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1

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

2

PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR AB) |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical:Rocky Mountain OTC GSSof

3

Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

liquid waste contractor, Savannah River Remediation (SRR): Closed two more underground tanks containing radioactive waste, helping reduce a significant environmental risk to South...

4

Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear...

5

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis...

6

Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

*Editor's note: This article is cross-posted from Savannah River Remediation's website, where it was posted on September 28, 2012.

7

An overview of treatment and characterization technologies for environmental remediation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has the responsibility to remediate waste sites and groundwater to standards as determined by Federal and State Authorities. This mission requires that certain programmatic interfaces within the ERD, Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC, formerly Savannah River Laboratory (SRL)), the Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Technology Development (OTD), and outside commercial contractors be utilized to ensure cost-effective remediation technologies are utilized. This paper provides a synopsis of a select cross-section of the treatment and characterization technologies currently being pursued by ERD. Environmental Restoration Technology (ERT) Department's future role in providing the necessary technologies for waste sites and groundwater remediation is also discussed.

Holt, D.L.; Butcher, B.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

An overview of treatment and characterization technologies for environmental remediation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has the responsibility to remediate waste sites and groundwater to standards as determined by Federal and State Authorities. This mission requires that certain programmatic interfaces within the ERD, Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC, formerly Savannah River Laboratory (SRL)), the Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Technology Development (OTD), and outside commercial contractors be utilized to ensure cost-effective remediation technologies are utilized. This paper provides a synopsis of a select cross-section of the treatment and characterization technologies currently being pursued by ERD. Environmental Restoration Technology (ERT) Department`s future role in providing the necessary technologies for waste sites and groundwater remediation is also discussed.

Holt, D.L.; Butcher, B.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Response of winter birds to soil remediation along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River at the Hanford Site, located in south-central Washington State, USA, is a regionally important refugium for overwintering birds. Some of the river shoreline has been designated by the U.S. Department of Energy for environmental clean-up following past production of materials for nuclear weapons. We evaluated the effects of soil remediation on winter birds at six inactive nuclear reactor areas. Remediation activities consisted of daily excavation and removal of approximately 1,035 t of contaminated soil from previously herbicided and denuded areas located between 30 m and 400 m and mostly in line-of-sight of the river shoreline. Remediation activities had no apparent effect on numbers of riverine or terrestrial birds using adjacent undisturbed shoreline and riparian habitat.

Becker, James M.; McKinstry, Craig A.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River - 13603  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In south-central Washington State, the Columbia River flows through the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. A primary objective of the Hanford Site cleanup mission is protection of the Columbia River, through remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater that resulted from its weapons production mission. Within the Columbia River system, surface water, sediment, and biota samples related to potential Hanford Site hazardous substance releases have been collected since the start of Hanford operations. The impacts from release of Hanford Site radioactive substances to the Columbia River in areas upstream, within, and downstream of the Hanford Site boundary have been previously investigated as mandated by the U.S. Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act. The Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River [1] was issued in 2008 to initiate assessment of the impacts under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 [2]. The work plan established a phased approach to characterize contaminants, assess current risks, and determine whether or not there is a need for any cleanup actions. Field investigation activities over a 120-mile stretch of the Columbia River began in October 2008 and were completed in 2010. Sampled media included surface water, pore water, surface and core sediment, island soil, and fish (carp, walleye, whitefish, sucker, small-mouth bass, and sturgeon). Information and sample results from the field investigation were used to characterize current conditions within the Columbia River and assess whether current conditions posed a risk to ecological or human receptors that would merit additional study or response actions under CERCLA. The human health and ecological risk assessments are documented in reports that were published in 2012 [3, 4]. Conclusions from the risk assessment reports are being summarized and integrated with remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) reports developed for upland areas, riparian areas, and groundwater in the Hanford Site River Corridor. The RI/FS reports will evaluate the impacts to soil, groundwater, and river sediments and lead to proposed cleanup actions and records of decision to address releases from the Hanford Site reactor operations. (authors)

Lerch, J.A.; Hulstrom, L.C. [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Sands, J.P. [U.S Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [U.S Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Facility Utilization and Risk Analysis for Remediation of Legacy Transuranic Waste at the Savannah River Site - 13572  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) completed the Accelerated TRU Project for remediating legacy waste at the Savannah River Site with significant cost and schedule efficiencies due to early identification of resources and utilization of risk matrices. Initial project planning included identification of existing facilities that could be modified to meet the technical requirements needed for repackaging and remediating the waste. The project schedule was then optimized by utilization of risk matrices that identified alternate strategies and parallel processing paths which drove the overall success of the project. Early completion of the Accelerated TRU Project allowed SRNS to pursue stretch goals associated with remediating very difficult TRU waste such as concrete casks from the hot cells in the Savannah River National Laboratory. Project planning for stretch goals also utilized existing facilities and the risk matrices. The Accelerated TRU project and stretch goals were funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). (authors)

Gilles, Michael L.; Gilmour, John C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

