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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as...

2

Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Scientists at Argonne and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District hope to map the Chicago River microbe population and how it changes during daily events like storms as well as larger events, such as the MWRD beginning to disinfect its discharge. Click to enlarge. Boats pass under the LaSalle St. Bridge in downtown Chicago. Scientists at Argonne are partnering with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to catalogue the microbe population of the Chicago River. Click to enlarge.

3

North City Water Reclamation Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of Water Supply Future Reliability UncertainFuture Reliability Uncertain Self Sustaining the City of San Courses Agricultural Irrigation #12;Economic & Environmental Benefits Self Sustaining Facility On

Prevedouros, Panos D.

4

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fort Carson has built a successful and Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

5

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

6

Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Southside Water Reclamation Plant Biomass Facility Facility Southside Water Reclamation Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Bernalillo County, New Mexico Coordinates 35.0177854°, -106.6291304° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0177854,"lon":-106.6291304,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Introduction The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 Introduction The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the New Mexico Water Resources concerning inland, small-scale, low-cost rural brackish desalination water projects using renewable energy such as solar, wind, geothermal, and waste heat sources. The conference brought together about 150 participants

Johnson, Eric E.

8

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Economic feasibility analysis of water-harvesting techniques for mined-land reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A water harvesting, agricultural production system, field tested as a means of reclaiming strip-mined land is described. Though the technical feasibility of the system is becoming increasingly apparent, economic feasibility and legal issues may determine its potential application. The purpose of this study is to explore the economic feasibility of the system and to provide information for use in assessing whether further investigation of water harvesting reclamation techniques is warranted. The economic feasibility of the PNL reclamation system hinges on whether its net benefits exceed those of conventional reclamation. This preliminary feasibility study assesses the net private benefits of each system using data for the Peabody Coal Company's Kayenta mine on the Black Mesa in Arizona. To compare the alternative reclamation systems, the present value of direct net benefits (income minus production and reclamation costs) is calculated for grazing (conventional reclamation) or for cropping (PNL reclamation). Three of the PNL system slope treatments have lower estimated total costs than conventional reclamation. The difference is $3895/acre for compacted slope, $3025/acre for salt-compacted slope and $2310/acre for crop-on-slope. These differences constitute a substantial cost advantage for the system on the basis of the present value of land reclamation and maintenance costs. The system also has advantages based on the estimated value of agricultural production capacity. Even the lowest yield levels considered for alfalfa, corn, and pinto beans had higher net present values than grazing.

Nieves, L.A.; Marti, M.H.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Reclamation of abandoned coal refuse piles and underground adit entries in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews reclamation activities conducting during 1984-85 in the Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Under this integrated reclamation project, four sites comprising 14 acres of highly acidic abandoned coal refuse were treated and 43 abandoned adit underground mine entries were closed. The techniques used were cost-effective and could be applied in reclaiming other coal minesites in Appalachia. 9 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Muncy, J.A.; Buckner, E.R.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reclamation Rural Water Act 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Desalination and Renewable Energy 71 Reclamation Rural Water Act: Southwestern Navajo Rural Water Supply researching new techniques for using renewable energy for desalination in an off grid setting. Kevin Black SrReclamation Rural Water Act 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking

Johnson, Eric E.

12

Plutonium discharges to the sanitary sewer: Health impacts at the Livermore Water Reclamation Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the largest discharger of sewage treated by the Livermore Water Reclamation (LWRP), contributing approximately 7% by volume of the LWRP influent LILNL operations, as potential sources both of industrial pollutants and radioactivity, are therefore of particular concern to the LWRP. For this reason, LLNL has maintained vigorous wastewater discharge control and monitoring programs. In particular, the monitoring program has demonstrated that, except in a few rare instances, the concentration of contaminants in LLNL effluent have always remained below the appropriate regulatory standards. The exceptions have generally been due to inadvertent discharges of metals-bearing solutions produced by metal plating or cleaning operations.

Balke, B.K.

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

13

Wastewater reclamation and reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal wastewater reclamation and reuse has been practiced for ... are emphasized with several examples of successful water recycling on a worldwide basis given. The discussion ... This is to be distinguishedf...

R. D. Heaton

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

(sanitary) landfill reclamation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(sanitary) landfill reclamation, reclamation of (sanitary) landfills [For industrial and commercial development] ? Deponielandgewinnung f, Kippenlandgewinnung

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Think water : reconditioning the Malden River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Reduced pressure and temperature reclamation of water using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for potential space flight application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEM FOR POTENTIAL SPACE FLIGHT APPLICATION A Thesis by HASAN IMTIAZ CHOWDHURY Approved as to style and content by: G. P. Peterson (Chair of Committee) T. D. Rogers (Member) R. D. pence (Member) W. Bradley (Head of Department) December... 1989 ABSTRACT Reduced Pressure and Temperature Reclamation of Water Using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for Potential Space Flight Application. (December 1989) Hasan Imtiaz Chowdhury, B. S. , Prairie View AlkM University Chair...

Chowdhury, Hasan Imtiaz

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reclamation Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reclamation Act (Nebraska) Reclamation Act (Nebraska) Reclamation Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources This section establishes Reclamation Districts to conserve, develop, and stabilize supplies of water for domestic, irrigation, power, manufacturing and other beneficial uses. Reclamation Districts are established by

18

Marketing the Colorado River: water allocations in the American Southwest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Colorado River is the lifeline of the American ... market in the west is one current way western states seek to reallocate water and address ... unclear what the long-term affects of marketing Colorado River ...

April R. Summitt

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

20

Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reclamation of Cleaning Water Using Ultrafiltration and Double Pass Reverse Osmosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Because of the commitment to minimize process generated wastes, an integrated ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) system was installed to reclaim the cleaning water at the PPG Industries, Inc. (PPG) Cleveland, Ohio plant. The recovered water... 590 590 590 600 595 600 590 INLET TORO PSIG 550 590 590 590 600 595 600 590 PSIG 540 580 580 580 595 590 590 585 INTO RO-CIP INTO UF-CIP Temperature Conductivity GPM GPM 2.0 8.5 2.0 6.0 2.0 6.0 1.0 6.0 1.8 5.5 1.9 5...

Neuman, T.; Long, G.; Tinter, M.

22

EIS-0268: Shutdown of River Water System at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to shut down the Savannah R]ver Site River Water System in order to save money; that is, to prevent further expenditure of the...

23

South River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

South River Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is providing rebates to encourage their customers to install solar water heating systems. To be eligible for the rebate solar collectors must have...

24

Lumbee River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lumbee River EMC is offering $850 rebates to residential customers who install solar water heaters on their homes. To qualify, the systems must be certified OG-300 by the Solar Ratings and...

25

Lumbee River EMC- Solar Water Heating Loan Program (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lumbee River EMC is offering 1.50% loans to residential customers for the installation of solar water heaters on their homes. To qualify, the systems must be certified OG-300 by the Solar Ratings...

26

Water resource management planning guide for Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Resource Management Planning Guide provides an outline for the development of a Savannah River Plant Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP) to protect, manage, and monitor the site's water resources. The management plan is based on three principle elements: (1) protection of the water quality, (2) management of the water quantity, and (3) monitoring of the water quality and quantity. The plan will assure that changes in water quality and quantity are identified and that corrective action is implemented as needed. In addition, water management activities within and between Savannah River Plant (SRP) organizations and departments will be coordinated to ensure the proper management of water resources. This document is intended as a guide to suggest goals and objectives that will provide a basis for the development of a water resource plan for SRP. Planning should be flexible rather than rigid, and the plan outlines in this document was prepared to be modified or updated as conditions necessitate. 16 refs., 12 figs.

Hubbard, J.E.; Stephenson, D.E.; Steele, J.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.); Gordon, D.E. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant)

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Design and Operation of Fan-Coil Units in Using River Water as Chilled Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the case research for China's first central air conditioning system utilizing natural cool river water as chilled water, this paper analyzes the technical design-and-innovation process and operating characteristics of Fan-Coil Units (FCUs...

Jiang, A.; Chen, H.; Ma, W.; Zhu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective management of the highly variable water resources of a river basin requires an understanding of the amount of suitable quality water that can be provided under various conditions within institutional constraints. Although much research has...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

29

Metals removal during estuarine mixing of Arvand River water with the Persian Gulf water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, the removal of dissolved and colloidal Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Zn in Arvand River water during estuarine mixing with the Persian Gulf water is investigated. The flocculation process was...

Abdolreza Karbassi; Gholam Reza Nabi Bidhendi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental and economic impacts associated with water managementfor environmental, water resources, and economic managementRiver basin water management, by establishing environmental

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Beijing Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Haohua Rivers International Water Engineering Consulting Co.Ltd. Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100053 Product String representation "Beijing Haohua ... ulting Co. Ltd." is too long. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

33

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic ecosystem sustainability?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emerging contaminants in wastewater and river water: Risks for human water security and aquatic and Environmental Science (BRGM), Orléans, France ; 2 National Research Institute for Rural Engineering, Water systems. Since degradation rates in conventional sewage treatment plants (STP) are rather low, ECs enter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

Final Independent External Peer Review Report Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impact Statement EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Project Background and Purpose The Sacramento River Deep WaterFinal Independent External Peer Review Report Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, California Peer Review Report of the Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, California Limited Reevaluation

US Army Corps of Engineers

35

(DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05): Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, 10/17/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 17, 2002 October 17, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05 memorandum Mark A. Jones Program Analyst - PGF-6 TO : Proposed Action: Boise River Diversion Dam - Amendment to Capital Investment Sub-Agreement, Contract Number DE-MS79-94BP94618 Proposed By: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) Location: Near Boise, in Ada County, Idaho Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund Reclamation's rehabilitation of the powerplant at the existing Boise River Diversion Dam (Diversion Dam) to use the water resource at Diversion Dam for electrical power production. Analysis: The Diversion Dam is located about 7 miles southeast of Boise, Idaho on the Boise River, about

36

River Forecast Application for Water Management: Oil and Water?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Managing water resources generally and managing reservoir operations specifically have been touted as opportunities for applying forecasts to improve decision making. Previous studies have shown that the application of forecasts into water ...

Kevin Werner; Kristen Averyt; Gigi Owen

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Land Reclamation Act (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to balance surface mining interests with the conservation of natural resources and land preservation. This Act authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the...

38

Reactivity of Charcoal-Derived Water Soluble Biomarkers in River Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combusted at 250C. The DOM was incubated with aliquots of filtered water collected from the Trinity River, (TX) for 37 days. We found that the reactivity of levoglucosan was similar to that of freely dissolved lignin-derived phenols in natural water...

Norwood, Matthew 1985-

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrodynamic and water quality river basin modeling using CE-QUAL-W2 version 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional (longitudinal-vertical) water quality and hydrodynamic computer simulation model that was originally developed of the Lower Snake River in the Northwestern USA; the Bull Run River basin composed of 3 water supply and computes water levels, horizontal and vertical velocities, temperature, and 21 other water quality

Wells, Scott A.

40

Water geochemistry of hydrothermal systems, Wood River District, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems of the Wood River District, central Idaho, have been studied by geologic mapping of thermal spring areas and geochemical investigations of thermal and non-thermal waters. This report summarizes the new geochemical data gathered during the study. Integration of the results of geological and geochemical studies has led to development of a target model for hydrothermal resources on the margin of the Idaho Batholith. Warfield Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 58/sup 0/C, flow from a major shear zone along the margin of an apophysis of the batholith. Hailey Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C, occur in an area of multiple thrust faults and newly recognized, closely spaced normal faults in the Paleozoic Milligen and Wood River Formations, 2.5 km from a highly brecciated batholith contact. Other Wood River district hydrothermal systems also occur along the margins of batholith apophyses or in adjacent highly fractured Paleozoic rocks, where there are indications of batholith rocks at shallow depths (100 to 300 m) in water wells.

Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.; Blackett, R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Reclamation Division of the Public Service Commission is tasked with administering the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation. Specific regulations can be found in article 69-05.2 of...

42

Two Rivers Water & Light | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water & Light Water & Light Jump to: navigation, search Name Two Rivers Water & Light Place Wisconsin Utility Id 19324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Business District Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting Business District Lighting- 200W HPS Lighting General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day- 7am-7pm Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day- 8am-8pm Commercial

43

A tale of two rivers: Pathways for improving water management in the Jordan and Colorado River basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper considers two river systems that have been subject to significant development during the last 60 years: the Jordan River in the Middle East and the Colorado River in the western United States. Both play major roles in serving the demands of growing populations, and climate change models predict both semi-arid to arid regions to become hotter and/or drier in the future. The Jordan River basin, shared by five nations, is already experiencing a critical level of environmental damage. Its lower stretch is practically a sewage canal with less than 10% of its natural base-flow. Due to its unique historical, religious and environmental role, restoration efforts have gained momentum and wide public support. In the Colorado River Basin, water law is characterized by the Law of the River and water use is managed through regional allocation constraints. The Colorado River, shared by seven U.S. states and Mexico, is highly managed and over-allocated. Shortage declarations have serious implications for low priority users, with the Central Arizona Project being among the lowest. This makes large population centers and agricultural users vulnerable to curtailment of deliveries. We argue that there are common factors with respect to the policy and management options of these two basins that may provide insights into the similarities and divergences of their respective future pathways. These factors are: regional water supply and demand pressures, water governance, transboundary issues and demand for environmental flows. With a particular focus on the Israel and Arizona portions of these respective river basins, we address synergies and tradeoffs between groundwater and surface water usage, sectoral allocation strategies, public vs. private water ownership and legality, transboundary sharing, technical options for addressing growing regional water scarcity, and economic considerations. Difficult and bold decisions are required in both regions.

Assaf Chen; Adam Abramson; Nir Becker; Sharon B. Megdal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Coagulationultrafiltration system for river water treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The in-line coagulationultrafiltration hybrid process has been investigated using three different coagulants, viz. FeCl3, Fe2(SO4)3 and Al2(SO4)3. The coagulants were dosed in the amounts of 2.4 mg Fe/dm3, 2.8 mg Fe/dm3 and 2.9 mg Al/dm3, respectively. Surface water from the Czarna Przemsza river (Silesia region, Poland) was used as raw water. The ultrafiltration membrane module with capillary polyethersulphone membranes was applied. It has been shown that the application of coagulant in-line contributes to the improvement of the quality of water as a result of growth of the removal of organic matter. It has also been statistically proven that the proper choice of the coagulant is of significant importance for the degree of removal of organic matter from the water. The highest efficiency of the process was achieved when the aluminum coagulant was used. Furthermore, it has been shown that the application of in-line coagulation and ultrafiltration with the most proper coagulant restricts the fouling of the membranes, so that contaminations deposited on the membrane can easily be removed using deionized water.

Krystyna Konieczny; Dorota S?kol; Joanna P?onka; Mariola Rajca; Micha? Bodzek

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling By SARAH and perhaps reduce some water management conflicts. Additional research for managing environmental water use manage water supplies and demands to increase water use efficiency through conservation, water markets

Lund, Jay R.

46

Application of the Colorado River Simulation System Model to Evaluate Water Shortage Conditions in the Central Arizona Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Colorado River system water management and reservoir operations ... following categories: water allocations, water deliveries, flood control, reservoir operating requirements and criteria,...

Jess R. Gastlum; Chuck Cullom

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Surface mine reclamation for wildlife: a model reclamation plan for southern Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reclamation plan for use on surface coal mines in southern Appalachia is presented. Included are suggestions relative to the establishment of groundcover and trees on the mine site. Also included are suggestions relative to the retention of surface water on mine sites. All techniques mentioned in the plan benefit wildlife and will assist the operator in achieving bond release. This plan has been implemented cooperatively by TVA and the FWS on a mine site in Campbell County, Tennessee. The costs of reclaiming a coal surface mine in Campbell County, Tennessee to benefit wildlife are described. The reclamation plan implemented on the mine site was designed for forestry and wildlife.

Fowler, D.K.; Turner, L.J.; Slaski, L.J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Water quality modelling for recreational use in the Kallang River Basin, Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singapore's Active, Beautiful, and Clean Waters Programme (ABC) aims to provide functional use of its water bodies to the public. The Kallang River Basin, being part of the ABC Programme, will be used for recreational ...

Angeles, Justin Victor V. (Justin Victor Velayo)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Surface mine reclamation for wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a reclamation plan for use on surface coal mines in southern Appalachia. The plan has been implemented cooperatively by TVA and the FWS on a mine site in Campbell County, Tennessee. Included are suggestions for establishing groundcover and trees on the mine site, and for retaining surface water on mine sites. All techniques discussed are to benefit wildlife and to assist the operator in achieving bond release. Also included is a section on the costs of reclaiming the Campbell County study site to benefit forestry and wildlife. The costs of this project are compared to the costs of reclaiming a more traditional forestry (monoculture) option. The comparison showed the techniques at the study site to be less costly than those that would be associated with a forestry option. 11 references, 14 figures, 2 tables.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Fossil-fuel Combustion By-products. Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...

51

Habitat restoration and sediment transport in rivers Streams and rivers or any bodies of flowing water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and deposition, streams and rivers transport and transform itself or was not considered important or scarce enough to conserve. Now the river region is increasingly heterogeneity of the river has reduced its ability to sustain a diverse ecology. Salmonids need pool and riffle

Barthelat, Francois

52

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

54

Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins Cretaceous aquifer systems in the Williston and Powder River structural basins is currently being assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The Williston basin is located in parts of North Dakota, South Dakota

Torgersen, Christian

55

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells

56

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

57

Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water conservation is a critical issue in Texas today. This publication explores the relationship between ecosystem health and land stewardship in the Trinity River Basin. It also describes how responsible land stewardship can be applied in urban...

Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

Recreational water quality analyses of the Colorado River corridor in Grand Canyon.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Article Recreational water quality analyses of the Colorado River...J. F. Nix. 1977. Water quality loadings during thirteen storms...American Society Agricultural Engineers Meeting, paper no. 77-2529...watershed on bacteri- al water quality. J. Environ. Qual. 3...

B Tunnicliff; S K Brickler

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Coastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largestCoastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary G. Curtis Roegner1 States of America Abstract Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water

60

Miscellaneous reclamation legislation. Part 4. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Water and Power of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on S. 1884, S. 1981, and S. 2643, September 20, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 4 of the hearing record covers the first session of hearings on S. 1884, S. 1981, and S. 2643, which affect reclamation projects at Elephant Butte Irrigation District, projects covered by the Small Reclamation Projects Act of 1956, the San Luis Unit of the Central Valley Project in California, and other purposes. The text of each bill is inserted in the record along with the testimony of 13 witnesses representing water agencies, environmental groups, and the Department of Interior's Bureau of Reclamation. Senators from several affected states also made statements. At issue was the need to authorize additional funds for the projects because repayment funds are not credited to the program, making it necessary to raise the authorization ceiling. Witnesses noted the merits of the small projects program in promoting conservation by securing funding on the open market and encouraging local initiative. Critics objected to the piecemeal effect of this approach.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on...

