Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terrel J. Spears Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste Disposition Project 2 Waste Disposition Project - Mission Radioactive Liquid Waste - Tank Waste Stabilization and Disposition - Disposition 36 million gallons of radioactive liquid waste - Close 49 underground storage tanks in which the waste now resides 3 36.7 Million 33.7 Mgal (92%) 3.0 Mgal (8%) Saltcake Sludge Salt Supernate Volume Curies 397 Million Curies (MCi) 212 MCi (54%) 185 MCi (46%) Gallons (Mgal) 36.5 Million 33.5 Mgal (92%) 3.0 Mgal (8%) Liquid Waste Background Liquid Waste Background * 2 tanks closed * 49 tanks remaining to close - aging, carbon steel - 27 compliant, 22 non-compliant - 12 have known leak sites

2

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review...

3

DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site January 18, 2006 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S....

4

EIS-0217: Savannah River Site Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Savannah River Site Waste Management 17: Savannah River Site Waste Management EIS-0217: Savannah River Site Waste Management Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts and costs of storing, treating, and/or disposing of liquid high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, hazardous, mixed (radioactive and hazardous), and transuranic wastes at SRS. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 28, 2001 EIS-0217: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina May 19, 1997 EIS-0217: Supplemental Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management May 19, 1997 EIS-0217: Supplemental Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management, Savannah River Operations Office,

5

Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in 2013 Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in 2013 December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers gather behind a “Safety and Security begins with Me” banner at the Savannah River Site. Workers gather behind a "Safety and Security begins with Me" banner at the Savannah River Site. Workers sort through transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. Workers sort through transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. SRR employees Glenn Kelly and Fred Merriweather pour the final amount of grout into Tank 6. SRR employees Glenn Kelly and Fred Merriweather pour the final amount of grout into Tank 6. Workers gather behind a "Safety and Security begins with Me" banner at the Savannah River Site.

6

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah...

7

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement...

8

Savannah River Site Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Melter's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Savannah River Site Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Melter's 2,000th Waste Canister Savannah River Site Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Melter's 2,000th Waste Canister February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, where a melter pours molten glass into a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, where a melter pours molten glass into a canister. AIKEN, S.C. - The second melter to operate in the 16-year history of the nation's largest radioactive waste glassification plant shows no signs of slowing after recently pouring its 2,000 canister of glass-formed hazardous

9

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the safety basis and design development for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The review was performed February 12-14, 2013 by DOE's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the safety basis, design, and the associated technical documents developed for

10

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the safety basis and design development for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The review was performed February 12-14, 2013 by DOE's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the safety basis, design, and the associated technical documents developed for

11

DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site January 18, 2006 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the waste determination for the treatment and stabilization of low activity salt-waste at the Savannah River Site allowing for significant reductions in environmental and health risks posed by the material. Stored in forty-nine underground tanks, approximately 36 million gallons of radioactive waste is left over from plutonium production during the Cold War. In addition, the department issued an amended Record of Decision and Implementation Plan to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. "Today's announcement clears the way for the removal and treatment of this

12

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building May 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07] Activity Description/Purpose: Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the proposed corrective actions

13

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Waste Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building May 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07] Activity Description/Purpose: Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the proposed corrective actions discussed in Reference 2, and clarify additional reviews to be performed by

14

DOE Statement on Savannah River Site Vitrified Waste Concentrations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement on Savannah River Site Vitrified Waste Concentrations Statement on Savannah River Site Vitrified Waste Concentrations DOE Statement on Savannah River Site Vitrified Waste Concentrations April 30, 2010 - 12:30pm Addthis "The Office of Environmental Management has decided not to move forward at this time with its February decision to direct contractors to start planning for higher concentrations of plutonium in waste canisters at the Savannah River Site. While this may ultimately be a better way to manage and minimize the volume of waste, the Department wants to further review the issues involved before proceeding. No canisters have been filled at the higher concentration level." Addthis Related Articles Energy Secretary Chu Announces $6 Billion in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup Department of Energy Projects Win 36 R&D 100 Awards for 2011

15

Savannah River Site Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone Savannah River Site Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone February 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is a component of the Interim Salt Disposition Process — known as Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) — that helped Savannah River Remediation process more than 500,000 gallons of salt waste since October last year, a contract milestone. Pictured here is a component of the Interim Salt Disposition Process - known as Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) - that helped Savannah River Remediation process more than 500,000 gallons of salt waste since October last year, a contract milestone. AIKEN, S.C. - The Savannah River Site's liquid waste contractor recently achieved a contract milestone by processing 500,000 gallons of

16

Savannah River Site Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Melter's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Melter's 2,000th Waste Canister Savannah River Site Marks Waste Processing Milestone with Melter's 2,000th Waste Canister February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, where a melter pours molten glass into a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, where a melter pours molten glass into a canister. AIKEN, S.C. - The second melter to operate in the 16-year history of the nation's largest radioactive waste glassification plant shows no signs of slowing after recently pouring its 2,000 canister of glass-formed hazardous

17

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Director Catherine Templeton and U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) unveil a marker to commemorate the closing of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left,

18

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone Savannah River Site Celebrates Historic Closure of Radioactive Waste Tanks: Senior DOE Officials and South Carolina Congressional Leadership Gather to Commemorate Historic Cleanup Milestone October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Director Catherine Templeton and U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) unveil a marker to commemorate the closing of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino, left,

19

Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

USED NUCLEAR MATERIALS AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: ASSET OR WASTE?  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable (assets) to worthless (wastes). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or in the case of high level waste awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Sites (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as waste include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the national interest.

Magoulas, V.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S Wet Air Savan contain liquid w contain potent to the option tank w Bed S condu be pur The as Techn Techn as liste * W o o The Ele Site: S roject: S P Report Date: J ited States Savanna Why DOE r Oxidation Proc nnah River Tan ning approxima waste. The wa ns tetraphenylb tially flammable tank head spa s have been id waste: Wet Air O team Reformin cted to aid in d rsued for treatin What th ssessment team ology Element ology Readine ed below: Wet Air Oxidatio Reactor sys Offgas Trea To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Savannah Rive SRS Tank 48H Project July 2007 Departmen ah River E-EM Did This cess k 48H is a 1.3 ately 250, 000 aste is a salt so borate (TPB), w e concentration ce. Two poten dentified for this Oxidation (WAO ng (FBSR). Th deciding which ng the Tank 48

22

EIS-0303: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure 03: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure EIS-0303: Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure SUMMARY This EIS evaluates alternatives for closing 49 high-level radioactive waste tanks and associated equipment such as evaporator systems, transfer pipelines, diversion boxes, and pump pits. DOE selected the preferred alternative identified in the Final EIS, Stabilize Tanks-Fill with Grout, to guide development and implementation of closure of the high-level waste tanks and associated equipment at the Savannah River Site. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 5, 2012 EIS-0303: Supplement Analysis Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Tank Closure, SC July 8, 2011 EIS-0303: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

23

Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.

Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 authorizes the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to reclassify certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from high-level waste to low-level waste if it meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116. Currently, DOE SRS has prepared one final (salt waste) and is working on two additional waste determinations: F Tank Farm and H Tank Farm. The Salt Waste Determination has been finalized and the Secretary of Energy issued that determination on January 17, 2006. In 2007, it was decided that due to a new Saltstone disposal vault design,

25

Savannah River Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely Reach Milestone Savannah River Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely Reach Milestone January 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis By May, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions expects to be shipping transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant almost continuously, using six TRUPACT-III shipping containers like the one shown here. By May, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions expects to be shipping transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant almost continuously, using six TRUPACT-III shipping containers like the one shown here. Workers relocate a pipe overpack container used to transport small amounts of excess plutonium oxide destined for long-term storage at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

26

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN SIMULATED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE SOLUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address the accelerated disposition of the supernate and salt portions of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW), solubility experiments were performed to develop a predictive capability for plutonium (Pu) solubility. A statistically designed experiment was used to measure the solubility of Pu in simulated solutions with salt concentrations and temperatures which bounded those observed in SRS HLW solutions. Constituents of the simulated waste solutions included: hydroxide (OH{sup -}), aluminate (Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) anions. Each anion was added to the waste solution in the sodium form. The solubilities were measured at 25 and 80 C. Five sets of samples were analyzed over a six month period and a partial sample set was analyzed after nominally fifteen months of equilibration. No discernable time dependence of the measured Pu concentrations was observed except for two salt solutions equilibrated at 80 C which contained OH{sup -} concentrations >5 mol/L. In these solutions, the Pu solubility increased with time. This observation was attributed to the air oxidation of a portion of the Pu from Pu(IV) to the more soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) valence states. A data driven approach was subsequently used to develop a modified response surface model for Pu solubility. Solubility data from this study and historical data from the literature were used to fit the model. The model predicted the Pu solubility of the solutions from this study within the 95% confidence interval for individual predictions and the analysis of variance indicated no statistically significant lack of fit. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) model was compared with predicted values from the Aqueous Electrolyte (AQ) model developed by OLI Systems, Inc. and a solubility prediction equation developed by Delegard and Gallagher for Hanford tank waste. The agreement between measured or values predicted by the SRNL model and values predicted by the OLI AG model was very poor. The much higher predicted concentrations by the OLI AQ model appears to be the result of the model predicting the predominate Pu oxidation state is Pu(V) which is reported as unstable below sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentrations of 6 M. There was very good agreement between the predicted Pu concentrations using the SRNL model and the model developed by Delegard and Gallagher with the exception of solutions that had very high OH{sup -} (15 M) concentrations. The lower Pu solubilities in these solutions were attributed to the presence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and NO{sub 2}{sup -} which limit the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(V).

Rudisill, T.; Hobbs, D.; Edwards, T.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

Progress Continues Toward Closure of Two Underground Waste Tanks at Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. The EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is filling two radioactive liquid waste tanks with a cement-like grout in an effort to operationally close them this fall.

28

Savannah River Site Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal Register (January 24, 2006), a Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site.

29

A COMPARISON OF HANFORD AND SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL WASTES  

SciTech Connect

This study is a simple comparison of high-level waste from plutonium production stored in tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Savannah River principally used the PUREX process for plutonium separation. Hanford used the PUREX, Bismuth Phosphate, and REDOX processes, and reprocessed many wastes for recovery of uranium and fission products. Thus, Hanford has 55 distinct waste types, only 17 of which could be at Savannah River. While Hanford and Savannah River wastes both have high concentrations of sodium nitrate, caustic, iron, and aluminum, Hanford wastes have higher concentrations of several key constituents. The factors by which average concentrations are higher in Hanford salt waste than in Savannah River waste are 67 for {sup 241}Am, 4 for aluminum, 18 for chromium, 10 for fluoride, 8 for phosphate, 6 for potassium, and 2 for sulfate. The factors by which average concentrations are higher in Hanford sludges than in Savannah River sludges are 3 for chromium, 19 for fluoride, 67 for phosphate, and 6 for zirconium. Waste composition differences must be considered before a waste processing method is selected: A method may be applicable to one site but not to the other.

HILL RC PHILIP; REYNOLDS JG; RUTLAND PL

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

Savannah River Site Waste Management Program Plan, FY 1993. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report on facilities being used to manage wastes, forces acting to change current waste management (WM) systems, and how operations are conducted. This document also reports on plans for the coming fiscal year and projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year to adequately plan for safe handling and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for developing technology for improved management of wastes.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Office of River Protection Waste Treatment and Immobilizatin Project Construction Site, Nov. 16-18, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tour and Review of the Office of River Tour and Review of the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project Construction Site, November 16-18, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit on November 16-18, 2010, at the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Immobilization Project (WTP) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The purposes of the visit were to plan and coordinate future HSS oversight activities and to review corrective actions to the most recent HSS review at WTP. The WTP is an industrial complex for separating and vitrifying millions of gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored at the Hanford site. The WTP complex consists of five major

32

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

33

Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Sahid C. Smith Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Review Team thanks Ms. Sonitza Blanco, Team Lead Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office and Mr. Pete Hill, Liquid Waste Planning Manager for Washington Savannah River Company, for their

34

Summary - Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility ETR Report Date: November 2006 ETR-4 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is intended to remove and concentrate the radioactive strontium (Sr), actinides, and cesium (Cs) from the bulk salt waste solutions in the SRS high-level waste tanks. The sludge and strip effluent from the SWPF that contain concentrated Sr, actinide, and Cs wastes will be sent to the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), where they will be vitrified. The decontaminated salt solution (DSS) that is left after removal of the highly

35

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

36

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

37

INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Savannah River Site high-level waste safety issues: The need for final disposal of the wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using new criteria developed by the High-Level Waste Tank Safety Task Force, the Savannah River Site (SRS) identified six safety issues in the SRS tank farms. None of the safety issues were priority 1, the most significant issues handled by the Task Force. This paper discusses the safety issues and the programs for resolving each of them.

d`Entremont, P.D.; Hobbs, D.T.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Savannah River Site high-level waste safety issues: The need for final disposal of the wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using new criteria developed by the High-Level Waste Tank Safety Task Force, the Savannah River Site (SRS) identified six safety issues in the SRS tank farms. None of the safety issues were priority 1, the most significant issues handled by the Task Force. This paper discusses the safety issues and the programs for resolving each of them.

d'Entremont, P.D.; Hobbs, D.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ADVANCES IN SE-79 ANALYSES ON SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATRICES  

SciTech Connect

Waste cleanup efforts underway at the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, as well as other DOE nuclear sites, have created a need to characterize {sup 79}Se in radioactive waste inventories. Successful analysis of {sup 79}Se in high activity waste matrices is challenging for a variety of reasons. As a result of these unique challenges, the successful quantification of {sup 79}Se in the types of matrices present at SRS requires an extremely efficient and selective separation of {sup 79}Se from high levels of interfering radionuclides. A robust {sup 79}Se radiochemical separation method has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) which is routinely capable of successfully purifying {sup 79}Se from a wide range of interfering radioactive species. In addition to a dramatic improvements in the Kd, ease, and reproducibility of the analysis, the laboratory time has been reduced from several days to only 6 hours.

Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Ned Bibler, N; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Savannah River Site mixed waste Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). Volumes 1 and 2 and reference document: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to prepare site treatment plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. This proposed plan contains Savannah River Site`s preferred options and schedules for constructing new facilities, and otherwise obtaining treatment for mixed wastes. The proposed plan consists of 2 volumes. Volume 1, Compliance Plan, identifies the capacity to be developed and the schedules as required. Volume 2, Background, provides a detailed discussion of the preferred options with technical basis, plus a description of the specific waste streams. Chapters are: Introduction; Methodology; Mixed low level waste streams; Mixed transuranic waste; High level waste; Future generation of mixed waste streams; Storage; Process for evaluation of disposal issues in support of the site treatment plans discussions; Treatment facilities and treatment technologies; Offsite waste streams for which SRS treatment is the Preferred Option (Naval reactor wastes); Summary information; and Acronyms and glossary. This revision does not contain the complete revised report, but only those pages that have been revised.

Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S.; Bailey, L.L.

1995-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

43

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW November 22, 2006 Conducted by: Harry Harmon, Team Lead Civil/Structural Sub Team Facility Safety Sub Team Engineering Sub Team Peter Lowry, Lead James Langsted, Lead George Krauter, Lead Robert Kennedy Chuck Negin Art Etchells Les Youd Jerry Evatt Oliver Block Loring Wyllie Richard Stark Tim Adams Tom Anderson Todd LaPointe Stephen Gosselin Carl Costantino Norman Moreau Patrick Corcoran John Christian Ken Cooper Kari McDaniel _____________________________ Harry D. Harmon ITR Team Leader SPD-SWPF-217 SPD-SWPF-217: Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review 11/22/2006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The ITR Team wishes to thank Shari Clifford of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for

44

Wetlands proximity mapping of 86 waste sites on the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

This project developed wetlands proximity maps and provided wetlands information by means of a Geographic Environmental Data Base (GEDB) for each of 11 interaction zones identified in DPST-84-684. It includes an analysis of 86 hazardous waste sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The map of each interaction zone is intended to indicate major wetland and land cover types, with emphasis on locations of hazardous waste sites with wetland areas identified within a 1000 meter radius. Statistics of aerial extent for wetland and land cover for each interaction zone are provided. 80 figs., 93 tabs.

Jensen, J.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (USA). Dept. of Geography)

1985-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Consolidation of Surplus Plutonium at Savannah River Site | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Consolidation of Surplus Plutonium at Savannah River Site Consolidation of Surplus Plutonium at Savannah River Site Waste...

46

Hydrogen generation rates in Savannah River Site high-level nuclear waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level nuclear waste (HLW) is stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as alkaline, high-nitrate slurries in underground carbon steel tanks. Hydrogen is continuously generated in the waste tanks as a result of the radiolysis of water. Hydrogen generation rates have recently been measured in several waste tanks containing different types of waste. The measured rates ranged from 1.1 to 6.7 cubic feet per million Btu of decay heat. The measured rates are consistent with laboratory data which show that the hydrogen generation rate depends on the nitrate concentration and the decay heat content of the waste. Sampling at different locations indicated that the hydrogen is uniformly distributed radially within the tank.

Hobbs, D.T.; Norris, P.W.; Pucko, S.A.; Bibler, N.E.; Walker, D.D.; d'Entremont, P.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cost benefit of caustic recycle for tank waste remediation at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites  

SciTech Connect

The potential cost savings due to the use of caustic recycle used in conjunction with remediation of radioactive underground storage tank waste, is shown in a figure for the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Two cost savings estimates for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case has been made for the Savannah River site. This is due to the Hanford site remediation effort being less mature than that of Savannah River; and consequently, a range of cost savings being more appropriate for Hanford. This range of cost savings (rather than a ingle value) for each case at Hanford is due to cost uncertainties related to the LAW immobilization operation. Caustic recycle Case-1 has been defined as the sodium required to meet al identified caustic needs for the entire Site. Case-2 has been defined as the maximum sodium which can be separated from the low activity waste without precipitation of Al(OH){sub 3}. It has been determined that the potential cost savings at Hanford ranges from $194 M to $215 M for Case-1, and $293 M to $324 M for Case-2. The potential cost savings at Savannah River are $186 M for Case-1 and $281 M for Case-2. A discussion of the uncertainty associated with these cost savings estimates can be found in the Discussion and Conclusions section.

DeMuth, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.; Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Progress in resolving Savannah River Site high-level waste tank safety issues  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina, approximately 35 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste are stored in 51 underground, carbon steel waste tanks. These tanks and associated facilities are distributed between the F and H areas, two processing areas at SRS, and are called the F- and H-area high-level waste tank farms. Within the last few years, issues have been raised about the safety of high-level waste tank farms throughout the DOE complex, including those at SRS. Plans for resolution of these issues were reported at the Waste Management 192 conference. This paper addresses progress made at SRS since 1992. Most of the efforts for resolving the six safety issues identified at SRS have concentrated on (1) preparing the tanks for waste removal and (2) completing construction, testing, and starting up three key facilities. These facilities will transform the waste into forms suitable for final disposal, specifically borosilicate glass and saltstone (grout). Removing the waste from the tanks and processing it is needed to resolve three of the safety issues. Two facilities -- In-Tank Precipitation and the Defense Waste Processing Facility -- are undergoing non-radioactive simulant testing (``cold runs``) at this time. The third facility -- Sludge Processing -- began testing with actual waste in October 1993. In Tank Precipitation is scheduled to be operating by the end of 1994.

d`Entremont, P.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of5 of5 U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Line:~ HS: Rev: Eff. Date: HSS CRAD 45-57 0 January 31,2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Acting Direc or, Office of Sifety and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: January 31, 2013 Criteria Review and Approach Document LL.v. ~·M Criteria Lead:ife\riew of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Page 1 of 5 Date: January 31, 2013 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) mission is to assess the effectiveness of the

50

CORROSION CONTROL MEASURES FOR LIQUID RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has stored radioactive wastes in large, underground, carbon steel tanks for approximately 60 years. An assessment of potential degradation mechanisms determined that the tanks may be vulnerable to nitrate- induced pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Controls on the solution chemistry and temperature of the wastes are in place to mitigate these mechanisms. These controls are based upon a series of experiments performed using simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks. The technical bases and evolution of these controls is presented in this paper.

Wiersma, B.; Subramanian, K.

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

Systems Engineering in the Development and Implementation of the Savannah River Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Program  

SciTech Connect

The use of systems engineering facilitated the strategic planning and implementation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) transuranic waste disposal program. This application represented the first SRS use of systems engineering in the pre-program planning stages during the development of a comprehensive strategic plan for the disposal of transuranic waste at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The use of systems engineering focused the efforts of the technical experts to devise a three initiative plan for the disposal of transuranic waste where previous efforts failed. Continued application of systems engineering facilitated the further development and implementation of the first initiative outlined in the strategic plan, i.e., set-up the program and process to begin to characterize and ship waste to the WIPP.This application of systems engineering to the transuranic waste program represented the first opportunity at the SRS for a comprehensive usage of systems engineering at all program levels. The application was initiated at the earliest possible point in the program development, i.e., strategic planning, and successively was used in detailed development and implementation of the program. Systems engineering successfully focused efforts to produce a comprehensive plan for the disposal of SRS transuranic waste at the WIPP, and facilitated development of the SRS capability and infrastructure to characterize, certify, and ship waste.

Fayfich, R.R.