14

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR THREE VISUAL EXAMINATION AND TRU REMEDIATION GLOVEBOX FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums at three separate facilities at the Savannah River Site. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements using cooled HPGe spectrometers are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. {sup 239}Pu is the main nuclide of interest; however, {sup 241}Pu, equilibrium {sup 237}Np/{sup 233}Pa and {sup 238}Pu (if detected) are typically assayed. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) facility {sup 243,244,245}Cm are also generally observed and are always reported at either finite levels or at limits of detection. A complete assay at each of the three facilities includes a measure of TRU content in the gloveboxes and HEPA filters in the glovebox exhaust. This paper includes a description of the {gamma}-PHA acquisitions, of the modeling, and of the calculations of nuclide content. Because each of the remediation facilities is unique and ergonomically unfavorable to {gamma}-ray acquisitions, we have constructed custom detector support devices specific to each set of acquisitions. This paper includes a description and photographs of these custom devices. The description of modeling and calculations include determination and application of container and matrix photon energy dependent absorption factors and also determination and application of geometry factors relative to our detector calibration geometry. The paper also includes a discussion of our measurements accuracy using off-line assays of two SRNL HEPA filters. The comparison includes assay of the filters inside of 55-gallon drums using the SRNL Q{sup 2} assay system and separately using off-line assay with an acquisition configuration unique from the original in-situ acquisitions.

Dewberry, R; Donald Pak, D

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

18

Deployment of Performance Management Methodology as part of Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River Site - 12178  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) assumed the management lead of the Liquid Waste (LW) Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The four SRR partners and AREVA, as an integrated subcontractor are performing the ongoing effort to safely and reliably: - Close High Level Waste (HLW) storage tanks; - Maximize waste throughput at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF); - Process salt waste into stable final waste form; - Manage the HLW liquid waste material stored at SRS. As part of these initiatives, SRR and AREVA deployed a performance management methodology based on Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) at the DWPF in order to support the required production increase. This project took advantage of lessons learned by AREVA through the deployment of Total Productive Maintenance and Visual Management methodologies at the La Hague reprocessing facility in France. The project also took advantage of measurement data collected from different steps of the DWPF process by the SRR team (Melter Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering, Laboratory Operations, Plant Operations). Today the SRR team has a standard method for measuring processing time throughout the facility, a reliable source of objective data for use in decision-making at all levels, and a better balance between engineering department goals and operational goals. Preliminary results show that the deployment of this performance management methodology to the LW program at SRS has already significantly contributed to the DWPF throughput increases and is being deployed in the Saltstone facility. As part of the liquid waste program on Savannah River Site, SRR committed to enhance production throughput of DWPF. Beyond technical modifications implemented at different location of the facility, SRR deployed performance management methodology based on OEE metrics. The implementation benefited from the experience gained by AREVA in its own facilities in France. OEE proved to be a valuable tool in order to support the enhancement program in DWPF by providing unified metrics to measure plant performances, identify bottleneck location, and rank the most time consuming causes from objective data shared between the different groups belonging to the organization. Beyond OEE, the Visual Management tool adapted from the one used at La Hague were also provided in order to further enhance communication within the operating teams. As a result of all the initiatives implemented on DWPF, achieved production has been increased to record rates from FY10 to FY11. It is expected that thanks to the performance management tools now available within DWPF, these results will be sustained and even improved in the future to meet system plan targets. (authors)

Prod'homme, A.; Drouvot, O.; Gregory, J. [AREVA, Paris (France); Barnes, B.; Hodges, B.; Hart, M. [SRR, Aiken, SC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modifications to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modifications to the water resources protection strategy detailed in the remedial action plan for the Green River, Utah, disposal site are presented. The modifications are based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. The modifications will result in compliance with the U.S. EPA proposed ground water standards (52 FR 36000 (1987)).

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1: Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

PROJECT STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDIATION AND DISPOSITION OF LEGACY TRANSURANIC WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE, South Carolina, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Savannah River Site Accelerated Transuranic (TRU) Waste Project that was initiated in April of 2009 to accelerate the disposition of remaining legacy transuranic waste at the site. An overview of the project execution strategy that was implemented is discussed along with the lessons learned, challenges and improvements to date associated with waste characterization, facility modifications, startup planning, and remediation activities. The legacy waste was generated from approximately 1970 through 1990 and originated both on site as well as at multiple US Department of Energy sites. Approximately two thirds of the waste was previously dispositioned from 2006 to 2008, with the remaining one third being the more hazardous waste due to its activity (curie content) and the plutonium isotope Pu-238 quantities in the waste. The project strategy is a phased approach beginning with the lower activity waste in existing facilities while upgrades are made to support remediation of the higher activity waste. Five waste remediation process lines will be used to support the full remediation efforts which involve receipt of the legacy waste container, removal of prohibited items, venting of containers, and resizing of contents to fit into current approved waste shipping containers. Modifications have been minimized to the extent possible to meet the accelerated goals and involve limited upgrades to address life safety requirements, radiological containment needs, and handling equipment for the larger waste containers. Upgrades are also in progress for implementation of the TRUPACT III for the shipment of Standard Large Boxes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the US TRU waste repository. The use of this larger shipping container is necessary for approximately 20% of the waste by volume due to limited size reduction capability. To date, approximately 25% of the waste has been dispositioned, and several improvements have been made to the overall processing plan as well as facility processing rates. These lessons learned, challenges, and improvements will be discussed to aid other sites in their efforts to conduct similar activities.