62

Distributions of selenium, iodine, lead, thorium and uranium in Japanese river waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-lived radionuclides released from nuclear facilities, such as deep underground disposal facilities, could reach humans through several transfer paths in the environment. Uses of ground water and river water for agricultural field irrigation and for drinking water are important paths. In order to understand behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial water environment, we carried out a natural analogue study, that is, measurement of selenium (Se), iodine (I), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and uranium (U) concentrations in 45 Japanese rivers at 10 sampling points from the upper stream to the river mouth for each river. Geometric mean concentrations for Se, I, Pb, Th and U were 0.057, 1.4, 0.039, 0.0055, 0.0109 ng/mL, respectively. Distribution patterns from upper stream to river mouth were different by elements, for instance, the concentrations of I, Th and U increased when the sampling points were nearer the river mouth, while that of Se were almost constant. For Pb, the highest value was observed in the middle part of each river in many cases. (authors)

Tagami, K.; Uchida, S. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Community Perceptions and Priorities for Managing Water and Environmental Resources in the River Njoro Watershed in Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Community Perceptions and Priorities for Managing Water and Environmental Resources in the River-5 years, to demonstrate improved and integrated management of water and environmental resources poverty and enhancing livelihoods are important goals for water and environmental resources management

Richner, Heinz

64

Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia A. Sorg adaptation measures will be needed to cope with changing water resources. In view of the geo, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan make up an area that is larger in size than India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh

Stoffel, Markus

65

NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the past week which should decrease irrigation water demand from the Western Slope. Areas of SW Colorado of moisture moving over western Colorado on Tuesday will spark off widely scattered showers in the highNIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project

66

Assessing Water Deprivation at the Sub-river Basin Scale in LCA Integrating Downstream Cascade Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing Water Deprivation at the Sub-river Basin Scale in LCA Integrating Downstream Cascade Effects ... Although these indicators represent a great step forward in the assessment of water-use-related impacts in LCA, significant challenges still remain in improving their accuracy and relevance. ...

Philippe Loubet; Philippe Roux; Montserrat Nez; Gilles Belaud; Vronique Bellon-Maurel

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring.

Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Planning and Management-ASCE, 129(3), 155-164. EnvironmentalEnvironmental valuation and its economic critics." Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management-water management regarding water markets, facility expansion, dam removal, conjunctive use, economic costs of environmental

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Water Supply Analysis for Restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mexico. Potential water sources include reductions in local agricultural and urban water use through and urban water uses were estimated by two ancillary models. The results provide insights into economically promising water supplies for restoration activities. Quantifying the trade-off between agricultural

Pasternack, Gregory B.

70

Analysis of potential impacts to resident fish from Columbia River System Operation alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The US Army Corps of Engineers, the US Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bonneville Power Administration initiated the Columbia River System Operation Review...

David R. Geist; Lance W. Vail; Daniel J. Epstein

71

Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

Torgersen, Christian

74

YSI Blue-Green Algae (BGA) Sensors Spatial Water Quality Mapping of the Potomac River Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

YSI Blue-Green Algae (BGA) Sensors Spatial Water Quality Mapping of the Potomac River Estuary Visit integrated Yellow Spring Instruments (YSI) blue- green algae (BGA) sensors into our system to evaluate of Microcystis aeruginosa. We compared interpolated results of traditional chlorophyll sensors with the BGA data

Boynton, Walter R.

75

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected by Hydropower Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Hydropower Production Total Dissolved Gas Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation often occurs during periods of high runoff and spill at hydropower projects and can be harmful to fish. Supersaturation occurs of hydropower projects on Columbia River water temperature has been to delay the time when thermal maximums

76

EIS-0121: Alternative Cooling Water Systems, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of cooling water systems for thermal discharges from K and C-Reactors and from a coal-fired powerhouse in the D-Area at the Savannah River Plant (SRP)

77

CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3: Hydrodynamic and Water Quality River Basin Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional (longitudinal-vertical) water quality and hy- drodynamic computer simulation model that was originally developed segments. Test cases for this new code include a 244 km section of the Lower Snake River in Idaho and ver- tical velocities, temperature, and 21 other wa- ter quality parameters (such as dissolved oxy

Wells, Scott A.

78

Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy [PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Wenatchee, WA

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Extending and Condensing the Brazos River Basin Water Availability Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Texas. This report documents an investigation that consisted of developing, testing, and applying procedures for (1) extending WAM hydrology datasets to cover a longer period-of-analysis and (2) condensing WAM water right datasets to focus on a...

Wurbs, Ralph; Kim, T.

80

Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

82

Bureau of Reclamation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reclamation Reclamation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Bureau of Reclamation Name Bureau of Reclamation Short Name BOR Address 1849 C Street Place Washington, DC References Reclamation Offices - Addresses and Contacts Name Bureau of Reclamation Address 1849 C Street NW Place Washington, DC Zip 20240-0001 Coordinates 38.8936749°, -77.0425236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8936749,"lon":-77.0425236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Reclamation of waste polystyrene by sulfonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste polystyrene containing additives was converted into a polymeric flocculant by a chemical modification. Specifically, waste polystyrene and waste high-impact polystyrene (HI-PS) containing rubber components or a coloring agent were sulfonated to produce a water-soluble polymer whose molecular weight ranged from 400,000 to 700,000. The polymer provides superior purification of the supernatant after flocculating a kaolin suspension than a conventional polymeric flocculant such as a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (hereafter abbreviate PAA). Moreover, using the polymer and a PAA together provides a higher sedimentation rate and a purer supernatant in the treatment of actual wastewater than using each one separately. A new reclamation technology to convert waste plastic into a functional polymer is reported.

Inagaki, Yasuhito; Kuromiya, Miyuki; Noguchi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Haruo [Sony Corp. Research Center, Yokohama (Japan). Center for Environmental Technology] [Sony Corp. Research Center, Yokohama (Japan). Center for Environmental Technology

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Changes in the water surface profile of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, between 1923 and 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mouths and deposit large boulders into the river [Cooley et al., 1977; Webb et al., 1989; Melis et al fans or boulder bars even further downstream. When viewed in profile, the water surface is stepped, of that material by main stem Colorado River floods [Kieffer, 1985; Webb et al., 1999a]. Reworking consists of both

85

Reclamation of Waste Polystyrene by Sulfonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reclamation of Waste Polystyrene by Sulfonation ... The carbon-black content in HI-PS was calculated by measuring the residue after burning the HI-PS. ...

Yasuhito Inagaki; Miyuki Kuromiya; Tsutomu Noguchi; Haruo Watanabe

1999-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

Virginia Coal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation implements the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act and establishes a statewide regulatory program for reclamation following coal surface mining activities. The...

87

Cs-137 in the Savannah River and the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water-treatment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium-137 concentration measurements made in 1965 are reported for the Savannah River above and below the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants down river. These concentrations, measured when four SRP reactors (C, K, L, and P) were operating, were used to estimate Cs-137 reduction ratios for transport in the Savannah River and across each water treatment plant. In 1965 there was a 48% reduction in the Cs-137 concentration in the Savannah River between Highway 301 and the water treatment plant inlet points. Measured Cs-137 values in the finished water from Port Wentworth and the Beaufort-Jasper water treatment plants showed an 80% and 98% reduction in concentration level, respectively, when compared to Cs-137 concentration at Highway 301. The lower Cs-137 concentration (0.04 pCi/l) in the Beaufort-Jasper finished water is attributed to dilution in the canal from inflow of surface water (40%) and sediment cleanup processes that take place in the open portions of the canal (about 17 to 18 miles). Using the 1965 data, maximum Cs-137 concentrations expected in finished water in the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants following L-Reactor startup were recalculated. The recalculated values are 0.01 and 0.09 pCi/l for Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth, respectively, compared to the 1.05 pCi/l value in the Environmental Assessment.

Hayes, D.W.; Boni, A.L.

1983-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Study on Performance Verification and Evaluation of District Heating and Cooling System Using Thermal Energy of River Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 16, 2014 NIKKEN SEKKEI Research Institute Naoki Takahashi Study on Performance Verification and Evaluation of District Heating and Cooling System Using Thermal Energy of River Water ESL-IC-14-09-19 Proceedings of the 14th International... of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 District heating and cooling system in Nakanoshima 4 Characteristics of heat supply plant in Nakanoshima district -River water is utilized as heat...

Takahashi,N.; Niwa, H.; Kawano,M.; Koike,K.; Koga,O.; Ichitani, K.; Mishima,N.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Environmental assessment for the domestic water supply upgrades and consolidation on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The domestic water systems on the Savannah River Site (SRS) are currently in need of upgrading to ensure compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Drinking Water Regulations. The SRS has 28 separate goundwater-based drinking water systems in use across the site. These aging systems were designed and constructed in the 1950s and are now facing increasing difficulties in meeting cur-rent regulations. Audits of the systems conducted by SCDHEC in 1986, 1988, 1991, and 1993 identified shortfalls in meeting the requirements for secondary maximum containment levels (MCLS) and SCDHEC design standards. Secondary MCLs are those items, such as odor or appearance, that do not pose a direct health impact. SRS has committed to SCDHEC to correct the drinking water discrepancies and construct two new consolidated inter-area drinking water systems. Upgrading the SRS drinking water systems would be necessary to support site activities regardless of the makeup or the mission at SRS. As such, the proposed upgrade and consolidation of SRS domestic water systems is treated as part of the ``No Action`` alternative for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Reconfiguration of the Nuclear Weapons Complex .

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Development of a GIS-based decision support tool and assessment of Nile River water quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to develop and present a GIS-based and software tool capable of data management, data visualisation, and data analysis. The developed software is proved to be a good tool in the initial assessment of the quality status of the Nile river water quality. In addition a Graphical User Interface (GUI) was fully designed and implemented to make the GIS tool very easy and handy for the decision maker. Spatial analysis and visualisation of water quality data can be easily presented through the interface. It is concluded that water quality along the main stem is much better than the quality along the two main branches, where more violations are observed.

Amgad Elmahdi; Assem Afify; Alaa Abdin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Immobilization of U(VI) from Oxic Groundwater by Hanford 300 Area Sediments and Effects of Columbia River Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impact of Water Resource Development on Coastal Erosion, Brazos River, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis of the river...

Mathewson, C. C.; Minter, L. L.

97

Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural basins are necessary for future development in these regions. To help determine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i Abstract Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural of streams, and quantify reservoir interaction in the Williston and Powder River structural basins the loss to underlying aquifers was 7790 ft3 /s. Both the Powder River and Williston basins contain gaining

Torgersen, Christian

98

Reclamation planning and operation at the Mae Moh Lignite Mine, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mae Moh Mine is a large open cut lignite mine situated in Northern Thailand. The mine produces lignite for coal fired power stations located adjacent to the mine. Current mine production is approximately 9 Mtpa providing lignite to eight power stations with a total output of 1,125 MW. The power development plan for Mae Moh provides for 19 power stations by the year 1999 which will require lignite production to be increased to 30.5 Mtpa and overburden will be mined at a rate approaching 300 Mtpa. Environmental management and reclamation planning at Mae Moh are major issues due to water quality impact and land use conflicts. This paper presents the key elements of the reclamation master plan and works strategy for progressive reclamation and water pollution control.

Miller, S.D. [Stuart D. Miller & Associates, Balmain (Australia); Teparat, C. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Mae Moh (Thailand)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project. Annual report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The successful water flood of the Green River Formation in the Monument Butte unit was analyzed in detail in the last yearly report. It was shown that primary recovery and the water flood in the unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close its bubble point. The reservoir performance of the smaller Travis unit was also analyzed. The Monument Butte unit is currently producing at around 300 barrels per day of oil. Two of the new wells drilled in the unit had zones pressurized by the water flood. The third well produced from pressurized as well as from zones which were unaffected by the water flood. The water flood response of the Travis unit is slow possibly due to problems of reservoir continuity. Plans for water flooding the Boundary unit were drawn. Core description and Formation Micro Imaging log of well 14a-28 provided insight about the important Lower Douglas Creek sandstone. It was determined that this sandstone was extensively fractured and detailed fracture characteristics were obtained through comprehensive interpretation of the FMI log. Reservoir modeling and simulation studies of all the three units were also continued. A larger, more detailed model of the Monument Butte unit was built in order to study the performance of the new development wells being drilled. Three alternate models developed to explain the performance of the Travis flood revealed that intersecting hydraulic fractures may have also provided paths for water channeling observed in this unit. The reservoir characterization activities identified new reservoirs in the Travis unit. Reservoir simulations helped design an injection program in Travis, unit expansion plans on the west and north sides of the Monument Butte until and to evaluate the infill drilling. The reservoir simulations are being used to examine the role of the aquifer underlying the oil bearing D2 sandstone in Boundary on water flood strategies and injection patterns.

Lomax, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Using Satellite Imagery to Assess Macrophyte Response to Water-level Manipulations in the Saskatchewan River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Saskatchewan River Delta, Manitoba Mark S. Baschuk & Michael D. Ervin & William R. Clark & Llwellyn M partially drawn down during a three-year period (2007­2010) in the Saskatchewan River Delta, Manitoba-based . Saskatchewan River Delta Introduction The Saskatchewan River Delta (SRD) is a large and ecolog- ically

Clark, William R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

103

Value creation in water allocation negotiations : lessons from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River and Lower Colorado River Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intense water disputes in the United States are being caused by new and conflicting demands from many quarters and changes in water availability that appear to be caused by climate change. Projections of heightened water ...

Solis, Miriam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patents, notably in water purification technologies (Foley &of water technology: water purification, reclamation andthe heart of the water purification process and the firms

Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Status of Metal Contamination in Surface Waters of the Coastal Ocean off Los Angeles, California since the Implementation of the Clean Water Act  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Status of Metal Contamination in Surface Waters of the Coastal Ocean off Los Angeles, California since the Implementation of the Clean Water Act ... (28) However, high concentrations of sewage-tracer dissolved Ag(29) (Figure 5) near the river locations might suggest that the ultimate source of these riverine metals are from upriver discharges from water reclamation plants, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems, power plants discharge, and/or storm drains. ... Pb concentrations had the largest difference between the two sampling months of all measured trace metals, potentially due to the strong association of this trace element with surface runoff, oceanic advection, and particle scavenging. ...

Emily A. Smail; Eric A. Webb; Robert P. Franks; Kenneth W. Bruland; Sergio A. Saudo-Wilhelmy

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Systematic Analysis of Priority Water Resources Problems to Develop a Comprehensive Research Program for the Southern Plains River Basins Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 61 1975 Systematic Analysis of Priority Water Resources Problems to Develop a Comprehensive Research Program for the Southern Plains River Basins Region R.E. Babcock J.W. Clark E.J. Dantin M.T. Edmison N.A. Evans...

Babcock, R. E.; Clark, J. W.; Dantin, E. J.; Edmison, M. T.; Evans, N. A.; Power, W. L.; Runkles, J. L.

110

A cost-effectiveness analysis of water security and water quality: impacts of climate and land-use change on the River Thames system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dustin Garrick, Simon Dadson and Rob Hope A cost-effectiveness analysis of water security...the river basin and used to assess the cost-effectiveness of a range of mitigation...measures can improve the situation. A cost-effectiveness study has been undertaken...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

112

Volatile Halogenated Hydrocarbons in River Water, Ground Water, Drinking Water and Swimming-Pool Water in the Federal Republic of Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With increasing shortage of ground water it becomes more and more necessary to use surface water as a resource for drinking water and swimming-pool water preparation. In the judgement of water...

M. Sonneborn; S. Gerdes; R. Schwabe

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K are also studied.

Hamzah, Zaini, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Saat, Ahmad, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Wood, Ab. Khalik, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Heavy Metal Contamination In Soil Under The Application Of Polluted Sewage Water Across Vrishabhavathi River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main aim in this study is to assess the level of heavy metals concentration in soil profile and their mobility in the presence of pH and organic carbon,where polluted water is used in agriculture. The samples of soil collected at different sites across Vrishabhavathi river valley have been analyzed for heavy metals, viz. Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Fe and Mn using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. These values assessed with respect to reference soil taken from unpolluted soil profile. The heavy metals studied at all sampling sites compared with Indian Standards and all heavy metals are below permissible limits. The concentration of all the metals is high compared to the soil sample taken from unpolluted site shows the build up of heavy metal concentration using polluted water in irrigation. The % of organic carbon varies from 1.9 to 2.9 % in top layer and 1 to 1.6 % in the subsequent layer. The pH value is higher on top layer soil and decreases in subsequent layer.

Jayadev E. T. Puttaih

116

Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

Gensheimer, Robert James, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Arkansas Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Act authorizes the state to develop, adopt, issue and amend rules and regulations pertaining to surface coal mining and reclamation operations. These regulations are consistent with, but no more restrictive that the federal regulations set forth in the Surface Mining and Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) Surface Mining and Reclamation Division (SMRD) is the authority under this act. Regulation No. 20 from the

120

Surface mining environmental monitoring and reclamation handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Surface Mining Environmental Monitoring and Reclamation Handbook has been expressly designed to meet the statutory requirements of surface coal mining and reclamation. It sets forth a range of monitoring techniques in a manner that is most likely to be of direct, practical, and cost-effective use to the widest expanse of mining-reclamation situations. A literature review identifies and evaluates those published sources of information that are most applicable to the needs of handbook users. This is supplemented by identifying other sources of pertinent information with particular attention paid to local, state, and federal agencies that can supply data required for mining and reclamation efforts. Attention is then directed toward the means whereby regulatory requirements can be satisfied. An effort has been made to identify those areas likely to present special problems. And, finally, where appropriate, modeling techniques are described and the extent of their utility delineated. Throughout, the handbook has maintained a practical focus. It attempts to provide surface coal mine operators with the tools and techniques needed to meet legal environmental and monitoring requirements without an unnecessary and costly overexpenditure of time and money. The provision of a range of alternatives to meet various obligations, the stress on using existing resources whenever possible, and the careful differentiation of means and ends are all directed toward the best ways to meet regulatory requirements.

Sendlein, L.V.A.; Yazicigil, H.; Carlson, C.L. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

www.water-alternatives.org Volume 3 | Issue 2 Gosnell, H. and Kelly, E.C. 2010. Peace on the river?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.water-alternatives.org Volume 3 | Issue 2 Gosnell, H. and Kelly, E.C. 2010. Peace on the river(2): 361-383 Gosnell and Kelly: Dam removal in the Klamath basin Page | 362 Peace on the River? Social of Geosciences, Oregon State University, USA; gosnellh@geo.oregonstate.edu Erin Clover Kelly Postdoctoral

Kurapov, Alexander

122

Toxic sulfide concentrations in the sediments and water column of the Suwannee River estuary and its influence on hard clam survival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toxic sulfide concentrations in the sediments and water column of the Suwannee River estuary that is grown to market size in estuarine sediments. Hydrogen sulfide, a natural metabolic poison known of hard clams used in field aquaculture areas in the Suwannee River estuary. Sulfide was found in sediment

Florida, University of

123

Dissolved and particulate aluminum in the Columbia River and coastal waters of Oregon and Washington: behavior in near-field and far-field plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Dissolved and particulate aluminum in the Columbia River and coastal waters of Oregon) and particulate (leachable and total) aluminum was examined in the Columbia River and estuary, in near Influence on Shelf Ecosystems (RISE) cruise of May/June 2006. Dissolved and particulate aluminum (Al

Hickey, Barbara

124

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Metal contamination of surface water, sediment and Tympanotonus fuscatus var. radula of Iko River and environmental impact due to Utapete gas flare station, Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-seasonal studies on the trace metal load of surface water, sediment and Tympanotonus fuscatus var. radula of Iko River were conducted between 2003 and 2004. The impact of anthropogenic activities especially...