1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

53

Determination of uranium distribution in the evaporation of simulated Savannah River Site waste  

SciTech Connect

The results of an experimental program addressing the distribution of uranium in saltcake and supernate for two Savannah River Site waste compositions are presented. Successive batch evaporations were performed on simulated H-Area Modified Purex low-heat and post-aluminum dissolution wastes spiked with depleted uranium. Waste compositions and physical data were obtained for supernate and saltcake samples. For the H-Area Modified Purex low-heat waste, the product saltcake contained 42% of the total uranium from the original evaporator feed solution. However, precipitated solids only accounted for 10% of the original uranium mass; the interstitial liquid within the saltcake matrix contained the remainder of the uranium. In the case of the simulated post-aluminum dissolution waste; the product saltcake contained 68% of the total uranium from the original evaporator feed solution. Precipitated solids accounted for 52% of the original uranium mass; again, the interstitial liquid within the saltcake matrix contained the remainder of the uranium. An understanding of the distribution of uranium between supernatant liquid, saltcake, and sludge is required to develop a material balance for waste processing operations. This information is necessary to address nuclear criticality safety concerns.

Barnes, M.J.; Chandler, G.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

MEASUREMENT AND PREDICTION OF RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING SLURRIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents results of measurements and predictions of radiolytic hydrogen production rates from two actual process slurries in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Hydrogen is a flammable gas and its production in nuclear facilities can be a safety hazard if not mitigated. Measurements were made in the Shielded Cells of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a sample of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) currently being processed by the DWPF. Predictions were made using published values for rates of radiolytic reactions producing H{sub 2} in aqueous solutions and the measured radionuclide and chemical compositions of the two slurries. The agreement between measured and predicted results for nine experiments ranged from complete agreement to 24% difference. This agreement indicates that if the composition of the slurry being processed is known, the rate of radiolytic hydrogen production can be reasonably estimated.

Bibler, N; John Pareizs, J; Terri Fellinger, T; Cj Bannochie, C

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

SOLUBILITY OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IN ALKALINE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SOLUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five actual Savannah River Site tank waste samples and three chemically-modified samples were tested to determine solubility limits for uranium and plutonium over a one year time period. Observed final uranium concentrations ranged from 7 mg U/L to 4.5 g U/L. Final plutonium concentrations ranged from 4 {micro}g Pu/L to 12 mg Pu/L. Actinide carbonate complexation is believed to result in the dramatic solubility increases observed for one sample over long time periods. Clarkeite, NaUO{sub 2}(O)OH {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, was found to be the dominant uranium solid phase in equilibrium with the waste supernate in most cases.

King, W.; Hobbs, D.; Wilmarth, B.; Edwards, T.

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Savannah River Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the man  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's 49 underground waste tanks, including the removal of waste materials. Once water is removed from the waste tanks, two materials remain: salt and sludge waste. Removing salt waste, which fills approximately 90 percent of the tank space in the SRS tank farms, is a major step toward closing the Site's waste tanks that currently contain approximately 38 million gallons of waste. Due to the limited amount of tank space available in new-style tanks, some salt waste must be dispositioned in the interim to ensure sufficient tank space for continued sludge washing and to support the initial start-up and salt processing operations at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF).

57

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology ......................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 3

58

Savannah River Site - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Savannah River Site Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Puncture Wound Injury resulting in a Radiological Uptake at the Savannah River Site, July 22, 2011 (NEA-2011-02) Consent Order issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Facility Construction Deficiencies and Subcontractor Oversight at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Amer Industrial Technologies, Inc. related to Weld Deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010

59

PROJECT STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDIATION AND DISPOSITION OF LEGACY TRANSURANIC WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE, South Carolina, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Savannah River Site Accelerated Transuranic (TRU) Waste Project that was initiated in April of 2009 to accelerate the disposition of remaining legacy transuranic waste at the site. An overview of the project execution strategy that was implemented is discussed along with the lessons learned, challenges and improvements to date associated with waste characterization, facility modifications, startup planning, and remediation activities. The legacy waste was generated from approximately 1970 through 1990 and originated both on site as well as at multiple US Department of Energy sites. Approximately two thirds of the waste was previously dispositioned from 2006 to 2008, with the remaining one third being the more hazardous waste due to its activity (curie content) and the plutonium isotope Pu-238 quantities in the waste. The project strategy is a phased approach beginning with the lower activity waste in existing facilities while upgrades are made to support remediation of the higher activity waste. Five waste remediation process lines will be used to support the full remediation efforts which involve receipt of the legacy waste container, removal of prohibited items, venting of containers, and resizing of contents to fit into current approved waste shipping containers. Modifications have been minimized to the extent possible to meet the accelerated goals and involve limited upgrades to address life safety requirements, radiological containment needs, and handling equipment for the larger waste containers. Upgrades are also in progress for implementation of the TRUPACT III for the shipment of Standard Large Boxes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the US TRU waste repository. The use of this larger shipping container is necessary for approximately 20% of the waste by volume due to limited size reduction capability. To date, approximately 25% of the waste has been dispositioned, and several improvements have been made to the overall processing plan as well as facility processing rates. These lessons learned, challenges, and improvements will be discussed to aid other sites in their efforts to conduct similar activities.

Rodriguez, M.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fluidized-bed potato waste drying experiments at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized-bed dryer was built and operated at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho to test the feasibility of using low-temperature (145/sup 0/C or lower) geothermal fluids as an energy source for drying operations. The dryer performed successfully on two potato industry waste products that had a solid content of 5 to 13%. The dried product was removed as a sand-like granular material or as fines with a flour-like texture. Test results, observations, and design recommendations are presented. Also presented is an economic evaluation for commercial-scale drying plants using either geothermal low-temperature water or oil as a heat source.

Cole, L.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL REACTIONS CONSUMING ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conversion of legacy radioactive high-level waste at the Savannah River Site into a stable glass waste form involves a chemical pretreatment process to prepare the waste for vitrification. Waste slurry is treated with nitric and formic acids to achieve certain goals. The total quantity of acid added to a batch of waste slurry is constrained by the catalytic activity of trace noble metal fission products in the waste that can convert formic acid into hydrogen gas at many hundreds of times the radiolytic hydrogen generation rate. A large block of experimental process simulations were performed to characterize the chemical reactions that consume acid prior to hydrogen generation. The analysis led to a new equation for predicting the quantity of acid required to process a given volume of waste slurry.

Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

Possible explosive compounds in the Savannah River Site waste tank farm facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on a comparison of the known constituents in high-level nuclear waste stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and explosive compounds reported in the literature, only two classes of explosive compounds (metal NO{sub x} compounds and organic compounds) were identified as requiring further work to determine if they exist in the waste, and if so, in what quantities. Of the fourteen classes of explosive compounds identified as conceivably being present in tank farm operations, nine classes (metal fulminates, metal azides, halogen compounds, metal-amine complexes, nitrate/oxalate mixtures, metal oxalates, metal oxohalogenates, metal cyanides/cyanates, and peroxides) are not a hazard because these classes of compounds cannot be formed or accumulated in sufficient quantity, or they are not reactive at the conditions which exist in the tank farm facilities. Three of the classes (flammable gases, metal nitrides, and ammonia compounds and derivatives) are known to have the potential to build up to concentrations at which an observable reaction might occur. Controls have been in place for some time to limit the formation or control the concentration of these classes of compounds. A comprehensive list of conceivable explosive compounds is provided in Appendix 3.

Hobbs, D.T.

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese during a single contact in the simulant demonstration. (The iron dissolution may be high due to corrosion of carbon steel coupons.) (3) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 80% of the uranium, {approx} 70% of the iron, {approx} 50% of the manganese, and {approx} 90% of the aluminum in the actual waste demonstration for a single contact. (4) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 15% of the iron, {approx} 40% of the manganese, and {approx} 80% of the aluminum in Tank 5F during the first contact cycle. Except for the iron, these results agree well with the demonstrations. The data suggest that a much larger fraction of the iron in the sludge dissolved, but it re-precipitated with the oxalate added to Tank 5F. (5) The demonstrations produced large volumes (i.e., 2-14 gallons of gas/gallon of oxalic acid) of gas (primarily carbon dioxide) by the reaction of oxalic acid with sludge and carbon steel. (6) The reaction of oxalic acid with carbon steel produced hydrogen in the simulant and actual waste demonstrations. The volume produced varied from 0.00002-0.00100 ft{sup 3} hydrogen/ft{sup 2} carbon steel. The hydrogen production proved higher in unmixed tanks than in mixed tanks.

Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

HANFORD SITE RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT (RPP) TRANSURANIC (TRU) TANK WASTE IDENTIFICATION & PLANNING FOR REVRIEVAL TREATMENT & EVENTUAL DISPOSAL AT WIPP  

SciTech Connect

The CH2M HILL Manford Group, Inc. (CHG) conducts business to achieve the goals of the Office of River Protection (ORP) at Hanford. As an employee owned company, CHG employees have a strong motivation to develop innovative solutions to enhance project and company performance while ensuring protection of human health and the environment. CHG is responsible to manage and perform work required to safely store, enhance readiness for waste feed delivery, and prepare for treated waste receipts for the approximately 53 million gallons of legacy mixed radioactive waste currently at the Hanford Site tank farms. Safety and environmental awareness is integrated into all activities and work is accomplished in a manner that achieves high levels of quality while protecting the environment and the safety and health of workers and the public. This paper focuses on the innovative strategy to identify, retrieve, treat, and dispose of Hanford Transuranic (TRU) tank waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.; TEDESCHI, R.; JOHNSON, M.E.; JENNINGS, M

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

67

Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) planning process, communicates ER/WM`s philosophy and overall strategy for achieving its compliance and cleanup goals, summarizes multi-year program plans and assesses progress made during the previous year. The FYP goal is to ensure that risks to human health and safety and to the environment posed by the Department`s past, present, and future operations are either eliminated to reduced to safer levels by the year 2019. The SSP applies the overall strategic goals and commitments of the FYP, incorporating site-specific and local public considerations. It will address accomplishments since the FY 1990 plan, document planned activities focused on the upcoming fiscal year (FY 1992) and discuss milestones and objectives based on restricted and nonrestricted budget conditions for FY 1993--1997. The SSP is the primary means of demonstrating the relationship of local cleanup and compliance activities to broad environmental goals set forth in the FYP. The SSP provides an important channel for conveying information to regulators, the public, special interest groups, and other DOE organizations. This summary will briefly review the site`s facilities and missions, current and future program objectives, major accomplishments, funding levels, and major milestones for the five-year period.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

HIGH LEVEL WASTE MECHANCIAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal (MSR) using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system for the first time within one of its storage tanks. The WOW system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple waste tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. In addition, the project is currently preparing another waste tank for MSR utilizing lessons learned from this previous operational activity. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2,840 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. The construction of these tanks was completed in 1953, and they were placed into waste storage service in 1959. The tank's primary shell is 23 meters (75 feet) in diameter, and 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height. Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. Both Tank 5 and Tank 6 received and stored F-PUREX waste during their operating service time before sludge removal was performed. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close (fill with grout) Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. Mechanical Sludge Removal, the first step in the tank closure process, will be followed by chemical cleaning. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks will be isolated and filled with grout for long-term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal operations within Tank 6 removed approximately 75% of the original 95,000 liters (25,000 gallons). This sludge material was transferred in batches to an interim storage tank to prepare for vitrification. This operation consisted of eleven (11) Submersible Mixer Pump(s) mixing campaigns and multiple intraarea transfers utilizing STPs from July 2006 to August 2007. This operation and successful removal of sludge material meets requirement of approximately 19,000 to 28,000 liters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. Removal of the last 35% of sludge was exponentially more difficult, as less and less sludge was available to mobilize and the lighter sludge particles were likely removed during the early mixing campaigns. The removal of the 72,000 liters (19,000 gallons) of sludge was challenging due to a number factors. One primary factor was the complex internal cooling coil array within Tank 6 that obstructed mixer discharge jets and impacted the Effective Cleaning Radius (ECR) of the Submersible Mixer Pumps. Minimal access locations into the tank through tank openings (risers) presented a challenge because the available options for equipment locations were very limited. Mechanical Sludge Removal activities using SMPs caused the sludge to migrate to areas of the tank that were outside of the SMP ECR. Various SMP operational strategies were used to address the challenge of moving sludge from remote areas of the tank to the transfer pump. This paper describes in detail the Mechanical Sludge Removal activities and mitigative solutions to cooling coil obstructions and other challenges. The performance of the WOW system and SMP operational strategies were evaluated and the resulting lessons learned are described for application to future Mechanical Sludge Removal operations.

Jolly, R; Bruce Martin, B

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

High temperature vitrification of surrogate Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed waste materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been funded through the DOE Office of Technology Development (DOE-OTD) to investigate high-temperature vitrification technologies for the treatment of diverse low-level and mixed wastes. High temperature vitrification is a likely candidate for processing heterogeneous solid wastes containing low levels of activity. Many SRS wastes fit into this category. Plasma torch technology is one high temperature vitrification method. A trial demonstration of plasma torch processing is being performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology on surrogate SRS wastes. This effort is in cooperation with the Engineering Research and Development Association of Georgia Universities (ERDA) program. The results of phase 1 of these plasma torch trials will be presented.

Applewhite-Ramsey, A.; Schumacher, R.F.; Spatz, T.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Newsom, R.A.; Circeo, L.J. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Danjaji, M.B. [Clark Atlanta Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Program - Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221-HET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. This heterogeneous debris transuranic waste stream was generated after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration, equipment, process operations and waste management practices. Information contained in this report was obtained from numerous sources including: facility safety basis documentation, historical document archives, generator and storage facility waste records and documents, and interviews with cognizant personnel.

Lunsford, G.F.

2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of tritium resources; by contributing to the stockpile surveillance program; and by assisting in the development of alternatives for large-scale pit disassembly/conversion capability. SRS also manages excess nuclear materials and supports nuclear nonproliferation initiatives. Environmental stewardship activities include the management, treatment, and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. Enforcement April 13, 2010 Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. -

73

FORM AND AGING OF PLUTONIUM IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANK 18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the effects of aging on and the expected forms of plutonium in Tank 18 waste residues. The findings are based on available information on the operational history of Tank 18, reported analytical results for samples taken from Tank 18, and the available scientific literature for plutonium under alkaline conditions. These findings should apply in general to residues in other waste tanks. However, the operational history of other waste tanks should be evaluated for specific conditions and unique operations (e.g., acid cleaning with oxalic acid) that could alter the form of plutonium in heel residues. Based on the operational history of other tanks, characterization of samples from the heel residues in those tanks would be appropriate to confirm the form of plutonium. During the operational period and continuing with the residual heel removal periods, Pu(IV) is the dominant oxidation state of the plutonium. Small fractions of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) could be present as the result of the presence of water and the result of reactions with oxygen in air and products from the radiolysis of water. However, the presence of Pu(V) would be transitory as it is not stable at the dilute alkaline conditions that currently exists in Tank 18. Most of the plutonium that enters Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) tanks is freshly precipitated as amorphous plutonium hydroxide, Pu(OH){sub 4(am)} or hydrous plutonium oxide, PuO{sub 2(am,hyd)} and coprecipitated within a mixture of hydrous metal oxide phases containing metals such as iron, aluminum, manganese and uranium. The coprecipitated plutonium would include Pu{sup 4+} that has been substituted for other metal ions in crystal lattice sites, Pu{sup 4+} occluded within hydrous metal oxide particles and Pu{sup 4+} adsorbed onto the surface of hydrous metal oxide particles. The adsorbed plutonium could include both inner sphere coordination and outer sphere coordination of the plutonium. PuO{sub 2(am,hyd)} is also likely to be present in deposits and scales that have formed on the steel surfaces of the tank. Over the operational period and after closure of Tank 18, Ostwald ripening has and will continue to transform PuO{sub 2(am,hyd)} to a more crystalline form of plutonium dioxide, PuO{sub 2(c)}. After bulk waste removal and heel retrieval operations, the free hydroxide concentration decreased and the carbonate concentration in the free liquid and solids increased. Consequently, a portion of the PuO{sub 2(am,hyd)} has likely been converted to a hydroxy-carbonate complex such as Pu(OH){sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub (s)}. or PuO(CO{sub 3}) {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Like PuO{sub 2(am,hyd)}, Ostwald ripening of Pu(OH){sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub (s)} or PuO(CO{sub 3}) {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} would be expected to occur to produce a more crystalline form of the plutonium carbonate complex. Due to the high alkalinity and low carbonate concentration in the grout formulation, it is expected that upon interaction with the grout, the plutonium carbonate complexes will transform back into plutonium hydroxide. Although crystalline plutonium dioxide is the more stable thermodynamic state of Pu(IV), the low temperature and high water content of the waste during the operating and heel removal periods in Tank 18 have limited the transformation of the plutonium into crystalline plutonium dioxide. During the tank closure period of thousands of years, transformation of the plutonium into a more crystalline plutonium dioxide form would be expected. However, the continuing presence of water, reaction with water radiolysis products, and low temperatures will limit the transformation, and will likely maintain an amorphous Pu(OH){sub 4} or PuO{sub 2(am,hyd)} form on the surface of any crystalline plutonium dioxide produced after tank closure. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic (XAS) measurements of Tank 18 residues are recommended to confirm coordination environments of the plutonium. If the presence of PuO(CO{sub 3}){sub (am,hyd)} is confirmed by XAS, it is recommended that e

Hobbs, D.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River 082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions now stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The high-activity fraction of the high-level waste (HLW) salt solution would then be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and stored until it could be disposed of as HLW in a geologic repository. The low activity fraction would be disposed of as low-level waste (saltstone)

76

Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility, July 19-22, 210  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadowing of the Environmental Management Construction Project Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility on July 19-22, 2010 A Department of Energy Construction Project Review (CPR) of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) project was conducted on July 19-22, 2010, at the request of the Principal Deputy Secretary, Office of Environmental Management (EM-2). The purpose of the review was to assess the cost, schedule, and technical progress against the approved Performance Baseline. Specific review areas were Engineering; Commissioning; Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance; Cost, Schedule, and Risk; and Management and Acquisition.

77

MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN SUPPORT OF QUALIFICATION OF PROCESSING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE LOW-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE INTO SALTSTONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) immobilizes low-level liquid waste into Saltstone to be disposed of in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility, Class Three Landfill. In order to meet the permit conditions and regulatory limits set by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), both the low-level salt solution and Saltstone samples are analyzed quarterly. Waste acceptance criteria (WAC) are designed to confirm the salt solution sample from the Tank Farm meets specific radioactive and chemical limits. The toxic characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) is used to confirm that the treatment has immobilized the hazardous constituents of the salt solution. This paper discusses the methods used to characterize the salt solution and final Saltstone samples from 2007-2009.

Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, C.; Cozzi, A.; Staub, A.; Ray, J.

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Application of accident progression event tree technology to the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility SAR analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Analysis in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has recently undergone an upgrade. Non-reactor SARs at SRS (and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites) use probabilistic techniques to assess the frequency of accidents at their facilities. This paper describes the application of an extension of the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) approach to accidents at the SRS DWPF. The APET technique allows an integrated model of the facility risk to be developed, where previous probabilistic accident analyses have been limited to the quantification of the frequency and consequences of individual accident scenarios treated independently. Use of an APET allows a more structured approach, incorporating both the treatment of initiators that are common to more than one accident, and of accident progression at the facility.

Brandyberry, M.D.; Baker, W.H.; Wittman, R.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site September 4, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. August 5, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office July 25, 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07] April 22, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013

80

Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Firre Protection System Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Firre Protection System Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1

82

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

83

STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114  

SciTech Connect

Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not meet current containment standards. These tanks are 22.9 meters (75 feet) in diameter, 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height, and have a capacity of 2.84E+6 liters (750,000 gallons). Chemical Cleaning adds 8 wt % oxalic acid to the carbon steel tank to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resulting acidic waste solution is transferred to Tank 7 where it is pH adjusted to minimize corrosion of the carbon steel tank. The Chemical Cleaning flowsheet includes multiple strikes of acid in each tank. Acid is delivered by tanker truck and is added to the tanks through a hose assembly connected to a pipe penetration through the tank top. The flowsheet also includes spray washing with acid and water. This paper includes an overview of the configuration required for Chemical Cleaning, the planned flowsheet, and an overview of technical concerns associated with the process. In addition, the current status of the Chemical Cleaning process in Tanks 5 and 6, lessons learned from the execution of the process, and the path forward for completion of cleaning in Tanks 5 and 6 will also be discussed.

Thaxton, D; Geoff Clendenen, G; Willie Gordon, W; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Poirier, M

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Savannah River Site sample and analysis plan for Clemson Technical Center waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this sampling and analysis plan is to determine the chemical, physical and radiological properties of the SRS radioactive Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) liquid waste stream, to verify that it conforms to Waste Acceptance Criteria of the Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Incineration Facility. Waste being sent to the ETTP TSCA Incinerator for treatment must be sufficiently characterized to ensure that the waste stream meets the waste acceptance criteria to ensure proper handling, classification, and processing of incoming waste to meet the Waste Storage and Treatment Facility`s Operating Permits. This sampling and analysis plan is limited to WSRC container(s) of homogeneous or multiphasic radioactive PCB contaminated liquids generated in association with a treatability study at Clemson Technical Center (CTC) and currently stored at the WSRC Solid Waste Division Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF).