Rodriguez, M.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sewage disposal in the Musi-River, India: water quality remediation through irrigation infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the river. Keywords Agriculture . Helminths . India . Musi River. Wastewater use . Wastewater treatment-pollution levels, through dilution, die-off, sedimentation and biological processes. These natural treatment sustainability. Hyderabad, one of India's largest cities, disposes large amounts of its wastewater untreated

Scott, Christopher

25

Savannah River Site, Liquid Waste Program, Savannah River Remediation American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Benefits and Lessons Learned - 12559  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)

Schmitz, Mark A.; Crouse, Thomas N. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

CX-007012: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory In support of Savannah River Remediation (SRR) tank closure Savannah River National Laboratory will perform rheology measurements of simulated sludge. The...

27

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 4. Information related to the feasibility study and ARARs. Appendixes G, H, I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Data Summary Report for teh Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data summary report summarizes the investigation results to evaluate the nature and distribution of Hanford Site-related contaminants present in the Columbia River. As detailed in DOE/RL-2008-11, more than 2,000 environmental samples were collected from the Columbia River between 2008 and 2010. These samples consisted of island soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater upwelling (pore water, surface water, and sediment), and fish tissue.

Hulstrom, L.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Modification No. 2 to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah: Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Portions of the final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) for the Green River site, Volumes 1 and 2, Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-81AL16257, March 1991 (DOE, 1991) have been modified. The changes to the RAP are designated as RAP Modification No. 2. These changes have been placed in a three-ring binder that will supplement the original RAP (DOE, 1991), and include the following: addendum to the Executive Summary; Section 3.5 (Ground Water part of the Site Characterization Summary); Section 4.0 (Site Design); Section5.0 (Water Resources Protection Strategy Summary); Appendix D.5 (Ground Water Hydrology); and Appendix E (Ground Water Protection Strategy). In addition to these revisions, there have been editorial changes that clarify the text, but do not change the meaning. Also, certain sections of the document, which are included in the submittal for ease of review and continuity, have been updated to reflect the final ground water protection standards and the current UMTRA Project format and content of RAPs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Wall-E Is So Jealous Right Now: SRR Robots Help Clean Up SRS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Science fiction is now science fact as remote-controlled robots work on tank waste removal and inspection at Savannah River Site (SRS).

32

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 4. Appendixes G, H, and I and information related to the feasibility study and ARARs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 4 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final, Revision 2, Version 5: Appendix E to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this appendix is to provide a ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Green River, Utah. Compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards will be achieved by applying supplemental standards (40 CFR {section} 192.22(a); 60 FR 2854) based on the limited use ground water present in the uppermost aquifer that is associated with widespread natural ambient contamination (40 CFR {section} 192.11(e); 60 FR 2854). The strategy is based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. The strategy will result in compliance with Subparts A and C of the EPA final ground water protection standards (60 FR 2854). The document contains sufficient information to support the proposed ground water protection strategy, with monitor well information and ground water quality data included as a supplement. Additional information is available in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a), the final completion report (DOE, 1991b), and the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1994a).

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Record of Decision/Remedial Alternative Selection for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

Palmer, E.

1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

Selecting Mold Remediation Contractors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas has strict regulations that govern mold remediation companies. Before contracting for mold remediation work, consumers should know what the law requires of remediation companies and what such contracts should contain....

Renchie, Don L.

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

37

John Tanaka SRR Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Ecological Provinces #12; 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Black Hills Coniferous Forest Great Plains - Palouse Dry,000 250,000 300,000 Black Hills Coniferous Forest Great Plains - Palouse Dry Steppe Intermountain Semi,000 60,000 70,000 Black Hills Coniferous Forest Great Plains - Palouse Dry Steppe Intermountain Semi

Wyoming, University of

38

SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

Savannah River Remediation, College Create Job Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

skills, and they are helping treat and disposition radioactive waste and close waste tanks. They are all graduates of Aiken Technical College (ATC), a public, two-year...

40

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Smith River Rancheria's Development of an Energy Organization Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smith River Rancheria (SRR), for some time, has had a strong commitment to attaining energy selfsufficiency, to reduce overall energy costs and concurrently initiate economic development within the community. Early on it was recognized that the development of an energy organization was important and for this reason was made part of the SRR's strategic review not only for economic development but also the reduction of energy costs. Towards this end, SRR retained Werner G. Buehler of W.G. Buehler & Associates to investigate the many phases or steps required to establish such an energy organization and determine, if in fact, it could benefit the Tribe. The basic phases are delineated as: (1) Identify potential sources of wholesale power and transmission paths; (2) Evaluating the various forms of energy organizations; (3) Determining the benefits (and disadvantages) of each form of organization; (4) Gathering costs to organize and operate the selected form or energy organization; (5) Performing an economic analysis of forming and operating an energy organization; and (6) Develop an implementation plan.

W.G Buehler & Associates

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

Palmer, E.