Nsikak U. Benson; Usoro M. Etesin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Groundwater responses to controlled water releases in the limitrophe region of the Colorado River: Implications for management and restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Flow regulation and water diversion for irrigation have considerably affected the exchange of surface water between the Colorado River and its floodplains. However, the way in which both have impacted groundwatersurface water interactions is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to conduct a hydrologic analysis of the 20092010 winter flows released into the limitrophe region of the Colorado River in order to characterize the surface flows along this dry reach and, for the first time, study the impact of winter flows on the groundwater conditions in the area. The study used existing data on groundwater levels that was collected from regional piezometers on both sides of the limitrophe every five years from 1980 to 2005. Regional flow direction from NE to SW was observed in all years. A groundwater depression cone in the southwest part of the limitrophe was identified from 1980 to 1995. A general rise of groundwater levels was observed from 2000 to 2005 on both sides of the limitrophe, but during the same time period, a depression cone formed along the border between Arizona and Sonora, in the Mesa Arenosa on the Mexican side of the border. In order to identify the water table evolution within the limitrophe riparian zone, nine sets of piezometers were constructed in an arrangement perpendicular to the main river channel. Water table levels were measured automatically every 30min and were also manually measured periodically. Nine geohydrological cross sections were constructed using the topographic relief from LIDAR elevation points and depth to groundwater measurements during water discharges in the Colorado River channel at Morelos dam. Groundwater seepage from irrigation canals, irrigation returns, and river discharge flows were identified and the depth to groundwater and its influence on riparian vegetation was analyzed. A strong correlation between flow discharge (up to 60.49hm3 from November 2009 to April 2010) and groundwater elevation (average elevation change of 1.62m on January 22, 2010) in time and space was found. The percentage of water retained in the main river channel decreased from 100% in the first discharge event (December 1213, 2009) to 36% after the last discharge event (April 917, 2010), due to remaining moisture in the unsaturated soil. The total volume of water retained, infiltrated, and evaporated, was 60% (36.6נ106m3) of the total water discharged. The delay time of the groundwater front during a discharge event was on average 6:30, 20:06, and 28:53h from section 1 to section 2, 13, and 14 respectively. This historical study provides insight into how floods affect the groundwater system, which is the foundation for aquatic and riparian biodiversity. This issue is of increasing relevance given growing international interest in rehabilitating the riparian and aquatic ecosystems of the Colorado River delta through intentional flood releases.

Jorge Ramrez-Hernndez; Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta; Mauricio Peregrina-Llanes; Alejandra Calvo-Fonseca; Edgar Carrera-Villa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

ontanans use water in homes, on land, and in industries. We also use the state's streams, rivers, and lakes for recreation. When we  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M ontanans use water in homes, on land, and in industries. We also use the state's streams, rivers Irrigation use reflects the size and importance of agriculture, the state's largest industry. Water withdrawn, and lakes for recreation. When we use water for such things as cooking, irrigation, or mineral extraction

Dyer, Bill

128

Reclaimed water. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning reclaimed water. The citations discuss water reclamation facilities and processes and reclaimed water uses and storage. Industrial and domestic wastewater reclamation and reuse systems are examined. Public attitudes and federal policy on this subject are also presented. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Christopher C. Mathewson Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis... Interval 1: 1920' s ? 41. Interval 2: 1942 ? 51. . . . . . . ~ . . - - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ Interval 5: 1952 ? 74. Interval 4: 1942 ? 74. Discharge Control During Flood Stages 20 25 25 25 51 54 54 SEDIMENTOLOGY. Suspended Load. Bed Load. Coastal...

Minter, Larry Lane

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fluctuating Asymmetry of Chironomus spp. (Diptera: Chironomidae) Larvae in Association with Water Quality and Metal Pollution in Permatang Rawa River in the Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Malaysia, considerable efforts have been made in the past two decades toward analyzing chemical pollution in several rivers, including those in the Juru River Basin (e.g., Lim and Kiu 1995; Fulazzaky et al. 20...

Salman Abdo Al-Shami; Mad Rawi Che Salmah; Ahmad Abu Hassan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources The Indiana Department of Natural Resources implements and enforces the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, as well as a statewide program to protect society and the environment from the adverse effects of mining operations, and regulates coal mining operations to

132

Land reclamation and strip-mined coal production in appalachia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study quantifies the short-run impacts of reclamation on strip mining costs, coal prices, production, and employment in Appalachia. A process analysis model is developed and used to estimate short-run strip-mined coal supply functions under conditions of alternative reclamation requirements. Then, an econometric model is developed and used to estimate coal demand relations. Our results show that full reclamation has rather minor impacts. In 1972, full reclamation would have increased strip-mined coal production costs an average of $0.35 per ton, reduced strip-mined coal production by 10 million tons, and cost approximately 1600 jobs in Appalachia.

William Lin; Robert L Spore; Edmund A Nephew

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clyde L. Munster The Upper North Bosque River (UNBR) watershed is under a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) mandate to reduce Phosphorus (P) due to excess nutrients in the watershed. To address... of the manure applied P. Plot and field scale research has demonstrated the effectiveness of turfgrass to remove manure phosphorus (P). In order to assess the impact of the turfgrass BMP on a watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used...

Stewart, George Russell

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

134

Strip Mining: Kentucky Begins To Close the Reclamation Gap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ad-vocated a federal strip-mining law. He is also working...reclamation by strip-mining states. Until recently...in dealing with strip mining. The good offices of...new regulations. The Appalachia Act pro-vides for a...mandatory rec-lamation by coal operators. The im-plications...

John Walsh

1965-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Draft reclamation program plan for site characterization; Yucca Mountain project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its obligations under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an environmental program that is to be implemented during site characterization at the Yucca Mountain site. This site is proposed for the location of the nation`s first high-level radioactive waste repository. A program for the reclamation of areas disturbed by site characterization is part of the overall environmental program for that site. This Reclamation Program Plan (RPP) describes the reclamation policy of the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site and presents an overview of the reclamation program. The RPP also provides an overview of the reclamation needs relative to site characterization; a review of legislation and requirements pertinent to reclamation; and a review of previous commitments made by the DOE to certain types of reclamation activities. The objective of the DOE reclamation program at Yucca Mountain is to return land disturbed by site-characterization activities to a stable ecological state with a form and productivity similar to the predisturbance state. The DOE will take all reasonable and necessary steps to achieve this objective. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

NONE

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power and Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans/School of Marine Affairs Climate Impacts Group Box controlling salmon marine survival in the Pacific Northwest, several ocean-climate events have been linked

Mantua, Nathan

137

Encouraging re-mining and reclamation of abandoned mined lands in Appalachia: Policy options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abandoned mined lands (AML) are areas that were mined prior to implementation of federal controls over coal-mined land reclamation and were inadequately reclaimed. The majority of the US`s AML acreages were produced by coal mining in the Appalachian areas. Environmental problems include lands in barren or semi-barren condition, excessive sedimentation, acid water discharges, and unstable slopes. This article address the potential to reclame AMLs in the Appalachian region by creating incentives for environmental enhancement through re-mining. Background information of AML and on current policies affecting re-mining are reviewed and the results of a survey of individuals who are knowledgeable in remining policy issues are reported. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Santopietro, G.D. [Ranford Univ., VA (United States); Zipper, C.E. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates all surface mining activities for the extraction of coal. The Commission acts with the authority of the Texas Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation Act, which establishes that the state of Texas has exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in the state, in accordance with the

139

Spacial Distribution of Salinity and the Mechanism of Saltwater Intrusion in the Modaomen Water Channel of Pear River Estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modaomen channel is an important fresh water resource in Pearl River Delta. It has been impacted by saltwater intrusion frequently in the last decade. This has drawn more and more attention from scientists and engineers. The hydrodynamic mechanism of saltwater intrusion is still impercipient. In the present paper hydrographs of velocity and salinity in the channel are analyzed based on field observations of velocity and salinity of upper middle and lower water layers at several stations along the Modaomen channel. It is found that the transport of salinity in Modaomen channel is obviously different from other estuaries. As the tidal range increases from neap to spring tide the salinity in each water layer decreases unexpectedly. This peculiar phenomenon is attributed to the extraordinary flow process in the channel. When salinity value in each layer and vertical salinity gradient are lower during spring tide no matter on rising or ebbing tide the flow velocity monotonously decreases from water surface to the bottom which is suggested by common sense. However when salinity values and vertical salinity gradient are higher during neap tide the flow velocity unexpectedly increases from water surface to the bottom during flood period and flood duration of the bottom current is surprisingly as long as 15?18 hours. In addition an inflexional velocity profile may remain amazingly for about 9 hours. This could be driven by the baroclinic pressure under the condition of tides topography and upstream runoff discharge of this channel.

J. B. Liu; Y. Bao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Occurrence of Aliphatic Hydrocarbons in Water, Suspended Particulate Matter and Sediments of Daliao River System, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In August of 2005 a study was carried out to evaluate contamination of aliphatic hydrocarbons(AHc) in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments...?1 in surface water, from 22.68 to 5,725.36...?1 in ...

W. Guo; M. C. He; Z. F. Yang; C. Y. Lin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Bacteriological water quality effects of hydraulically dredging contaminated upper Mississippi River bottom sediment.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the 782 WATER QUALITY AFTER HYDRAULIC...Army Corps of Engineers' hydraulic dredge...District, Corps of Engineers (purchase order...788 GRIMES WATER QUALITY AFTER HYDRAULIC...Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment...Committee on Water Quality Cri- teria. U...

D J Grimes

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

In-situ partitioning and bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among water, suspended particulate matter, and fish in the Dongjiang and Pearl Rivers and the Pearl River Estuary, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The partitioning and bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and fish samples from the Dongjiang River (DR), Pearl River (PR), and the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) were examined. Although \\{PAHs\\} are much lower in PRE than in DR or PR, \\{PAHs\\} in some fish species are significantly higher in PRE than in DR or PR. Aqueous or particulate \\{PAHs\\} respectively show significant correlations with dissolved organic carbon, particulate organic matter, and chlorophyll a, suggesting that biological pumping effect regulates their distribution. The in situ partitioning coefficients (logKoc) for \\{PAHs\\} are one order magnitude higher than the empirical logKoclogKow correlation. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) is slightly higher for the marine fish than for the freshwater fish. The above phenomena indicate that BCF may vary due to the diversity of fish species, feeding habits, and metabolism of \\{PAHs\\} in fish.

Haiyan Li; Lei Lu; Wen Huang; Juan Yang; Yong Ran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Manual for training reclamation inspectors in the fundamentals of hydrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to be a desk reference to help nonhydrologists achieve a basic understanding of hydrology as it relates to surface mining and reclamation. Surface coal mining and reclamation inspectors and other staff will find it useful in implementing regulatory programs. The handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The handbook can be used in the training of surface-mining and reclamation inspectors, both Federal and State, and as a basic reference for inspectors in carrying out their assigned duties. The handbook describes clues and indicators of potential problems, suggests ways to prevent or mitigate them, and discusses various observation and sampling techniques.

Curtis, W.R.; Dyer, K.L.; Williams, G.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Life Cycle Assessment of Three Water Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use/ Reuse/ Maintenance Recycling Material and Energy Inputs Releases to the Environment Process on portion of total water received (3%) #12;Reclamation: Scottsdale Reclaims wastewater for use (Reclaimed Plant) Wastewater treatment, advanced water treatment, and groundwater recharge and extraction

Keller, Arturo A.

145

River Steamboats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

River Steamboats River Steamboats Nature Bulletin No. 628-A February 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RIVER STEAMBOATS The westward migration of the pioneer settlers and the rapid growth of agriculture, commerce and industry in the Middle West is in large part the story of water transportation on our inland waterways. The two main water routes were the chain of Great Lakes on the north and the Ohio River on the south. Sailing vessels carrying hundreds of tons were able to navigate on the Great Lakes almost as freely as on the ocean. Also, on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers heavy loads could be floated downstream from Pittsburgh to New Orleans -- almost 2000 miles. But boats had to be hauled back upstream by manpower -- grueling labor, stretching over weeks or months to move a few tons a few hundred miles. The coming of the steamboat a century and a half ago changed all this.

146

Information retrieval system: impacts of water-level changes on uses of federal storage reservoirs of the Columbia River.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project undertaken to provide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with information needed to conduct environmental assessments and meet requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Regional Act) is described. Access to information on environmental effects would help BPA fulfill its responsibilities to coordinate power generation on the Columbia River system, protect uses of the river system (e.g., irrigation, recreation, navigation), and enhance fish and wildlife production. Staff members at BPA identified the need to compile and index information resources that would help answer environmental impact questions. A computer retrieval system that would provide ready access to the information was envisioned. This project was supported by BPA to provide an initial step toward a compilation of environmental impact information. Scientists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) identified, gathered, and evaluated information related to environmental effects of water level on uses of five study reservoirs and developed and implemented and environmental data retrieval system, which provides for automated storage and retrieval of annotated citations to published and unpublished information. The data retrieval system is operating on BPA's computer facility and includes the reservoir water-level environmental data. This project was divided into several tasks, some of which were conducted simultaneously to meet project deadlines. The tasks were to identify uses of the five study reservoirs, compile and evaluate reservoir information, develop a data entry and retrieval system, identify and analyze research needs, and document the data retrieval system and train users. Additional details of the project are described in several appendixes.

Fickeisen, D.H.; Cowley, P.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effect of drought and fires on the quality of water in Lithuanian rivers Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 423427 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years in Lithuanian rivers. Such a sudden increase in heavy metal pollution reduces the value of any of secondary heavy metal pollution (Crossland and LaPoint, 1992). These processes may make water bodies and September 2002, concentrations of heavy metals (copper, lead, and zinc) were 21-74% more than in previous

Boyer, Edmond

149

Positive correlation between Li and Mg isotope ratios in the river waters of the Mackenzie Basin challenges the interpretation of apparent isotopic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geochemistry magnesium Mg isotopes lithium Li isotopes chemical weathering a b s t r a c t During chemical expressed as d26 Mg) show in excess of one per mil variability. Part of this variability is attributed covariation between lithium (7 Li/6 Li, expressed as d7 Li) and Mg isotope ratios in the river waters

Paytan, Adina

150

Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) Nonmetallic Mining Reclamation; Oil and Gas (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info Start Date 1995 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources These regulations describe standards relevant to reclamation that must be followed both during and after the completion of mining in a given area. An

151

Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) Texas Uranium Exploration, Surface Mining, and Reclamation Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Railroad Commission of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas is the regulatory authority for uranium surface mining. Law authorizes the Commission to assure that reclamation of mining sites is possible, to protect land owners and the environment through regulation and permitting, and to ensure that mining is operated within the rules and regulations to prevent unreasonable degradation of

152

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Facility Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Adams County, Colorado Coordinates 39.8398269°, -104.1930918° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398269,"lon":-104.1930918,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

153

The estimation of radiation doses in human organs due to natural and artificial radioactivity in surface waters of the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the estimation of the radiation doses in the human body in the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain), following drinking water ingestion by measuring 40K, 226Ra, 90Sr and 3H. The equivalent dose in ten different organs was estimated. Dose calculations were performed by means of the GENII computer program. The lowest equivalent dose calculated through ingesting drinking water was in the small intestine whereas the highest was in the bone surface.

Feda Oner; Nazmi T. Okumusoglu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Surface Water and Energy Budgets for the Mississippi River Basin in Three NCEP Reanalyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface water and energy budgets from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Global Reanalysis II (GR2), the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR)...

Rongqian Yang; Michael Ek; Jesse Meng

156

The future of the Salton Sea under proposed lower Colorado River basin water management scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Valley by month ...................................... 293 A.83 Percent of annual total acreage for a given crop type in Imperial Valley based on 2003 data from Imperial Irrigation District Water Department (IIDWD...) .................................................................................................... 293 A.84 Monthly crop hectarage by crop type in the Imperial Valley .................... 294 A.85 Monthly proportions of annual crop hectarages in the Imperial Valley .... 295 A.86 Imperial Valley average water requirements for crop...

Kjelland, Michael Edward

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hydrocarbon accumulation conditions and exploration direction of Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas in the Pearl River Mouth Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An integrated geologic study was performed in the Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas, Pearl River Mouth Basin, based on the achievements obtained during the past five exploration stages. The following understandings were obtained. (1) The Baiyun Sag has superior source rock conditions and has experienced three tectonic evaluation stages like rifting, rifting-depression and depression. The Wenchang-Enping Fms deposited during the rifting stage have large hydrocarbon generation potentials. During the rifting-depression and depression stages, the deposition in the study area was controlled by the Oligocene and Miocene shelf slope break zones. The Oligocene Zhuhai Fm shallow marine delta-longshore depositional system and the Miocene Zhujiang-Hanjiang Fms deep fan depositional system were formed, and they are the most favorable reservoir-caprock assemblages in the study area. (2) The Hydrocarbon accumulation pattern in the deep waters is different from that in the northern shallow waters. Shelf slope break zone, composite conduction system consisting of structural ridge, fault, sandbody, unconformity and fluid diapir as well as late tectonic movement are the three major factors controlling hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the study area. (3) The Liwan 3-1 gas field is a typical example. The superior trapping conditions, high-quality reservoirs of delta distributary channel controlled by shelf slope break zone, vertical conduction system consisting of fault and diapir, as well as the overlying massive marine mudstone caprock provide favorable geologic conditions for the formation of large gas fields. Four areas were identified as the targets of gas exploration in the near future: the deep water fan system in the central sag, the structural-stratigraphic traps in the uplifted areas on both sides of the main sag of Baiyun, a series of large structural traps on the fault terrace to the southwest of the main sag, and the ultradeep frontiers in sags such as Liwan to the south of the main sag.

Lin Heming; Shi Hesheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

Heo, Joonghyeok

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Introducing River Modelling in the Implementation of the DPSIR Scheme of the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, University of Florence Via S. Marta, 3 - 50139 Florence, ITALY Email:marsili@ingfi1.ing, integrates the QUAL2E water quality model for the generation of quality data to assess differing DPSIR, whereby current quality data can be used to generate quality scenarios and apply the DPSIR model

160

Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project: Final report. [October 21, 1992-April, 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. Comprehensive reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations of the Monument Butte, Travis and Boundary units were presented in the two published project yearly reports. The primary and the secondary production from the Monument Butte unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close to its bubble point. The water flood in the smaller Travis unit appeared affected by natural and possibly by large interconnecting hydraulic fractures. Water flooding the boundary unit was considered more complicated due to the presence of an oil water contact in one of the wells. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter c ore, Formation Micro Imaging logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir characterization efforts identified new reservoirs in the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2000 barrels per day.

Deo, M.D. [Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US); Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc., Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (US); Nielson, D.L.; Lutz, S.J. [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

163

Revalorisation of property objects and collective action: the case of reclamation systems in northwest Poland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article examines two drastic changes in the performance of local water associations in providing local public goods appropriate levels of water table in the reclamation system in the Powiat Pyrzyce in the Voivodship Zachodniopomorski in northwest Poland. Employing an institutional economics approach shows the results of processes of revalorisation of the interrelated property objects land and reclamation infrastructure that have been triggered and shaped not only by the drastic political, economic and administrative changes after the breakdown of the socialist regime in Poland in 1990, but also by the prospect of joining the European Union. More precisely, both processes the discontinuation (from 1990 onwards) and revival (from 2002 onwards) of the local water associations were mainly determined by changing market conditions together with variances in the ability of state authorities to effectively control and facilitate these associations. Further, the delay in overcoming the period of collective inaction was fostered by the time-delayed and cumulative effects of neglecting the cleaning and the maintenance of secondary ditches.

Christian Schleyer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

CHRONIC ZINC SCREENING WATER EFFECT RATIO FOR THE H-12 OUTFALL, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to proposed Zn limits for the NPDES outfall H-12, a Zn screening Water Effects Ratio (WER) study was conducted to determine if a full site-specific WER is warranted. Using standard assumptions for relating the lab results to the stream, the screening WER data were consistent with the proposed Zn limit and suggest that a full WER would result in a similar limit. Addition of a humate amendment to the outfall water reduced Zn toxicity, but the toxicity reduction was relatively small and unlikely to impact proposed Zn limits. The screening WER data indicated that the time and expense required to perform a full WER for Zn is not warranted.

