of the oil is believed to be predominantly from the Jurassic Kingak formation with migration occurring along the basal Cretaceous unconformity. The dominant trapping mechanism is stratigraphic pinch-out and truncation of the reservoir at an intraformational unconformity along the southern and western flanks of a southeast plunging antiform. Structural dip closure exists along the northern and eastern flanks with a tilted oil-water contact at ca. 6675 ft subsea. The reservoir sandstones occur within cleaning and coarsening-upward sequences which are interpreted as shallow-marine and sublittoral in origin.

Hardwick, P.; Carman, G.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 16, 2011 May 16, 2011 CX-006405: Categorical Exclusion Determination 707-C Storm Drain Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/16/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office May 13, 2011 CX-006406: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silver Chloride Injection at the F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Barrier Wall CX(s) Applied: B6.9 Date: 05/13/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office May 12, 2011 CX-006407: Categorical Exclusion Determination Removal of Inactive Chromate Water Isolation Valves CRW-V-170 and CRW-V-175 and Installation of 3 Inch Blind Flanges for F-area New Hill CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/12/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina

437

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Use of electrodialysis for concentrating simulated (Model) drainage collector waters  

SciTech Connect

The volume of mineralized drainage collector waters (DCW) increased as the result of development of soil reclamation. For example, this volume is 0.3 km/sup 3//yr in the Ashkhabad province alone, and the total for the Turkmen SSR is 5 km/sup 3//hr. The degree of mineralization of DCW varies from 2 to 33 g/liter. About 50% of the mineralization of DCW is made up of hardness salts. Desalination of mineralized DCW and their return the water-supply system would decrease consumption of fresh water and diminish salination of existing water sources. The purpose of this work was to examine the possibility of obtaining highly concentrated brines during desalination of simulated DCW without preliminary softening with the use of MK-100M cation-exchange membrane obtained by chemical modification of homogeneous MK-100 cation-exchange membrane with the ethylenediamine.

Grebenyuk, V.D.; Veisov, B.K.; Chebotareva, R.D.; Braude, K.P.; Nefedova, G.Z.

1986-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature of w a t e r Produced water = 360F (182OC) I nt o l i f t i n g t h e produced water a g a i n s t g r a ve i n j e c t e d o r produced water moves. Moreover, even i

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Property:Project Nearest Body of Water | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nearest Body of Water Nearest Body of Water Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Nearest Body of Water Property Type String Pages using the property "Project Nearest Body of Water" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + North Atlantic Ocean + MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Galway Bay site close to Spiddal + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + government Pilot Zone + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + East River + MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + Ingram Thorofare + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + Maurice River +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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441

Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermometer temperatures of shallow samples suggest significant re-equilibration at temperatures below those found in the deep wells. Silica geothermometer temperatures of water samples from the deep wells are in reasonable agreement with measured temperatures, whereas Na-K-Ca temperatures are significantly higher than measured temperatures. The chemical characteristics of the water, as indicated by chloride concentration, are extremely variable in shallow and deep samples. Chloride concentrations of the deep samples range from 580 to 2200 mg/kg.

442

White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pump: 10 tons for Residential, 50 tons for Commercial Dual Fuel Heat Pump: 10 tons for Residential, 50 tons for Commercial Air Source Heat Pump: 10 tons Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Sector Only: Refrigerator: $75 Electric Water Heater: $50 Room AC: $50 Both Commercial and Residential: Ground Source Heat Pump (New Installation): $750/ton Ground Source Heat Pump (Replacement) : $150/ton

443

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan: $25 Clothes Washer: $50 Decorative Light String: $3.50/string (6 string limit) Dehumidifier: $10 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator: $50 Room A/C: $15 Central A/C: $100 Furnace with ECM: $150 Air Handler with ECM: $150 Air-Source Heat Pump: $200 - $350 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton Heat Pump Water Heater - $300

444

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial hot water. Volume 1. Final design report. [For American Linen Supply laundry in El Centro, California  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a solar system for integration into the process hot water and steam services for the laundry facility, American Linen Sypply, located in El Centro, California is presented. A tracking parabolic collector array and thermal storage tanks will be used. Process analysis, instrumentation for control and data analysis, construction, maintenance and safety, energy reduction analysis, and economic analysis are described. A waste heat reclamation system is included in the design. (WHK)

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hydroclimatic Trends in the Mississippi River Basin from 1948 to 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends of the surface water and energy budget components in the Mississippi River basin from 1948 to 2004 are investigated using a combination of hydrometeorological observations and observation-constrained simulations of the land surface ...

Taotao Qian; Aiguo Dai; Kevin E. Trenberth

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Evaluation of Membrane Processes for Reducing Total Dissolved Solids Discharged to the Truckee River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-surrogate technologies-- devices that infer properties of river sediments using partially or wholly automated methods tradeoffs and manage risks to Begonia bulbs are produced using reclaimed water. EdwinRemsberg,CSREES #12

448

Climate and Salmon Restoration in the Columbia River Basin: The Role and Usability of Seasonal Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest is dependent on the vast and complex Columbia River system for power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, municipal and industrial water supplies, and fish and wildlife habitat. In recent years ...

Roger S. Pulwarty; Kelly T. Redmond

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449