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

Griffin, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

1998-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

46

Savannah River Site’s H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions- Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation’s only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – The Savannah River Site (SRS) is breathing new life into the H Canyon, the only active nuclear chemical separations facility still operating in the U.S.

47

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Remediating MGP brownfields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before natural gas pipelines became widespread in this country, gas fuel was produced locally in more than 5,000 manufactured gas plants (MGPs). The toxic wastes from these processes often were disposed onsite and have since seeped into the surrounding soil and groundwater. Although the MGPs--commonly called gas plants, gas-works or town gas plants--have closed and most have been demolished, they have left a legacy of environmental contamination. At many MGP sites, underground storage tanks were constructed of wood or brick, with process piping and equipment which frequently leaked. Waste materials often were disposed onsite. Releases of coal tars, oils and condensates produced within the plants contributed to a wide range of contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, benzene and cyanide. Remediation of selected MGP sites has been sporadic. Unless the site has been identified as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) Superfund site, the regulatory initiative to remediate often remains with the state in which the MGP is located. A number of factors are working to change that picture and to create a renewed interest in MGP site remediation. The recent Brownfield Initiative by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is such an example.

Larsen, B.R.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Subsurface characterization of the San Jacinto River Research site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to develop an effective petroleum repudiation ics. strategy, the interaction between surface and shallow subsurface water was determined for the San Jacinto River Oi1 Spill Remediation Research site. The ten-acre wetland is located...

Leik, Jason Allan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

BERGMAN TB; STEFANSKI LD; SEELEY PN; ZINSLI LC; CUSACK LJ

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Brownfield landfill remediation under the Illinois EPA site remediation program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brownfield type landfill remediation was completed at the Ft. Sheridan Historic Landmark District, a former Army Base Realignment and Closure Facility, in conjunction with the future development of 551 historic and new homes at this site. The project was completed during 1998 under the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (Illinois EPA) Site Remediation Program. This paper highlights the Illinois EPA's Site Remediation Program and the remediation of Landfills 3 and 4 at Fort Sheridan. The project involved removal of about 200,000 cubic yards of landfill waste, comprised of industrial and domestic refuse and demolition debris, and post-removal confirmation sampling of soils, sediment, surface water, and groundwater. The sample results were compared to the Illinois Risk-Based Cleanup levels for residential scenarios. The goal of the removal project was to obtain a No Further Remediation letter from the Illinois EPA to allow residential development of the landfill areas.

Beck, J.; Bruce, B.; Miller, J.; Wey, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

SRR Rangeland Ecosystem Services Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributes to clean air Hydrologic, Solar, and Wind energy potential Flood mitigation #12;Miscellaneous EGS Added Costs Reduced Costs Reduced Benefits Total Positive Total Negative #12; For relatively small for the EGS Set of questions to ponder How to Determine the Potential Benefits and Costs #12; Must Haves

Wyoming, University of

55

REMEDIAL ACTION PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designated site consists of the 111-acre tailings pile, the mill yard, and piles of demolition rubble awaiting burial. The site contains 2.659 million cubic yards of tailings including 277,000 cubic yards of contaminated material in the mill yard, ore storage area, and Ann Lee Mine area; 151,000 cubic yards in the protore storage and leach pad areas; and 664,000 cubic yards of windblown contaminated soil, including excess soil that would result from excavation. Remedial action The remedial action will start with the excavation of windblown contaminated material and placement around the west, south, and east sides of the pile to buttress the slopes for increased stability. Most of the demolition rubble will be placed in the southern part of the pile and be covered with tailings. The northern part of the tailings pile (one million cubic yards) will then be excavated and placed on the south part of the pile to reduce the size of the disposal cell footprint. Demolition rubble that

Inactive Uranium; Mill Tailings Site; Uranium Mill Tremedial

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Soil Remediation Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – DOE Savannah River Operations Office Manager Dave Moody views the partnering relationship between his office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation (SRR) as an opportunity to view cleanup work from each other’s point of view.

58

DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

60

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

W. M. Heileson

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

Conger, R.M. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of a Performance and Processing Property Acceptance Region for Cementitious Low-Level Waste Forms at Savannah River Site - 13174  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Production and Disposal Facilities (SPF and SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been treating decontaminated salt solution, a low-level aqueous waste stream (LLW) since facility commissioning in 1990. In 2012, the Saltstone Facilities implemented a new Performance Assessment (PA) that incorporates an alternate design for the disposal facility to ensure that the performance objectives of DOE Order 435.1 and the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of Fiscal Year 2005 Section 3116 are met. The PA performs long term modeling of the waste form, disposal facility, and disposal site hydrogeology to determine the transport history of radionuclides disposed in the LLW. Saltstone has been successfully used to dispose of LLW in a grout waste form for 15 years. Numerous waste form property assumptions directly impact the fate and transport modeling performed in the PA. The extent of process variability and consequence on performance properties are critical to meeting the assumptions of the PA. The SPF has ensured performance property acceptability by way of implementing control strategies that ensure the process operates within the analyzed limits of variability, but efforts continue to improve the understanding of facility performance in relation to the PA analysis. A similar understanding of the impact of variability on processing parameters is important from the standpoint of the operability of the production facility. The fresh grout slurry properties (particularly slurry rheology and the rate of hydration and structure formation) of the waste form directly impact the pressure and flow rates that can be reliably processed. It is thus equally important to quantify the impact of variability on processing parameters to ensure that the design basis assumptions for the production facility are maintained. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been pursuing a process that will ultimately establish a property acceptance region (PAR) to incorporate elements important to both processability and long-term performance properties. This process involves characterization of both emplaced product samples from the disposal facility and laboratory-simulated samples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the lab simulation. With that basis confirmed, a comprehensive variability study using non-radioactive simulants will define the acceptable PAR, or 'operating window' for Saltstone production and disposal. This same process will be used in the future to evaluate new waste streams for disposal or changes to the existing process flowsheet. (authors)