Hagstrom, T.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

86

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project May 2011 August 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

87

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

88

Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project May 2011 August 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 2

89

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a presentation outlining the Salt Waste Processing Facility process, major risks, approach for conducting reviews, discussion of the findings, and conclusions.

90

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

91

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

92

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management, Safety Instrumented System Commercial Grade Dedication, Setpoint Calculations, and Software Testing at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project

93

Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Subject: Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Line: HS: Rev:...

94

DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested development of tooling for remote replacement of gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors. The facility has compressed air supply, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and a lightweight robotic arm for operation of the remote tools. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and tested multiple tools to perform the gasket replacement tasks. Separate pneumatic snap-ring removal tools that use the connector skirt as a reaction surface were developed for removal of the snap ring and spent gasket on both vertical and horizontal Hanford connectors. A pneumatic tool that clamps and centers on the jumper pipe ID was developed to simultaneously install the new gasket and snap ring. A pneumatic snap-ring-loading tool was developed that compresses the snap ring and places it in a groove in the installation tool. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and vents the tools as needed. The entire system has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Deployment of the entire system is expected during FY08. The Hanford connector gasket replacement tooling has been successfully tested using MSM's to manipulate the various tools. Nitric acid is used in many of the decontamination processes performed in the REDC, where the tooling will be deployed. Although most of the tool components were fabricated/purchased with nitric acid and radioactive service in mind, some of the prototype parts must be replaced with parts that are more compatible with nitric acid/radioactive service. Several modifications to the various tools are needed to facilitate maintenance and replacement of failed components. Development of installation tools for replacement of 1-inch, 2-inch and multi-hole gaskets is being considered. Deployment of the existing system in the DWPF REDC is expected during FY08.

Krementz, D

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

95

IMPACT OF NOBLE METALS AND MERCURY ON HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING HIGH LEVEL WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are added to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing was used to identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests and was spiked with the required amount of noble metals immediately prior to performing the test. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. SME cycles were also performed during six of the tests.

Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T; David Koopman, D

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Applying the Systems Engineering Process for Establishing Requirements for the Safety and Health Monitoring System of the Waste Solidification Building at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safety and Health Monitoring (SHM) System technical basis document for the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) was developed by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company design team. The WSB is being designed and built to support the waste disposal needs of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The main mission of the WSB is to process the radiological liquid waste streams from the PDCF and the MFFF into a solid waste form. The solid waste form, concrete encased waste, is acceptable for shipment and disposal as transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and as Low Level Waste (LLW) at on-site disposal areas. The SHM System will also handle the job control waste from the PDCF, the MFFF, and the WSB. The SHM System will serve the WSB by monitoring personnel radiation exposure and environmental releases. The WSB design used HPT design support in determining the air monitoring equipment required for the WSB. The Systems Engineering (SE) process was applied to define the functions and requirements necessary to design and operate the SHM System. The SE process is a proven disciplined approach that supports management in clearly defining the mission or problem, managing system functions and requirements, identifying and managing risk, establishing bases for informed decision making, and verifying that products and services meet customer needs. This SE process applied to the SHM System was a major effort encompassing requirements analysis and interface control. Use of the SE process combined with HPT design input resulted in well-defined requirements to support the procurement of a safe-mission essential SHM System.

Simpkins, P.J.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review Harry Harmon January 9, 2007 2 U.S. Department of Energy Outline * SWPF Process Overview * Major Risks * Approach for Conducting Review * Discussion of Findings * Conclusions 3 U.S. Department of Energy Salt Waste Processing Facility 4 U.S. Department of Energy SWPF Process Overview Alpha Finishing Process CSSX Alpha Strike Process MST/ Sludge Cs Strip Effluent DSS 5 U.S. Department of Energy BOTTOM LINE The SWPF Project is ready to move into final design. 6 U.S. Department of Energy Major Risks * Final geotechnical data potentially could result in redesign of the PC-3 CPA base mat and structure. * Cost and schedule impacts arising from the change from ISO-9001 to NQA-1 quality assurance requirements. * The "de-inventory, flush, and then hands-on

98

Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection Waste Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms - February 2013 Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms - February 2013 February 2013 Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms [HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25] The Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) assigned a new Site Lead to provide continuous oversight of activities at the Office of River Protection (ORP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and tank farms. To gain familiarity with the site programs and personnel, the new Site Lead made two trips to the site, which included tours of the WTP construction site

99

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Enforcement Documents - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Enforcement Documents - Savannah River Site April 13, 2010 Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. - NCO-2010-02 Consent Order issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. related to Nuclear Facility Construction Deficiencies and Subcontractor Oversight at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex - April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Amer Industrial Technologies - April 13, 2010

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MERCURY-NITRITE-RHODIUM-RUTHENIUM INTERACTIONS IN NOBLE METAL CATALYZED HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM FORMIC ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical pre-treatment of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site is performed to prepare the waste for vitrification into a stable waste glass form. During pre-treatment, compounds in the waste become catalytically active. Mercury, rhodium, and palladium become active for nitrite destruction by formic acid, while rhodium and ruthenium become active for catalytic conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Nitrite ion is present during the maximum activity of rhodium, but is consumed prior to the activation of ruthenium. Catalytic hydrogen generation during pre-treatment can exceed radiolytic hydrogen generation by several orders of magnitude. Palladium and mercury impact the maximum catalytic hydrogen generation rates of rhodium and ruthenium by altering the kinetics of nitrite ion decomposition. New data are presented that illustrate the interactions of these various species.

Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J; Stone, M.

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms, February 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 Site: Hanford - Office of River Production Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Dates of Activity : 02/25/13 - 03/07/13 and 03/18-28/13 Report Preparer: Robert E. Farrell Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) assigned a new Site Lead to provide continuous oversight of activities at the Office of River Protection (ORP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and tank farms. To gain familiarity with the site programs and personnel, the new Site Lead made

104

Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms, February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 Site: Hanford - Office of River Production Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Dates of Activity : 02/25/13 - 03/07/13 and 03/18-28/13 Report Preparer: Robert E. Farrell Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) assigned a new Site Lead to provide continuous oversight of activities at the Office of River Protection (ORP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and tank farms. To gain familiarity with the site programs and personnel, the new Site Lead made

105

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2010 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project Review A Department of Energy Construction Project Review (CPR) of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) project was conducted on July 19-22, 2010, at the request of the Principal Deputy Secretary, Office of Environmental Management (EM-2). The purpose of the review was to assess the cost, schedule, and technical progress against the approved Performance Baseline. Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010

106

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2010 September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the DOE Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), Salt Waste Processing Facility Project Office (SWPFPO), Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Effectiveness Review. The HSS participation, through its Site Lead program, provided HSS with an opportunity to maintain operational awareness and evaluate site programs, while supporting DOE line management efforts to safely and securely accomplish their missions. The onsite review was conducted during the

107

Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

REMOTE IN-CELL SAMPLING IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM AT THESAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote Systems Engineering (RSE) of the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) in combination with the Defense Waste Processing Facility(DWPF) Engineering and Operations has evaluated the existing equipment and processes used in the facility sample cells for 'pulling' samples from the radioactive waste stream and performing equipment in-cell repairs/replacements. RSE has designed and tested equipment for improving remote in-cell sampling evolutions and reducing the time required for in-cell maintenance of existing equipment. The equipment within the present process tank sampling system has been in constant use since the facility start-up over 17 years ago. At present, the method for taking samples within the sample cells produces excessive maintenance and downtime due to frequent failures relative to the sampling station equipment and manipulator. Location and orientation of many sampling stations within the sample cells is not conducive to manipulator operation. The overextension of manipulators required to perform many in-cell operations is a major cause of manipulator failures. To improve sampling operations and reduce downtime due to equipment maintenance, a Portable Sampling Station (PSS), wireless in-cell cameras, and new commercially available sampling technology has been designed, developed and/or adapted and tested. The uniqueness of the design(s), the results of the scoping tests, and the benefits relative to in-cell operation and reduction of waste are presented.

Marzolf, A

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2010 June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Orientation Visit The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit on June 21-25, 2010, at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) construction site at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). The purpose of the visit was to determine methods for HSS to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities with respect to this project in coordination with DOE's Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR). Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010

110

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2010 May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 May 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Walkthrough The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a visit to the Savannah River Site (SRS) on May 4-5, 2010. The visit focused on the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Construction Site, which is managed by Parsons with DOE line management program direction and oversight from the DOE Savannah River Operations Office. Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. -

111

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF A CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM TO REMOVE CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have completed construction and assembly of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility. Following assembly, they conducted testing to evaluate the ability of the process to remove non-radioactive cesium and to separate the aqueous and organic phases. They conducted tests at salt solution flow rates of 3.5, 6.0, and 8.5 gpm. During testing, the MCU Facility collected samples and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel for analysis of cesium, Isopar{reg_sign} L, and Modifier [1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol]. SRNL personnel analyzed the aqueous samples for cesium by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the solvent samples for cesium using a Parr Bomb Digestion followed by ICP-MS. They analyzed aqueous samples for Isopar{reg_sign} L and Modifier by gas chromatography (GC).

Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Earl Brass, E; Stanley Brown, S; Mark Geeting, M; Lcurtis Johnson, L; Charles02 Coleman, C; S Crump, S; Mark Barnes, M; Samuel Fink, S

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tank Farms at the Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Farms at the Savannah River Site Tank Farms at the Savannah River Site Tank Farms at the Savannah River Site Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 authorizes the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to reclassify certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from high-level waste to low-level waste if it meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116. A Waste Determination Basis (WD Basis) provides the analysis to document the Secretary's determination to manage the residuals as low-level radioactive waste. The Savannah River Site has several facilities managed under Section 3116. The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) WD Basis covers 20 tanks remaining to be closed in the FTF and the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) WD Basis will cover all 29 HTF

113

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Office of River Protection Waste Treatment and Immobilizatin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Review of the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project Construction Site, November 16-18, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of...

115

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

116

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site - September 2012 Savannah River Site - September 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2012 September 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an independent review of construction quality at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The focus of the review, performed on site between May 14 and 18, 2012, was piping and pipe supports. The review team also observed installation of two tanks in the dark cells (DCs). Subsequent to the onsite review, procurement records were reviewed for quality-related piping and piping system components.

117

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2011 July 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011 July 2011 Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project The Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of selected engineering processes for the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) safety significant electrical system at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The purpose of this review was to assess the adequacy of the contractor's electrical system configuration management and design change control during construction and initial system turnover activities. Interviews and reviewed WSB Project Electrical System DCFs, an SDDR, and

118

Summary - Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR-19 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review Disposal operations have been ongoing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for over 50 years. Active disposal in E-Area, is near the center of the site. Although a wide range of wastes are being managed at the SRS, only low level radioactive wastes (LLRW) are disposed of on site. Wastes are disposed of in unlined slit and engineered trenches, and in low activity waste and intermediate level vaults. Some wastes are isolated in place with grout and all wastes will be covered with a cap that includes a hydraulic barrier to limit precipitation infiltration. The objective of this review was to

119

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Savannah River Site Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/2014 7/2014 SEARCH GO News Releases Video Releases Upcoming Events 12.31.13 Dr. Sam Fink Earns Donald Orth Lifetime Achievement Award 12.31.13 Savannah River Remediation Issues Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report 12.18.13 Prototype System Brings Advantages of Wireless Technology to Secure Environment CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL NEWS RELEASES CLICK HERE for our email news service, govDELIVERY 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award - Click to play on YouTube 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award Finalist: SRS Recovery Act Project PLAY VIDEO CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL VIDEO RELEASES Enterprise.SRS - Safety and Security begin with me! SRS Status & Emergency Information * Cold War Patriot's Resource Fair - Aiken, SC (04.25.13) * 3rd Annual Small Modular Reactor Conference - Columbia, SC (04.16-17.13)

122

Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary...

123

Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

Lawrence, B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Berry, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from producing nuclear weapons materials for national defense to managing the waste it has generated, restoring the environment, and enhancing industrial development in and around the site. But no matter what the site`s mission is, it will continue to maintain its comprehensive environmental monitoring and surveillance program. In 1994, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 30,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, foodstuffs, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.; Spitzer, D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' to present summary environmental data for the purpose of: (a) characterizing site's environmental management performance; (b) summarizing environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) describing compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; and (d) highlighting significant site programs and efforts. This report is the principal document that demonstrates compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,' and is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at Savannah River Site (SRS). SRS has four primary missions: (1) Environmental Management - Cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War efforts and preparing decommissioned facilities and areas for long-term stewardship; (2) Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Support - Meeting the needs of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile through the tritium programs of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); (3) Nuclear Nonproliferation Support - Meeting the needs of the NNSA's nuclear nonproliferation programs by safely storing and dispositioning excess special nuclear materials; and (4) Research and Development - Supporting the application of science by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to meet the needs of SRS, the DOE complex, and other federal agencies During 2010, SRS worked to fulfill these missions and position the site for future operations. SRS continued to work with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to find and implement solutions and schedules for waste management and disposition. As part of its mission to clean up the Cold War legacy, SRS will continue to address the highest-risk waste management issues by safely storing and preparing liquid waste and nuclear materials for disposition, and by safely stabilizing any tank waste residues that remain on site.

Mamatey, A.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

126

DOE/EA-1308; Environmental Assessment for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-Level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from the Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities (February 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 08 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE OFFSITE TRANSPORTATION OF CERTAIN LOW-LEVEL AND MIXED RADIOACTIVE WASTE FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE FOR TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL AT COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT FACILITIES FEBRUARY 2001 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE i ii This page is intentionally left blank iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Background 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Action 6 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 6 2.1 Proposed Action 6 2.2 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 11 2.2.1 No Action, Continue to Store These Waste Forms at SRS 11 2.2.2 Construct and Operate Onsite Treatment and Disposal Facilities 11 3.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 12 3.1 Onsite Loading Operations 12 3.2 Transportation Impacts

127

Chernobyls waste site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the prospects for using the Chernobyl exclusion zone for development of a spent fuel store, waste disposal site and other nuclear facilities.

Schmieman, Eric A.; Paskevych, Sergiy; Sizov, Andrey; Batiy, Valeriy

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Savannah River Site Contractor Receives Project Management Institute Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Contractor Receives Project Management Savannah River Site Contractor Receives Project Management Institute Award Savannah River Site Contractor Receives Project Management Institute Award November 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis SRR Bubbler Project Manager Bill Pepper, center, accepts the PMI Project of the Year award from Eloy Saldivar, left, president of the Savannah River Chapter of PMI. DWPF Facility Manager Les Sonnenberg is on the right. SRR Bubbler Project Manager Bill Pepper, center, accepts the PMI Project of the Year award from Eloy Saldivar, left, president of the Savannah River Chapter of PMI. DWPF Facility Manager Les Sonnenberg is on the right. AIKEN, S.C. - The local chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI) recently honored the Savannah River Site liquid waste contractor with its

129

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-Level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities, DOE/EA-1308 (02/15/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from the Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities Agency: U. S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1308) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed offsite transportation of certain low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed (i.e., hazardous and radioactive) low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) from the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting

130

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2011 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2011 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2011 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - July 2011 July 2011 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project Peer Review [HIAR-SRS-2011-07-15] At the request of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Enterprise Project Management (NAAPM-20), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), provided an expert to review the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) startup programs and procedures associated with worker safety and health, environment, and security. Criteria for the review was detailed in the Criteria, Review and Approach Document (CRAD) contained within the NNSA review plan, and the expert served as a member of

131

Environmental Assessment for the Closure of the High-Level Waste Tanks in F- & H-Areas at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the closure of 51 high-level radioactive waste tanks and tank farm ancillary equipment (including transfer lines, evaporators, filters, pumps, etc) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The waste tanks are located in the F- and H-Areas of SRS and vary in capacity from 2,839,059 liters (750,000 gallons) to 4,921,035 liters (1,300,000 gallons). These in-ground tanks are surrounded by soil to provide shielding. The F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tanks are operated under the authority of Industrial Wastewater Permits No.17,424-IW; No.14520, and No.14338 issued by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with the Permit requirements, DOE has prepared a Closure Plan (DOE, 1996) and submitted it to SCDHEC for approval. The Closure Plan identifies all applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations, statutes, and DOE Orders for closing systems operated under the Industrial Wastewater Permits. When approved by SCDHEC, the Closure Plan will present the regulatory process for closing all of the F- and H-Area High Level Waste Tanks. The Closure Plan establishes performance objectives or criteria to be met prior to closing any tank, group of tanks, or ancillary tank farm equipment. The proposed action is to remove the residual wastes from the tanks and to fill the tanks with a material to prevent future collapse and bind up residual waste, to lower human health risks, and to increase safety in and around the tanks. If required, an engineered cap consisting of clay, backfill (soil), and vegetation as the final layer to prevent erosion would be applied over the tanks. The selection of tank system closure method will be evaluated against the following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) criteria described in 40 CFR 300.430(e)(9): ( 1) overall protection of human health and the environment; (2) compliance with applicable or relevant and appropriated requirement: (ARARs); (3) long-term effectiveness and permanence; (4) reduction of toxicity, mobility, or volume through treatment; (5) short-term effectiveness; (6) implementability; (7) cost; (8) state acceptable; and (9) community acceptance. Closure of each tank involves two separate operations after bulk waste removal has been accomplished: (1) cleaning of the tank (i.e., removing the residual contaminants), and (2) the actual closure or filling of the tank with an inert material, (e.g., grout). This process would continue until all the tanks and ancillary equipment and systems have been closed. This is expected to be about year 2028 for Type I, II, and IV tanks and associated systems. Subsequent to that, Type III tanks and systems will be closed.

N /A

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - August 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2011 August 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - August 2011 August 2011 Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of selected aspects of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions' (SRNS) plans for commercial grade dedication (CGD) of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Safety Instrumented System (SIS) safety significant components at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The independent review was conducted during June 14-24 and July 12-13, 2011, by Independent Oversight in coordination with the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear

133

IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 7, 2008 IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES Plan won't impact DOE commitment to removing all stored waste from Idaho Site Idaho's Advanced Mixed Waste...

134

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) The DOE Carlsbad Field Office funds a number of...

135

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Savannah River site environmental report for 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of site-generated waste, restoration of the surrounding environment, and the development of industry in and around the site. However, SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program. In 1996, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 31,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Though the environmental monitoring program was streamlined in 1996-to improve its cost-effectiveness without compromising data quality or reducing its overall ability to produce critical information-thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, food products, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.; Mamatey, A. [eds.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

THE EFFECT OF THE PRESENCE OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABILITY LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process uses ozone to effect the oxidation of metal oxalates produced during the dissolution of sludge in the Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks. The ozone reacts with the metal oxalates to form metal oxide and hydroxide precipitants, and the CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and any unreacted O{sub 3} gases are discharged into the vapor space. In addition to the non-radioactive metals in the waste, however, the SRS radioactive waste also contains a variety of radionuclides, hence, hydrogen gas is also present in the vapor space of the ECC system. Because hydrogen is flammable, the impact of this resultant gas stream on the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL) of hydrogen must be understood for all possible operating scenarios of both normal and off-normal situations, with particular emphasis at the elevated temperatures and pressures of the typical ECC operating conditions. Oxygen is a known accelerant in combustion reactions, but while there are data associated with the behavior of hydrogen/oxygen environments, recent, relevant studies addressing the effect of ozone on the flammability limit of hydrogen proved scarce. Further, discussions with industry experts verified the absence of data in this area and indicated that laboratory testing, specific to defined operating parameters, was needed to comprehensively address the issue. Testing was thus designed and commissioned to provide the data necessary to support safety related considerations for the ECC process. A test matrix was developed to envelope the bounding conditions considered credible during ECC processing. Each test consists of combining a gas stream of high purity hydrogen with a gas stream comprised of a specified mixture of ozone and oxygen in a temperature and pressure regulated chamber such that the relative compositions of the two streams are controlled. The gases are then stirred to obtain a homogeneous mixture and ignition attempted by applying 10J of energy to a fuse wire. A gas combination is considered flammable when a pressure rise of 7% of the initial absolute pressure is observed. The specified testing methodology is consistent with guidelines established in ASTM E-918-83 (2005) 'Standard Practices for Determining Limits of Flammability of Chemicals at Elevated Temperature and Pressure'.

Sherburne, C.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

138

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2012 September 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an independent review of construction quality at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The focus of the review, performed on site between May 14 and 18, 2012, was piping and pipe supports. The review team also observed installation of two tanks in the dark cells (DCs). Subsequent to the onsite review, procurement records were reviewed for quality-related piping and piping system components.