Coughlin, D; Brian02 Looney, B; Margaret Millings, M

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

Water information bulletin No. 30, part 13: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Preliminary geologic reconnaissance of the geothermal occurrences of the Wood River Drainage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pre-tertiary sediments of the Milligen and Wood River Formations consisting primarily of argillite, quartzite, shale and dolomite are, for the most part, exposed throughout the area and are cut locally by outliers of the Idaho Batholith. At some locations, Tertiary-age Challis Volcanics overlay these formations. Structurally the area is complex with major folding and faulting visible in many exposures. Many of the stream drainages appear to be fault controlled. Hydrologic studies indicate hot spring occurrences are related to major structural trends, as rock permeabilities are generally low. Geochemical studies using stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the thermal water in the Wood River region to be depleted by about 10 0/00 in D and by 1 to 2 0/00 in /sup 18/0 relative to cold water. This suggests the water could be meteoric water that fell during the late Pleistocene. The geological data, as well as the chemical data, indicate the geothermal waters are heated at depth, and subsequently migrate along permeable structural zones. In almost all cases the chemical data suggest slightly different thermal histories and recharge areas for the water issuing from the hot springs. Sustained use of the thermal water at any of the identified springs is probably limited to flow rates approximating the existing spring discharge. 28 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Anderson, J.E.; Bideganeta, K.; Mitchell, J.C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Prioritizing Abandoned Coal Mine Reclamation Projects Within the Contiguous United States Using Geographic Information System Extrapolation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal mine reclamation projects are very expensive and ... combination of spatial data on resources for the coal mine reclamation and uses GIS analysis to develop a priority list of ... United States, it was possi...

Yuri Gorokhovich; Andrew Voros; Matthew Reid; Erica Mignone

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

1,3,5-trichloro-2-(4-nitrophenoxy)benzene (CNP) in water, sediments, and shellfish of the Ishikari River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since organochlorine compounds are known to be accumulated in benthic animals and CNP is very persistent in aquatic animals, shellfish might be useful as an indicator of environmental contamination by CNP. In order to understand the correlations between the concentrations in shellfish, water and sediments, it is necessary to investigate their temporal changes and the residue half-life time of CNP in the environment. For this purpose, CNP-free shellfish (Corbicula japonica) were transferred to fixed point in the lower reaches of the Ishikari River, and the CNP concentrations in shellfish, water and sediments, before and after CNP application, were examined biweekly from May to August and monthly from September to December 1984. The present paper will show that shellfish can be a biological indicator for CNP contamination in the river.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: TODAM and FLESCOTs theories and mathematical formulations TODAM and FLESCOT model structures Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment EMSL tour Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

Onishi, Yasuo

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

170

"1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250 "3. Gila River Power Station","Gas","Gila River Power Station LP",2060 "4. Springerville","Coal","Tucson Electric Power Co",1618 "5. Glen Canyon Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1312 "6. Santan","Gas","Salt River Project",1227 "7. Mesquite Generating Station","Gas","Mesquite Power LLC",1073 "8. Harquahala Generating Project","Gas","New Harquahala Generating Co, LLC",1054 "9. Hoover Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1040

171

The Nation's Rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...task of water quality assessment." Such interpretation...environment demands continuing assessment and interpretation...pro-cesses active in river systems and hence such measures...character of many river systems. To date, observations...money, observational tools must be designed to...

M. Gordon Wolman

1971-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

173

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

174

Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

176

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River Thames River Thames Du Cane Road Wood Lane Wood Lane North Pole Road Barlby Road Highlever Street Acton Market Place Acton Horn Lane Wood Lane Du Cane Road Wood Lane South Africa Road White City for BBC Television Centre Wood Lane Ariel Way Wood Lane Shepherd's Bush Green Shepherd's Bush Green

177

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Building the urban river edge : proposed connections to the water at the foot of Boston's Beacon Hill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The core of this investigation is based on the design of built form at the public urban river edge. It proposes the transformation of a portion of public park edge into public built edge. The Esplanade embankment at the ...

Gorini, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Western Water Institutional Solutions-Western Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Conflict and Cooperation in the Bureau of Reclamation's Upper Colorado Region 1970-2005 Western WaterThe Western Water Institutional Solutions-Western Water Information Network Collaboration Institutional Solutions Project Upper Colorado Region Nathan Eidem Dept. of Geosciences Oregon State University

Wolf, Aaron

180

Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a users manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not

183

Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10). Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Study on consumption efficiency of soil water resources in the Yellow River Basin based on regional ET structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the regional water resources character, the concept of soil water resources is first redefined, and then associated...ET)-based consumption structure and consumption efficiency of soil water resources ar...

Hao Wang; GuiYu Yang; YangWen Jia; DaYong Qin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Application of Specialized Optimization Techniques in Water Quantity and Quality Management with Respect to Planning for the Trinity River Basi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the disposal of wastes. Thus, there is a clear interaction between quantity and quality of water. However, largely due to the agency structure in state and federal government, water quality management and water development activities are usually separated...

Meier Jr., W. L.; Shih, C. S.

187

Risk of Gastrointestinal Disease Associated with Exposure to Pathogens in the Water of the Lower Passaic River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and R. Cantu. 2006. Water ingestion during swimming activities in a pool: a pilot study. J. Water Health 4: 425-430...Department of Environmental Conservation. 2004. State enforcement targets quality of water near New York City...

Ellen Donovan; Ken Unice; Jennifer D. Roberts; Mark Harris; Brent Finley

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Changing climatic conditions in the Colorado River Basin: Implications for water resources management in the Las Vegas Valley.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Climate change affects the water available in a region. It also affects the water demand, because of the increase in temperature. A system dynamics model (more)

Dawadi, Srijana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of Reclamation dams ORISE has served as lead exercise planner for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation's Critical Infrastructure Exercise Program since its inception in 2003. Six of the dams operated by BOR are designated as National Critical Infrastructure facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. The program helps BOR answer an important question-are these massive dams secure in the event of a terrorist attack? Exercise programs for each of these critical facilities typically extend over a 12-month period during which ORISE facilitates a series of exercise events that test emergency response plans. ORISE guides the dam's staff,

190

Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water management problems as a combined environmental andwater management problems as a combined environmental and

Cavelle, Jenna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Chao Phraya River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the river flow during low flow in January and 4% during high flow conditions in July 2004. The unit shoreline ...... since the water first became enriched in radium isotopes assuming no ... uranium-series isotopes (223Ra and 226Ra), estimating radium ages .... inventory into concentration by dividing by the water depth, which

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Salinity Gradient Energy at River Mouths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salinity Gradient Energy at River Mouths ... River mouths are potentially abundant locations for the exploitation of the clean and renewable salinity gradient energy (SGE) as here perpetually fresh water mixes with saline seawater. ...

Oscar Alvarez-Silva; Christian Winter; Andres F. Osorio

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

Spatio-temporal analysis of urbanization and land and water resources efficiency of oasis cities in Tarim River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the spatial pattern of land and water resources as well as urbanization and their ... so, we extract the data associated with efficiency of land and water resources and urbanization for the ye...

Yu Yang; Yi Liu

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Facing Israel's water problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Sea of Galilee), rivers and wadies; it calls for the implementation of sea water desalination by nuclear energy.

Kapai Pines

1975-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

A conceptual study of floating axis water current turbine for low-cost energy capturing from river, tide and ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost of utilizing kinetic energy of river stream, tidal and ocean current is considered to be higher than that of wind power generation because of difficulties in construction and maintenance of devices installed in seawater. As a solution to the problem, the authors propose a new concept of water stream turbine. The main idea is in the manner of supporting turbine. Although it is similar to a vertical axis turbine, the direction of turbine axis is not firmly fixed and its tilt angle is passively adjustable to the stream velocity. Since it does not have to keep the turbine axis in upright position, required structural strength and weight of the device will be reduced significantly. This paper describes the application ranging from the small hydro power in river streams to large application of tidal and ocean current turbine. In the large capacity plant for tidal stream and ocean current, the main mechanism of turbine axis support is the same as that of the wind turbine authors proposed in the previous paper. It leads to the further opportunity of cost reduction. The sample design of a multi-megawatt ocean current turbine shows the possibility of high economic performance of the concept. The results show that the cost of energy in the concept can be comparable to a land based wind turbine.

Hiromichi Akimoto; Kenji Tanaka; Kiyoshi Uzawa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integration of reclamation and tailings management in oil sands surface mine planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processing of oil sands generates large volumes of slurry, known as tailings, that is impounded in tailings ponds. Oil sands operators are committed to develop reclamation plans to ensure that the mine site is restored to a natural or economically ... Keywords: Integer programming, Mine planning, Oil sands, Open-pit mining, Reclamation planning, Strategic planning, Tailings management

Mohammad Mahdi Badiozamani; Hooman Askari-Nasab

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Simulation of Cooperative Water Supply and Flood Operations for Two Parallel Reservoirs on the Feather and Yuba Rivers, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-i- Simulation of Cooperative Water Supply and Flood Operations for Two Parallel Reservoirs: _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ Committee in Charge 2003 #12;-ii- Simulation of Cooperative Water Supply and Flood Operations for Two probabilistic-based synthetic flood events in HEC-ResSim. Simulation results were evaluated using indicators

Lund, Jay R.

202

Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System; 21Feb1997  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD) SUMMARY: The Columbia River System Operation Review (SOR) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assessed operations at the 14 Federal dams and reservoirs on the Columbia and lower Snake Rivers that have a major influence on the multiple purpose system operation, and for which power production is coordinated under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement. Lead agencies for this six-year process were the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

203

Efficient Water Use & Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Use Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: Using reverse osmosis to superpurify water reduces bacterial growth and mineral build up, allowing the system to circulate water up to four times in the High-Performance Computing Center. LANSCE cooling towers circulate water for evaporative cooling. LANL is testing methods for decreased water and chemical use at this location. Gabriel C. Herrera of LANL checks gauges on piping inside the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF). Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility: In an effort to reduce water consumption, the SERF was constructed to treat and process sanitary effluent water used for cooling the supercomputing facilities. Sandia Canyon: Water from the SERF is used to keep the wetlands healthy to transform hexavalent into trivalent chromium.

204

Macroinvertebrate response to land cover, habitat, and water chemistry in a mining-impacted river ecosystem: A GIS watershed analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study addressed potential land use impacts to macroinvertebrate communities and water quality from past coal mining activities in the watershed of the ... and southern New York). Landscape tools of GIS and r...

Dale A. Bruns

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluating LSM-Based Water Budgets over a West African Basin Assisted with a River Routing Scheme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Land Surface Model Intercomparison Project phase 2 (ALMIP-2), this study evaluates the water balance simulated by the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and ...

Augusto C. V. Getirana; Aaron Boone; Christophe Peugeot

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restoration, wildlife and livestock management, and educational and economic resources. #31;e website has contact information for water and land management experts, tips on becoming involved, information on ongoing conservation projects, #25;nancial... plans and determining implementation costs. #31;ese datasets and tools provide baseline support for projects addressing wildlife habitat management and water quality, particularly native grassland and wetland restoration, and bo#26;omland hardwood...

Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal irrigation scheduling, household conservation patterns, the effects of wastewater reuse on turfgrass, the economics of water transfers, or historical and optimal of Reclamation asked us to help stage a workshop on produced waters those waters resulting from the extraction

209

Canadian River Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Canadian River Compact Commission The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by

210

The use of geographical information system (GIS) technology in surface mine reclamation monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and related technologies (e.g., Digital cartographic tools, satellite image processing systems) can benefit the planning and monitoring of open-pit mine reclamation activities. PCI Geomatics, in conjunction with Luscar Limited's Line Creek Mine, has developed a GIS-based system designed to store information relevant to planning and assessing reclamation progress. Data that existed in various formats throughout the company, and which had been collected since the mine-planning phase, was integrated into the GIS. The system is used to summarize current reclamation activities and is linked to corporate costing procedures. Monitoring of reclamation activities and quantifying change in the mine area is easily done using the spatial analysis capabilities of the GIS. Assessments of the change in reclamation areas are enhanced by using satellite image data to produce inexpensive and timely information on the land base, and allow the comparison of the health of the vegetation to reclamation areas from year to year. The implemented system substantially reduces the time needed to generate statistics and produce maps for government or internal reports. Also, there are benefits in terms of both cost and effectiveness of reclamation planning.

Dixon, C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cooperating for Cleaner Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to date. TCEQ contracted with James Miertschin & Associates to develop the Leon River TMDL. The company is using a water quality model to mimic the hydrologic conditions on the impaired segment of the river. The Leon River Bacteria TMDL Advisory Group... in the state. In 2002, the TCEQ determined that the water quality for 44 miles of the Leon River between Proctor Lake and Lake Belton contained elevated bacteria concen- trations that impair the water for contact recreation such as wading and swimming...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Nation's Rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...soil erosion and the need for soil conserva-tion were first clearly...residuals accumu-lated in soils, vegetation, and other organisms...from the Potomac River near Washing-ton, D.C., and doubtless...Ruhe and R. B. Daniels, J. Soil Water Conserv. 20, 52 (1965...

M. Gordon Wolman

1971-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluating Bacteriophage P22 as a Tracer in a Complex Surface Water System: The Grand River, Michigan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 ... Meanwhile, water temperature, pH, suspended solids, and weather data (i.e., ambient temperature, rainfall, wind, etc.) were noted during sampling. ...

Chaopeng Shen; Mantha S. Phanikumar; Theng T. Fong; Irfan Aslam; Shawn P. McElmurry; Stephanie L. Molloy; Joan B. Rose

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reclamation of Abandoned Shrimp Pond Soils in Southern Thailand for Cultivation of Mauritius Grass (Brachiaria mutica)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study on soil reclamation for cultivation of Mauritius grass was conducted on soils obtained from abandoned shrimp ponds at Ranote District, Songkhla Province, southern Thailand. A glass house experiment on ...

P. Towatana; C. Voradej; N. Leeraphante

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Lower Colorado River Authority LCRA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lower Colorado River Authority LCRA Lower Colorado River Authority LCRA Jump to: navigation, search Name Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) Place Austin, Texas Zip 78703 Product LCRA is a conservation and reclamation district created by the Texas Legislature in 1934. Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

Owen, M.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA) P.O. Box 2065 integrity of the White River ecosystem. To successfully accomplish the vision of UWRWA, a 16-county was formed. It exists to improve and protect water quality on a watershed basis in the larger Upper White

218

Opportunities for improved surface mine reclamation in the central Appalachian coal region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to estimate the costs of coal surface mine reclamation methods designed to prepare mined lands for improved use in areas of steeply sloping topography. During the course of this research, a computer-based mining and reclamation cost estimating system was developed. COSTSUM is a set of seven programs designed to analyze data from active surface mining sites to determine spoil handling and reclamation costs. OPSIM is a surface mining simulator designed to estimate the differences in spoil handling costs among reclamation and postmining landform alternatives. This cost-estimating system was utilized during an intensive study of mining and reclamation cost at a surface mining site in Wise County, Virginia, where a number of improved reclamation practices were implemented. At this site, a steeply sloping premining topography was transformed to a postmining landform containing an extensive near-level area covered with deep, uncompacted, potentially productive mine soils. Analysis of daily records of operations revealed that the cost of mining and reclaiming this site was comparable to industry average costs in the area in spite of departure from conventional methods. The results of simulation procedures indicated that the cost of mining so as to produce this landscape was less than the estimated cost of conventional mining methods.

Zipper, C.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Novel electrodialysiselectrochlorination integrated process for the reclamation of treated wastewaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents a novel integrated process for the reclamation of wastewaters. This process combines, in the same cell, the reduction in the effluent conductivity and TOC by electrodialysis together with the production of a value added stream, which can be used for disinfection purposes. In the diluate compartment, the solution is desalted whereas hypochlorite is electrochemically synthesized in the anolyte. The treatment of actual effluents from the Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) of Ciudad Real (Spain) was confronted. It was observed that the concentration of hypochlorite synthesized in the anolyte increased when anolyte and catholyte are separated into different circuits, avoiding the reduction of hypochlorite on the cathode surface. Furthermore, a higher voltage to cell pair ratio also enhances the production of hypochlorite. Finally, it was checked the disinfectant potential of the final anolyte, being possible to produce a desalted and disinfected final stream with a total electrical consumption of 1.03Whdm?3 and dosing a volumetric ratio anolyte:diluate of 4:96.

J. Llanos; S. Cotillas; P. Caizares; M.A. Rodrigo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water project was inspired by three historic Chicago engineering feats: the reversal of the Chicago River, the Deep

Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Columbia River System Inside Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwestfrom fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the regions electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

none,

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Our River  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

224

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

225

A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outlook ~Pt t 1 Trinity River Basin EconoInic outlook ~Pt t 1 Neches River Basin 10 10 Economic outlook 10 ~Pt t 1 Sabine River Basin Economic outlook 12 I I I. THE WATER RESOURCES DF THE NECHES AND RED RIVER BASINS 14 Neches River Basin 14.... Municipal and Industrial Water Requirements Page 13 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page I- 1. State of Texas 2-1. Population Projection and Municipal and Industrial Water Requirements 3-1. Neches River Basin Reservoirs 19 3-2. Low Flow Events, Neches River...

Cook, John Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Case studies: developing land uses in surface-mine reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulations adopted in 1978 by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to implement the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 foreclosed many opportunities for development of postmining uses because of the requirement to return land to its approximate original contour (AOC), and the difficulty of qualifying for a variance. The regulations all but eliminated development of postmining uses with economic or community benefits. The effect of those regulations was to develop forestland, farmland, and rangeland similar to that which existed before mining. Recent changes in OSM's regulations have made development of postmining uses more feasible by removing many restrictive conditions and interpretations. This report documents the main types of uses that have been developed as postmining uses - recreation, forestry, housing, community facilities, industry, and commercial and mixed urban uses. Most of the cases presented predate the Act, and thus were not developed in a regulatory situation comparable to the present time. However, they demonstrate the practical feasibility and the benefits to local communities of developing postmining uses. The review of examples and case studies leads to three main conclusions: in certain situations surface-mined land may be an important resource for communities; most successful postmining developments required considerable vision and dedicated effort over many years; and an intended postmining use should be studied and planned during the preparation of mining permits so that the mining operation can be coordinated with the postmining use.

Seddon, J.; Petrich, C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Modeling the System: How Computers are Used in Columbia River Planning.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication describes the three computer models Federal agencies and the Northwest Power Pool use regularly to help plan hydro operations in the Columbia River Basin: HYSSR, HYDROSIM, and HYDREG. It is one of a series of booklets written for participants in the System Operation Review (SOR) being conducted jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and theBonneville Power Administration (BPA). A list of the other publications appears on the inside front cover. The SOR is the environmental analysis required to consider changes in Columbia River system operations related contract arrangements. Over the next few years, the agencies will develop a new multiple-use operation for the Columbia River. At the time, the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) and other contracts related to the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada will be renegotiated and renewed. Many alternative ways of operating individual projects and the river system as a whole will be considered in the SOR. To analyze how these changes would affect the system's ability to meet its multiple-use goals, various operating scenarios will be thoroughly evaluated. The three computer models, HYSSR, HYDROSIM, and HYDREG, will play an important role in this evaluation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army Corps of Engineers; United States. Bureau of Reclamation

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A numerical soil-water-balance (SWB) model was used to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains. The SWB model consisted of 1 km2 to 2011. Average calculated recharge in the Williston basin was 0.190 in/yr (1,281 ft3 /sec) and ranged.1 percent of precipitation in the Williston basin. Average recharge in the Powder River basin was 0.136 in

Torgersen, Christian

229

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Homes Heat Pump: $150 - $500 Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Electric Water Heater: $150 Existing Homes Heat Pump: $200 Gas to Electric Water Heater Conversion: $150 Provider Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association provides incentives through its Comfort Advantage Program to encourage energy efficiency within the

231

Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostat: $15 Central AC: $25 - $50 Heat Pump: $60 - $195 Geothermal Heat Pump: $350 Water Heaters: $45 - $75 Heat Pump Water Heater: $425 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 - $75 Provider Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services.