Staub, Aaron V. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Reigel, Marissa M. [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Savannah River Technology Center. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information about the research programs being conducted at the Savannah River Plant. Topics of discussion include: thermal cycling absorption process, development of new alloys, ion exchange, oxalate precipitation, calcination, environmental research, remedial action, ecological risk assessments, chemical analysis of salt cakes, natural phenomena hazards assessment, and sampling of soils and groundwater.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, February 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a progress report for the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of February 1992. The progress and activities in six categories were described in the report. The categories are reactor, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. Each category described numerous and varied activities. Some examples of these activities described are such things as radiation monitoring, maintenance, modifications, and remedial action.

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.); Ice, L.W. (ed.)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Risk-Based Remediation Approach for Cs-137 Contaminated Sediment/Soils at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Lower Three Runs Tail (U) - 13348 - SRNS-RP-2012-00546  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower Three Runs is a large blackwater stream that runs through the eastern and southern portion of the Savannah River Site. The Lower Three Runs watershed includes two SRS facility areas: P Area (P Reactor) and R Area (R Reactor) that provided effluent discharges to Lower Three Runs. During reactor operations, effluent discharges were well above natural (pre-industrial) or present day stream discharges. The watershed contains a 2,500-acre mainstream impoundment (PAR Pond), several smaller pre-cooler ponds, and a canal system that connects the pre-cooler ponds and discharges surface water to PAR Pond. From the PAR Pond dam, Lower Three Runs flows approximately 36 kilometers braiding through bottom-land/flood-plain forests before it enters the Savannah River. About eight kilometers downstream from the PAR Pond dam, the SRS boundary narrows (termed the Lower Three Runs tail) providing a limited buffer of DOE property for the Lower Three Runs stream and associated flood-plain. Previous screening characterization efforts revealed Cs-137 contamination in the sediment/soils of the flood-plain. As a part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus package, a comprehensive characterization effort was executed on the sediment/soils of the Lower Three Runs tail flood-plain providing a comprehensive look at the contaminant signature of the area. As a follow-up to that characterization, a regulatory decision Core Team, comprised of members of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Environmental Protection Agency - Region IV, and DOE, conducted negotiations on a risk-based approach to address the level of contamination found in the tail flood-plain as an early action that provided a long-term solution to exposure scenarios. For evaluation purposes, the adolescent trespasser was selected as the most likely human receptor for the Lower Three Runs tail portion because of the natural attractiveness of the area for recreational activities (i.e., hunting, fishing, hiking etc.) and access from public property. Exposure of the adolescent trespasser to Cs-137 contaminated sediment/soil at concentrations greater than 23.7 pico curies per gram have been calculated to result in an unacceptable cancer risk (> 1 x 10{sup -4}). Comparing the characterization sampling results conducted in 2009 with the benchmark concentration of 23.7 pCi/g, identified elevated risk levels along three sampling areas in the Lower Three Runs tail portion. On January 5, 2012, it was agreed by the core team that a Removal Action in the Lower Three Runs tail was to be conducted for the identified soil/sediment locations in the three identified areas that exceed the 1 x 10{sup -4} risk (23.7 pCi/g) for the adolescent trespasser receptor. The addition of Land Use Controls following the Removal Action was appropriate to protect human health and the environment. A systematic screening matrix was initiated at the identified hot spots (i.e., sampling points with Cs-137 activities greater than 23.7 pCi/g) to identify the limits of the excavation area. Sediment/soil within the defined removal areas would be excavated to the depth necessary to achieve the cleanup goal and disposed of in a CERCLA Off-Site Rule approved disposal facility. It was agreed that this removal action would adequately reduce the volume of available Cs-137 in the Lower Three Runs tail and consequently residual activities of the Cs-137 would decay over time reducing the amount of Cs-137 available in the tail which would curtail risk. The Land Use Controls consist of installation of an additional seven miles of fencing at major road crossings, utility easements, and at areas that showed a higher probability of access. In addition, signs were placed along the entire SRS perimeter of the Lower Three Runs tail approximately every 200 feet. Sign posts included both a No Trespassing sign and a Contaminant Warning sign. The project initiated a subcontract for both the removal action and the installation of fencing and signs on May 1, 2012. All field activities were completed

Freeman, Candice [Department of Energy- Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States)] [Department of Energy- Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Bergren, Christopher; Blas, Susan; Kupar, James [Area Completion Projects, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Area Completion Projects, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