139

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - January 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of construction quality and selected aspects for fire protection system design at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB). The review was performed on site between September 24 and 27, 2012, focusing on the WSB process vessel ventilation (PVV) system and the fire protection active and passive

140

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. Idaho - The Waste Disposition Project Team at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site has continued to keep its commitment to remove remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste out of Idaho, protecting the Snake River Plain Aquifer and keeping the Office of Environmental Management's commitment to environmental clean up. In 2007, the first shipment of RH TRU waste left the gates of the Idaho Site, headed to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In the three years since, devoted individuals on the CH2M-WG, Idaho's (CWI)

142

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. Idaho - The Waste Disposition Project Team at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site has continued to keep its commitment to remove remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste out of Idaho, protecting the Snake River Plain Aquifer and keeping the Office of Environmental Management's commitment to environmental clean up. In 2007, the first shipment of RH TRU waste left the gates of the Idaho Site, headed to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In the three years since, devoted individuals on the CH2M-WG, Idaho's (CWI)

143

Savannah River Site Environmental Implentation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the organizational responsibilities for the Savannah River Site Environmental program. Operations, Engineering and projects, Environment, safety, and health, Quality assurance, and the Savannah River Laboratory are described.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

WASTE INVENTORY DATA AT OAK RIDGEAND SAVANNAH RIVER, IG-0434...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE INVENTORY DATA AT OAK RIDGEAND SAVANNAH RIVER, IG-0434 WASTE INVENTORY DATA AT OAK RIDGEAND SAVANNAH RIVER, IG-0434 The Oak Ridge and Savannah River Operations Offices are...

145

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site December 8, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award to Savannah River Remediation, LLC as the liquid waste contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $3.3 billion over the entire contract, consisting of a base period of six years, plus an option to extend for up to two additional years. The base performance period of the contract will be from April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2015. A 90-day transition period will begin January 2, 2009.

146

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site December 8, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award to Savannah River Remediation, LLC as the liquid waste contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $3.3 billion over the entire contract, consisting of a base period of six years, plus an option to extend for up to two additional years. The base performance period of the contract will be from April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2015. A 90-day transition period will begin January 2, 2009.

147

Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup Savannah River Site Makes Progress on Recovery Act-funded Cleanup February 9, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis SRS loaded 14 standard waste boxes containing mixed and low-level waste that previously was classified as transuranic TRU waste. This shipment to a Florida treatment site marks the 1,000 cubic meter milestone of the 5,000 cubic meters in the Site’s TRU program that will be dispositioned through the Recovery Act. SRS loaded 14 standard waste boxes containing mixed and low-level waste that previously was classified as transuranic TRU waste. This shipment to a Florida treatment site marks the 1,000 cubic meter milestone of the 5,000 cubic meters in the Site's TRU program that will be dispositioned through

148

Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms- February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms [HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25

149

EA-1061: The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive Waste From  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive 1: The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive Waste From the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina EA-1061: The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive Waste From the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for off-site volume reduction of low-level radioactive wastes generated at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site located near Aiken, South Carolina. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 28, 1995 EA-1061: Finding of No Significant Impact The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive Waste From the Savannah River Site July 28, 1995 EA-1061: Final Environmental Assessment The Off-site Volume Reduction of Low-level Radioactive Waste From the

150

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-3 Burn Pit Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-058  

SciTech Connect

The 128-B-3 waste site is a former burn and disposal site for the 100-B/C Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River. The 128-B-3 waste site has been remediated to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results of sampling at upland areas of the site also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

Inspector General audit report on waste inventory data at Oak Ridge and Savannah River  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge and Savannah River Operations Offices are responsible for maintaining reliable and accurate waste inventories to ensure effective waste management operations at their sites. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the hazardous, low-level, and low-level mixed waste inventories at the Oak Ridge Reservation and the Savannah River Site were accurate and reliable in Fiscal year (FY) 1998. The volumes of hazardous, low-level, and low-level mixed waste stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation was overstated in FY 1998 inventory records, and the locations of many waste containers at the Savannah River Site were recorded inaccurately or incompletely. Additionally, the Department incurred unnecessary costs adjusting waste inventory data for management reports at the Oak Ridge Reservation and locating waste containers for treatment or disposal at the Savannah River Site. The auditors recommended that the Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management establish general requirements for tracking and reporting waste inventories at the sites. They also recommended that the Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office, direct contractor personnel to perform an inventory of stored waste and establish adequate procedures to ensure that waste inventory records are kept current, accurate, and complete at all Oak Ridge Reservation sites. Further, they recommended that the Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, ensure that the planned inventory of stored waste is completed, and the contractor personnel record the storage location for all containers and update inventory data when containers are moved.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Report Audit Report Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site OAS-L-12-09 August 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's largest cleanup task involves the treatment, immobilization and disposal of 56 million gallons of hazardous and highly radioactive waste at the Hanford Site, located in Southeastern Washington State. As part of this effort, the Department is constructing

153

Savannah River Site Contractor Receives Project Management Institute Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Receives Project Management Contractor Receives Project Management Institute Award Savannah River Site Contractor Receives Project Management Institute Award November 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis SRR Bubbler Project Manager Bill Pepper, center, accepts the PMI Project of the Year award from Eloy Saldivar, left, president of the Savannah River Chapter of PMI. DWPF Facility Manager Les Sonnenberg is on the right. SRR Bubbler Project Manager Bill Pepper, center, accepts the PMI Project of the Year award from Eloy Saldivar, left, president of the Savannah River Chapter of PMI. DWPF Facility Manager Les Sonnenberg is on the right. AIKEN, S.C. - The local chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI) recently honored the Savannah River Site liquid waste contractor with its 2011 Project of the Year award.

154

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-233 Waste Site, Vertical Pipe Near 100-B Electrical Laydown Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-041  

SciTech Connect

The 600-233 waste site consisted of three small-diameter pipelines within the 600-232 waste site, including previously unknown diesel fuel supply lines discovered during site remediation. The 600-233 waste site has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

155

Site hydrogeologic/geotechnical characterization report for Site B new municipal solid waste landfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Site Hydrogeologic/Geotechnical Characterization Report (SHCR) presents the results of a comprehensive study conducted on a proposed solid waste landfill site, identified herein as Site B, at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report is intended to satisfy all requirements of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with regard to landfill siting requirements and ground water and environmental protection. In addition, this report provides substantial geotechnical data pertinent to the landfill design process.

Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

Arnett, M.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Contractor Fee Payments- Savannah River Site Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Savannah River Site Office on these charts.

163

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system being developed for deployment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a supplementary salt waste processing technology that, if implemented, will augment the baseline Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) capability. An opportunity exists to shorten the SRS radioactive waste system lifecycle by 6 years, and significantly reduce life cycle costs, by accelerating salt processing to earlier completion, simultaneous with sludge vitrification. As described in the Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy, which is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Roadmap - EM Journey to Excellence,

164

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Savannah River Site Savannah River Site http://www.srs.gov/general/srs-home.html Field Office: Located south of Aiken, South Carolina, the Savannah River Field Office (SRFO) is responsible for the NNSA Defense Program missions at

166

Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Savannah River Site Savannah River Site http://www.srs.gov/general/srs-home.html Field Office: Located south of Aiken, South Carolina, the Savannah River Field Office (SRFO) is responsible for the NNSA Defense Program missions at

167

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Proposed Use of a Constructed Wetland for the Treatment of Metals in the S-04 Outfall of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF is part of an integrated waste treatment system at the SRS to treat wastes containing radioactive contaminants. In the early 1980s the DOE recognized that there would be significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the radioactive waste in a stable solid form. The Defense Waste Processing Facility was designed and constructed to accomplish this task.

Glover, T.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Work is under way to decommission the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, which had been used to test experimental fuel assemblies for commercial heavy-water power reactors. SRS is scheduled to remove the dome of the reactor this month (January 2011). Workers also will displace the reactor vessel and steam generators, grout the remaining structure in place, and install a concrete cover over the reactor's footprint Work is under way to decommission the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, which had been used to test experimental fuel assemblies for commercial heavy-water power reactors. SRS is scheduled to remove the dome of the reactor this month (January 2011). Workers also will displace the reactor vessel and steam generators, grout the remaining structure in place, and

171

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-2, 100-B Burn Pit #2 Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-038  

SciTech Connect

The 128-B-2 waste site was a burn pit historically used for the disposal of combustible and noncombustible wastes, including paint and solvents, office waste, concrete debris, and metallic debris. This site has been remediated by removing approximately 5,627 bank cubic meters of debris, ash, and contaminated soil to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nuclear Material Processing at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium production for national defense began at Savannah River in the mid-1950s, following construction of production reactors and separations facilities. Following the successful completion of its production mission, the site`s nuclear material processing facilities continue to operate to perform stabilization of excess materials and potentially support the disposition of these materials. A number of restoration and productivity improvement projects implemented in the 1980s, totaling nearly a billion dollars, have resulted in these facilities representing the most modern and only remaining operating large-scale processing facilities in the DOE Complex. Together with the Site`s extensive nuclear infrastructure, and integrated waste management system, SRS is the only DOE site with the capability and mission of ongoing processing operations.

Severynse, T.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radioactive releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the continuation of a series of reports, previously titled, Releases of Radioactivity at the Savannah River Plant (DPSPU-YR-25-1). The reports reflect the use of air and liquid effluent sample analyses in determining the amount of radioactivity released from Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The identification and characterization of these source terms since plant startup in 1954 have aided Site personnel in confining and limiting the amount of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS facilities. This document is an effluent/source term report; items falling under other categories, such as environmental spills or solid waste transport to the burial ground, are not included. Any classified or secret data have either been excluded, as in the case of 1960--1970 atmospheric releases of {sup 85}Kr from the Separations Areas, or combined to avoid classification, such as atmospheric tritium releases from the Separations Area.

Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Martin, D.K.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste to Energy Power Production Waste to Energy Power Production at DOE and DOD Sites January 13, 2011 Overview - Federal Agency Innovations DOE: S avannah River S ite * Biomass Heat and Power US AF: Hill Air Force Base * Landfill Gas to Energy Generation Ameresco independent DOES avannah River S ite DOES avannah River S ite (DOE-S R) * Georgia / S outh Carolina border * 300+ sq miles extending into 3 counties * Began operations in 1950s Challenges faced by DOE-S R * Aging Infrastructure Ameresco independent * Coal and fuel oil power plants * Increased / new clean air requirements * New energy efficiency / sustainability requirements Business Case Analysis S ite need for both steam and power Repair, renovate, or replace Mandates and desire for renewable energy solution Appropriated funds not available

185

DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hanford site transuranic waste certification plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management, and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant' (DOE 1996d) (WIPP WAC). The WIPP WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WIPP WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their management of TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter41 (TRUPACT-11). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-I1 requirements in the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (NRC 1997) (TRUPACT-I1 SARP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site Performance Assessments (PA) are analyses conducted for low level radioactive waste disposal facilities (or appropriate CERCLA documentation for a low level radioactive waste disposal facility), and are critical in determining the nature and extent of the controls that need to be put in place at the facility being evaluated. There are specific requirements for the protection of the public, workers, and environment that are critical to maintaining safe and effective disposal of radioactive waste and the PA is a risk analysis of the potential hazards of disposing of low level radioactive waste. The review and approval of these evaluations is

188

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site - March 2013 Savannah River Site - March 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 March 2013 Oversight Scheduling an Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site [HIAR-SRS-2013-03-25] Activity Description/Purpose: The Independent Oversight Site Lead for the Savannah River Site traveled to the site to work with functional area managers to schedule nuclear safety oversight activities. The Site Lead reviewed the differing professional opinion (DPO) program at the Savannah River Operations Office (Department of Energy (DOE)-SR). Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Policy Flash 2013-74 Quarterly Notification of the DOE's Differing

189

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990s have brought dramatic change to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in its role as a key part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) weapons complex. Shrinking federal budgets, sharp workforce reductions, the end of the Cold War, and a major shift in mission objectives have combined to severely test the mettle of SRS-South Carolina`s largest employer. But the sprawling 310-square-mile site`s employees have responded to the test in admirable fashion, effectively shifting their emphasis from weapons production to environmental restoration. This report describes the environmental report for the SRS for 1995.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A. [eds.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Plan for the management of radioactive waste, Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

The following areas are covered in the Savannah River Plant's radioactive waste management plan: program administration; description of waste generating processes; waste management facilities; radioactive wastes stored; plans and budget projections; and description of decontamination and decommissioning . (LK)

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance to ensure the safety of the public and the well-being of the environment. DOE Order 5400,1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` requires the submission of an environmental report that documents the impact of facility operations on the environment and on public health. SRS has had an extensive environmental surveillance program in place since 1951 (before site startup). At that time, data generated by the on-site surveillance program were reported in site documents. Beginning in 1959, data from off-site environmental monitoring activities were presented in reports issued for public dissemination. Separate reporting of SRS`s on- and off-site environmental monitoring activities continued until 1985, when data from both surveillance programs were merged into a single public document. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 1993. For complete program descriptions, consult the ``SRS Environmental Monitoring Plan`` (WSRC-3Ql-2-1000). It documents the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, the frequency of monitoring and analysis, the specific analytical and sampling procedures, and the quality assurance requirements.

Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hanford and Savannah River Site Programmatic and Technical Integration  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) were the primary plutonium production facilities within the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. Radioactive wastes were generated as patt of these missions and are stored in similar fashion. The majority of radioactivity maintained by the two sites is located in underground carbon steel tanks in the physical form of supernatant, saltcake, or sludge. Disposition of SRS tank waste is ongoing by converting it into glass (pathway for sludge and radionuclides separated from supernatant or dissolved saltcake) or cement (pathway for the decontaminated supernatant and dissolved saltcake). Tank closure activity has also begun at SRS and will continue for the duration of mission. The Hanford tank waste inventory is roughly 2/3rds larger than SRS's by volume- but nominally half the radioactivity. The baseline disposition path includes high-level and low-activity waste vitrification. with separate disposition of contact-handled transuranic tank waste. Retrieval of tank waste from aging single shell tanks (SSTs) into double-shell tanks (DSTs) is currently ongoing. As vitrification commences later this decade, Hanford will be in a similar operations mode as SRS. Site integration is increasing as the missions align. The ongoing integration is centered on key issues that impact both sites- regardless of mission timeframe. Three recent workshop exchanges have been held to improve communication with the primary intent of improving operations and technical work organization. The topics of these workshops are as follows: 1) DST space utilization, optimization, and closure 2) Waste Feed Qualification 3) Cementitious Waste Forms Key goals for these and future exchanges include aligning research and technology, preparing for joint initiatives (to maximize budgetary value for the customer), and reviewing lessons learned. Each site has played a leading role in the development of technology and operational practices that can be used to meet current challenges and to minimize the impact of future challenges. This paper provides an overview of the exchanges held, but predominately focuses on the team development and actions leading from the workshops.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

US Forest Service - Annonymous,

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

G. A. Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W S R C: M S- 9 5 -0 0 0 8 W S R C: M S- 9 5 -0 0 0 8 Analytical Considerations in the Code Qualification of Piping Systems (U) by G. A. Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, South Carolina 29808 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or respnsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

196

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

197

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site - September 2011 Savannah River Site - September 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2011 September 2011 Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the Implementation Verification Review (IVR) Processes at Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities. The overall objective of the Independent Oversight IVR review process includes verification that contractors and site offices have developed and implemented appropriate methods for performing IVRs (including direction for scheduling and conducting IVR activities) and measurement of the

198

Risk assessment data bank design at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has designed and implemented a database system containing a series of compilations of incidents used primarily for risk assessment. Four databases have been designed and implemented using advanced database management system computer software. These databases exist for reprocessing, fuel fabrication, waste management, and the Savannah River Technology Center. They are combined into one system caged the Risk Assessment Methodology (RAM) Fault Tree Data Banks. This paper will discuss the logical design of the data, the menus, and the operating platform. Built-in updating features, such as batch and on-line data entry; data validation methods; automatic update features; and expert system programs, will also be discussed. User functions, such as on-line search/view/report and statistical functions, will be presented. Security features and backup and recovery methods will also be covered.

Townsend, C.S.; Johnson, K.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Risk assessment data bank design at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has designed and implemented a database system containing a series of compilations of incidents used primarily for risk assessment. Four databases have been designed and implemented using advanced database management system computer software. These databases exist for reprocessing, fuel fabrication, waste management, and the Savannah River Technology Center. They are combined into one system caged the Risk Assessment Methodology (RAM) Fault Tree Data Banks. This paper will discuss the logical design of the data, the menus, and the operating platform. Built-in updating features, such as batch and on-line data entry; data validation methods; automatic update features; and expert system programs, will also be discussed. User functions, such as on-line search/view/report and statistical functions, will be presented. Security features and backup and recovery methods will also be covered.

Townsend, C.S.; Johnson, K.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 120-F-1 Glass Dump Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-028  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 120-F-1 waste site consisted of two dumping areas located 660 m southeast of the 105-F Reactor containing laboratory equipment and bottles, demolition debris, light bulbs and tubes, small batteries, small drums, and pesticide contaminated soil. It is probable that 108-F was the source of the debris but the material may have come from other locations within the 100-F Area. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

J. M. Capron

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2007 (WSRC-STI-2008-00057) prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting', and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; (3) highlight significant programs and efforts; (4) assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, A

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

203

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2005  

SciTech Connect

The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2005'' (WSRC-TR-2006-00007) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, A

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2007 (WSRC-STI-2008-00057) prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting', and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; (3) highlight significant programs and efforts; (4) assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, A

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2004  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2004 (WSRC-TR-2005-00005) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,'' and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Mamatey, Albert R.

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Waste Disposal Site and Radioactive Waste Management (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes the considerations of the Commission in determining whether to approve the establishment and operation of a disposal site for nuclear waste. If a permit is issued, the...

208

A Milestone for Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Milestone for Savannah River Site A Milestone for Savannah River Site A Milestone for Savannah River Site October 21, 2010 - 4:38pm Addthis Employees of the Savannah River Site's M Area Operable Unit (MAOU) gather at the completed site. Employees of the Savannah River Site's M Area Operable Unit (MAOU) gather at the completed site. Dr. Ines Triay I had the privilege yesterday to celebrate history and embrace the future at the first Savannah River Site (SRS) Area Completion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. I was one of about 250 people gathered at the M Area Operable Unit (MAOU) area completion event that marked the end of an era at SRS. During the Cold War, M Area was the site of three support buildings used to fabricate fuel targets for the Site's reactors; home to the Liquid Effluent Treatment

209

A Milestone for Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Milestone for Savannah River Site A Milestone for Savannah River Site A Milestone for Savannah River Site October 21, 2010 - 4:38pm Addthis Employees of the Savannah River Site's M Area Operable Unit (MAOU) gather at the completed site. Employees of the Savannah River Site's M Area Operable Unit (MAOU) gather at the completed site. Dr. Ines Triay I had the privilege yesterday to celebrate history and embrace the future at the first Savannah River Site (SRS) Area Completion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. I was one of about 250 people gathered at the M Area Operable Unit (MAOU) area completion event that marked the end of an era at SRS. During the Cold War, M Area was the site of three support buildings used to fabricate fuel targets for the Site's reactors; home to the Liquid Effluent Treatment

210

Recommended Distribution Coefficients, Kd Values, for Special Analysis Risk Calculations Related to Waste Disposal and Tank Closure on the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a technically defensible list of distribution coefficients, or Kd values, for use in performance assessment (PA) and special analysis (SA) calculations on the SRS. Only Kd values for radionuclides that have new information related to them or that have recently been recognized as being important are discussed in this report. Some 150 Kd values are provided in this report for various waste-disposal or tank-closure environments: soil, corrosion in grout, oxidizing grout waste, gravel, clay, and reducing concrete environments. Documentation and justification for the selection of each Kd value is provided.

Kaplan, D

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona...

212

EA-1097: Solid waste Disposal - Nevada Test Site, Nye County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Solid waste Disposal - Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada EA-1097: Solid waste Disposal - Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental...

213

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jobs at Savannah River Site Jobs at Savannah River Site Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site Addthis Description The Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of the new hires. Speakers Skila Harris, Doug Clark, Bill Picciano, Kelli Culpepper, Nancy Cole, Duration 5:08 Topic Recovery Act Waste Management Nuclear Security & Safety Credit Energy Department Video SKILA HARRIS: We understand the health risks associated with radioactivity much better today than we did 50 years ago. And at the sites where this country was developing its weapons, we were not responsible in how we handled those materials. The recovery act has allowed us to accelerate the clean-up, hire a lot more people so we can

214

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site March 29, 2012 - 10:37am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Energy Department announced it has reached a major milestone in the Department's efforts to clean up the Cold War legacy at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, laying the groundwork for closing two underground storage tanks that previously held radioactive liquid waste from nuclear weapons production at SRS. The determination signed by Energy Secretary Steven Chu paves the way for SRS to begin closing the massive tanks that make up the F Tank Farm. The site will start this year by closing two tanks that pose the greatest risk to the environment - Tanks 18 and 19. These tank closures will be the first

215

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site Major Cold War Cleanup Milestone Reached at the Savannah River Site March 29, 2012 - 10:37am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Energy Department announced it has reached a major milestone in the Department's efforts to clean up the Cold War legacy at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, laying the groundwork for closing two underground storage tanks that previously held radioactive liquid waste from nuclear weapons production at SRS. The determination signed by Energy Secretary Steven Chu paves the way for SRS to begin closing the massive tanks that make up the F Tank Farm. The site will start this year by closing two tanks that pose the greatest risk to the environment - Tanks 18 and 19. These tank closures will be the first

216

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes environmental activities conducted on and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C., from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1991, with an update on compliance activities through April 1, 1992. The report is a single volume with a separate summary pamphlet highlighting the major findings for 1991. The report is divided into an executive summary and 14 chapters containing information on environmental compliance issues, environmental monitoring methods and programs, and environmental research activities for 1991, as well as historical data from previous years. Analytical results, figures, charts, and data tables relevant to the environmental monitoring program for 1991 at SRS are included.

Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R.; Todd, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Meteorological Support at the Savanna River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) operates many nuclear facilities on large complexes across the United States in support of national defense. The operation of these many and varied facilities and processes require meteorological support for many purposes, including: for routine operations, to respond to severe weather events, such as lightning, tornadoes and hurricanes, to support the emergency response functions in the event of a release of materials to the environment, for engineering baseline and safety documentation, as well as hazards assessments etc. This paper describes a program of meteorological support to the Savannah River Site, a DOE complex located in South Carolina.

Addis, Robert P.

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

F-Area Tank Farm, Savannah River Site Available for Public Comment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 February 20, 2013 Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for Liquid Waste Tanks 5F and 6F F-Area Tank Farm, Savannah River Site Available for Public Comment Background: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office has requested approval from the South Carolina De- partment of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) of the Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for Waste Tanks 5F and 6F to support removal from service of these subject tanks located in the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF General Closure Plan, approved on January 24, 2011, established the protocols by which DOE would: (1) close SRS FTF waste tank systems in accordance with South Carolina Regulations R.61-82, "Proper Closeout of Wastewater

219

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2008 (SRNS-STI-2009-00190) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts.

Mamatey, A.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to meet three of the primary objectives of the Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental monitoring program. These objectives are to assess actual or potential exposures to populations form the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from normal operations or nonroutine occurrences; to demonstrate compliance with applicable authorized limits and legal requirements; and to communicate results of the monitoring program to the public. This 1989 report contains descriptions of radiological and nonradiological monitoring programs, it provides data obtained from these programs, and it describes various environmental research activities ongoing at the site. Also included are summaries of environmental management and compliance activities, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act activities, and a listing of environmental permits issued by regulatory agencies.

Cummins, C.L.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Savannah River Site environmental implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office- August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development.

224

Savannah River Site new NIM design  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing a replacement Nuclear Incident Monitor (NIM) system. A prototype system has been built for human factors study and for operations testing. The design of the new NIM is based on the existing NIM system, developed at SRL, which has been in operation at the Savannah River Site since 1979. Many of the components of this system have remained unchanged, or with only minimal changes. The design of the new NIM system takes advantage of the extensive maintenance and operation records that have been accumulated on the existing NIM system. These records identified those components of the system that had performed satisfactorily over the years. Most importantly, the records pinpointed the problem areas in the system. Components were that required replacement, and circuitry that required redesign to ensure that the NIM system meets all of the site criteria for safety, accuracy and maintainability were identified. Mechanical changes were made to assure that the new system conforms to all seismic requirements specified in pertinent standards. 7 figs.

Smoak, A.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The effect of adding crystalline silicotitanate on the durability, liquidus, and viscosity of simulated high-level waste glasses at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the results obtained for a limited variability study for glasses containing Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), Monosodium Titanate (MST), and either simulated Purex or HM sludge. Twenty-two glasses containing Purex sludge and three glasses containing HM sludge were fabricated and tested. The fabricated glasses were tested for durability using the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) and characterized by measuring the viscosity at 1,150 C and by determining an approximate, bounding liquidus temperature. The current models used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for predicting durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature were applied to all 25 glasses. The goal of this work was to identify any major problems from a glass perspective, within the scope of this effort, which could potentially preclude the use of CST at DWPF.

Harbour, J.R.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Amended Record of Decision for the Interim Management of Nuclear Materials: Savannah River Site Waste Management (DOE/EIS-0220) (07/28/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29 29 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 144 / Monday, July 28, 2003 / Notices Electronic Access to This Document You may view this document, as well as all other Department of Education documents published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) on the Internet at the following site: http://www.ed.gov/ legislation/FedRegister. To use PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at this site. If you have questions about using the PDF, call the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), toll free, at 1- 888-293-6498; or in the Washington, DC, area at (202) 512-1530. Note: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code

227

Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to identify, assess, and rank potential sites for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities complex at the Savannah River Site.

Wike, L.D.

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revieir of the Plutonium Revieir of the Plutonium Preparation Project at Savannah River Site October 2008 Dr. David S. Kosson, Vanderbilt University Dr. David R. Gallay, Logistics Management Institute Dr. R. Bruce Mathews, Consultant Mr. David Nulton, National Nuclear Security Administration (ret.) Dr. Kenneth Okafor, South Carolina State University Dr. Steven Krahn, U. S. Department of Energy I I External Technical Review of the Plutonium Preparation Project October 2008 - I Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Ms. Michelle Ewart, Savantiah River Site, and Mr. Ricky Bell, for their exceptional support during this review. Ms. Ewart was the lead DOE representative responsible for organizing reviews held on-site by the Review Team. Mr. Theodore Venetz (Fluor Hanford Company) served as an observer to this review. The

229

Microsoft Word - Tualatin_River_Pipeline_Crossing_Site_LURR_19940060...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum Julie Goodrich - TERR-3 Project Manager Proposed Action: Tualatin River Pipeline Crossing Site - Monitoring Well Redevelopment Categorical Exclusion Applied (from...

230

Record of Decision for the Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Final Environmental Impact Statement, Aiken, SC AGENCY: Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel...

231

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and...

232

Assessment of mercury in the Savannah River Site environment  

SciTech Connect

Mercury has been valued by humans for several millennia. Its principal ore, cinnabar, was mined for its distinctive reddish-gold color and high density. Mercury and its salts were used as medicines and aphrodisiacs. At SRS, mercury originated from one of the following: as a processing aid in aluminum dissolution and chloride precipitation; as part of the tritium facilities` gas handling system; from experimental, laboratory, or process support facilities; and as a waste from site operations. Mercury is also found in Par Pond and some SRS streams as the result of discharges from a mercury-cell-type chlor-alkali plant near the city of Augusta, GA. Reactor cooling water, drawn from the Savannah River, transported mercury onto the SRS. Approximately 80,000 kg of mercury is contained in the high level waste tanks and 10,000 kg is located in the SWDF. Additional quantities are located in the various seepage basins. In 1992, 617 wells were monitored for mercury contamination, with 47 indicating contamination in excess of the 0.002-ppm EPA Primary Drinking Water Standard. More than 20 Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) reports and publications pertinent to mercury (Hg) have been generated during the last two decades. They are divided into three groupings: SRS-specific studies, basic studies of bioaccumulation, and basic studies of effect. Many studies have taken place at Par Pond and Upper Three Runs Creek. Mercury has been detected in wells monitoring the groundwater beneath SRS, but not in water supply wells in excess of the Primary Drinking Water Limit of 0.002 ppm. There has been no significant release of mercury from SRS to the Savannah River. While releases to air are likely, based on process knowledge, modeling of the releases indicates concentrations that are well below the SCDHEC ambient standard.

Kvartek, E.J.; Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.; Eldridge, L.; Newman, M.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling of the sub-surface reducing environment of the Z-Area Saltstone disposal facility at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-level radioactive liquid wastes at the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site are treated by mixing the wastes with Saltstone grout to generate the Saltstone waste form that is poured into the concrete vaults for long-term disposal. The formula ... Keywords: contaminant transport, environmental science, radioactive waste, radionuclides

Thong Hang; Daniel I. Kaplan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site - January Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 January 2010 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected the emergency management program at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) in August and September 2009. The inspection was performed by the Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight to support site management in the execution of the SRS mission. This report discusses the results of the review of the SRS emergency management program. Overall, SRS has implemented a mature, comprehensive, and well-documented emergency management program whose programmatic elements and site emergency

235

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2003  

SciTech Connect

The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2003'' (WSRC-TR-2004-00015) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; (3) highlight significant programs and efforts; and (4) assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. This year's report reflects a continuing effort (begun in 2001) to streamline the document and thereby increase its cost effectiveness--without omitting valuable technical data. To that end each author will continue to work toward presenting results in summary fashion, focusing on historical trends. Complete data tables again are included on the CD inside the back cover of the report. The CD also features an electronic version of the report; an appendix of site, environmental sampling location, dose, and groundwater maps; and complete 2003 reports from a number of other SRS organizations.

A. MAMATEY

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Summary - Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank 48 Tank 48 ETR Report Date: August 2006 ETR-2 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review Tank 48 is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system that will play a very important role in removal and processing of high-level waste (HLW) in the years ahead. However, the tank is currently isolated from the system and unavailable for use, because its contents. It contains approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cesium-137 and other radioisotopes which are contaminated with significant quantities of tetraphenylborate (TPB), a material which

237

Savannah River Site - Tank 48 SRS Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR-2 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Tank 48 at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review Tank 48 is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system that will play a very important role in removal and processing of high-level waste (HLW) in the years ahead. However, the tank is currently isolated from the system and unavailable for use, because its contents. It contains approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cesium-137 and other radioisotopes which are contaminated with significant quantities of tetraphenylborate (TPB), a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in

238

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and {sup 137}Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and [sup 137]Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 August 2013 Review of the...

243

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The U....

244

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The...

245

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project 1 Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality 1.0...

246

Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

During 1988, as in previous years, Savannah River Site operations had no adverse impact on the general public or the environment. Based on the SRS site-specific code, the maximum radiation dose commitment to a hypothetical individual at the SRS boundary from 1988 SRS atmospheric releases of radioactive materials was 0.46 millirem (mrem) (0.0046 millisievert (mSv)). To obtain the maximum dose, an individual would have had to reside on the SRS boundary at the location of highest dose for 24 hours per day, 365 days per year, consume a maximum amount of foliage and meat which originated from the general vicinity of the plant boundary, and drink a maximum amount of milk from cows grazing at the plant boundary. The average radiation dose commitment from atmospheric releases to the hypothetical individual on the SRS boundary in 1988 was 0.18 mrem (0. 0018 mSv). This person, unlike the maximumly exposed individual, consumes an average amount of foliage, meat, and milk which originated from the foliage and animals living at the plant boundary.

Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Stevenson, D.A. (eds.); Davis, H.A.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-23, 100-B/C Area Surface Debris, Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-027  

SciTech Connect

The 100-B-23, 100-B/C Surface Debris, waste consisted of multiple locations of surface debris and chemical stains that were identified during an Orphan Site Evaluation of the 100-B/C Area. Evaluation of the collected information for the surface debris features yielded four generic waste groupings: asbestos-containing material, lead debris, oil and oil filters, and treated wood. Focused verification sampling was performed concurrently with remediation. Site remediation was accomplished by selective removal of the suspect hazardous items and potentially impacted soils. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

J. M. Capron

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 January 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis H Canyon, above, and HB-Line are scheduled to soon begin dissolving and purifying plutonium currently stored at the Savannah River Site to demonstrate the capability to produce oxide material that meets the Mixed Oxide Facility (MOX) feedstock specifications. The production process at MOX, which is now under construction, will eventually create fuel pellets for U.S. commercial reactor fuel assemblies.

250

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. First quarter, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition June 21, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Will Callicott, SRNL (803) 725-3786 will.callicott@srs.gov AIKEN, SC - The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has received Environmental Sustainability (EStar) awards from DOE for two projects growing out of technology research, development and application at the Savannah River National Laboratory. EStar awards recognize excellence in pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship. They are awarded for projects and programs that reduce environmental impacts, enhance site operations, and reduce costs. One award, for Renewable Technology Development, Deployment and Education

252

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Summary Savannah River Site, Summary Report - February 2004 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report - February 2004 February 2004 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) and emergency management programs at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in January and February 2004. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and the Office of Emergency Management Oversight. WSRC has implemented an emergency management program at SRS that exhibits

253

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site Office - December  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Office - Savannah River Site Office - December 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site Office - December 2009 December 2009 Inspection of Nuclear Safety at the Savannah River Site Office and the Tritium Program Facilities The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an inspection of nuclear safety at several National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) facilities located at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) during August and September 2009. The inspection was performed by the Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. With some isolated exceptions, the current SRNS nuclear safety programs and processes at the Tritium Program facilities are effective. Facility and

254

Lempke visits Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

visits Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security visits Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Lempke visits Savannah River Site Lempke visits Savannah River Site Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Associate Principal Deputy Administrator Michael Lempke recently visited the Savannah River Site, getting an up-close look at facilities

255

Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition June 21, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Will Callicott, SRNL (803) 725-3786 will.callicott@srs.gov AIKEN, SC - The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has received Environmental Sustainability (EStar) awards from DOE for two projects growing out of technology research, development and application at the Savannah River National Laboratory. EStar awards recognize excellence in pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship. They are awarded for projects and programs that reduce environmental impacts, enhance site operations, and reduce costs. One award, for Renewable Technology Development, Deployment and Education

256

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

257

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - February 2006 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site - February Savannah River Site - February 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - February 2006 February 2006 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) in January and February 2006. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This 2006 Independent Oversight inspection found that nearly all of the WSRC weaknesses from the 2004 inspection have been addressed. Actions included implementing a comprehensive hazardous material screening process,

258

Site-specific waste management instruction - radiological screening facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction provides guidance for managing waste generated from radiological sample screening operations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration Contractor`s activities. This document applies only to waste generated within the radiological screening facilities.

G. G. Hopkins

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

SRNS-RP-2013-00005 Savannah River Site Ten Year Site Plan FY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRNS-RP-2013-00005 SRNS-RP-2013-00005 Savannah River Site Ten Year Site Plan FY 2014 - 2023 May 2013 United States Department of Energy Savannah River Site Ten Year Site Plan FY 2014 - 2023 May 2013 Prepared by: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC A Fluor Daniel Partnership Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 SRNS-RP-2013-00005 Savannah River Site Ten Year Site Plan SRNS-RP-2013-00005 May 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC (SRNS) for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process or services by trademark, name, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply endorsement,

260

Site Selection for Concrete Batch Plant to Support Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WSRC conducted a site selection study to identify, assess, and rank candidate sites for an onsite concrete batch plant at the Savannah River Site in the vicinity of F-Area.

Wike, L.D.

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tritium Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of preparedness for severe natural phenomena events (NPEs) at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Savannah River Site's (SRS's) Tritium Facilities (TF). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this review to evaluate the processes for identifying emergency response capabilities and maintaining them in a state of readiness in case of a severe NPE.

262

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - September 2011 September 2011 Review of the Implementation Verification Review Processes at the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the Implementation Verification Review (IVR) Processes at Savannah River Site Environmental Management Nuclear Facilities. The overall objective of the Independent Oversight IVR review process includes verification that contractors and site offices have developed and implemented appropriate methods for performing IVRs (including direction for scheduling and conducting IVR activities) and measurement of the

263

Environmental data management system at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The volume and complexity of data associated with escalating environmental regulations has prompted professionals at the Savannah River Site to begin taking steps necessary to better manage environmental information. This paper describes a plan to implement an integrated environmental information system at the site. Nine topic areas have been identified. They are: administrative, air, audit & QA, chemical information/inventory, ecology, environmental education, groundwater, solid/hazardous waste, and surface water. Identification of environmental databases that currently exist, integration into a ``friendly environment,`` and development of new applications will all take place as a result of this effort. New applications recently completed include Groundwater Well Construction, NPDES (Surface Water) Discharge Monitoring, RCRA Quarterly Reporting, and Material Safety Data Sheet Information. Database applications are relational (Oracle RDBMS) and reside largely in DEC VMS environments. In today`s regulatory and litigation climate, the site recognizes they must have knowledge of accurate environmental data at the earliest possible time. Implementation of this system will help ensure this.

Story, C.H.; Gordon, D.E.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Environmental data management system at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The volume and complexity of data associated with escalating environmental regulations has prompted professionals at the Savannah River Site to begin taking steps necessary to better manage environmental information. This paper describes a plan to implement an integrated environmental information system at the site. Nine topic areas have been identified. They are: administrative, air, audit QA, chemical information/inventory, ecology, environmental education, groundwater, solid/hazardous waste, and surface water. Identification of environmental databases that currently exist, integration into a friendly environment,'' and development of new applications will all take place as a result of this effort. New applications recently completed include Groundwater Well Construction, NPDES (Surface Water) Discharge Monitoring, RCRA Quarterly Reporting, and Material Safety Data Sheet Information. Database applications are relational (Oracle RDBMS) and reside largely in DEC VMS environments. In today's regulatory and litigation climate, the site recognizes they must have knowledge of accurate environmental data at the earliest possible time. Implementation of this system will help ensure this.

Story, C.H.; Gordon, D.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) planning process, communicates ER/WM's philosophy and overall strategy for achieving its compliance and cleanup goals, summarizes multi-year program plans and assesses progress made during the previous year. The FYP goal is to ensure that risks to human health and safety and to the environment posed by the Department's past, present, and future operations are either eliminated to reduced to safer levels by the year 2019. The SSP applies the overall strategic goals and commitments of the FYP, incorporating site-specific and local public considerations. It will address accomplishments since the FY 1990 plan, document planned activities focused on the upcoming fiscal year (FY 1992) and discuss milestones and objectives based on restricted and nonrestricted budget conditions for FY 1993--1997. The SSP is the primary means of demonstrating the relationship of local cleanup and compliance activities to broad environmental goals set forth in the FYP. The SSP provides an important channel for conveying information to regulators, the public, special interest groups, and other DOE organizations. This summary will briefly review the site's facilities and missions, current and future program objectives, major accomplishments, funding levels, and major milestones for the five-year period.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the proposed corrective actions discussed in...

267

Savannah River Site, Health Physics Instrument Calibration ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Send E-Mail to Laboratory: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC ... for Alarming Personal Radiation Detection for Homeland Security, Clause 7 ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

268

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

269

ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended area-specific values range from 0.3 m for E Area to 0.7 m for A Area at the Savannah River National Laboratory. These area-specific values, summarized in Table 4-1, were determined using the Environmental Protection Agency's AERSURFACE computer algorithm.

Hunter, C.

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT MISSION ANALYSIS WASTE BLENDING STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary evaluation for blending Hanford site waste with the objective of minimizing the amount of high-level waste (HLW) glass volumes without major changes to the overall waste retrieval and processing sequences currently planned. The evaluation utilizes simplified spreadsheet models developed to allow screening type comparisons of blending options without the need to use the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model. The blending scenarios evaluated are expected to increase tank farm operation costs due to increased waste transfers. Benefit would be derived from shorter operating time period for tank waste processing facilities, reduced onsite storage of immobilized HLW, and reduced offsite transportation and disposal costs for the immobilized HLW.

SHUFORD DH; STEGEN G

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

AREA COMPLETION STRATEGIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: CHARACTERIZATION FOR CLOSURE AND BEYOND  

SciTech Connect

During the first four decades of its 56 year existence, the Savannah River Site (SRS) was a key supplier of nuclear material for national defense. During the 1990s, the site's primary missions became waste site closure, environmental restoration, and deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of remnant cold war apparatus. Since 1989, with the approval of State and Federal regulatory agencies and with the participation of interested stakeholders, SRS has implemented a final remedy for a majority of the more than 500 individual waste sites at the former nuclear materials complex. These waste sites range from small, inert rubble pits to large, heavy industrial areas and radioactive waste disposal grounds. The closure and final remediation of these waste sites mark significant progress toward achieving SRS's overarching goal of reducing or eliminating future environmental damage and human health threats. However, larger challenges remain. For example, what are appropriate and achievable end-states for decommissioned nuclear facilities? What environmental and human health risks are associated with these end-states? To answer these questions within the strictures of smaller budgets and accelerated schedules, SRS is implementing an ''area completion'' strategy that: (1) unites several discrete waste units into one conceptual model, (2) integrates historically disparate environmental characterization and D&D activities, (3) reduces the number of required regulatory documents, and (4) in some cases, compresses schedules for achieving a stakeholder-approved end-state.

Bagwell, L; Mark Amidon, M; Sadika Baladi, S

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - February 2006 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February February 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - February 2006 February 2006 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health and emergency management programs at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) in January and February 2006. The inspection was performed as a joint effort by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations and Office of Emergency Management Oversight. This 2006 Independent Oversight inspection found that nearly all of the WSRC weaknesses from the 2004 inspection have been addressed. Actions included implementing a comprehensive hazardous material screening process,

273

Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PURPOSE PURPOSE The U.S. Department of Energv SUMRY (DOE) has Dreuared this environmental impact -. . . statement (EIS) to assess the environmental consequences of the implementation of modified waste management activities for hazardous, low-level radioactive, and mixed wastes for the protection of groundwater, human health, and the environment at its Savannah River Plant (SRP) in Aiken, South Carolina. This EIS, which is both programmatic and project-specific, has been prepared in accordance with Section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. It is intended to support broad decisions on future actions on SRP waste management activities and to provide project- related environmental input and support for project-specific decisions on pro- ceeding with cleanup activities at existing waste sites in the R- and F-Areas, establishing new waste

274

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2009 (SRNS-STI-2010-00175) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A,'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts. SRS maintained its record of environmental excellence in 2009, as its operations continued to result in minimal impact to the offsite public and the surrounding environment. The site's radioactive and chemical discharges to air and water were well below regulatory standards for environmental and public health protection; its air and water quality met applicable requirements; and the potential radiation dose from its discharges was less than the national dose standards. The largest radiation dose that an offsite, hypothetical, maximally exposed individual could have received from SRS operations during 2009 was estimated to be 0.12 millirem (mrem). (An mrem is a standard unit of measure for radiation exposure.) The 2009 SRS dose is just 0.12 percent of the DOE all-pathway dose standard of 100 mrem per year, and far less than the natural average dose of about 300 mrem per year (according to Report No. 160 of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) to people in the United States. This 2009 all-pathway dose of 0.12 mrem was the same as the 2008 dose. Environmental monitoring is conducted extensively within a 2,000-square-mile network extending 25 miles from SRS, with some monitoring performed as far as 100 miles from the site. The area includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina. Thousands of samples of air, rainwater, surface water, drinking water, groundwater, food products, wildlife, soil, sediment, and vegetation are collected by SRS and state authorities and analyzed for the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. Compliance with environmental regulations and with DOE orders related to environmental protection provides assurance that onsite processes do not impact the public or the environment adversely. Such compliance is documented in this report. SRS had a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance rate of 99.92 percent in 2009, with only four of the 4,989 sample analyses performed exceeding permit limits. The NPDES program protects streams, reservoirs, and other wetlands by limiting the release of nonradiological pollution into surface waters. Discharge limits are set for each facility to ensure that SRS operations do not negatively impact aquatic life or degrade water quality.