232

Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential to release significant levels of acidity, heavy metals, and toxic oxyanions (As) to groundwater Information Category Data Title Influence of Organic Mine Reclamation Amendments on Metal Mobility and Water Pollution Potential Project Number C-01 Start Date 09/01/1998 End Date 09/30/2000 Research Category Water

233

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

Saldin, Dilano

235

Geomorphic histories for river and catchment management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...area, changes in water temperature or pH, or disturbances to fish migration by the construction of weirs and dams. Therefore...river catchments of Asia by Clift [35]. Using high-quality seismic records for continental margins offshore from the large rivers...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Wastewater reclamation and reuse in a petrochemical plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large petrochemical plant located in a water-limited area is a major water user. The plant is facing a critical water problem because of several factors: (1) the raw water total dissolved solids (TDS) content has been increasing, (2) water rationing, which limits plant production, occurs during drought periods, (3) the plant is planning for a major expansion that requires major additional water supply, and (4) there is persistent community pressure for wastewater discharge reduction. A water resource management and planning study was conducted for this plant to resolve the water problem. This chapter describes the results of the study and the design of a pilot plant program for the testing of a wastewater treatment and recycling system.

Wong, J.M. [Brown and Caldwell, Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Media Treatment of`Climate Change' in Shaping Colorado River Problems and Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Media Treatment of`Climate Change' in Shaping Colorado River Problems and Solutions WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER Abby Kuranz and Doug Kenney University of Colorado 2014 #12;Western Water Assessment 2 on the hydrology of the Colorado River Basin and those water systems dependent upon the river.1 Among the impacts

Neff, Jason

238

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates Great River Energy (28 Member Cooperatives) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Great River Energy State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by measure and member cooperative offering. Provider Great River Energy Great River Energy, a generation and transmission cooperative which serves

239

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 1, Sand reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mobile thermal foundry sand reclamation unit was designed and constructed. This unit consisted of thermal and mechanical sand reclamation equipment installed on the bed of a 50 foot low-boy trailer. It was transported to a number of Midwest foundries for on-site demonstration of the sand reclamation process. This allowed participating foundries to have their own refuse sand (10-100 tons) processed and then reused in production for evaluation. The purpose for building the unit was to demonstrate to foundries through ``hands on`` experience that refuse sands can be reclaimed and successfully reused particularly in regard to product quality. Most of the participating foundries indicated a high level of satisfaction with the reclaimed sand. Laboratory testing of samples of the used sand, before and after processing by the demonstration unit, verified the usability of the reclaimed sand. One of the foundries participating was a brass foundry, the sand from this foundry contained lead and is classified as a hazardous material. After reclamation the sand was no longer hazardous and could also be reused in the foundry.

Vondra, L.F.; Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Integration of reclamation and tailings management in oil sands surface mine planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The processing of oil sands generates large volumes of slurry, known as tailings, that is impounded in tailings ponds. Oil sands operators are committed to develop reclamation plans to ensure that the mine site is restored to a natural or economically usable landscape. Since most of the material that is needed for capping of the tailings pond is produced in mining operation, it is reasonable to include material requirement for reclamation as part of mine planning. In this paper, an integrated long-term mine planning model is proposed that includes tailings capacity and reclamation material requirements. A mixed integer linear programming (MILP) model is developed to test the performance of the proposed model. The MILP model is coded in Matlab. It is verified by carrying out a case study on an actual oil sands dataset, and has resulted in an integer solution within a 2% gap to the optimality. The resulted production schedule meets the capacity constraint of the tailings facility and guarantees the production of the required reclamation material.

Mohammad Mahdi Badiozamani; Hooman Askari-Nasab

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 8598 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 85­98 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater membrane processes for reclamation and reuse of wastewater in future space missions was evaluated and used in estimating the specific energy cost of treating the wastewater generated in space. The weight

245

Economic Incentives and Regulatory Framework for Shale Gas Well Site Reclamation in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic Incentives and Regulatory Framework for Shale Gas Well Site Reclamation in Pennsylvania ... They also noted that economies of scale exist when more than one well is on each well pad, which is the norm for wells in the Marcellus Shale. ... Pennsylvanias experience with bonding of coal mining sites may be indicative of what to expect. ...

Austin L. Mitchell; Elizabeth A. Casman

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

L. C. Hulstrom

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

Rationing the river: evaluating hybrid instream flow programs in Colorado and Montana.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Properly managing river water is one of the most important common pool resource issues in the Western United States. Historically, laws regulating water in the (more)

Bruning, Zachary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that connects the pump, distribution tank and holding ponds. As of April 15, 2013, three of the ponds were completed and have been lined with a synthetic liner to prevent seepage and leakage as this was a major problem in early projects. Pecos River WPP...Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update Funding Provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a Clean Water Act 319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S Environmental Protection Agency TR-447 October 2013 Pecos River...

Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Zombie Water Projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...it makes no difference to the corn and the alfalfa whether it gets Colorado River water or Mississippi water or Missouri ... which have been severely impaired this year by flood conditions, and at the same tim...

Peter H. Gleick; Matthew Heberger; Kristina Donnelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Water Scarcity, Climate Change, and Water Quality: Three Economic Essays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

essays by implicitly incorporating uncertainty about future climate, water demand from all types of water use, a spatial river flow relationship, interaction between ground and surface water, institutional regulations, and the possibilities of inter-basin...

Cai, Yongxia

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Understand processes and develop tools (models and ocean indices) for forecasting salmonid survival and returns #12;EggEgg--smolt Potentialsmolt Potential-- Snake RiverSnake River Spring ChinookSpring Chinook 0 Recent `good' ocean 100 yr ave ocean `Poor' ocean #12;CHART OF SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE · Note: warm water

253

920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile is supplied mainly by rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile in the main city of region II, Antofagasta, was approximately 90 µg/L (1), nearly twice the drinking water.permissions@oxfordjournals.org. Fifty-Year Study of Lung and Bladder Cancer Mortality in Chile Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water

California at Berkeley, University of

254

Scenic Rivers Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Virginia Scenic Rivers Programs intent is to identify, designate and help protect rivers and streams that possess outstanding scenic, recreational, historic and natural characteristics of...

255

Platte River Cooperative Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platte River Cooperative Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY,...

256

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

257

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as outstanding...

258

Sediment dynamics of an impounded river: Yegua Creek, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

taking place within the reservoir (Pozo et al., 1997). These changes are translated to the water released into the stream. Any changes in water quality affect the life cycles of organisms (Graf, 1980; Magilligan and Nislow, 2005). Along the River...

Martinez, Adriana Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Surface reclamation of the Big Lake oil field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the discovery of 1 Santa Rita in 1923, millions of barrels of salt water have been produced along with 135 million bbl of oil from the Big Lake oil field in Reagan County, Texas. Until the early 1960s, the accepted disposal method for the produced water was surface discharge to a large evaporation pond north of the field. Produced water was allowed to flow from wells to the pond via natural topographic drainage. This practice resulted in 2000 ac of eroded, barren landscape, characterized by highly saline soils incapable of supporting vegetation. In 1989, the University of Texas System, the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, and Marathon Oil Company, which acquired Big Lake field in 1962, initiated an experimental project to reclaim the affected land and restore rangeland productivity. An underground drainage system, consisting of 125,000 ft of buried drainage conduit and eight collection sumps, was installed over 205 ac of the affected area. Earthen terraces were constructed to capture and hold rain water to facilitate downward percolation and leaching of salts from the soil profile. Salts leached from the soil are captured by the drainage system and pumped to injection wells for disposal. The excellent revegetation that has occurred over the test area after three years of operations is encouraging and has shown the need for expanding and enhancing the existing system with supplemental water from fresh water wells, application of soil-amending agents, additional terracing, and selective planting with salt-tolerant species.

Weathers, M.L. (Univ. of Texas Lands, Midland, TX (United States)); Moore, K.R. (Univ. of Texas Lands, Big Lake, TX (United States)); Ford, D.L. (U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation Service, San Angelo, TX (United States)); Curlee, C.K. (Marathon Oil Company, Midland, TX (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Desalination and Water Treatment www.deswater.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.22 µm. Seawater, reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate collected from a wastewater reclamation plant for the treatment of saline water and wastewater such as thermal distillation and reverse osmosis [2,3]. MD has several advantages compared to conventional thermal distillation and reverse osmosis processes [3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Tool for Integrated Planning of Water Infrastructure Gwendolyn Woods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or inaccurate. Economy of scale for wastewater reclamation (treatment) facilities may conflict with the energy. Yet the need to plan for new water and wastewater infrastructure remains. In the Assessment of Climate Change in the Southwest United States: A Report Prepared for the National Climate Assessment, Theobald et

Fay, Noah

262

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1991 State Indiana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Wabash River Heritage Corridor Commission The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee

263

FOOD AND FEEDING HABITS OF JUVENILE ATLANTIC TOMCOD, MICROGADUS TOMCOD, FROM HAVERSTRAW BAY, HUDSON RIVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-water quality analysis: Hudson River. National Comm. on Water Quality. NTIS PB-251099. Manuscript accepted June biological monitoring program for a fossil fuel steam electric generating station located at Hudson River mile- point 37.5. The study area (Figure 1) encompassed Hudson River milepoints 37.5-41.5, as measured

264

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS Rivers are major generators of electrical power and support a rapidly growing population and economy. Water resource management activities such as water rights adjudication, groundwater resources assessment

265

A reclamation approach for mined prime farmland by adding organic wastes and lime to the subsoil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface mined prime farmland may be reclaimed by adding organic wastes and lime to subsoil thus improving conditions in root zone. In this study, sewage sludge, poultry manure, horse bedding, and lime were applied to subsoil (15-30 cm) during reclamation. Soil properties and plant growth were measured over two years. All organic amendments tended to lower the subsoil bulk density and increase organic matter and total nitrogen. Liming raised exchangeable calcium, slightly increased pH, but decreased exchangeable magnesium and potassium. Corn ear-leaf and forage tissue nitrogen, yields, and nitrogen removal increased in treatments amended with sewage sludge and poultry manure, but not horse bedding. Subsoil application of sewage sludge or poultry manure seems like a promising method in the reclamation of surface mined prime farmland based on the improvements observed in the root zone environment.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

MHK Technologies/Microturbine River In Stream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microturbine River In Stream Microturbine River In Stream < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Microturbine River In Stream.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Whitestone Power Communications Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Microturbine River In Stream Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description HDPE blades are the only moving parts in the water.This gives the turbine high resistance to silty or salty water. Blades designed to survive impact of 1500 lb object. HDPE provides flexibility and strength. Blades penetrate water 24 inches allowing for deep and shallow operation. Mounting design allows for variable depth operation for varying river conditions.All submerged prime-mover parts constructed from HDPE. No underwater gearboxes, generators or electrical cables. Velocity of blades 50% of velocity of river current.

267

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Project #31: Connecticut River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GEOMORPHIC SETTING: At the project location, the Connecticut River has an annual average discharge of...

Wendi Goldsmith; Donald Gray; John McCullah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Spoil handling and reclamation costs at a contour surface mine in steep slope Appalachian topography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate overburden handling cost estimation methods are essential to effective pre-mining planning for post-mining landforms and land uses. With the aim of developing such methods, the authors have been monitoring costs at a contour surface mine in Wise County, Virginia since January 1, 1984. Early in the monitoring period, the land was being returned to its Approximate Original Contour (AOC) in a manner common to the Appalachian region since implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). More recently, mining has been conducted under an experimental variance from the AOC provisions of SMCRA which allowed a near-level bench to be constructed across the upper surface of two mined points and an intervening filled hollow. All mining operations are being recorded by location. The cost of spoil movement is calculated for each block of coal mined between January 1, 1984, and August 1, 1985. Per cubic yard spoil handling and reclamation costs are compared by mining block. The average cost of spoil handling was $1.90 per bank cubic yard; however, these costs varied widely between blocks. The reasons for those variations included the landscape positions of the mining blocks and spoil handling practices. The average reclamation cost was $0.08 per bank cubic yard of spoil placed in the near level bench on the mined point to $0.20 for spoil placed in the hollow fill. 2 references, 4 figures.

Zipper, C.E.; Hall, A.T.; Daniels, W.L.

1985-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

272

Diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and implications for habitat reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain was assessed during 1992 to 1995 using a combination of feeding observations and scat analysis. Feeding observation data (1993 through 1995) showed that tortoises fed on a wide variety of items. The most frequently eaten items were forbs and annual grasses. These two forage groups comprised more than 90% of all bites taken. Analysis of scat (1992 and 1993) also showed that grasses and forbs were the most common groups, making up more than 80% of the composition of scat. Yearly differences between proportions of species in the diet were observed and were most likely attributable to differences in plant productivity, which is linked to rainfall patterns. Non-native species were an important component of the diet in all years, accounting for 13 to 50% of all bites observed and 6 to 24% of scat contents. A list of all items encountered in the diet is provided. To facilitate reclamation of desert tortoise habitat disturbed by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, native forage species that should be included in reclamation seed mixes, when feasible, were identified. Although shrubs make up only a small proportion of the diet, they should also be included in reclamation efforts because they provide habitat structure. Tortoise cover sites, and microhabitats amenable to seed germination and seedling establishment. In addition, non-native species should not be planted on reclaimed sites and, if necessary, sites should be recontoured and soil compaction reduced prior to planting.

Rakestraw, D.L.; Holt, E.A.; Rautenstrauch, K.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Other Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type PACE Financing Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The program will also support the installation of energy efficiency measures in connection with a qualifying renewable energy project, provided that the renewable energy

274

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Rappahannock River Basin Commission The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity

275

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Work is under way to decommission the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, which had been used to test experimental fuel assemblies for commercial heavy-water power reactors. SRS is scheduled to remove the dome of the reactor this month (January 2011). Workers also will displace the reactor vessel and steam generators, grout the remaining structure in place, and install a concrete cover over the reactor's footprint Work is under way to decommission the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, which had been used to test experimental fuel assemblies for commercial heavy-water power reactors. SRS is scheduled to remove the dome of the reactor this month (January 2011). Workers also will displace the reactor vessel and steam generators, grout the remaining structure in place, and

276

Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase II BMP Modeling Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bosque River Watershed is located in the Brazos River Basin in central Texas and is facing a suite of water quality issues resulting in sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. These loadings are potentially derived from improperly managed...

Tuppad, Pushpa; Srinivasan, Raghavan

277

Development of Criteria for Evaluating Urban River Settings for Tourism-Rereation Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An earlier study, Cultural Benefits from Metropolitan River Recreation--San Antonio Prototype, (Gunn, et al., 1972), revealed that urban water resources can be successfully developed for tourism and recreation. The San Antonio River Walk is a unique...

Gunn, C. A.; Hanna, J. W.; Parenzin, A. J.; Blumberg, F. M.

278

Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pumps: Maximum of 10 tons for residential systems and 50 tons for commercial systems Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $50 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $750/ton Dual Fuel Air-source Heat Pumps: $150/ton Provider Cuivre River Electric Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control and Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water heaters. Water

279

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

280

The aesthetics of water and land: a promising concept for managing scarce water resources under climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...approach to water management Any strategy for managing...change) and the water demand side (e.g. adaptive...sustainable water management in the Jordan River...underestimation of the demand side of water management. Since fresh water...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 growing seasons, showing higher river flow during the 2001 irrigation season compared to 2002 or 2003. 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Water Level (ft.) B4r 2001 B4r 2002 B4r 2003 JuneMayApril July August September October November 159... it to dS/m. The number is then multiplied by 640 making the number equivalent to ppm. A control using reagent-water was also performed here. Additionally, electrical conductivity measurements were made at two sites near Mentone, Texas...

McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

River Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) Sabine River Compact (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Sabine River Compact Commission The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the

284

Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Evaluation of options for reclamation of the Salton Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, was asked last May by the Congressional Salton Sea Task Force to provide technical support for the remediation of the ecological problems in the Salton Sea. The results of their work in evaluating various concepts for addressing high salinity and variable water levels of the Sea relate to H.R. 3267 is presented. The results are preliminary and in some cases qualitative, but they can be used to help guide decision-makers in their deliberations. Ultimately, selecting the best solution for reclaiming the Salton Sea will have to integrate performance, economic, ecological, and institutional factors into the decision.

Hardie, R.W.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Reclamation and groundwater remediation at a hydrocarbon site in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a joint hydrocarbon cleanup project between Unocal and Marathon, we have initiated the use of constructed wetlands for restoration of the 40-acre Poppy Lane gravel pit located near Kenai, Alaska. Gravel excavated from this site was used to construct roads and drilling pads in the 1960`-70`s. During this period it was also used as a refuse dump for waste from the Kenai gas field and from local residents. The bulk wastes were removed and pockets of oily sand were removed, treated and returned to a stockpile on the site. This left the site with residual pockets of hydrocarbon-impacted sand (<1000 TPH) plus traces of hydrocarbon contamination in the uppermost shallow groundwater flowing through the outwash gravels. The final part of the cleanup will be land restoration and bioremediation of the final traces of hydrocarbons, which are predominantly diesel-range. High resolution gas chromatography analysis indicated that common plants already growing on the site (willow, cottonwood, and alder) did not concentrate diesel-range petroleum hydrocarbons in their foliage when growing in soils containing these contaminants. As part of the planned restoration and shallow groundwater remediation, two 1/3 acre test plots were constructed to promote in-situ biodegradation processes. In spring 1995, the first test, a tree root-barrier plot, was planted with dormant cuttings of four native wetland tree and shrub species, which were planted to depths up to five feet. Alder and elderberry did not succeed under any conditions, nor did any species planted in standing water. For cottonwood and willow species, approximately one half of each rooted and survived. When the water table dropped the second year, the willow cuttings rooted deeper in the vadose zone, while cottonwood did not. As a result of these findings, a tree root-barrier wetland is not considered to be a viable option for groundwater treatment at Poppy Lane.

Ririe, G.T. [Unocal, Brea, CA (United States); Drake, L.D. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Olson, S.S. [Marathon Oil, Tyler, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended to serve as guidance, or to supplement EPA or other agency environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-1 Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended, it is an outline of practices which may or have been used for uranium site restoration. Mining reclamation for uranium mining sites. The existence of bonding requirements and/or financial guarantees in the cases where

288

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

289

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply � Approximately 49 inches

MacAdam, Keith

290

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Platte River valley and ground water contamination in southwestern Grand Island. ` The ongoing drought cycle. Ground water level changes and related ground water/surface water interaction research-owned water wells. Cleanup and remediation efforts will be discussed by Gary Mader, Utilities Director, City

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

291

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF THE DIRECTOR . . . April 1973 NEBRASKA AND THE NATIONAL WATER COMMISSION REPORT The National Water Commission grew out of con t r-ovc rey over water resource deve lopment in the Colorado River Basin. Rp

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

292

Tucannon River Temperature Study, Prepared for : Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a temperature analysis of the Tucannon River completed for the WRIA 35 Planning Unit. The Tucannon River is located in southeastern Washington and flows approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) from the Blue Mountains to the Snake River. High water temperature in the Tucannon River has been identified as a limiting factor for salmonid fish habitat (Columbia Conservation District, 2004). Several segments of the Tucannon River are included on Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) 303(d) list of impaired waterbodies due to temperature. Ecology is currently conducting scoping for a temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study of the Tucannon River. The WRIA 35 Planning Unit retained HDR Engineering to evaluate water temperature in the Tucannon River. The project objectives are: (1) Review recent and historic data and studies to characterize temperature conditions in the river; (2) Perform field studies and analyses to identify and quantify heating and cooling processes in the river; (3) Develop and calibrate a computer temperature model to determine the sources of heat to the Tucannon River and to predict the temperature of the river that would occur with increased natural riparian shading assuming the current river morphology; (4) Evaluate differences in river temperatures between current and improved riparian shading during the 'critical' period - low river flows and high temperatures; and (5) Determine the potential benefits of riparian shading as a mechanism to decrease river temperature.