Tunison, Douglas Irvin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Progress Toward Remediation of Uranium Tailings in Mailuu-Suu, Kyrgyzstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The town of Mailuu-Suu in Kyrgyzstan inherited 23 distinct tailings deposits from Soviet-Era uranium mining operations. Mailuu-Suu is located in the narrow landslide-prone valley of the Mailuu-Suu River about 25 km from the Uzbekistan border. Large-scale release of the radioactive tailings, as a result of landslides, could lead to irreversible contamination of the river and downstream areas. The Mailuu-Suu River is a tributary to the Syr-Darya River, the Fergana valley's main source of irrigation water. The Fergana Valley is a key agricultural region and major population center that spans Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. The trans-boundary nature of the Mailuu-Suu tailings issue presents an opportunity for collaboration among these Central Asian states. A cooperative approach to addressing environmental issues such as Mailuu-Suu may contribute to the region's stability by facilitating peaceful associations. Experience from remediation of sites in the US under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project (UMTRA) will be useful in progressing toward remediation at Mailuu-Suu.

Buckley, P B; Ranville, J; Honeyman, B D; Smith, D K; Rosenberg, N; Knapp, R B

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

69

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment ofThe full text ofMay 2013DepartmentDepartment

70

Savannah River Remediation, College Create Job Opportunities for Graduates  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1Sandra L. BurrellSarai Geary|and|

71

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

objective of the Liquid Waste contract is to achieve closure of the SRS liquid waste tanks in compliance with the Federal Facilities Agreement, utilizing the Defense Waste...

72

Performance Assessment Program for the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Facilities - 13610  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Waste facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) are operated by Liquid Waste Operations contractor Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR). A separate Performance Assessment (PA) is prepared to support disposal operations at the Saltstone Disposal Facility and closure evaluations for the two liquid waste tank farm facilities at SRS, F-Tank Farm and H-Tank Farm. A PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified in operations and closure regulatory guidance. The Saltstone Disposal Facility is subject to a State of South Carolina industrial solid waste landfill permit and the tank farms are subject to a state industrial waste water permit. The three Liquid Waste facilities are also subject to a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Due to the regulatory structure, a PA is a key technical document reviewed by the DOE, the State of South Carolina and the EPA. As the waste material disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility and the residual material in the closed tank farms is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is also a reviewing agency for the PAs. Pursuant to the Act, the NRC also has a continuing role to monitor disposal actions to assess compliance with stated performance objectives. The Liquid Waste PA program at SRS represents a continual process over the life of the disposal and closure operations. When the need for a PA or PA revision is identified, the first step is to develop a conceptual model to best represent the facility conditions. The conceptual model will include physical dimensions of the closed system, both the engineered and natural system, and modeling input parameters associated with the modeled features, both initial values (at the time of facility closure) and degradation rates/values. During the development of the PA, evaluations are conducted to reflect not only the results associated with the best available information at the time but also to evaluate potential uncertainties and sensitivities associated with the modeled system. While the PA will reflect the modeled system results from the best available information, it will also identify areas for future work to reduce overall PA uncertainties moving forward. DOE requires a PA Maintenance Program such that work continues to reduce model uncertainties, thus bolstering confidence in PA results that support regulatory decisions. This maintenance work may include new Research and Development activities or modeling as informed by previous PA results and other new information that becomes available. As new information becomes available, it is evaluated against previous PAs and appropriate actions are taken to ensure continued confidence in the regulatory decisions. Therefore, the PA program is a continual process that is not just the development of a PA but seeks to incorporate new information to reduce overall model uncertainty and provide continuing confidence in regulatory decisions. (author)

Rosenberger, Kent H. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Remediation of oil field wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment and disposal of drilling muds and hazardous wastes has become a growing concern in the oil and gas industry. Further, past practices involving improper disposal require considerable research and cost to effectively remediate contaminated soils. This paper investigates two case histories describing the treatments employed to handle the liquid wastes involved. Both case histories describe the environmentally safe cleanup operations that were employed. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Avian Research at the Savannah River Site: A Model For Integrating Basic Research and Long-Term Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... Savannah River Site: implications for habitat management and nuclear waste site remediation ... I. Lehr Brisbin, Jr., and Robert A. ... The resulting discus- sions improved our collective understanding of the research/management interaction, and even- tually ...

77

CRITICAL RADIONUCLIDE AND PATHWAY ANALYSIS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an update to the analysis, Assessment of SRS Radiological Liquid and Airborne Contaminants and Pathways, that was performed in 1997. An electronic version of this large original report is included in the attached CD to this report. During the operational history (1954 to the present) of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released to the environment from the various production facilities. However, as will be shown by this updated radiological critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis, only a small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to potential doses and risks to offsite people. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface waters, the principal media that carry contaminants offsite. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. The groundwater monitoring performed at the site shows that an estimated 5 to 10% of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, no evidence exists from the extensive monitoring performed that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated off the site (SRS 2011). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people. In addition, in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Order 435.1, several Performance Assessments (WSRC 2008; LWO 2009; SRR 2010; SRR 2011) and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis (SRNO 2010) have recently been completed at SRS. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in these extensive reports are discussed and, where applicable, included in this analysis.