Mamatey, A.; Fanning, R.

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Consent Order, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order, September 29, 1995 (No. 95-22-HW) State South Carolina Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Approve and establish guidelines for the Proposed Site Treatment Plan Parties DOE (SRS); State of South Carolina (Department of Health and Environmental Control) Date 9/29/1995 SCOPE * Approve the Proposed Site Treatment Plan, now to be known as the Approved Site Treatment Plan. * Establish guidelines for executing the Approved STP. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * No later than April 30 of each year, SRS shall submit to the Department Annual Updates to the Approved STP. * SRS shall submit to the Department for information only a progress report on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) with the Annual Update.

276

DOE-EA-0179; Waste Form Selection for Savannah River Plant High-Level Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48326 (F.R.) 48326 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Compliance With the National Environmental Policy Act Proposed Finding of No Significant Impact, Selection of Borosilicate Glass as the Defense Waste Processing Facility Waste Form for High -Level Radioactive Wastes Savanah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina Thursday, July 29, 1982 *32778 AGENCY: Energy Department. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA- 0179) on the proposed selection of borosilicate glass as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste form for the immobilization of the high -level radioactive wastes generated and stored at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP), Aiken, South Carolina. DOE recently decided to immobilize

277

A Supplement Analysis on Plutonium Consolidation at Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOEs April 2002 decision to consolidate surplus, non-pit weapons-usable plutonium at Savannah River Site did not affect a 1997 DOE decision to continue storage of non-pit surplus plutonium at...

278

Summary - Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR-19 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site Why DOE-EM Did...

279

External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Mr. Glyn Trenchard, Team Lead for Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of River Protection, Mr. Paul Rutland, RPP System Planning Manager for Washington River Protection Solutions, and Mr. Ernie Lee,

280

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-31, 144-F Sanitary Sewer System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-033  

SciTech Connect

The 100-F-31 waste site is a former septic system that supported the inhalation laboratories, also referred to as the 144-F Particle Exposure Laboratory (132-F-2 waste site), which housed animals exposed to particulate material. The 100-F-31 waste site has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

282

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

283

Finding of No Significant Impact, Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

92 WL 381301 (F.R.) 92 WL 381301 (F.R.) NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact, Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC Thursday, December 24, 1992 *61402 AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Finding of no significant impact. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA -0400) for the proposed construction and operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. The CIF would be for the treatment of hazardous, low- level radioactive, and mixed (both hazardous and radioactive) wastes from SRS. Incineration would reduce the volume and toxicity of these wastes. Construction and operation of the

284

Technical Scope and Approach for the 2004 Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A composite analysis is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual 435.1-1 to ensure public safety through the management of active and planned low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities associated with the Hanford Site (DOE/HQ-Manual 435.1-1). A Composite Analysis is defined as ''a reasonably conservative assessment of the cumulative impact from active and planned low-level waste disposal facilities, and all other sources from radioactive contamination that could interact with the low-level waste disposal facility to affect the dose to future members of the public''. At the Hanford Site, a composite analysis is required for continued disposal authorization for the immobilized low-activity waste, tank waste vitrification plant melters, low level waste in the 200 East and 200 West Solid Waste Burial Grounds, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste in the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The 2004 Composite Analysis will be a site-wide analysis, considering final remedial actions for the Columbia River corridor and the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site. The river corridor includes waste sites and facilities in each of the 100 Areas as well as the 300, 400, and 600 Areas. The remedial actions for the river corridor are being conducted to meet residential land use standards with the vision of the river corridor being devoted to a combination of recreation and preservation. The ''Central Plateau'' describes the region associated with operations and waste sites of the 200 Areas. DOE is developing a strategy for closure of the Central Plateau area by 2035. At the time of closure, waste management activities will shrink to a Core Zone within the Central Plateau. The Core Zone will contain the majority of Hanford's permanently disposed waste

Kincaid, Charles T.; Bryce, Robert W.; Buck, John W.

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. Waste management 1993 symposium papers and viewgraphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has the most diverse and largest amount of highly radioactive waste of any site in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program has been established within the DOE to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Management 1993 Symposium Papers and Viewgraphs covered the following topics: Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Overview; Tank Waste Retrieval Issues and Options for their Resolution; Tank Waste Pretreatment - Issues, Alternatives and Strategies for Resolution; Low-Level Waste Disposal - Grout Issue and Alternative Waste Form Technology; A Strategy for Resolving High-Priority Hanford Site Radioactive Waste Storage Tank Safety Issues; Tank Waste Chemistry - A New Understanding of Waste Aging; Recent Results from Characterization of Ferrocyanide Wastes at the Hanford Site; Resolving the Safety Issue for Radioactive Waste Tanks with High Organic Content; Technology to Support Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Objectives.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Savannah River Site Federal Facility Agreement, January 15, 1993 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Site Agreement Name Savannah River Site Federal Facility Agreement Under Section 120 of CERCLA, January 15, 1993 State South Carolina Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with past and present activities at the Savannah River Site are thoroughly investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken to protect the public health, welfare, and the environment. Parties DOE; US EPA; South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Date 1/15/1993 SCOPE * Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with past and present activities at the Savannah River Site are thoroughly investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken to protect the public health, welfare, and the environment.

287

Sensor system for buried waste containment sites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor system is disclosed for a buried waste containment site having a bottom wall barrier and/or sidewall barriers, for containing hazardous waste. The sensor system includes one or more sensor devices disposed in one or more of the barriers for detecting a physical parameter either of the barrier itself or of the physical condition of the surrounding soils and buried waste, and for producing a signal representing the physical parameter detected. Also included is a signal processor for receiving signals produced by the sensor device and for developing information identifying the physical parameter detected, either for sounding an alarm, displaying a graphic representation of a physical parameter detected on a viewing screen and/or a hard copy printout. The sensor devices may be deployed in or adjacent the barriers at the same time the barriers are deployed and may be adapted to detect strain or cracking in the barriers, leakage of radiation through the barriers, the presence and leaking through the barriers of volatile organic compounds, or similar physical conditions.

Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pfeifer, May Catherine (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is located in south-central South Carolina approximately 100 miles from the Atlantic Coast  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

124 124 Revision 0 Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site February 2012 Prepared by: Savannah River Remediation LLC Closure and Waste Disposal Authority Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract No. DE-AC09-09SR22505 Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the SRR-CWDA-2010-00124 Performance Assessment for the Revision 0 F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site February 2012 Page 2 of 132 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................................. 2 LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................................................................... 4

289

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 Revision 0 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT for the H-AREA TANK FARM at the SAVANNAH RIVER SITE March 2011 Prepared by: Savannah River Remediation LLC Closure & Waste Disposal Authority Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract No. DE-AC09-09SR22505 Performance Assessment for the SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 H-Area Tank Farm at the Revision 0 Savannah River Site March 2011 Page ii of 864 REVISION SUMMARY REV. # DESCRIPTION DATE OF ISSUE 0a Initial issue to DOE-SR 09/17/2010

290

CHEMICAL SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT 8183  

SciTech Connect

Chemical Sludge Removal (CSR) is the final waste removal activity planned for some of the oldest nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. In 2008, CSR will be used to empty two of these waste tanks in preparation for final closure. The two waste tanks chosen to undergo this process have previously leaked small amounts of nuclear waste from the primary tank into an underground secondary containment pan. CSR involves adding aqueous oxalic acid to the waste tank in order to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resultant acidic waste solution is then pumped to another waste tank where it will be neutralized and then stored awaiting further processing. The waste tanks to be cleaned have a storage capacity of 2.84E+06 liters (750,000 gallons) and a target sludge heel volume of 1.89E+04 liters (5,000 gallons) or less for the initiation of CSR. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CSR process and to discuss the most significant technical issues associated with the development of CSR.

Thaxton, D; Timothy Baughman, T

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hazardous waste site investigations: Towards better decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Life Sciences Symposia series is conducted under the Associate Director for Environmental, Life, and Social Sciences. This series began in 1978 and it provides a forum to discuss subjects of interest to the US Department of Energy, the scientific community, and the public. The Tenth ORNL Life Sciences Symposium focused on key aspects of measurements made at hazardous waste sites and their impact on the decision-making process. In particular, the symposium was concerned with how field measurements could be improved to provide greater quality and quantity of data at less cost and in less time. Presentations and papers presented in this publication provide a critical review of the current status in their respective areas of interest. An effort has been made to identify existing deficiencies, future directions, and needed research. Experts were brought together to present data on the state-of-the-art hazardous waste site investigations in four major areas: Individual projects are processed separately for the databases.

Gammage, R.B.; Berven, B.A. [eds.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste

295

Audit Report on "Hanford Site Radiation and Hazardous Waste Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in radiation andor hazardous waste that was not required. Audit Report on "Hanford Site Radiation and Hazardous Waste Training", WR-B-00-06 More Documents & Publications Audit...

296

Two Years Later: Bill Picciano of DOE's Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

We checked back in with Bill Picciano, who we last spoke to in October 2009 after he'd recently been hired at the Savannah River Site (SRS) through the Recovery Act. Now he's permanently employed at the Site as an Associate Engineer/Technical Support Specialist - a job he's proud to have.

297

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - December 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December December 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - December 2009 December 2009 Inspection of Reinforced Concrete Construction at the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight conducted a nuclear safety inspection at the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) construction project, focusing on construction quality, specifically for reinforced concrete, at the MFFF construction project. This purpose of the inspection was to provide mission support to site management in determining whether the facility structure is constructed in accordance with the applicable requirements. The overall quality of concrete that has been placed in the MFFF to date is

298

Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: SRS Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Charles Jernigan 1250 A Reynolds Street Augusta, GA 30901 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

299

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Green River Mill Site (UT.0-01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Documents Related to Green River Mill Site Data Validation Package for the June 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site; LMS/GRN/S0609; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Green River, Utah, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Historic Fact Sheet: Green River Disposal Site Uranium ore was

300

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE COLD WAR HISTORIC PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAR HISTORIC PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION WAR HISTORIC PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION NARRATIVE AND PHOTOGRAPHY CMX AND TNX SAVANNAH RIVER'S PILOT PLANTS Aiken County, South Carolina SAVANNAH RIVER SITE COLD WAR HISTORIC PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION CMX AND TNX CMX AND TNX SA SA V V ANNAH RIVER'S ANNAH RIVER'S PILOT PLANTS PILOT PLANTS Aiken County, South Carolina NARRATIVE AND PHOTOGRAPHY ii ABSTRACT This documentation was prepared in accordance with a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed by the Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR) and the South Carolina Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) dated February 27, 2003, as well as the Consolidated MOA of August 2004. The MOA stipulated a thematic study and photographic documentation of 679-T and 678-T, known respectively as the CMX and TNX buildings. Initially, this area was called the CMX-TNX

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level nuclear waste facilities. This legislation describes the factors considered by the Board in making siting decisions. The Board is authorized to enact rules and regulations pertaining to the siting of hazardous and low-level nuclear

303

Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update  

SciTech Connect

The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

Lawrence, B.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Savannah River Site approved site treatment plan, 2000 annual update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

Lawrence, B.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 2012 - including the Site?s performance against applicable standards and requirements. Details are provided on major programs such as the Environmental Management System (EMS) and permit compliance.

Griffith, M.; Jannik, T.; Cauthen, K.; Bryant, T.; Coward, L.; Eddy, T.; Vangelas, K.; O& #x27; Quinn, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Waste immobilization demonstration program for the Hanford Site`s Mixed Waste Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility, Module 2A> waste immobilization demonstration program, focusing on the cooperation between Hanford Site, commercial, and international participants. Important highlights of the development and demonstration activities is discussed from the standpoint of findings that have had significant from the standpoint of findings that have had significant impact on the evolution of the facility design. A brief description of the future direction of the program is presented, with emphasis on the key aspects of the technologies that call for further detailed investigation.

Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Management at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

309

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. These drums containing radioactive waste from uranium enrichment operations were included in the Portsmouth site's first shipment to...

310

Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s More Documents & Publications Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup...

311

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Little Here, A Little There, A Fairly Big Problem Everywhere: Small Quantity Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

Luke, Dale Elden; Parker, Douglas Wayne; Moss, J.; Monk, Thomas Hugh; Fritz, Lori Lee; Daugherty, B.; Hladek, K.; Kosiewicx, S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A little here, a little there, a fairly big problem everywhere: Small quantity site transuranic waste disposition alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound Laboratory. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

D. Luke; D. Parker; J. Moss; T. Monk (INEEL); L. Fritz (DOE-ID); B. Daugherty (SRS); K. Hladek (WM Federal Services Hanford); S. Kosiewicx (LANL)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Radiolytic gas production from concrete containing Savannah River Plant waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine the extent of gas production from radiolysis of concrete containing radioactive Savannah River Plant waste, samples of concrete and simulated waste were irradiated by /sup 60/Co gamma rays and /sup 244/Cm alpha particles. Gamma radiolysis simulated radiolysis by beta particles from fission products in the waste. Alpha radiolysis indicated the effect of alpha particles from transuranic isotopes in the waste. With gamma radiolysis, hydrogen was the only significant product; hydrogen reached a steady-state pressure that increased with increasing radiation intensity. Hydrogen was produced faster, and a higher steady-state pressure resulted when an organic set retarder was present. Oxygen that was sealed with the wastes was depleted. Gamma radiolysis also produced nitrous oxide gas when nitrate or nitrite was present in the concrete. With alpha radiolysis, hydrogen and oxygen were produced. Hydrogen did not reach a steady-state pressure at <140 psi. From these results, estimates of pressure in conceptual containers (cylinders 2 feet ID by 10 feet tall, 90% full) of SRP waste concrete were made. During the first 300 years of storage when radiolysis will mainly be from beta-gamma radiation (from /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr), hydrogen will reach a steady-state pressure of 8 to 28 psi, and oxygen will be partially consumed. These predictions were confirmed by measurement of gas produced over a short time in a container of concrete and actual SRP waste. The tests with simulated waste also indicated that nitrous oxide may form, but because of the low nitrate or nitrite content of the waste, the maximum pressure of nitrous oxide after 300 years will be <60 psi. After decay of these fission products, alpha radiolysis from /sup 238/Pu and /sup 239/Pu will predominate; the hydrogen and oxygen pressures will increase to >200 psi.

Bibler, N.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

River Protection Project (RPP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supporting document contains the training plan for dangerous waste management at River Protection Project TSD Units. This document outlines the dangerous waste training program developed and implemented for all Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Units operated by River Protection Project (RPP) in the Hanford 200 East, 200 West and 600 Areas and the <90 Day Accumulation Area at 209E. Operating TSD Units managed by RPP are: the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System, 204-AR Waste Unloading Facility, Grout, and the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System. The program is designed in compliance with the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-330 and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 265.16 for the development of a written dangerous waste training program and the Hanford Facility Permit. Training requirements were determined by an assessment of employee duties and responsibilities. The RPP training program is designed to prepare employees to operate and maintain the Tank Farms in a safe, effective, efficient, and environmentally sound manner. In addition to preparing employees to operate and maintain the Tank Farms under normal conditions, the training program ensures that employees are prepared to respond in a prompt and effective manner should abnormal or emergency conditions occur. Emergency response training is consistent with emergency responses outlined in the following Building Emergency Plans: HNF-IP-0263-TF and HNF-=IP-0263-209E.

POHTO, R.E.

2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, highlight significant programs and efforts, and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

Arnett, M.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOEs Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and accept potentially hazardous waste that has been at the Portsmouth site for decades. Pictured (from left) are Scott Fraser, Joe Hawes, Craig Herrmann, Jim Book, John Lee, John Perry, Josh Knipp, Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil McCoy, Trent Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the

319

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F3 Sanitary Sewer System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-047  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1607-F3 waste site is the former location of the sanitary sewer system that supported the 182-F Pump Station, the 183-F Water Treatment Plant, and the 151-F Substation. The sanitary sewer system included a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipeline, all in use between 1944 and 1965. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

May 6, 2010, Savannah River Site Safety Training Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAY o G aorn MAY o G aorn MEMORANDUM FOR JACK CRAIG MANAGER SAVANNAH RIVER sr~~ FROM: ARNOLDE.GUEVA~ DIRECTOR NATIONAL TRAINING CENTER OFFICE OF HEAL TH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Savannah River Site Safety Training Workshop Report Attached please find the final report from the December 8-9, 2009 collaborative safety training workshop conducted in Savannah River Site (SRS), which was attended by key SRS federal, contractor and union representatives. We apologize for the belated delivery of this report. The report provides results and recommendations developed by workshop attendees on possible enhancements to the safety training programs across the SRS complex. It should be noted that SRS has already implemented numerous initiatives to gain

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Implemntation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Recovery Act Implementation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site OAS-RA-L-11-12 September 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 29, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Daniel M. Weeber, Director Environment, Technology, and Corporate Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Implementation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site" Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-12 BACKGROUND The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided the Department of Energy (Department) $5.1 billion for Defense Environmental Cleanup. These funds have afforded the Department's Office of Environmental Management (EM) the opportunity to reduce

322

ONSITE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORIZATION CHALLENGES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Prior to 2008, transfers of radioactive material within the Savannah River Site (SRS) boundary, referred to as onsite transfers, were authorized by Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents that only required approval by the SRS contractor. This practice was in accordance with the existing SRS Transportation Safety Document (TSD). In 2008 the Department of Energy Savannah River Field Office (DOE-SR) requested that the SRS TSD be revised to require DOE-SR approval of all Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents. As a result, the primary SRS contractor embarked on a multi-year campaign to consolidate old or generate new TSB documents and obtain DOE-SR approval for each. This paper focuses on the challenges incurred during the rewriting or writing of and obtaining DOE-SR approval of all Savannah River Site Onsite Transportation Safety Basis documents.

Watkins, R.; Loftin, B.; Hoang, D.; Maxted, M.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Tritium Processing and Containment Practices at the Savannah River Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report emphasizes the features of the United States Tritium Facility operation at the Savannah River Site. It outlines the buildings that represent the facility operating basis. It explores areas where new technology and proven methods of operation developed at the Site have made dramatic environmental and facility work enhancements over the last several years. These enhancements should be consideration for future facility designs and for any current tritium missions.

Buley, R.D.; Green, D.J.; Metzler, J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Radioactive releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1989. An Environmental Protection Department summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the continuation of a series of reports, previously titled, Releases of Radioactivity at the Savannah River Plant (DPSPU-YR-25-1). The reports reflect the use of air and liquid effluent sample analyses in determining the amount of radioactivity released from Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The identification and characterization of these source terms since plant startup in 1954 have aided Site personnel in confining and limiting the amount of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS facilities. This document is an effluent/source term report; items falling under other categories, such as environmental spills or solid waste transport to the burial ground, are not included. Any classified or secret data have either been excluded, as in the case of 1960--1970 atmospheric releases of {sup 85}Kr from the Separations Areas, or combined to avoid classification, such as atmospheric tritium releases from the Separations Area.

Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Martin, D.K.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste

326

Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit.

327

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

328

SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390  

SciTech Connect

High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

Keefer, M.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021  

SciTech Connect

The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

OPERATIONS REVIEW OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS - 11327  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is removing liquid radioactive waste from its Tank Farm. To treat waste streams that are low in Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides, SRS developed the Actinide Removal Process and implemented the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The Actinide Removal Process contacts salt solution with monosodium titanate to sorb strontium and select actinides. After monosodium titanate contact, the resulting slurry is filtered to remove the monosodium titanate (and sorbed strontium and actinides) and entrained sludge. The filtrate is transferred to the MCU for further treatment to remove cesium. The solid particulates removed by the filter are concentrated to {approx} 5 wt %, washed to reduce the sodium concentration, and transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The CSSX process extracts the cesium from the radioactive waste using a customized solvent to produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS), and strips and concentrates the cesium from the solvent with dilute nitric acid. The DSS is incorporated in grout while the strip acid solution is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The facilities began radiological processing in April 2008 and started processing of the third campaign ('MarcoBatch 3') of waste in June 2010. Campaigns to date have processed {approx}1.2 million gallons of dissolved saltcake. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel performed tests using actual radioactive samples for each waste batch prior to processing. Testing included monosodium titanate sorption of strontium and actinides followed by CSSX batch contact tests to verify expected cesium mass transfer. This paper describes the tests conducted and compares results from facility operations. The results include strontium, plutonium, and cesium removal, cesium concentration, and organic entrainment and recovery data. Additionally, the poster describes lessons learned during operation of the facility.