HDR Engineering.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Reclamation cost inputs for the resource allocation and mine costing model. Final working paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to improve estimates of surface mining reclamation cost components used as inputs to the Energy Information Administration's Resource Allocation and Mine Costing (RAMC) model. Costs ignored by the RAMC equations and input separately into the model on a regional basis were the focus of this study. Estimates of costs associated with the following reclamation activities were developed: valley fill construction, topsoil handling, runoff and diversion ditch construction and backfilling, sediment pond construction and backfilling, final pit backfilling and highwall reduction, revegetation, and permitting. For each activity, separate estimates were developed by cost component (initial capital, deferred capital, and annual operating), region (central Appalachia, northern Appalachia, the Midwest, and the West), and overburden ratio. For the first five activities, a ''composite mine'' approach was used. Basic engineering data on the quantity of material moved, and the distance over which it is moved, were obtained on a task-by-task basis for regional samples of actual mining operations. Mine permit applications filed with state and federal regulatory agencies were used as the source of these data. On the basis of the collected data, average material quantities and transportation distances were calculated for each region and reclamation task; these averages were used as the composite mine specifications assumed to be representative of the typical earthmoving requirements associated with each task in each region. Revegetation costs were estimated on the basis of published or publicly available data representing either the actual or estimated costs to state governments of revegetating abandoned mine sites. Permitting costs were developed on the basis of estimates of typical regional permitting costs solicited from engineering contractors providing permitting services to the coal industry. 11 tabs.

Not Available

1984-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Elements of a decision support system for real-time management ofdissolved oxygen in the San Joaquin River deep water ship channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A decision support system (DSS) has been designed and will be implemented over the next three years to assist in the control and management of episodes of low dissolved oxygen (DO) in a Deep Water Ship Channel (DWSC), located near Stockton, California. The DSS integrates three information technology functions. The first part is the collection and management of data on flow, pollution loads and water quality. The second part is the simulation model which can forecast the dissolved oxygen sag in the DWSC and determine management actions necessary to improve dissolved oxygen concentrations. The third part is the graphical user interface, which facilitates the computer simulations and posting of the forecasted dissolved oxygen and remedial measures to a stakeholder group for implementations.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Jacobs, Karl; Chen, Carl W.; Stringfellow, WilliamT.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Turbulent Rivers Bjorn Birnir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) function gives rise to Hack's law [16]; stating that the length of the main river, in mature river basins, scales with the area of the basin l Ah, h = 0.568 being Hack's exponent. 1 Introduction The flow]. One of the best known scaling laws of river basins is Hack's law [16] that states that the area

Birnir, Björn

297

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Department of Energy's Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and...

298

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Upscaling river biomass using dimensional analysis and hydrogeomorphic scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for management and restoration of watersheds and water supplies, as well as basic understand- ing of major energy and cyanobacteria (the primary producers that often dominate periphyton) in rivers and streams are critical component of periphyton in temperate streams and rivers throughout the world [Prosperi, 1989; Dodds et al

Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

300

Fish Assemblage and Food Web Structure in Whedos (Shallow Floodplain Habitats) of the Oueme River, West Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Oueme River, a lowland river in Benin, Africa, artificial ponds constructed in the floodplain (whedos) are colonized during the high-water period by a presumably random sample of fishes from the river channel. As water slowly recedes from...

Jackson, Andrew

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - acushnet river estuary Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estuaries are places where fresh and salt water mix. Typically they occur where rivers enter the sea. Estero Limantour, Drakes' Bay, Point Reyes National Seashore. Summary: level...

303

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity, (more)

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

US Army Corps of Engineers

305

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio River Greenway Commission

306

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Catawba Wateree River Basin Advisory Commission

307

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

308

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology Provider Missouri River Energy Solutions Bright Energy Solutions offers energy efficiency cash incentive programs to [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN170F&r... residential] and business customers of municipal utilities that are members

309

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Systems Integrator Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1961 State Delaware Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Project Review Section The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New

310

Distribution of Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) in polluted rivers of the Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of physical and chemical parameters on the abundance and diversity of chironomids was studied in six rivers with moderate to highly polluted water in the Juru River Basin. The rivers: Ceruk Tok Kun (CTKR) as reference site, and polluted rivers of Pasir (PR), Juru (JR), Permatang Rawa (PRR), Ara (AR) and Kilang Ubi (KUR) were sampled over a period of five months (November 2007-March 2008). Nine chirnomid species: Chironimus kiiensis, C. javanus, Polypedilum trigonus, Microchironomus sp., Dicrotendipes sp., Tanytarsus formosanus, Clinotanypus sp., Tanypus punctipennis and Fittkauimyia sp. were identified. Assessment of their relationships with several environmental parameters was performed using the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Tanytarsus formosanus was the most dominant in the relatively clean CTKR and moderately polluted JR with mean densities of 19.66 and 25.32 m?2, respectively while C. kiiensis was abundant in more polluted rivers. Tanytarsus formosanus, Dicrotendipes sp. and Microchironomus sp. were grouped under moderate to high water temperature, total organic matter (TOM), total suspended solids (TSS), velocity, pH, phosphates and sulphates. However, Tanypus punctipennis, Fittkauimyia sp., and Clinotanypus sp. were associated with high contents of river sediment such as TOM, Zn and Mn and water ammonium-N and nitrate-N and they were associated with higher dissolved oxygen (DO) content in the water. Chironomus kiiensis, C. javanus and P. trigonus showed positive relationships with TOM, ammonium-N and nitrate-N as well as trace metals of Zn, Cu and Mn. These three species could be considered as tolerant species since they have the ability to survive in extreme environmental conditions with low DO and high concentrations of pollutants. Based on the water parameter scores in all rivers, the highest diversity of chironomid larvae was reported in CTKR. With higher concentrations of organic and/or inorganic pollutants as reported in PPR, KUR and AR, the chironomid larval diversity decreased, and the abundance of tolerant species, mainly Chironomus spp., increased.

Salman A. Al-Shami; Che Salmah Md Rawi; Abu HassanAhmad; Siti Azizah Mohd Nor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS MAINSTEM PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE MAINSTEM PLAN COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM SUBMITTED ON BEHALF OF THE COMMITTEE OF NINE AND THE IDAHO WATER USERS ASSOCIATION JUNE 15, 2001 and Flow Augmentation Policy in the Columbia River Basin #12;1 IDAHO WATER USER RECOMMENDATIONS

312

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River-water-balance (SWB) model to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins

Torgersen, Christian

313

Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in New Pilot Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Des Moines Metropolitan Wastewater Reclamation Authority (WRA) and Des Moines Water Works have committed to participate in the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program as the first members of a new program pilot. SEP recognizes facilities that meet the ISO 50001 global energy management standard and demonstrate improved energy performance.

314

Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between Florida's Universities and the state agencies that are responsible for managing Florida's water Management District, Southwest Florida Water Management District, St. Johns River Water Management District Florida Water Management District and Florida Geologic Survey) to investigate arsenic mobilization during

315

WILLAMETTE RIVER AND COLUMBIA RIVER WASTE LOAD ALLOCATION Christopher J. Berger, Research Associate, Department of Civil and Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was developed to evaluate management alternatives designed to improve water quality. The Lower Willamette River Associate, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon Robert L. Annear, Jr., Research Assistant, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland

Wells, Scott A.

316

Waste oil reclamation, January 1980-August 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 80-Aug 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains 144 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. long-term trends could affect hydropower, ecosystems and aquatic species...). 1917 2005 Athabasca; #12;4 Reduced Water Supply from Reservoirs Climate Change Issues in the US 1. Rainfall vs Snowmelt; 21 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept

Julien, Pierre Y.

318

Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual ?ow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak ?ood waters, that ?ow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, of?cials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the ?ooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Construction Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Ontario Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details regulations for the protection of persons and property by ensuring that dams are suitably located, constructed, operated and maintained and are of an appropriate nature. The

320

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as for the conservation,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

322

Reading Comprehension - The Water Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Water Cycle The Water Cycle Evaporation, Condensation and Precipitation The _________ moon sun water clouds evaporates _________ fish oceans rain water from lakes and oceans. As the air rises, it cools. The water vapor condenses into tiny droplets of _________ evaporation clouds water sunshine . The droplets crowd together and form a _________ cloud lake storm precipitation . Wind blows the _________ rain sun droplet cloud towards the land. The tiny droplets join together and fall as precipitation to the _________ river lake ground cloud . The water soaks into the ground and collects in _________ rivers and lakes oceans and clouds jars and cups plants and animals . The _________ storm cycle river house that never ends has started again! A water cycle diagram. Use the diagram to identify the different parts of the water cycle:

323

Savannah River Site - Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

324

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

325

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

326

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of lab building SREL Home Faculty and Scientists Research Technical Reports Assessment of Radionuclide Monitoring in the CSRA Savannah River NERP Research Opportunities Field Sites...

327

Post-dam sediment dynamics and processes in the Colorado River estuary: Implications for habitat restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

River-sea connectivity is essential for restoring ecosystem services in the Colorado River delta. The mixing of river water and seawater sustains biodiversity and provides brackish-water nursery grounds for both commercially important and endangered marine species. The Colorado River no longer reaches the sea except during particularly high tides and anomalously wet years. The river's relict channel is now obstructed by an accumulation of sediments deposited during flood tides; ebb flows are not strong enough to keep the channel open. Landsat 5-TM and Landsat-7 scenes from the Colorado River delta and tide prediction tables were used to reconstruct river-sea connectivity and geomorphic processes after 50 years of extensive human manipulation of the Colorado River. Historical documentation, previous topographic surveys and sediment cores were used to estimate sedimentation rates in the lower river channel. Satellite images and tide charts show that currently the river reaches the sea or the sea reaches the river about 12 days per year, unlike 10 years ago when a year-round connection existed. Reduction in connectivity results from the evolution of a tidal sandbar located within the bedload convergence zone, about 35km upstream from the river's mouth. Historical documentation and sediment core analyses suggest sedimentation rates in the range of 1021cm per year. With the current conditions prevailing, active management dredging is required and needs to occur once every 510 years to reconnect the remaining riparian wetlands in the Colorado River to the Gulf of California.

Hector A. Zamora; Steven M. Nelson; Karl W. Flessa; Ritsuo Nomura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River...

Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

329

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

330

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

331

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Savannah River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

332

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources is responsible for maintaining a state water plan, intended to implement state policies for water management. A portion of the plan is reserved for rivers

333

Individual and population dose to users of the Savannah River following K-Reactor tritium release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 5700 curies of tritium were released to Pen Branch between December 22, 1991 and December 25, 1991. As expected, the tritiated water traveled through the Savannah River swamp to Steel Creek and the Savannah River. Elevated tritium concentrations in the river at Becks Ferry (Beaufort-Jasper) and Abercorn Creek (Port Wentworth) has caused some concern among downstream water users as to the amount of tritium available for uptake through the domestic drinking water supplies at the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment facilities. Radiation dose to the downstream drinking water population is estimated in this report.

Carlton, W.H.; Hamby, D.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

335

Texas Legislative and Irrigation Districts of the Rio Grande River Basin: A Map Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The title of this map series is Texas Legislative and Irrigation Districts of the Rio Grande River Basin. The series consists of nine (9) maps showing the boundaries of legislative districts and 32 water districts that deliver irrigation water...

Leigh, Eric; Fipps, G.

336

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of March. Sweetwater County, WY, western CO and the Colorado River valleyNIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado Colorado River Basin (UCRB) received below average precipitaQon (Fig. 1). Some

338

NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of March. Sweetwater County, WY, western CO and the Colorado River valleyNIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado Colorado River Basin (UCRB) received below average precipitaPon (Fig. 1). Some

339

FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in water levels and mean water temperature in Pool 8 of the Mississippi River during summer of I9U8 ih 6 and Wildlife Service, meeting in December, I9I1.3, formed the Upper Mississippi River Conservation Committee of Conservation St. Paul, Minn. Special Scientific Reports Fisheries No. 101 #12;#12;CONTENTS Page Area fished 1

340

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the Catchment Area and Water of the River Taff in South Wales, United Kingdom, and Its Potential Relationship to Clustering of Crohn's Disease Cases in the City of Cardiff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prevailing southwesterly winds. This would influence...America (18, 37, 49). Wildlife reservoirs may contribute...prevailing southwesterly winds. (Map reproduced with...Agency (Wales) for the wind, river, and rainfall...infection of nonruminant wildlife in Scotland. J. Clin...

R. W. Pickup; G. Rhodes; S. Arnott; K. Sidi-Boumedine; T. J. Bull; A. Weightman; M. Hurley; J. Hermon-Taylor

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

More than two-thirds of the Earth's surface is covered with water, so it is not surprising that the planet's oceans, lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands are considered valuable natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the planet's oceans, lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands are considered valuable natural resources and/stream ecology, wetland science, aquatic- conservation biology and Great Lakes ecosystems. Because of the breadth

Edwards, Paul N.

342

Monitoring groundwater and river interaction along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an adjunct to efficient Hanford Site characterization and remediation of groundwater contamination, an automatic monitor network has been used to measure Columbia River and adjacent groundwater levels in several areas of the Hanford Site since 1991. Water levels, temperatures, and electrical conductivity measured by the automatic monitor network provided an initial database with which to calibrate models and from which to infer ground and river water interactions for site characterization and remediation activities. Measurements of the dynamic river/aquifer system have been simultaneous at 1-hr intervals, with a quality suitable for hydrologic modeling and for computer model calibration and testing. This report describes the equipment, procedures, and results from measurements done in 1993.

Campbell, M.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 20, 2011 June 20, 2011 CX-006372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Well Installations at R-Area Operable Unit CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 15, 2011 CX-006373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Connect 735-11A to the Central Plant Chilled Water System CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/15/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 14, 2011 CX-006375: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Transfer Lines with Spare Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/14/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office June 14, 2011 CX-006374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

344

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 11, 2009 August 11, 2009 CX-000513: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cone Penetration Test sampling at ECODS (Early Construction and Operational Disposal Sites) B3 and B5 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/11/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Isolation of Domestic Water Line, 782-4G CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tree Removal and Chipping at P-Area Ash Basin and R-Area Ash Basin and P-007 Outfall Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

345

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 10, 2010 December 10, 2010 CX-004837: Categorical Exclusion Determination Measurement of Compressive Strength CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/10/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office December 7, 2010 CX-004826: Categorical Exclusion Determination Piezometer Well Installation for 1,4-Dioxane Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/07/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office December 7, 2010 CX-004824: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle and Remove Tank 6 Riser 7 for Waste Determination (WD) Sampling CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/07/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office December 7, 2010 CX-004823: Categorical Exclusion Determination Consolidation of K- and L-Area Heavy Water in C-Area

346

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 20, 2012 July 20, 2012 CX-009070: Categorical Exclusion Determination A-Area Alternate Fire Water Supply CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/20/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 20, 2012 CX-009069: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove and Dispose of 107 A & B Tanks and Support Structure CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 07/20/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 20, 2012 CX-009068: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydrogen Charging Tritium Contaminated Metals CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/20/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 16, 2012 CX-009077: Categorical Exclusion Determination F-Area Infrasturcture Improvement CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07/16/2012

347

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 30, 2012 August 30, 2012 CX-009100: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cooling Tower Water Sampling and Analysis for Legionella Pneumophila Density CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 29, 2012 CX-009106: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle/Remove Vacuum System and Related Equipment in 772-F CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 29, 2012 CX-009105: Categorical Exclusion Determination 284-H Track Coal Hopper Pit Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 29, 2012 CX-009104: Categorical Exclusion Determination Infrastructure Modification for the Mobile Plutonium Facility (MPF) at the

348

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2012 9, 2012 CX-008639: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish Laydown Yard East of 281-3F CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 29, 2012 CX-008638: Categorical Exclusion Determination Excavate to Repair Underground Domestic Water Leak between Tanks 5 and 7 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 29, 2012 CX-008637: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operation and Maintenance of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Method in 773, B142 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/29/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 29, 2012 CX-008636: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Organic Species by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas

349

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 20, 2013 June 20, 2013 CX-010655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Roof Repair on Crane Maintenance Area Roof CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/20/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 18, 2013 CX-010657: Categorical Exclusion Determination Western Sector Treatment System Soil Vapor Extraction Wells CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 18, 2013 CX-010656: Categorical Exclusion Determination Stormwater Drainage Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/18/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 17, 2013 CX-010662: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reroute Diesel Water Cooling Line at 241-125H CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/17/2013

350

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 20, 2011 July 20, 2011 CX-006620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocate Hydroburst System from 238-H to 234-7H CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 07/20/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 18, 2011 CX-006619: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Seventeen Monitoring Wells Around 715-D CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/18/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 18, 2011 CX-006618: Categorical Exclusion Determination Disable F-Tank Farm (FTF) Air Compressor Sequencer CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/18/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 18, 2011 CX-006617: Categorical Exclusion Determination E Area Fire Water Extension CX(s) Applied: B1.15

351

Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

Matthews, R. A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Predicting the rivers blue line for fish conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Basin (VRB), a tributary to the lower Colorado River that has been the poster child...rivers like the San Pedro River (also a Colorado River tributary in Arizona), citizen...reaches with zero flows (i.e., during floods) and hence colonize parts of the distant...

John L. Sabo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Green River Mill Site (UT.0-01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Documents Related to Green River Mill Site Data Validation Package for the June 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site; LMS/GRN/S0609; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Green River, Utah, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Historic Fact Sheet: Green River Disposal Site Uranium ore was

354

Numerical Simulation of Flood Levels for Tropical Rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flood forecasting is important for flood damage reduction. As a result of advances in the numerical methods and computer technologies, many mathematical models have been developed and used for hydraulic simulation of the flood. These simulations usually include the prediction of the flood width and depth along a watercourse. Results obtained from the application of hydraulic models will help engineers to take precautionary measures to minimize flood damage. Hydraulic models were used to simulate the flood can be classified into dynamic hydraulic models and static hydraulic models. The HEC-2 static hydraulic model was used to predict water surface profiles for Linggi river and Langat river in Malaysia. The model is based on the numerical solution of the one dimensional energy equation of the steady gradually varied flow using the iteration technique. Calibration and verification of the HEC-2 model were conducted using the recorded data for both rivers. After calibration, the model was applied to predict the water surface profiles for Q10, Q30, and Q100 along the watercourse of the Linggi river. The water surface profile for Q200 for Langat river was predicted. The predicted water surface profiles were found in agreement with the recorded water surface profiles. The value of the maximum computed absolute error in the predicted water surface profile was found to be 500 mm while the minimum absolute error was 20 mm only.