Jannik, T.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

Rieck, R.H.

1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ORSSAB Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation.

80

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

82

Lower Three Runs Remediation Safety Preparation Strategy - 13318  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site. It is a large blackwater stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 20 mile stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows and provides a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood-plain. Based on data collected during the years 2009 and 2010 under American Recovery and Re-investment Act funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. In agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, three areas were identified for remediation [1] (SRNS April 2012). A comprehensive safety preparation strategy was developed for safe execution of the LTR remediation project. Contract incentives for safety encouraged the contractor to perform a complete evaluation of the work and develop an implementation plan to perform the work. The safety coverage was controlled to ensure all work was observed and assessed by one person per work area within the project. This was necessary due to the distances between the fence work and three transects being worked, approximately 20 miles. Contractor Management field observations were performed along with DOE assessments to ensure contractor focus on safe performance of the work. Dedicated ambulance coverage for remote worker work activities was provided. This effort was augmented with access to medical evacuation services. The areas where the work was performed were remote and difficult to get emergency vehicles to in a timely manner in case of an accident. Satellite phones were utilized due to intermittent phone coverage. High visibility vests were utilized to enable any hunters in the area to see the workers; due to the limited buffer areas along the stream route. An innovative approach to providing the necessary protection for workers during periods of extreme heat and humidity was also employed, which included the use of 'heat islands' with fans and crew trailers and ice vests for workers. (authors)

Mackay, Alexander; Fryar, Scotty; Doane, Alan [United States Department of Energy, Building 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Building 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

Tank Waste Remediation System Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope, number and complexity of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) decisions require an integrated, consistent, and logical approach to decision making. TWRS has adopted a seven-step decision process applicable to all decisions. Not all decisions, however, require the same degree of rigor/detail. The decision impact will dictate the appropriate required detail. In the entire process, values, both from the public as well as from the decision makers, play a key role. This document concludes with a general discussion of the implementation process that includes the roles of concerned parties.

Robershotte, M.A.; Dirks, L.L.; Seaver, D.A.; Bothers, A.J.; Madden, M.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 6, 1997 Issued to Rocky Mountain Remediation Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site,...

87

SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & InformationAdmin Support SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & InformationAdmin Support December...

88

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

89

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Final Report - Conservation & Renewable Energy Potential Study For Smith River Rancheria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 2006 the Smith River Rancheria (SRR), located in Smith River, California, contracted with the team of Strategic Energy Solutions (SES) and Evergreen NRG to conduct a study for the community. The objective of the study was to identify renewable generation opportunities that would facilitate Rancheria energy independence through SRR owned and operated power projects. These generation facilities were to be located either on or near the reservation. Specifically, the Rancheria was interested in the viability of generating electric power using biomass and wind fuel resources. Initial research identified that a very small portion of the community's energy could be offset by renewable energy generation due to the low solar resource in this area, and the lack of significant wind or biomass resources on or near reservation land. Some larger projects were identified which offered little or no benefit to the Rancheria. As a result, the scope of this study was changed in October 2006 to focus on energy efficiency opportunities for key reservation facilities, with a continued analysis of smaller renewable energy opportunities within reservation boundaries. The consulting team initially performed a resource analysis for biomass and solar generation opportunities in the region of the Rancheria. It was quickly concluded that none of these options would yield renewable power for the Rancheria at costs competitive with current utility sources, and that any larger installations would require substantial funding that may not be available. Having made these conclusions early on, the study effort was redirected and the team investigated each of the major Rancheria buildings to look for solar, wind and conservation opportunities. The buildings were audited for energy use and the roof areas were examined for exposure of solar radiation. Wind resources were also investigated to determine if smaller wind turbines would offer power generation at a reasonable cost.

Greg Retzlaff

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Remediation of inactive mining and milling sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation introduces relevant environment remediation standards and describes some measures of engineering remedied for inactive mines and mills. Since 1990, the remediation of decommissioned nuclear facilities has obtained fixed financial aid from state government, part of which is offered to inactive mines and mills. Considering the environmental characteristics of Chinese uranium mines and mills, the major task of decommissioning is to prevent radon release, and keep surface water and underground water from contamination. In order to control the rate of radon release effectively, the authors` research institutes conducted a series of experiments on the covers of tailings with two kinds of different material, clay and concrete.

Mao, H.; Pan, Y.; Li, R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

93

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

D. E. Shanklin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

REAL TIME DATA FOR REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES [11505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health physicists from the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company collaborated with Berkeley Nucleonics Corporation to modify the SAM 940 isotope identifier instrument to be used for nuclear waste remediation. These modifications coupled with existing capabilities of the SAM 940 have proven to be invaluable during remediation activities, reducing disposal costs by allowing swift remediation of targeted areas that have been identified as having isotopes of concern (IOC), and eliminating multiple visits to sites by declaring an excavation site clear of IOCs before demobilizing from the site. These advantages are enabled by accumulating spectral data for specific isotopes that is nearly 100 percent free of false positives, which are filtered out in 'real time.'