Peters, T.; Poirier, M.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.; Brown, S.; Geeting, M.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Savannah River Site ECS-2 tests uncertainty report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a measurement uncertainty analysis for the instruments used in the ECS-2 test series conducted for the Savannah River Site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The tests are a series of downflow dryout heat transfer experiments designed to support computer code development and verification in setting limits for the Savannah River Production reactors. The measurements include input current, voltage, and power; air and water flows, fluid and metal temperatures, and absolute and differential pressures. An analysis of the data acquisition system as it relates to these measurements is also included. 18 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

Wilkins, S.C.; Larson, R.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

MCDONALD, K.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Bagless transfer at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the end of the Cold War buildup, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex is shifting its focus from producing nuclear weapons to cleaning up, packaging, and storing excess materials and associated by-products. Old transfer and interim storage methods are now being reevaluated in the context of the recent long-term storage criteria. One of the methods used for the interim storage of plutonium/uranium products in the past involved the use of a bagout technique. In reviewing interim storage containers, it was found that the plastic bags used in this technique are not suitable for use inside long-term storage containers because they release gases that cause container pressurization and associated problems. As the DOE synthesized its long-term plutonium storage criteria, plastic bags and other organics were banned from use in future storage processes to prevent these types of problems. In response to these problems and the subsequent long-term storage criteria, the DOE sites began to pursue alternate material transferral methods.

Rogers, L.; Jones, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

338

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Engineering program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

339

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The review, which was performed June 10-14, 2013, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP construction site. The scope of this quarterly assessment of construction quality review

340

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Feasibility of using biological degradation for the on-site treatment of mixed wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002. EPAs Radiation Protection Program: Mixed Waste.http://www.epa.gov/radiation/mixed-waste/.ON-SITE TREATMENT OF MIXED WASTES William T. Stringfellow (

Stringfellow, William T.; Komada, Tatsuyuki; Chang, Li-Yang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites, where anthropogenic 129 I from

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

343

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure,

344

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and accept potentially hazardous waste that has been at the Portsmouth site for decades. Pictured (from left) are Scott Fraser, Joe Hawes, Craig Herrmann, Jim Book, John Lee, John Perry, Josh Knipp, Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil McCoy, Trent Eckert, Anthony Howard and Chris Ashley. Waste management and transportation personnel worked late to complete the first shipment to WCS. Through a contract with DOE, WCS will treat and

345

Waste treatment at the La Hague and Marcoule sites  

SciTech Connect

In this report, an overview of waste treatment and solidification facilities located at the La Hague and Marcoule sites, which are owned and/or operated by Cogema, provided. The La Hague facilities described in this report include the following: The STE3 liquid effluent treatment facility (in operation); the AD2 solid waste processing facility (also in operation); and the UCD alpha waste treatment facility (under construction). The Marcoule facilities described in this report, both of which are in operation, include the following: The STEL-EVA liquid effluent treatment facilities for the entire site; and the alpha waste incinerator of the UPI plant. This report is organized into four sections: this introduction, low-level waste treatment at La Hague, low-level waste treatment at Marcoule, and new process development. including the solvent pyrolysis process currently in the development stage for Cogema`s plants.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Characteristics of transuranic waste at Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect

This document reports data and information on TRU waste from all DOE generating and storage sites. The geographical location of the sites is shown graphically. There are four major sections in this document. The first three cover the TRU waste groups known as Newly Generated, Stored, and Buried Wastes. Subsections are included under Newly Generated and Stored on contact-handled and remote-handled waste. These classifications of waste are defined, and the current or expected totals of each are given. Figure 1.3 shows the total amount of Buried and Stored TRU waste. Preparation of this document began in 1981, and most of the data are as of December 31, 1980. In a few cases data were reported to December 31, 1981, and these have been noted. The projections in the Newly Generated section were made, for the most part, at the end of 1981.

Jensen, R.T.; Wilkinson, F.J. III

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Waste Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site Waste Management Magazine Highlights Nevada National Security Site March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A worker at NNSS handles large, high-powered batteries called radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are discussed in the recent article on the NNSS in RadWaste Solutions magazine. Like most low-level waste, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or clothing because of the relatively low dose rate levels. A worker at NNSS handles large, high-powered batteries called radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which are discussed in the recent article on the NNSS in RadWaste Solutions magazine. Like most low-level waste, RTGs disposed of at the NNSS were handled without any special equipment or

348

Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites  

SciTech Connect

The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Audit of the Savannah River Site's Quality Control Program for Groundwater Sampling, IG-0405  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 1997 0, 1997 MEMORANDUM FOR: THE SECRETARY FROM: John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of the Savannah River Site's Quality Control Program for Groundwater Sampling" BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site's groundwater remediation program was managed by the Department of Energy's (Department) management and operating contractor for the site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse). One component of the remediation

350

Assessment of Noble Gases in the Savannah River Site Environment  

SciTech Connect

A series of documents has been published that assesses the impact of various radionuclides released to the environment by Savannah River Site operations. The quantity released, the disposition of the radionuclides in the environment, and the dose to offsite individuals has been presented for carbon, cesium, iodine, plutonium, strontium, technetium, tritium, and uranium. An assessment of the impact of non-radioactive mercury also has been published.

Carlton, W.H.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

1996 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1996 through December 31, 1996. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1996 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 1996 report includes a new section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1996.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

1997 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 1997. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1997 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 199 7 report includes a section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1997.

None

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Environmental Assessment for the Replacement Source of Steam for A Area at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1568 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..............................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action.....................................................1 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES

354

Section 3116 Activities at the Savannah River Site  

E. P. A. Operational. Closure. FFA. Cease. Waste. Removal. Decision (EPA) Performance. Assessment. Waste. Determination. Basis. Document. Waste. Determination. DOE ...

355

Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

EA-0915: Waste Tank Safety Program Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to resolve waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and to reduce the risks associated with...

357

Young Professionals in Nuclear Industry Group Forms at Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Young Professionals in Nuclear Industry Group Forms at Savannah Young Professionals in Nuclear Industry Group Forms at Savannah River Site Young Professionals in Nuclear Industry Group Forms at Savannah River Site January 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Savannah River Chapter of North American – Young Generation in Nuclear is a new group forming at the Savannah River Site. The Savannah River Chapter of North American - Young Generation in Nuclear is a new group forming at the Savannah River Site. AIKEN, S.C. - Supporting the development of young nuclear professionals in the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA) is the purpose behind a new group forming at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Savannah River Chapter of North American - Young Generation in Nuclear (SR-YGN) will hold a kick-off meeting Jan. 26 in Aiken and all

358

Savannah River Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Savannah River Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site: SRS Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Donna Cragle, PhD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 812-6703 Website: http://www.orau.org/nssp/ This project is conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), as a component of its National Supplemental Screening Program. ORAU has teamed with its partners, Comprehensive Health Services, National Jewish Health, the University of Colorado Denver, and Axion Health, to run the program. Construction Worker Screening Projects Construction Worker Projects, Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)

359

Past Radioactive Particle Contamination in the Columbia River at the Hanford Site, USA  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site was originally established in 1943 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce a nuclear weapon. During the Sites early history, eight single-pass reactors were constructed along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to produce plutonium. Reactor coolant effluent was held temporarily in retention basins so that short-lived activation products and temperature could dissipate before discharge to the river. Reactor components included valves and pumps constructed with Stellite, an alloy containing high levels of cobalt and other metals. Neutron activation of these components produced cobalt-60. As these components aged, they deteriorated and released radioactive particles into the liquid effluent. Over the 26 years of reactor operations, relatively small numbers of these particles were released to the Columbia River along with the liquid discharges, and the particles were deposited in sediment along the shoreline and on islands. In 1976, portions of the Hanford Reach were opened for public access and the presence of these radioactive cobalt-60 particles became a concern for public exposure. A survey conducted in 1979 determined that the particles were small, with a diameter of approximately 0.1 mm, and their activity level was estimated to be between 63 and 890 GBq. Dose rates from the particles ranged from 1 to 14 ?Gray/hr. Fourteen particles were collected during the 1979 survey and subsequent monitoring and particle clean-up campaigns continued during the 1980s and 1990s. The presence of radioactive particles in the river environment was a continuing concern as cleanup of the Hanford Site accelerated during the 1990s. Principal issues included: 1) Site management response to the presence of radioactive particles in the Columbia River, 2) methods to monitor this contamination, 3) stakeholder concerns, and 4) anti-nuclear activist intervention. Reducing ecological and human health risk caused by contamination is a major focus of Site cleanup. Because of the 5.3 year half-life of cobalt-60, the radiological risk from these particles is now negligible. Also, at locations where human access is limited, some scientists believe that the reduction in ecological risk gained by cleanup activities is overshadowed by the ecological damage caused by the clean-up activities. Suggestions have been made by scientists and regulatory agencies that it may be economically and environmentally more sound to manage isolated low-level waste sites until the activity decays (i.e., natural attenuation) to levels below health concerns, when the sites can be released.

Poston, Ted M.; Peterson, Robert E.; Cooper, Andrew T.

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. September 22, 2011 Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation. Contact Colleen Curran Communicatons Office (505) 664-0344 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 22, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed excavation of its oldest waste disposal site, Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B). The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. MDA-B was used from 1944-48 as a waste disposal site for Manhattan Project and Cold War-era research and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Control of incidental asbestos exposure at hazardous waste sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses asbestos regulations that are not part of Superfund and examines how these regulations can help to identify, evaluate and manage the risk associated with Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) at hazardous waste cleanup sites. Unless one knows where to look for ACM at hazardous waste sites, it may go undetected even after all the traditional sampling is done. Although EPA is currently developing a policy for evaluating risk from asbestos exposure at certain Superfund sites, information from existing regulations can be used to manage hazards associated with asbestos exposure at hazardous waste sites. This paper also identifies where to find governmental agency personnel and consultants who may be retained for site-specific help.

Kaustas, R.N. (Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Hanford site tank waste remediation system technical strategy  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, has the most diverse and largest amount of radioactive tank the United States. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. Approximately 230,000 m{sup 3} (61 Mgal) of caustic liquids, slurries, saltcakes, and sludges have accumulated in 177 tanks. In addition, significant amounts of {sup 90}S and {sup 137}Cs were removed from the tank waste, converted to salts, doubly encapsulated in metal containers, and stored in water basins. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program was established by the US DOE Energy in 1991 to safely manage and immobilize these wastes for permanent disposal of the high-level waste fraction in a geologic repository. The technical strategy to manage and dispose of these wastes has been revised and successfully negotiated with the regulatory agencies.

Wodrich, D.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Summary - Plutonium Preparation Project at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Site EM Project: PuPP ETR Report Date: October 2008 ETR-17 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Plutonium Preparation Project at the Savannah River Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review The purpose of the Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) is to prepare for disposition of plutonium materials; for examination, re-stabilization, and disassembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) unirradiated fuel; and for repackaging of Pu stored in 3013 containers. Of ~12.8 MT of plutonium, ~4.1 MT will be directly transferred to the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF); ~3.7 MT will require processing prior to transfer to the MFFF; and ~5 MT was proposed to be processed in H-Canyon with the

365

Siting GNEP at the Savannah River Site: Using Legacy and Infrastructure in a Commercial Energy Park Concept  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) was proposed as one of eleven potential sites to be included in the U.S. Department of Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. The approach to meet siting and infrastructure requirements for possible GNEP facilities at the SRS focused on available infrastructure including land, cooling water systems, high voltage power supplies, existing heavy haul roadways, existing analytical capabilities, and existing waste handling capabilities. Additional siting criteria and existing SRS capabilities and conditions were developed to locate the GNEP within a commercial Energy Park contained within, but separate from, the SRS. Included as part of, or corollary to, existing infrastructure at the SRS was the availability of a nuclear trained workforce living within the area. The SRS consists of approximately 803 square kilometers (310 square miles) in the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina bordering along the Savannah River. Historic production reactors, processing, and laboratory facilities are currently being decommissioned and destroyed while new facilities such as the MOX facility are being built. Existing legacy infrastructure, beneficial to the potential GNEP facilities, continues to exist and operate. The SRS has a long history of processing, reprocessing and in the disposition of nuclear fuels and byproducts continuing through today with HCanyon as the only DOE facility currently capable of uranium reprocessing. Because of ongoing operations and maintenance of historic systems, SRS has existing infrastructure immediately available for GNEP facilities in or near the proposed Energy Park. The Energy Park location was chosen to achieve maximum use of this legacy infrastructure. In summary: Requirements for potential or conceivable GNEP facilities can be met using the existing facilities and infrastructure of the SRS. A potential commercially operated Energy Park located within the existing boundaries of the SRS can use existing site infrastructure to lessen the overall construction costs and decrease the start up time for our national GNEP program. (authors)

Wyatt, D. [URS, Washington Division/Safety Management Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States); Chaput, E. [Aiken-Edgefield Economic Development Partnership, Aiken, SC (United States); Hoffman, D. [URS, Washington Division/Safety Management Solutions, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

PROTECTING GROUNDWATER & THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Along the remote shores of the Columbia River in southeast Washington state, a race is on. Fluor Hanford, a prime cleanup contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site, is managing a massive, multi-faceted project to remove contaminants from the groundwater before they can reach the Columbia. Despite the daunting nature and size of the problem--about 80 square miles of aquifer under the site contains long-lived radionuclides and hazardous chemicals--significant progress is being made. Many groups are watching, speaking out, and helping. A large. passionate, diverse, and geographically dispersed community is united in its desire to protect the Columbia River--the eighth largest in the world--and have a voice in Hanford's future. Fluor Hanford and the DOE, along with the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) interact with all the stakeholders to make the best decisions. Together, they have made some remarkable strides in the battle against groundwater contamination under the site.

GERBER, M.S.

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL LESSONS LEARNED AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60% of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring the waste to the DST system since 1997 as part of the interim stabilization program. Retrieval of SST saltcake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. This paper presents lessons learned from retrieval of tank waste at the Hanford Site and discusses how this information is used to optimize retrieval system efficiency, improve overall cost effectiveness of retrieval operations, and ensure that HFFACO requirements are met.

DODD, R.A.

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hanford Waste Simulants Created to Support the Research and Development on the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of nonradioactive waste simulants to support the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant bench and pilot-scale testing is crucial to the design of the facility. The report documents the simulants development to support the SRTC programs and the strategies used to produce the simulants.

Eibling, R.E.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Radioactive releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Releases at the Savannah River Site, 1954--1988 (WSRC-RP-89-737) is the continuation of a series of reports, previously titled Releases of Radioactivity at the Savannah River Plant (DPSU-1-YR-25). The series reflects the use of air and liquid effluent sample analyses in determining the amount of radioactivity released from Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The identification and characterization of these source terms since plant startup in 1954 have aided Site personnel in confining and limiting the amount of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS facilities. Data contained in this report are used for a variety of purposes, including the calculation of offsite dose estimates and aiding special environmental studies. This document is an effluent/source term report. The report is divided into four summary sections. Summary A details volumes of air and water released from emission sources since plant startup. Summary B lists annual radioactive release data from these emission sources, grouped by nuclide and area. Summary C provides yearly totals of radioactive releases by radionuclide, under the headings Atmospheric,'' Liquid to streams,'' or Liquid to Seepage Basins'' accordingly. Monthly radioactive releases from each emission source from 1986 to 1988 are found in Summary D. Where appropriate, headings in the summary tables have been changed to clarify and simplify emission data (see Appendix B). Additionally, any new discharge points, such as the liquid discharge from the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), are included in this report. A listing of 1988 source term and onsite discharge designations is provided in Appendix C. 36 refs.

Hetrick, C.S.; Martin, D.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: A NEW PROCESS FOR CHEMICALLY CLEANING SAVANNAH RIVER WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has 49 high level waste (HLW) tanks that must be emptied, cleaned, and closed as required by the Federal Facilities Agreement. The current method of chemical cleaning uses several hundred thousand gallons per tank of 8 weight percent (wt%) oxalic acid to partially dissolve and suspend residual waste and corrosion products such that the waste can be pumped out of the tank. This adds a significant quantity of sodium oxalate to the tanks and, if multiple tanks are cleaned, renders the waste incompatible with the downstream processing. Tank space is also insufficient to store this stream given the large number of tanks to be cleaned. Therefore, a search for a new cleaning process was initiated utilizing the TRIZ literature search approach, and Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination--Ultraviolet (CORD-UV), a mature technology currently used for decontamination and cleaning of commercial nuclear reactor primary cooling water loops, was identified. CORD-UV utilizes oxalic acid for sludge dissolution, but then decomposes the oxalic acid to carbon dioxide and water by UV treatment outside the system being treated. This allows reprecipitation and subsequent deposition of the sludge into a selected container without adding significant volume to that container, and without adding any new chemicals that would impact downstream treatment processes. Bench top and demonstration loop measurements on SRS tank sludge stimulant demonstrated the feasibility of applying CORD-UV for enhanced chemical cleaning of SRS HLW tanks.

Ketusky, E; Neil Davis, N; Renee Spires, R

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-H-1, 116-H Reactor Stack Burial Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-053  

SciTech Connect

The 132-H-1 waste site includes the 116-H exhaust stack burial trench and the buried stack foundation (which contains an embedded vertical 15-cm (6-in) condensate drain line). The 116-H reactor exhaust stack and foundation were decommissioned and demolished using explosives in 1983, with the rubble buried in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

372

Savannah River Site K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the results of a Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Measures of adverse consequences to health and safety resulting from representations of severe accidents in SRS reactors are presented. In addition, the report gives a summary of the methods employed to represent these accidents and to assess the resultant consequences. The report is issued to provide useful information to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the risk of operation of SRS reactors, for insights into severe accident phenomena that contribute to this risk, and in support of improved bases for other DOE programs in Heavy Water Reactor safety.

Brandyberry, M.D.; Bailey, R.T.; Baker, W.H.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; O`Kula, K.R.; Wittman, R.S.; Woody, N.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N.; Weingardt, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1991. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

This report describes environmental activities conducted on and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C., from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1991, with an update on compliance activities through April 1, 1992. The report is a single volume with a separate summary pamphlet highlighting the major findings for 1991. The report is divided into an executive summary and 14 chapters containing information on environmental compliance issues, environmental monitoring methods and programs, and environmental research activities for 1991, as well as historical data from previous years. Analytical results, figures, charts, and data tables relevant to the environmental monitoring program for 1991 at SRS are included.

Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R.; Todd, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Microbial effects on radioactive wastes at SLB sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to determine the significance of microbial degradation of organic wastes on radionuclide migration on shallow land burial for humid and arid sites, establish which mechanisms predominate and ascertain the conditions under which these mechanisms operate. Factors contolling gaseous eminations from low-level radioactive waste disposal sites are assessed. Importance of gaseous fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide and possibly hydrogen from the site stems from the inclusion of tritium and/or /sup 14/C into the elemental composition of these compounds. In that the primary source of these gases is the biodegradation of organic components of the waste materials, primary emphasis of the study involved on examination of the biochemical pathways producing methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and the environmental parameters controlling the activity of the microbial community involved. Although the methane and carbon dioxide production rate indicates the degradation rate of the organic substances in the waste, it does not predict the methane evolution rate from the trench site. Methane fluxes from the soil surface are equivalent to the net synthesis minus the quantity oxidized by the microbial community as the gas passes through the soil profile. Gas studies were performed at three commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (West Valley, New York; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky) during the period 1976 to 1978. The results of these studies are presented. 3 tables.

Colombo, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is home to the first  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site (SRS) is home to the first Site (SRS) is home to the first two liquid radioactive waste tank operational closures in the nation. These two closures marked a major milestone in stabilizing another portion of the Cold War legacy materials for the Site and the country. Tank 20, the first closed, was certified closed by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders in July 1997. SCDHEC certified closure of Tank 17 in December 1997. Both tanks were constructed in 1958 and first used in 1960. The DOE, SCDHEC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, SRS workers and the public worked closely together to establish strict closure requirements that supported all state and Federal regulations. Closure activities for Tanks 17 and 20 began years before the actual closing of the tanks. Initially, radioactive

377

Savannah River Site Environmental Implentation Plan. Volume 3, Management and support programs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the organizational responsibilities for the Savannah River Site Environmental program. Operations, Engineering and projects, Environment, safety, and health, Quality assurance, and the Savannah River Laboratory are described.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application of UAVs at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Small, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) equipped with sensors for physical, chemical, and radiochemical measurements of remote environments have been tested at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A miniature helicopter was used as an aerial platform for testing a variety of sensors with outputs integrated with the flight control system for real-time data acquisition and evaluation. The sensors included a precision magnetometer, two broad band infra-red radiometers, a 1-inch by 1-inch Nal(TI) scintillation detector, and an on-board color video camera. Included in the avionics package was an ultrasonic altimeter, a precision barometer, and a portable Global Positioning System. Two separate demonstration locations at SRS were flown that had been previously characterized by careful sampling and analyses and by aerial surveys at high altitudes. The Steed Pond demonstration site contains elevated levels of uranium in the soil and pond silt due to runoff from one of the site`s uranium fuel and target production areas. The soil at the other site is contaminated with oil bearing materials and contains some buried objects. The results and limitations of the UAV surveys are presented and improvements for future measurements are discussed.