Thamer Ahmed Mohammed; Salim Said; Mohd Zohadie Bardaie; Shah Nor Basri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

357

Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) Little Missouri State Scenic River Act (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting This legislation aims to preserve the Little Missouri River in its present, free-flowing natural condition. The Little Missouri River Commission is

358

New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead May 24, 2010 - 1:23pm Addthis Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Joshua DeLung Hydropower harnesses water power to create reliable, clean and plentiful renewable energy, but dams can have an unintended impact on wildlife --

359

National Smart Water Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

Beaulieu, R A

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fish Passage in the Upper Mississippi River System Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were analyzed relative to open (gates out of the water) versus closed (water retained in upstream pool above LDs 22 and 26 and 75% below. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and Western Illinois University (WIU) have also tagged 91 lake sturgeon in pools 20, 24, and the open river, most of which moved

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Using Airborne Sensing to Map Pools in Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Water, Land and Biodiversity Conservation, South Australia #12;#12;Mapping methods · SpaceborneUsing Airborne Sensing to Map Pools in Rivers Michael Stewardson, Jeffrey Walker, Michelle Kan, Luke Kitchen, Stephen Wealands, Payam Ghadirian eWater Cooperative Research Centre, The University

Walker, Jeff

362

Advanced Water Treatment System: Technological and Economic Evaluations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The supply of potable water from polluted rivers, lakes, unsafe wells, ... most effective methods to obtain low cost drinking water is desalination. In this chapter, an advanced water treatment system, based on electrodialysis

Artak Barseghyan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

364

FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A quantitative evaluation of borehole-impeller flowmeter data leads to estimated field hydraulic conductivity. Data were obtained during an injection test of a geothermal well at the Raft River geothermal test site in Idaho. Both stationary and trolling calibrations of the flowmeter were made in the well. Methods were developed to adjust for variations in hole diameter, impeller speed, and trolling speed. These methods were applied to evaluate water losses into the formation as a function of depth. Application of the techniques is restricted to aquifers below the water

365

Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Chemical Logging Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To use new methods to assist geothermal well drilling. Notes Chemical logging resulted in the development of a technique to assist in geothermal well drilling and resource development. Calcium-alkalinity ratios plotted versus drill depth assisted in defining warm and hot water aquifers. Correlations between the calcium-alkalinity log and lithologic logs were used to determine aquifer types and detection of hot water zones

366

Savannah River National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

367

Regional water planning Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy, capital and O&M ­ surface water: generally large investments, canals, pipelines ­ ground water demand for resources water, energy, firewood etc. · Need to meet demand with supply ­ Logistics efficiency, equity, sustainability #12;Regional View LOCATE: Farmland Villages Road/highways River/stream Dam

Sohoni, Milind

368

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Shared Savings Program: $2,500 - $50,000 Energy Improvement Incentive: Varies, Contact WPPI RFP for Energy Efficiency: Varies, Contact WPPI Efficient Lighting Program: Will match Focus on Energy incentive to $5,000

369

Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider

370

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources

371

South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

372

Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of

373

Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Niobrara Council This act establishes the Niobrara Council, to assist in all aspects of the

374

MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In stream River Hydrokinetics In stream River Hydrokinetics < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description New Energy Corporation EnCurrent vertical axis turbine mounted on pontoon barge Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10:01.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/In_stream_River_Hydrokinetics&oldid=680959" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

375

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: rebate amounts cannot exceed 50% of the total project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Clothes Washers: $50 Gas, Oil or Propane Clothes Washers: $20 Refrigerators/Freezers: $15 Duct Sealing: $400 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,000 Air-source Heat Pumps: $700 - $1,100

376

Scenic Rivers Energy Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scenic Rivers Energy Coop Scenic Rivers Energy Coop Place Wisconsin Utility Id 16740 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power Commercial Commercial Power with Water Heater Load Control Commercial Controlled Electric Loads- Controlled Electric Residential Controlled Electric Loads- Off-Peak Storage Residential Large Power Industrial Large Power with Water Heater Load Control Industrial Multiple Site Single Phase Rate Residential Peak Alert Commercial Residential and Small Commercial Service Residential

377

FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD RIVER AND PLATEAU...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to focus on three critical projects in tandem: the glove boxes, the Plutonium and Americium Reclamation Facility, and removing highly contaminated process vacuum lines. She...

378

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sioux River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place: Hudson, South Dakota Zip: 57034 Product: Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol...

379

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - April...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Company - July 21, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - March 29, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000...

380

WHO OWNS "YOUR" WATER? RECLAIMING WATER AS A PUBLIC GOOD UNDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to export water from its lakes and rivers to the United States if the US demanded it? This issue became so, and with foreign investment becoming a dominant part of water and wastewater management in many countries

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reining in drought : how water limits influence conservation in Massachusetts towns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It's surprising to learn that the water-rich state of Massachusetts experiences incidences of water stress, where rivers go dry for stretches of the year and where municipalities struggle to meet water demand. Water ...

Brown, Anna L. (Anna Libby)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Groundwater Sampling Activity Date 1974 - 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Collect baseline chemical data Notes Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is

385

River Protection.PDF  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cc: cc: DOE/IG-0506 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS I N S P E C T I O N O F SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM JUNE 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 June 14, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Selected Aspects of the Office of River Protection Performance-Based Incentive Program" BACKGROUND The Office of River Protection (ORP), which reports to the Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for remediation of the radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in the State of Washington. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2000, ORP established 26 performance-based contract

386

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface E&WR - Water-Energy Interface Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation: A Modeling Framework The purpose of this study, conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center at West Virginia University, is to develop and demonstrate a framework for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects, and environmental benefits of using mine water for thermo-electric power generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering, and environmental factors to be considered and evaluated in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. Development and demonstration of the framework involves the following activities: A field investigation and case study conducted for the proposed Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. This 300 megawatt power plant has been proposed to burn coal refuse from the Champion coal refuse pile, which is the largest coal waste pile in Western Pennsylvania. The field study, based on previous mine pool research conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC), identifies mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2,000 to 3,000 gpm power plant water requirement.

387

Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River NERP Research Opportunities Field Sites Data Research Facilities Low Dose Irradiation Facility Tritium Irrigation Facility Microsatellite Development Education...

388

River restoration Ellen Wohl,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, massive expenditures, and the burgeoning industry of aquatic and riparian restoration, river ecosystems. Introduction: Problem Statement [2] Continuing degradation of river ecosystems and loss of aquatic biodiversityRiver restoration Ellen Wohl,1 Paul L. Angermeier,2 Brian Bledsoe,3 G. Mathias Kondolf,4 Larry Mac

Poff, N. LeRoy

389

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part I Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Model [LRGFCM] RiverWare Model Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 FIGURE 17. Correlations for Del Rio and La Mesa Drain s ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 F I G U R E 18. Correl a t i o n s for East and Montoy a Dr ain... was developed using an ARIMA time-series transfer function analysis of the relationship between diversion from the Mesilla Dam and flow in the Del Rio, La Mesa, East, and Montoya Drains. ? The RiverWare physical model was constructed based on the reach...

Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 "2. Chief Joseph","Hydroelectric","USCE-North Pacific Division",2456 "3. Transalta Centralia Generation","Coal","TransAlta Centralia Gen LLC",1596 "4. Rocky Reach","Hydroelectric","PUD No 1 of Chelan County",1254 "5. Columbia Generating Station","Nuclear","Energy Northwest",1097 "6. Wanapum","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",1059 "7. Boundary","Hydroelectric","Seattle City of",1040 "8. Priest Rapids","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",932

391

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell, Wellpinit, Washington, February 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Maintenance Program and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell Wellpinit, Washington February 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 01-06 Document Number S00204 DOE/Grand Junction Office Sherwood LTSP February 2001 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction............................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.2 Legal and Regulatory Requirements ........................................................................

392

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A discussion of the geology and the wellfield development at Raft River is presented. The geothermal resource is located in a downdropped and downwarped basin bordered on east, west, and south by mountain ranges that vary in both stratigraphy and structure. It is inferred that the geothermal resource occurs where hydrothermal water rises at the intersection of and along the Narrows Zone and the Bridge Fault. Three exploration wells, two development wells, and two injection wells were drilled. The basic strategy of field development was to drill deep production wells on the faulted

393

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting An association organized for the purpose of addressing issues on a specific lake or river, a lake improvement district, or a lake conservation district

394

Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

50) 50) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1950 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Agricultural Wells Notes The geothermal resource at Raft River was discovered sometime prior to 1950 when two shallow agricultural wells, the Bridge and Crank wells, encountered boiling water. References Diek, A.; White, L.; Roegiers, J.-C.; Moore, J.; McLennan, J. D. (1 January 2012) BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Exploratory_Well_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1950)&oldid=473844

395

Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State Interagency Missouri River Authority engages in comprehensive

396

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This interim report presents the results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well vicinity. Recommendations

397

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6) 6) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine productive zones in the reservoir Notes Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water 1450C reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. References Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Kinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. (1 January 1976) Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conceptual_Model_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473821

398

COLORADO RIVER COMPACT The states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO RIVER COMPACT The states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah of Colorado, J. G. Scrugham for the state of Nevada, Stephen B. Davis, Jr., for the state of New Mexico, R. E of the Colorado river system; to establish the relative importance of different beneficial uses of water

Johnson, Eric E.

399

Fish Assemblages and Substrates in the Middle Wabash River, USA Robert Mueller, Jr.1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish Assemblages and Substrates in the Middle Wabash River, USA Robert Mueller, Jr.1,2 and Mark Pyron1 We collected fishes at 28 sites of the middle Wabash River, Indiana, using a boat electrofisher for fish assemblage variation that was explained by variation in water depth and substrate frequency

Pyron, Mark

400

PCB Concentration in Fish in a River System after Remediation of Contaminated Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An 1991 investigation of PCB concentrations in water and fish along a river was repeated in 1996 after the completion of a remediation of PCB-containing sediment in a lake within the river system. ... The results indicated, that changes in background exposure must be taken into account when evaluating the success of remedial actions measures carried out over several years. ...

Gudrun Bremle; Per Larsson

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dynamics of an Equatorial River Plume: Theory and Numerical Experiments Applied to the Congo Plume Case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Congo River has the second largest rate of flow in the world and is mainly responsible for the broad tongue of low-salinity water that is observed in the Gulf of Guinea. Despite their importance, near-equatorial river plumes have not been ...

Clment Vic; Henrick Berger; Anne-Marie Trguier; Xavier Couvelard

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Review of river discharge records and gauging stations in the Rwenzori Mountains of Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of river discharge records and gauging stations in the Rwenzori Mountains of Uganda Richard Department Directorate of Water Development Entebbe, Uganda November 2004 Review of river discharge records and gauging stations in the Rwenzori Mountains of Uganda 1 #12;Summary This report provides an overview

Jones, Peter JS

403

Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be? Harbor Branch launches new study of humans who eat fish and live around the estuary By Scott Wyland Tuesday, May 22, 2012 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A 20-year-old man fishes local waters every day for his meals and scoffs

Belogay, Eugene A.

404

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges in the implications of seasonal disinfection practices of wastewater effluents for meeting water quality goals from municipal wastewater outfalls along the river, as well as upstream and downstream of each outfall

Mitch, William A.

405

Condamine River Meteor Zamia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONNORS Cape Townshend Townshend Island Island Long Broad Sound Condamine River Maran oa Comet Isaac Daws Roper Nogoa Ca llide Bungeworgorai North Balmy L ogan Denison L o t us Buck land Con ciliation Humb oldt Elphinstone Dam Eungella Dam R Ck Nebo RomaAmby Wowan Warra Miles Moura Dingo Comet Alpha Banana Rannes Marmor

Greenslade, Diana

406

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

River meandering dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Ikeda, Parker, and Sawai river meandering model is reexamined using a physical approach employing an explicit equation of motion. For periodic river shapes as seen from above, a cross-stream surface elevation gradient creates a velocity shear that is responsible for the decay of small-wavelength meander bends, whereas secondary currents in the plane perpendicular to the downstream direction are responsible for the growth of large-wavelength bends. A decay length D=H/2Cf involving the river depth H and the friction coefficient Cf sets the scale for meandering, giving the downstream distance required for the fluid velocity profile to recover from changes in the channel curvature. Using this length scale and a time scale T, we explicitly trace the observed length scale invariance to the equations of motion, and predict similar time and velocity scale invariances. A general time-dependent nonlinear modal analysis for periodic rivers reveals that modes higher than the third mode are needed to describe upstream migration of bend apexes just before oxbow cutoff, and are important to accurate calculations of the time and sinuosity at cutoff.

Boyd F. Edwards and Duane H. Smith

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 16, 2011 May 16, 2011 CX-006405: Categorical Exclusion Determination 707-C Storm Drain Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/16/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office May 13, 2011 CX-006406: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silver Chloride Injection at the F Area Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Barrier Wall CX(s) Applied: B6.9 Date: 05/13/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office May 12, 2011 CX-006407: Categorical Exclusion Determination Removal of Inactive Chromate Water Isolation Valves CRW-V-170 and CRW-V-175 and Installation of 3 Inch Blind Flanges for F-area New Hill CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/12/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina

409

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation project: Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges (typically based on water use), reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals because the recycled water has already been treated with soaps and conditioners. A recovery system saves water by recycling wash water that would normally be dumped into the city sewage system. Recycling the wash water produces considerable energy savings because the recycled water has a higher temperature than fresh water. As a result, a hot water heater consumes less energy to heat the recycled water. The demonstration project discussed in this report was based in a large commercial laundry in Portland, Oregon. The laundry serves a large hotel/motel chain and processes an average of 25,000 pounds of laundry per day. A wastewater recovery system using a membrane microfiltration unit (MFU) was installed in the laundry in September 1995. Time series data of the water and energy consumption of the laundry were taken before and after installation of the MFU. Energy savings were measured by performing a thermal energy balance around the washing machines. Water savings were calculated by metering volumetric flow rates. After a period of approximately five months, the MFU has achieved final results of 52 percent savings in water consumption and 44 percent savings in energy to heat water. This five-month period represents a learning curve during which several small technical improvements were made to the MFU and laundry staff adjusted laundry operations to maximize the benefits of the MFU. An economic analysis discusses the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Property:Project Nearest Body of Water | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nearest Body of Water Nearest Body of Water Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Nearest Body of Water Property Type String Pages using the property "Project Nearest Body of Water" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + North Atlantic Ocean + MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Galway Bay site close to Spiddal + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + government Pilot Zone + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + East River + MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + Ingram Thorofare + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + Mississippi River + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + Maurice River +

412

Town of Hague landfill reclamation study: Research ways to increase waste heating value and reduce waste volume. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitored composing was studied as a method for reducing the quantity of waste requiring disposed from a landfill reclamation project. After each of two re-screening steps, composted {open_quotes}soil{close_quotes} from a single long windrow of varying depths and moisture content was subjected to analytical testing to determine its suitability to remain as backfill in a reclaimed landfill site. The remaining uncomposted waste was combusted at a waste-to-energy facility to determine if Btu values were improved. Results indicate that a full-scale composting operation could result in a net decrease of approximately 11 percent in disposal costs. The Btu value of the reclaimed waste was calculated to be 4,500 to 5,000 Btu/lb. The feasibility of composting reclaimed waste at other landfill reclamation projects will depend upon site-specific technical and economic factors, including size and nature of the organic fraction of the waste mass, local processing costs, and the cost of waste disposal alternatives.

Salerni, E. [SSB Environmental Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermometer temperatures of shallow samples suggest significant re-equilibration at temperatures below those found in the deep wells. Silica geothermometer temperatures of water samples from the deep wells are in reasonable agreement with measured temperatures, whereas Na-K-Ca temperatures are significantly higher than measured temperatures. The chemical characteristics of the water, as indicated by chloride concentration, are extremely variable in shallow and deep samples. Chloride concentrations of the deep samples range from 580 to 2200 mg/kg.

415

White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program White River Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pump: 10 tons for Residential, 50 tons for Commercial Dual Fuel Heat Pump: 10 tons for Residential, 50 tons for Commercial Air Source Heat Pump: 10 tons Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Sector Only: Refrigerator: $75 Electric Water Heater: $50 Room AC: $50 Both Commercial and Residential: Ground Source Heat Pump (New Installation): $750/ton Ground Source Heat Pump (Replacement) : $150/ton

416

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Residential  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Missouri River Energy Services (23 Member Cooperatives) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan: $25 Clothes Washer: $50 Decorative Light String: $3.50/string (6 string limit) Dehumidifier: $10 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator: $50 Room A/C: $15 Central A/C: $100 Furnace with ECM: $150 Air Handler with ECM: $150 Air-Source Heat Pump: $200 - $350 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton Heat Pump Water Heater - $300

417

Global analysis of river systems: from Earth system controls to Anthropocene syndromes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...soil-derived particles plus wastewater release in rivers, the recycling of treated urban sewage sludges...yet with- out appropriate wastewater treatment, which was gen...regulation, as contaminated water recycling and/or treatment, new technical...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Oil sands development contributes polycyclic aromatic compounds to the Athabasca River and its tributaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excessive water withdrawals, pipeline and road crossings that increase erosion and sedimentation...docu-mented. In June 1970, an oil pipeline leak to the Athabasca River...impacts and stated that the program design could not assess cumulative impacts...

Erin N. Kelly; Jeffrey W. Short; David W. Schindler; Peter V. Hodson; Mingsheng Ma; Alvin K. Kwan; Barbra L. Fortin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Moisture Origin and Meridional Transport in Atmospheric Rivers and Their Association with Multiple Cyclones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During December 2006 many cyclones traveled across the North Atlantic, causing temperature and precipitation in Norway to be well above average. Large excursions of high vertically integrated water vapor, often referred to as atmospheric rivers, ...

Harald Sodemann; Andreas Stohl

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Errors in Estimating River Discharge from Remote Sensing based on Manning's Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

° inclination; all rivers, lakes, reservoirs observed at least twice every 22 days. Will measure reach (2008) estimated errors in width resulting from water coherence time effects (due to wind and turbulence

Washington at Seattle, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine which reservoir model best matches the isotope data. Notes 1) Chemical and light-stable isotope data are presented for water samples from the Raft River geothermal area and nearby. On the basis of chemical character, as defined by a trilinear plot of per cent milliequivalents, and light-stable isotope data, the waters in the geothermal area can be divided into waters that have and have not mixed with cold water. 2) Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic

422

NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water Drought Assessment Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lower Green River basin, western valleys of Colorado and the four corners area received littleNIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin March 23 of Colorado also received beneficial moisture in the range of 0.50 ­ 3.00". The eastern plains of Colorado

423

CARBON FLOW AND ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME DESCRIBED BY INVERSE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into four subregions connected by water flow to discretize the gradient of ecosystem properties as river with mid-salinity waters (15-29 psu), surrounded by a larger region of net heterotrophic waters where- salinity regions of the plume, with strongest sedimentation from the productive mid- salinity regions

Breed, Greg A.

424

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Future of Global Water Stress: An Integrated Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assess the ability of global water systems, resolved at 282 large river basins or Assessment Sub Regions (ASRs), to the meet water requirements over the coming decades under integrated projections of socioeconomic growth ...

Schlosser, C. Adam

426

EVALUATING TRADEOFFS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW PROTECTIONS AND AGRICULTURAL WATER SECURITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATING TRADEOFFS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW PROTECTIONS AND AGRICULTURAL WATER SECURITY T. E Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA ABSTRACT River basin managers responsible for water allocation decisions are increasingly required

Merenlender, Adina

427

Managing hydroclimatic risks in federal rivers: a diagnostic assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Difficult hydrology in the Colorado, Ebro and Murray-Darling...Australia, Spain and the Western USA-are a distinct...storage (RS4). The Colorado and Murray-Darling...priority under the 1968 Colorado River Basin Project...the adaptability of western water compacts. Public...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

PORTSMOUTH HARBOR AND PISCATAQUA RIVER, NH & ME NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the states of New Hampshire and Maine. The existing project consists of 35-foot deep entrance channel, with a minimum width of 400 feet, extending about 6.2 miles from deep water at the harbor entrance upriverPORTSMOUTH HARBOR AND PISCATAQUA RIVER, NH & ME NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 21 August 2014

US Army Corps of Engineers

429

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Area Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Four formation water samples were collected from well 56-4, during an airlift test which took place between November 11 and November 14, 2007. One sample was taken from the Steiner Well which was the source for drilling water for the drilling of 56-4 and for the short injection test. The samples were analyzed by Thermochem for chemical constituents and by Rafter Lab at GNS for isotope analysis. References William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne (2008) Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Reese_River_Area_(Henkle_%26_Ronne,_2008)&oldid=51045

430

Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents February 6, 2012 - 3:16pm Addthis Free Flow System turbine being installed in East River, New York, NY (Dec 2006). | Image Credit: Kris Unger/Verdant Power, Inc. Free Flow System turbine being installed in East River, New York, NY (Dec 2006). | Image Credit: Kris Unger/Verdant Power, Inc. Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program What does this project do? The 30 turbines will generate 1,050 kilowatts of electricity -- this power will be delivered to 9,500 New York homes. As part of the Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy project, 30 turbines are being installed along the strait that connects the Long Island Sound with the

431

EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

432

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Savannah River Site - Enforcement Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Savannah River Site Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Puncture Wound Injury resulting in a Radiological Uptake at the Savannah River Site, July 22, 2011 (NEA-2011-02) Consent Order issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Facility Construction Deficiencies and Subcontractor Oversight at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Amer Industrial Technologies, Inc. related to Weld Deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010

434

Raft river geothermal pump disassembly and inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disassembly and postoperation inspection of the Peerless geothermal water pump used in teh RRGE-1 well at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site are summarized. Disassembly was hampered by scale that froze some of the pump bearings onto the impeller shaft after operation ceased. The pump appeared otherwise in generally excellent condition after more than 1600 h running time in a geothermal environment. Most postoperation diameters of rotating parts were still within factory tolerance. The few out-of-tolerance bearing diameters could not be attributed to wear and could have been out of tolerance when received. This possibility points to a need for preoperation quality-control inspection of the bearings.

Van Treeck, R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Floating Robots Track Water Flow With Smartphones  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of water conditions in the Delta. For the large part of a day, 100 mobile sensors will be placed into the Sacramento River near Walnut Grove, Calif., making four...

436

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Southwest region solar pond study for three sites: Tularosa Basin, Malaga Bend, and Canadian River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the study, the Bureau of Reclamation investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using solar salt-gradient ponds to generate power and to produce freshwater in Bureau projects at three sites--the Canadian River at Logan, New Mexico; Malaga Bend on the Pecos River near Carlsbad, New Mexico; and the Tularosa Basin in the vicinity of Alamogordo, New Mexico. The ponds would be used to generate electric power that could be integrated with the Bureau's power grid or used in combination with thermal energy from the ponds to power commercially available desalination systems to produce freshwater. Results of the economic analysis, which concentrated primarily on the Tularosa Basin site, showed that solar-pond-generated intermediate load power would cost between 62 and 90 mills/kWh and between 52 and 83 mills/kWh for baseload power. This results in benefit-cost ratios of approximately 2.0 and 1.3 for intermediate and baseload, respectively, when compared to similar facilities powered by fossil fuels. The cost savings are even more pronounced when comparing the two (solar versus fossil fuel) as a source of power for conventional distillation and membrane-type desalination systems.

Boegli, W.J.; Dahl, M.M.; Remmers, H.E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water co produced with shale oil and decanted from it isWater from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Impact of Reservoir Evaporation and Evaporation Suppression on Water Supply Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir storage is essential for developing dependable water supplies and is a major component of the river system water budget. The storage contents of reservoirs fluctuate greatly with variations in water use and climatic conditions that range...

Ayala, Rolando A

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Environmental Assessment for the new sanitary sludge land application sites at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Action is necessary to allow the Savannah River Site (SRS) to provide for efficient disposal of sanitary sludge for SRS as forecast by the latest site projections (WSRC, 1991) and modified by the latest US Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance for SRS (Stello, 1993). From 1986 to 1992, sanitary wastewater sludge was applied on SRS lands in accordance with a South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) permit as part of the reclamation of SRS`s F- and H-Area borrow pits (disturbed land). This reclamation is essentially complete and, if land disposal of sludge is to continue, new land application sites on SRS must be selected as the extended permit for applying sludge to the borrow pits expired in 1992. Currently, sludge is being trucked offsite for disposal by a subcontractor to a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) near Augusta, Georgia (WSRC, 1992a). This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE to assess the potential environmental impacts of onsite land disposal of treated sanitary sewage sludge from SRS. The proposed action is to replace the present offsite disposal of the treated sanitary sludge from existing SRS wastewater treatment plants with onsite reuse through land application. The proposed action is independent of SRS production operations and is necessary for more efficient disposal of SRS sanitary sludge at lower costs. The proposed land application at SRS is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) ``No Action`` alternative (DOE, 1991). The sludge from SRS sanitary wastewater treatment plants is nonhazardous. Onsite disposal of this sludge allows SRS to comply with current DOE policies to keep any DOE wastes onsite where possible and to eliminate any potential accidents due to continuing offsite transportation of sanitary wastes (DOE, 1990a).

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

444

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

445

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

446

Population dynamics of the Concho water snake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the upper Colorado and Concho river systems of central Texas. It is 1 of 2 subspecies, the other being the Brazos water snake (Nerodia harteri harteri) which occurs in the Brazos river system of north-central Texas, Together they comprise the only species..., reproductive potential, mortality, and movements. williams predicted that habitat degradation resulting from the creation of Spence Reservoir, 2 km above his study site, would be detrimental to the Concho water snake population. Since the impoundment...

Mueller, James Michael

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Influence of river discharge and ocean currents on coastal optical properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The variability in the optical properties of a coastal region influenced by river runoff and multiple ocean currents in a southern hemisphere setting has been studied. The study area, Tasmanian coastal waters, is influenced by subtropical currents such as the East Australian Current (EAC) and the Zeehan Current (ZC) mix with cooler sub-Antarctic water (SAW). Freshwater discharges from rivers around the island and their mixing with the ocean currents also influence Tasmanian coastal waters. This study was performed to understand the influence of hydrodynamic processes on coastal optical properties and underwater light propagation. Physical, biogeochemical and optical properties were measured in Tasmanian coastal water during the austral autumn of 2007. In this study we found that physical properties have a good correlation with optical properties indicating the role played by hydrodynamic processes in distribution of optically active substances, optical properties of the water mass and underwater light propagation. Analysis of in situ salinity and temperature confirmed the presence of relatively cooler ZC in the South-West region, a cooler mixture of the ZC and SAW in the South-East, warm and saline EAC waters along the East coast and relatively cooler and fresh Bass straight waters along the North coast. In Tasmanian coastal waters light absorption in the water column is controlled by Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) with regionally varying contributions from Non-Algal Particulate (NAP) matter and phytoplankton. Absorption due to CDOM and NAP show a conservative mixing behaviour indicating that these biogeochemical components were delivered by the river and diluted in the coastal water. Suspended particulate matter in Tasmanian coastal water are highly scattering in nature and the beam attenuation is mainly due to light scattering. Variability in probability of light backscattering was mainly due to varying availability of non-algal particulate matter in the surface waters, which is controlled by river discharges in the region. Beam attenuation was high in coastal waters that are influenced by river runoff and increasing beam attenuation had constrained the underwater light propagation in these coastal waters. In the absence of major rivers along the East coast, optical properties were mainly influenced by the EAC water mass. Optical properties of the East coast were clearly different from the rest of the Tasmanian regions. In other regions the influence of ocean currents is subtle due to strong mixing between river discharges and ocean water mass. Overall, analysis of bio-optical properties shows that optical properties are constrained by regional hydrodynamic processes. Results presented highlight importance of using hydrodynamic process specific bio-optical properties and parameterisation in modelling light propagation in coastal ecosystems that are influenced by multiple ocean currents and river discharges.

Nagur Cherukuru; Vittorio E. Brando; Thomas Schroeder; Lesley A. Clementson; Arnold G. Dekker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of [sup 137]Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of [sup 137]Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope [sup 137]Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of {sup 137}Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of {sup 137}Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope {sup 137}Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Freeing up Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 14 Freeing up Water Story by Kathy Wythe Freeing up Water Brush control efforts yield water tx H2O | pg. 15 For 10 years during the 1990s drought, H. R.Wardlaw, a West Texas rancher, watchedand waited. He watched as the Middle... bottom: H. R. Wardlaw, a rancher near San Angelo, has seen the streams on his land restored after he participated in the Texas Brush Control Program. Right bottom: Chuck Brown, staff hydrologist for the Upper Colorado River Authority, measures flow...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

RIVER RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS River Res. Applic. 21: 849864 (2005)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assimilate wastewater treatment plant effluent. Our study illustrates the types of changes that river of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily

Poff, N. LeRoy

452

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for water withdrawal and diversion from the Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, no major

453

Wind River Watershed Restoration 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2004, researchers from U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. Juvenile salmonid population surveys were conducted within select study areas throughout the subbasin. We expanded our survey coverage of the mainstem Wind River to a reach in the vicinity of Carson National Fish Hatchery to assess effects of non-indigenous Chinook on native steelhead. These efforts add to a database of habitat and fish data collected in the Wind River since 1996. This research contributes to the Wind River Restoration Project, which includes active stream habitat restoration and monitoring of adult and juvenile steelhead populations. We maintained a network of 32 thermographs in the Wind River subbasin during 2004. Additionally, Underwood Conservation District provided us with data from seven thermographs that they maintained during 2004. Thermograph data are identifying areas with chronic high water temperatures and stream sections where high rates of warming are occurring. During 2004, water temperatures at 26 thermograph sites exceeded the 16 C limit for surface waters set by the Washington Department of Ecology. Water temperatures exceeded 20 C at five sites in the Trout Creek watershed. Our thermograph dataset includes information from as early as 1996 at some sites and has become a valuable long-term dataset, which will be crucial in determining bioenergetic relationships with habitat and life-histories. We have monitored salmonid populations throughout the Wind River subbasin by electrofishing and snorkeling. We electrofished four stream sections for population estimates during 2004. In these sections, and others where we simply collected fish without a population estimate, we tagged juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to track growth and movement of individuals. We snorkeled nine stream sections during 2004. Juvenile steelhead populations have varied greatly between streams and between years. Numbers of age-0 steelhead have increased substantially since 2000 within the MINE reach (rkm 35.0-40.0) section of the upper Wind River. Because of potential negative interactions with steelhead, naturally spawned populations of introduced juvenile Chinook salmon are of concern in the mainstem of the Wind River. During 2004, we deployed over 3,000 PIT tags in the Wind River subbasin, primarily in juvenile steelhead, but also in juvenile Chinook. We are compiling a dataset of recapture information on these tagged fish as well as interrogation information from Bonneville Dam and other sites. The habitat and fish data collected have been used in Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment modeling efforts, the Wind River Subbasin Plan, and the Total Maximum Daily Load report from Washington Department of Ecology. Continued monitoring of changes in habitat, combined with data on fish populations, will help guide planning efforts of land and fish managers. As long-term active and passive restoration actions are implemented in the Wind River and its tributaries, these data will provide the ability to measure change. Because the Wind River subbasin has no steelhead hatchery or supplementation, these data will be useful to compare population trends in subbasins with hatchery or supplementation management.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

Water on Earth Source % of Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Water on Earth Source % of Supply Oceans 97.08 Ice Sheets and Glaciers 1.99 Ground Water 0.62 Atmosphere 0.29 Lakes (Fresh) 0.01 Inland Seas / Salt Water Lakes 0.005 Soil Moisture 0.004 Rivers 0.001 Water · Water is the solvent, the medium and the participant in most of the chemical reactions occurring

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

455

Toxicity assessment of water and sediment elutriates from fixed-station ambient water quality network stations, 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxicity biomonitoring of water column and sediment toxicity was conducted at six fixed network stations from 1986 through 1989. Stations were located on the Holston River, Bear Creek (Pickwick Reservoir), Hiwassee River, Emory River, Nolichucky River, and French Broad River at locations chosen to represent those sub-basins. Tests evaluated acute and chronic responses of larval fathead minnow survival and growth and Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction to water and sediment elutriates collected from these sites. Samples were collected once each year during summer. Neither water nor sediment elutriates from the French Broad River were toxic during the study period. Water column toxicity (chronic) occurred in Bear Creek in 1986 and in the Nolichucky River in 1987. Sediment elutriate toxicity occurred once during the study period in the Emory (1987) and Nolichucky (1988) Rivers. Sediments from the Holston and Hiwassee Rivers were toxic two times each. Hiwassee River sediment exhibited >1.3 chronic toxicity units in 1987 and 1989 (were toxic at the lowest dilution tested). Holston River sediment toxicity occurred during the most recent two years of testing. Results from the Holston and Hiwassee Rivers may indicate a toxics problem in the sub-basin. No acute toxicity occurred during the study. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Coal-Combustion and Biomass-Pyrolysis Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov 04/2008 Carbon Sequestration Enhancing carbon SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS ProductS Background Terrestrial sequestration of carbon can occur by three mechanisms, all of which first require "capture" or fixation of atmospheric carbon by photosynthesis into plant tissues. If captured by herbaceous plants, much of the carbon is quickly

457

XXI Century Climatology of Snow Cover for the Western River Basins of the Indus River System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under changing climate, freshwater resources of Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalaya (HKH) region can be affected by changes in temperature and in amount, type and distribution of precipitation. This can have serious implications for the water supply and in turn threaten the food security and economic wellbeing of Indus basin. Using MODIS daily snow products (Terra & Aqua), this study focuses on the assessment of the 2000-2010 snow cover dynamics on seasonal/annual basis against geophysical parameters (aspect, elevation and slope) for the so called western river basins of Indus River System (IRS), namely Indus, Kabul, Jhelum, Astore, Gilgit, Hunza, Swat, Shigar and Shyok basins. Results show that inputs from MODIS instrument provide unprecedented better opportunity to study by using GIS techniques the snow cover dynamics in the remote areas like HKH region at such hyper-temporal and finer planar resolution. Adapted non-spectral cloud filtering techniques have significantly reduced cloud coverage and improved sno...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- November 14, 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Criticality Safety Violations at the Savannah River Site

459

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- April 19, 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Employee Reprisal at the Savannah River Site

460

Water quality management library. 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of ten books offered in conjunction with Water Quality International, the Biennial Conference and Exposition of the International Association on Water Pollution Research and Control (IAWPRC). Volume 1, Activated Sludge Process, Design and Control, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 2, Upgrading Wastewater Treatment Plants, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 3, Toxicity Reduction, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 4, Municipal Sewage Sludge Management, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 5, Design and Retrofit of Wastewater Treatment Plants for Biological Nutrient Removal, 1st edition, 1992: Volume 6, Dynamics and Control of the Activated Sludge Process, 2nd edition, 1998: Volume 7: Design of Anaerobic Processes for the Treatment of Industrial and Municipal Wastes, 1st edition, 1992: Volume 8, Groundwater Remediation, 1st edition, 1992: Volume 9, Nonpoint Pollution and Urban Stormwater Management, 1st edition, 1995: Volume 10, Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse, 1st edition, 1998.

Eckenfelder, W.W.; Malina, J.F.; Patterson, J.W. [eds.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

NERPs Definition | Savannah River National Environmental Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NERPS: Idaho, Hanford, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Fermilab, Nevada, and Savannah River. The Savannah River Site became the first NERP in 1972. Unlike National Parks, NERPs provide a...

463

Overview | Savannah River National Environmental Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology Laboratory (SREL), USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (USFS-SR), and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As a research unit of UGA, SREL's primary function is...

464

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

465

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

466

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

467

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II...

468

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site, Summary Report - February 2004 February 2004 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site...

469

The Des Plaines River -- Part One  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

One One Nature Bulletin No. 606 May 28, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE DES PLAINES RIVER -- PART ONE: DESCRIPTION Chicago was incorporated as a village in 1833 and in less than 100 years it had become one of the world's great cities. Four unique natural features have contributed to its phenomenal growth. The first is Lake Michigan. Chicago is strategically located at the south end of it, deep in the heart of the continent and the vast central lowland -- bread-basket of our nation. The lake provides an inexhaustible supply of fresh water and a highway for water-borne commerce. Since the completion of the St. Lawrence Seaway, Chicago has also become a port for ocean going ships.

470

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from producing nuclear weapons materials for national defense to managing the waste it has generated, restoring the environment, and enhancing industrial development in and around the site. But no matter what the site`s mission is, it will continue to maintain its comprehensive environmental monitoring and surveillance program. In 1994, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 30,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, foodstuffs, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.; Spitzer, D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

471

Savannah River site environmental report for 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of site-generated waste, restoration of the surrounding environment, and the development of industry in and around the site. However, SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program. In 1996, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 31,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Though the environmental monitoring program was streamlined in 1996-to improve its cost-effectiveness without compromising data quality or reducing its overall ability to produce critical information-thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, food products, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.; Mamatey, A. [eds.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Columbia River Pathway Dosimetry Report, 1944-1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to individuals who were exposed to the radionuclides released to the Columbia River (the river pathway). This report documents the last in a series of dose calculations conducted on the Columbia River pathway. The report summarizes the technical approach used to estimate radiation doses to three classes of representative individuals who may have used the Columbia River as a source of drinking water, food, or for recreational or occupational purposes. In addition, the report briefly explains the approaches used to estimate the radioactivity released to the river, the development of the parameters used to model the uptake and movement of radioactive materials in aquatic systems such as the Columbia River, and the method of calculating the Columbia River`s transport of radioactive materials. Potential Columbia River doses have been determined for representative individuals since the initiation of site activities in 1944. For this report, dose calculations were performed using conceptual models and computer codes developed for the purpose of estimating doses. All doses were estimated for representative individuals who share similar characteristics with segments of the general population.

Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Snyder, S.F.; Shipler, D.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

Not Available

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

475

Tongue River Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tongue River Electric Coop Inc Tongue River Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Tongue River Electric Coop Inc Place Montana Utility Id 19022 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - Three Phase Commercial Irrigation Service Industrial Large Power Service Commercial Single Phase Service Residential Stock Water Pumping Service Industrial Street and Security Lighting - 175 watt HPS Lighting Street and Security Lighting - 250 Watt MV or 150 Watt HPS Lighting

476

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

477

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates River Falls Municipal Utilities - Energy Star Appliance Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Other Program Info Start Date 05/01/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/12 State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Tree Planting: 50% of cost up to $50 (limit 3 trees) Freezer Recycling: $30 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Energy Star Home Performance: 33.3% up to $1,500 15% Energy Savings from Installed Measures: $200

478

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of River Protection-Richland  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 1, 2011 March 1, 2011 CX-005367: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project T-222 Hazardous Materials Management Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Facility Water Main Extension for Fire Protection CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.15 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office March 1, 2011 CX-005366: Categorical Exclusion Determination Herbicide Applications Along Gravel and Paved Roads on the Hanford Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office January 31, 2011 CX-005190: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project L-691, 200 West Area Sanitary Sewage Lagoon CX(s) Applied: B1.26 Date: 01/31/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office

479

Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: Rebate amounts cannot exceed 50% of the total project cost Lighting: Rebate amounts cannot exceed 70% of the total project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies greatly Wall/Floor Insulation: $0.25 per sq ft Attic Insulation: $0.45 per sq ft

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian fresh water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: australian fresh water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy River, Victoria. Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy Summary:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river water reclamation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - area modulate water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-steps. The hydrological module is designed to ac- count for: water availability in terms of river runo , reservoir storage... -arid hydroclimatological conditions. This...

482

Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Knezevic, Z.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP), located at Aiken, South Carolina. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The following topics are discussed: general site information; air, soil, surface water and ground water; hydrogeology; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; release of tritium oxides; radioactivity in milk; contamination of ground water and wildlife; pesticide use; and release of radionuclides into seepage basins. 149 refs., 44 figs., 53 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z