Hofstetter, K.J.; Pendergast, M.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiologic surveillance at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 16-75 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and salary status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absences, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Savannah River Site environmental implementation plan. Volume 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Protection programs  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Short History of Waste Management at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"The worlds first full-scale nuclear reactors and chemical reprocessing plants built at the Hanford Site in the desert of eastern Washington State produced two-thirds of the plutonium generated in the United States for nuclear weapons. Operating these facilities also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste, some of which was released into the environment exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Hanford now contains the largest accumulation of nuclear waste in the Western Hemisphere. Hanfords last reactor shut down in 1987 followed by closure of the last reprocessing plant in 1990. Today, Hanfords only mission is cleanup. Most onsite radioactive waste and nuclear material lingers inside underground tanks or storage facilities. About half of the chemical waste remains in tanks while the rest persists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Six million dollars each day, or nearly two billion dollars each year, are spent on waste management and cleanup activities. There is significant uncertainty in how long cleanup will take, how much it will cost, and what risks will remain for future generations. This paper summarizes portions of the waste management history of the Hanford Site published in the book Hanford: A Conversation about Nuclear Waste and Cleanup.(1) "

Gephart, Roy E.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Application of neural networks to waste site screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste site screening requires knowledge of the actual concentrations of hazardous materials and rates of flow around and below the site with time. The present approach consists primarily of drilling boreholes near contaminated sites and chemically analyzing the extracted physical samples and processing the data. This is expensive and time consuming. The feasibility of using neural network techniques to reduce the cost of waste site screening was investigated. Two neural network techniques, gradient descent back propagation and fully recurrent back propagation were utilized. The networks were trained with data received from Westinghouse Hanford Corporation. The results indicate that the network trained with the fully recurrent technique shows satisfactory generalization capability. The predicted results are close to the results obtained from a mathematical flow prediction model. It is possible to develop a new tool to predict the waste plume, thus substantially reducing the number of the bore sites and samplings. There are a variety of applications for this technique in environmental site screening and remediation. One of the obvious applications would be for optimum well siting. A neural network trained from the existing sampling data could be utilized to decide where would be the best position for the next bore site. Other applications are discussed in the report.

Dabiri, A.E.; Garrett, M.; Kraft, T.; Hilton, J.; VanHammersveld, M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-F-2, 183-F Clearwells, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-017  

SciTech Connect

The 126-F-2 site is the clearwell facility formerly used as part of the reactor cooling water treatment at the 183-F facility. During demolition operations in the 1970s, potentially contaminated debris was disposed in the eastern clearwell structure. The site has been remediated by removing all debris in the clearwell structure to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of radiological surveys and visual inspection of the remediated clearwell structure show neither residual contamination nor the potential for contaminant migration beyond the clearwell boundaries. The results of verification sampling at the remediation waste staging area demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

385

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Waste Disposal Sites' and consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Closure activities were conducted from December 2008 to April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996, as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 139 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007b). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized. CAU 139, 'Waste Disposal Sites,' consists of seven CASs in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the NTS. The closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. This CR provides a summary of completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and confirmation that remediation goals were met. The following site closure activities were performed at CAU 139 as documented in this CR: (1) At CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit, soil and debris were removed and disposed as LLW, and debris was removed and disposed as sanitary waste. (2) At CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site, an administrative UR was implemented. No postings or post-closure monitoring are required. (3) At CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris, soil and debris were removed and disposed as LLW, and debris was removed and disposed as sanitary waste. (4) At CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit, no work was performed. (5) At CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches, a native soil cover was installed, and a UR was implemented. (6) At CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie, a UR was implemented. (7) At CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station, no work was performed.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: First quarter 1993, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the first quarter of 1993. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site June 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Harrel McCray, left, and Joey Clark, employees with SRS management and operations contractor, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, stand by an extensive SRS cleanup system that safely and successfully rid the site of more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical

388

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site June 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Harrel McCray, left, and Joey Clark, employees with SRS management and operations contractor, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, stand by an extensive SRS cleanup system that safely and successfully rid the site of more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical

389

Idaho Site Taps Old World Process to Treat Nuclear Waste | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Taps Old World Process to Treat Nuclear Waste Idaho Site Taps Old World Process to Treat Nuclear Waste September 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Idaho site's sodium...

390

Oversight Scheduling and Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-SRS-2013-03-25 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report on Oversight Scheduling and Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site Dates of Activity : 03/25/2013 - 03/28/2013 Report Preparer: Phillip D. Aiken Activity Description/Purpose: 1. The Independent Oversight Site Lead for the Savannah River Site traveled to the site to work with functional area managers to schedule nuclear safety oversight activities. 2. The Site Lead reviewed the differing professional opinion (DPO) program at the Savannah River Operations Office (Department of Energy (DOE)-SR). Result: 1. The Site Lead scheduled a radiological program review at the National Nuclear Security Administration Savannah River

391

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-B-3, 184-B Coal Pit Dumping Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-028  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 126-B-3 waste site is the former coal storage pit for the 184-B Powerhouse. During demolition operations in the 1970s, the site was used for disposal of demolition debris from 100-B/C Area facilities. The site has been remediated by removing debris and contaminated soils. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site  

SciTech Connect

In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Follow-up Review of Implementation Verification Reviews at the Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Site, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Follow-up Review of Implementation Verification Reviews at the Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Site May 2011 January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

395

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 537: Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 537 is identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 as Waste Sites. CAU 537 is located in Areas 3 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-23-06, Bucket; Yellow Tagged Bags; and CAS 19-19-01, Trash Pit. CAU 537 closure activities were conducted in April 2007 according to the FFACO and Revision 3 of the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2003). At CAS 03-23-06, closure activities included removal and disposal of a 15-foot (ft) by 15-ft by 8-ft tall wooden shed containing wood and metal debris and a 5-gallon plastic bucket containing deteriorated plastic bags with yellow radioactive contamination tape. The debris was transported to the Area 9 U10c Landfill for disposal after being screened for radiological contamination according to the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). At CAS 19-19-01, closure activities included segregation, removal, and disposal of non-friable, non-regulated asbestos-containing material (ACM) and construction debris. The ACM was determined to be non-friable by waste characterization samples collected prior to closure activities. The ACM was removed and double-bagged by licensed, trained asbestos workers and transported to the Area 9 U10c Landfill for disposal. Construction debris was transported in end-dump trucks to the Area 9 U10c Landfill for disposal. Closure activities generated sanitary waste/construction debris and ACM. Waste generated during closure activities was appropriately managed and disposed. Waste characterization sample results are included as Appendix A of this report, and waste disposition documentation is included as Appendix B of this report. Copies of the Sectored Housekeeping Site Closure Verification Forms for CAS 03-23-06 and CAS 19-19-01 are included as Appendix C of this report. These forms include before and after photographs of the sites, descriptions and removal status of waste, and waste disposal information. CAU 537, Waste Sites, was closed by characterizing and disposing of debris. The purpose of this CR is to summarize the completed closure activities, document appropriate waste disposal, and confirm that the closure standards were met.

NSTec Envirornmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC September 7, 2011 EA-1606: Draft Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah...

397

Hanford Site Hazardous waste determination report for transuranic debris waste streams NPFPDL2A  

SciTech Connect

This hazardous waste determination report (Report) describes the process and information used on the Hanford Site to determine that waste stream number NPFPDLZA, consisting of 30 containers of contact-handled transuranic debris waste, is not hazardous waste regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. For a waste to be hazardous under these statutes, the waste either must be specifically listed as a hazardous waste, or exhibit one or more of the characteristics of a hazardous waste, Le., ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity. Waste stream NPFPDLZA was generated, packaged, and placed into storage between 1993 and 1997. Extensive knowledge of the waste generating process, facility operational history, and administrative controls and operating procedures in effect at the time of generation, supported the initial nonhazardous waste determination. Because of the extent and reliability of information pertaining to this waste type, and the total volume of waste in the debris matrix parameter category, the Hanford Site is focusing initial efforts on this and similar waste streams for the first shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). RCRA regulations authorize hazardous waste determinations to be made either by using approved sampling and analysis methods or by applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or the process(es) used. This latter approach typically is referred to as process knowledge. The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (CAO-94-1010) for WIPP refers to acceptable knowledge in essentially the same terms; acceptable knowledge as used throughout this Report is synonymous with the term process knowledge. The 30 containers addressed in this Report were characterized by the following methods: Acceptable knowledge; Nondestructive examination using real-time radiography; Visual examination; and Headspace gas sampling and analysis. The initial nonhazardous waste determination was based solely on acceptable knowledge. Relevant administrative documents and operating methods in effect at the time of waste generation were reviewed, generator waste profiles and certifications were examined, and personnel interviews were conducted. The acceptable knowledge information and supporting data were further evaluated based on the results of nondestructive examination, visual examination, and container headspace gas analysis. In all cases, the physical examination processes supported the initial nonhazardous waste determination, and in effect served to validate and finalize that determination. Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this Report describe in more detail the actions taken and conclusions reached with respect to this nonhazardous waste determination, The hazardous waste determination process described in this Report fully satisfies the requirements of 40 CFR 261, and the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA-June 16, 1999) signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the New Mexico Environment Department pertaining to the exchange of waste stream information.

WINTERHALDER, J.A.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Commercial integration and partnering at Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS), particularly the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with the experience from the first successful Integrated Technology Demonstration, can provide an excellent foundation for meeting DOE-EM`s objectives with the new DOE-EM five focus area approach. With this in mind, SRTC established an activity to pursue full commercialization of environmental technologies. This report is an assessment of the status of commercialization at SRS and provides recommendations for enhancement as well as some tools critical to implementation. A review was made of the current situation at SRS with regards to taking technology development to commercial fruition. This was done from the perspective of comparing it to known commercialization models and processes. It was found that SRTC already works through many of the steps in these processes. With integration and action-oriented efforts of the inclusion of business and market factors, SRTC could become an aggressive, successful developer of commercialized technologies. Commercial success criteria tools were developed with regards to integrating them with SRTC selection criteria to ensure that all critical factors are covered in technology commercialization project evaluations. Private investors are very clear that their interest lies in funding commercial enterprises, not merely technologies. Mobilizing private capital is critical to real job growth and long-term economic development. Also, potential industry partners were identified that are willing to be involved with SRS` technology applications and regional development efforts. As another important component to success, regional support organizations were reviewed and evaluated.

Steele, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Babione, R.A.; Shikashio, L.A.; Wacaster, A.J.; Paterson, A.D. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Improved neutron monitor systems for Savannah River Site separations facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), in conjunction with Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Technology personnel, has developed and implemented a comprehensive program to improve the performance and reliability of neutron detector systems (neutron monitors) in the SRS separations areas. The neutron monitors, which monitor the buildup of fissile material in the mixer-settler banks of the solvent extraction process, are important nuclear safety control devices. A review of the performance history of the neutron monitors reveals that many of the systems exhibit problems arising from several causes, including: low neutron sensitivity, high susceptibility to electromagnetic interferences (due to long cable runs between detectors and their electronics), and high maintenance requirements. To address these problems, the neutron monitor improvement program encompasses both technical and administrative improvements, including: substitution of more sensitive neutron monitors at many locations in the solvent extraction areas, the development of an integrated preamplifier/amplifier package to eliminate long cable runs, and improvements in the neutron monitor functional test procedures to reduce maintenance requirements. The implementation of these improvements, already partially complete, is expected to provide enhanced operation and reliability for the neutron monitors. This paper will present a description of the solvent neutron monitors as well as technical details of the improvement program. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Griffin, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

WIPP Receives Waste Characterized With Mobile System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The shipment came to WIPP from DOE's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The shipment was the eighth to WIPP from the Savannah River Site,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river site waste" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site October 30, 2009 - 3:35pm Addthis The Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of their new hires. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Hear from some of the Recovery Act hires at the Energy Department's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. These are just a few of the jobs funded by the Recovery Act to accelerate the cleanup of the former nuclear weapons research site and make the site safe for future generations. Addthis Related Articles Deputy Secretary Poneman: Recovery Act Putting Americans to Work and

402

HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR VISUAL EXAMINATION GLOVEBOXES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. High Cs-137 backgrounds in the VE glovebox areas preclude the use of a sodium iodide spectrometer, so a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, having superior resolution, is used. Plutonium-239 is usually the nuclide of interest; however, Pu-241, Np-237 (including its daughter Pa-233) and Pu-238 (if detected) are typically assayed. Cs-137 and Co-60 may also be detected but are not reported since they do not contribute to the Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent or Pu-239 Equivalent Curies. HEPA filters, drums and waste boxes are also assayed by the same methodology. If--for example--the HEPA is contained in a stainless steel housing, attenuation corrections must be applied for both the filter and the housing. Dimensions, detector locations, materials and densities are provided as inputs to Ortec's ISOTOPIC software to estimate attenuation and geometry corrections for the measurement positions. This paper discusses the methodology, results and limitations of these measurements for different VE glovebox configurations.

Sigg, R

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

MOX Lead Assembly Fabrication at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on the disposition of the nations weapon-usable surplus plutonium.This EIS is tiered from the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Material Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement issued in December 1996,and the associated Record of Decision issued on January, 1997. The EIS will examine reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. The three types of facilities are: a pit disassembly and conversion facility, a facility to immobilize surplus plutonium in a glass or ceramic form for disposition, and a facility to fabricate plutonium oxide into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel.As an integral part of the surplus plutonium program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition(MD) as the technical lead to organize and evaluate existing facilities in the DOE complex which may meet MD`s need for a domestic MOX fuel fabrication demonstration facility. The Lead Assembly (LA) facility is to produce 1 MT of usable test fuel per year for three years. The Savannah River Site (SRS) as the only operating plutonium processing site in the DOE complex, proposes two options to carry out the fabrication of MOX fuel lead test assemblies: an all Category I facility option and a combined Category I and non-Category I facilities option.

Geddes, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Spiker, D.L.; Poon, A.P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE COLD WAR HISTORIC PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAR WAR HISTORIC PROPERTY DOCUMENTATION 700/A AREA Aiken County, South Carolina 6150 East Ponce de Leon Avenue Stone Mountain, Georgia 30083 700/A AREA SITE ADMINISTRATION, SAFETY, SECURITY, AND SUPPORT NEW SOUTH ASSOCIATES ii ABSTRACT This documentation was prepared in accordance with a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed by the Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR) and the South Carolina Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) dated February 17, 2004, as well as the Consolidated MOA of August 2004. The MOA stipulated that a thematic study and photographic documentation be undertaken on A Area historic properties 703-A and 708-A. In addition, a Cultural Resource Management Plan was accepted and signed by DOE-SR and the SHPO on December 9, 2004 calling for documentation of the remainder

405

Implementation of ISO140001 at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC recently received ISO14001 certification. ISO14001 is an internationally recognized standard that delineates the elements of an effective environmental management system (EMS) and enhances environmental stewardship. SRS preparations for ISO14001 certification involved a comparison of existing programs to the requirements of the standard. Gaps in the program were identified and work initiated to fill those gaps. Primarily, these deficiencies were related to documentation of the SRS EMS and employee training. Certification was granted after an extensive review by a team of independent auditors. The review included personnel interviews, documentation reviews, and work practice observations. An overview of the preparation process as well as the independent review will be presented.

Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Reeves, R.D.

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Method of draining water through a solid waste site without leaching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of preventing water from leaching solid waste sites by preventing atmospheric precipitation from contacting waste as the water flows through a solid waste site. The method comprises placing at least one drain hole through the solid waste site. The drain hole is seated to prevent waste material from entering the drain hole, and the solid waste site cover material is layered and graded to direct water to flow toward the drain hole and to soil beneath the waste site.

Treat, R.L.; Gee, G.W.; Whyatt, G.A.

1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Impact \ DoE/Els-o120 Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina Volume 3 Q ~+ ~ FNT O&@+@ &v a w ~ k ~ ;%." $ +6 & ~+e $TiTES Of December 1987 United States Department of Energy TABLE OF CONTENTS ~pendix G ASSESSMENT OF ALTERNATIVE STRATEGIES FOR STORAGE FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . G.1 No-Action Strategy . . . . . . . . G.1.l Sununarv and Objectives . . NEW DISPOSAL/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.1.2 Groundwater and Surface Water Effects G.1.3 Nonradioactive Atmospheric Releases . G.1.4 Ecological Effects . . . . . . . . . G.1.5 Radiological Releases . . . . . . . . G.1.6 Archaeological and Historic Resources G.1.7 SOciOecOnOmics . . . . . . . . . . . G.1.8 Dedication of Site . . . . . . . . . G.1.9 Institutional Impacts . . . . . . . . G.l.10 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.2 Dedication Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.2.1 G.2.2 G.2.3 G.2.4 G.2.5 G.2.6

408

Tank Waste Retrieval Lessons Learned at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60 percent of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring this waste to the DST system. Retrieval of SST salt-cake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. Regulatory requirements for SST waste retrieval and tank farm closure are established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), better known as the Tri- Party Agreement, or TPA. The HFFACO was signed by the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and requires retrieval of as much waste as technically possible, with waste residues not to exceed 360 ft{sup 3} in 530,000 gallon or larger tanks; 30 ft{sup 3} in 55,000 gallon or smaller tanks; or the limit of waste retrieval technology, whichever is less. If residual waste volume requirements cannot be achieved, then HFFACO Appendix H provisions can be invoked to request Ecology and EPA approval of an exception to the waste retrieval criteria for a specific tank. Tank waste retrieval has been conducted at the Hanford Site over the last few decades using a method referred to as Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing. Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing employs large volumes of DST supernatant and water to dislodge, dissolve, mobilize, and retrieve tank waste. Concern over the leak integrity of SSTs resulted in the need for tank waste retrieval methods capable of using smaller volumes of liquid in a more controlled manner. Retrieval of SST waste in accordance with HFFACO requirements was initiated at the Hanford Site in April 2003. New and innovative tank waste retrieval methods that minimize and control the use of liquids are being implemented for the first time. These tank waste retrieval methods replace Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing and employ modified sluicing, vacuum retrieval, and in-tank vehicle techniques. Waste retrieval has been completed in seven Hanford Site SSTs (C-106, C-103, C-201, C-202, C-203, C-204, and S-112) in accordance with HFFACO requirements. Three additional tanks are currently in the process of being retrieved (C-108, C-109 and S-102) Preparation for retrieval of two additional SSTs (C-104 and C-110) is ongoing with retrieval operations forecasted to start in calendar year 2008. Tank C-106 was retrieved to a residual waste volume of 470 ft{sup 3} using oxalic acid dissolution and modified sluicing. An Appendix H exception request for Tank C-106 is undergoing review. Tank C-103 was retrieved to a residual volume of 351 ft{sup 3} using a modified sluicing technology. This approach was successful at reaching the TPA limits for this tank of less than 360 ft{sup 3}and the limits of the technology. Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204 are smaller (55,000 gallon) tanks and waste removal was completed in accordance with HFFACO requirements using a vacuum retrieval system. Residual waste volumes in each of these four tanks were less than 25 ft{sup 3}. Tank S-112 retrieval was completed February 28, 2007, meeting the TPA Limits of less than

Dodd, R.A. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., Richland, Washington (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Zone of Interaction Between Hanford Site Groundwater and Adjacent Columbia River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the FY 2000 results of a Science and Technology investigation of the groundwater/river interface at the Hanford Site. The investigation focused on (1) a 2-D simulation of water flowpaths beneath the shoreline region under the influence of a transient river stage, and (2) mixing between groundwater and river water.

Peterson, Robert E.; Connelly, Michael P.

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

Monitor well responses at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of geothermal fluid production and injection on overlying ground-water aquifers have been studied at the Raft River Geothermal Site in southcentral Idaho. Data collected from 13 monitor wells indicate a complex fractured and porous media controlled ground-water flow system affected by natural recharge and discharge, irrigation withdrawal, and geothermal withdrawal and injection. The monitor wells are completed in aquifers and aquitards overlying the principal geothermal aquifers. Potentiometric heads and water quality are significantly affected by natural upward geothermal leakage via faults and matrix seepage. No significant change in water quality data has been observed, but potentiometric head changes resulted due to geothermal resource testing and utilization. Long-term hydrographs for the wells exhibit three distinct patterns, with superimposed responses due to geothermal pumping and injection. Well hydrographs typical of the Shallow aquifer exhibit effects of natural recharge and irrigation withdrawals. For selected wells, pressure declines due to injection and pressure buildup associated with pumping are observed. The latter effect is presumably due to the elastic deformation of geologic material overlying the stressed aquifers. A second distinct pattern occurs in two wells believed to be hydraulically connected to the underlying Intermediate aquifer via faults. These wells exhibit marked buildup effects due to injection as well as responses typical of the Shallow aquifer. The third pattern is demonstrated by three monitor wells near the principal production wells. This group of wells exhibits no seasonal potentiometric head fluctuations. Fluctuations which do occur are due to injection and pumpage. The three distinct hydrograph patterns are composites of the potentiometric head responses occurring in the various aquifers underlying the Raft River Site.

Skiba, P.A.; Allman, D.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, was established in 1999 based on an extensive probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996 by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. In subsequent years, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) staff questioned the some of the assumptions used in developing the seismic design basis, particularly the adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. Existing site-specific shear wav