BROCK CT

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electrolytic remediation of chromated copper arsenate wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has proven to be exceptionally effective in protecting wood from rot and infestation, its toxic nature has led to the problem of disposal of CCA-treated lumber and remediation of waters ...

Stern, Heather A. G. (Heather Ann Ganung)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Littleton, CO 80127 #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 SAMPLING Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By: Date: Sally Cuffin Project Quality Assurance Manager New Horizons...................................................................................................................................3 2.5 Decision Rules

97

Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

SRR Ecological Assessment Indicators: Selection and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Soil aggregate stability · Water - Surface water frequency, Volume · Plants - Key species, Invasives, Pounds of domestic meat produced, Pounds of harvestable materials produced #12;Why these indicators in cover or stability is expected from better management. #12;Surface Water Availability · Water is vital

Wyoming, University of

99

SRR-CWDA-2013-00091  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORTSORNRecovery ActR E Q U E N C Y091

100

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this process also provides new opportunities to think differently and look at the bigger picture of the overall benefit we are providing with our remediation projects. The opportunities from the move towards GSR are very real. They will help us make remedial actions truly more beneficial to the environment and to society. They will also allow (or force) remediation practitioners to think outside of the usual realm of approaches to find newer and more beneficial technologies. (authors)

Simpkin, Thomas J. [CH2M HILL, Denver, Colorado (United States); Favara, Paul [CH2M HILL, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Multiscale modeling of surfactant phase behavior in the remediation of DNAPL contamination.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The brine barrier remediation technique (BBRT) has been proposed as a novel Brine barrier remediation techniques (BBRT) that use surfactants have been proposed for remediating… (more)

Fan, Xiangyu.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

W. M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Applicability of petroleum horizontal drilling technology to hazardous waste site characterization and remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Horizontal wells have the potential to become an important tool for use in characterization, remediation and monitoring operations at hazardous waste disposal, chemical manufacturing, refining and other sites where subsurface pollution may develop from operations or spills. Subsurface pollution of groundwater aquifers can occur at these sites by leakage of surface disposal ponds, surface storage tanks, underground storage tanks (UST), subsurface pipelines or leakage from surface operations. Characterization and remediation of aquifers at or near these sites requires drilling operations that are typically shallow, less than 500-feet in depth. Due to the shallow nature of polluted aquifers, waste site subsurface geologic formations frequently consist of unconsolidated materials. Fractured, jointed and/or layered high compressive strength formations or compacted caliche type formations can also be encountered. Some formations are unsaturated and have pore spaces that are only partially filled with water. Completely saturated underpressured aquifers may be encountered in areas where the static ground water levels are well below the ground surface. Each of these subsurface conditions can complicate the drilling and completion of wells needed for monitoring, characterization and remediation activities. This report describes some of the equipment that is available from petroleum drilling operations that has direct application to groundwater characterization and remediation activities. A brief discussion of petroleum directional and horizontal well drilling methodologies is given to allow the reader to gain an understanding of the equipment needed to drill and complete horizontal wells. Equipment used in river crossing drilling technology is also discussed. The final portion of this report is a description of the drilling equipment available and how it can be applied to groundwater characterization and remediation activities.

Goranson, C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

GROUNDWATER RADIOIODINE: PREVALENCE, BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, AND POTENTIAL REMEDIAL APPROACHES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine-129 ({sup 129}I) has not received as much attention in basic and applied research as other contaminants associated with DOE plumes. These other contaminants, such as uranium, plutonium, strontium, and technetium are more widespread and exist at more DOE facilities. Yet, at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site {sup 129}I occurs in groundwater at concentrations significantly above the primary drinking water standard and there is no accepted method for treating it, other than pump-and-treat systems. With the potential arrival of a 'Nuclear Renaissance', new nuclear power facilities will be creating additional {sup 129}I waste at a rate of 1 Ci/gigawatts energy produced. If all 22 proposed nuclear power facilities in the U.S. get approved, they will produce more {sup 129}I waste in seven years than presently exists at the two facilities containing the largest {sup 129}I inventories, ({approx}146 Ci {sup 129}I at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site). Hence, there is an important need to fully understand {sup 129}I behavior in the environment to clean up existing plumes and to support the expected future expansion of nuclear power production. {sup 129}I is among the key risk drivers at all DOE nuclear disposal facilities where {sup 129}I is buried, because of its long half-life (16 million years), high toxicity (90% of the body's iodine accumulates in the thyroid), high inventory, and perceived high mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that {sup 129}I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define {sup 129}I mass balance and flux at sites, but can not accurately predict its response to changes in the environment. This uncertainty is in part responsible for the low drinking water standard, 1 pCi/L {sup 129}I, and the low permissible inventory limits (Ci) at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the former Yucca Mountain disposal facilities. The objectives of this report are to: (1) compile the background information necessary to understand behavior of {sup 129}I in the environment, (2) discuss sustainable remediation approaches to {sup 129}I contaminated groundwater, and (3) identify areas of research that will facilitate remediation of {sup 129}I contaminated areas on DOE sites. Lines of scientific inquiry that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating {sup 129}I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of {sup 129}I waste are: (1) Evaluation of amendments or other treatment systems that can sequester subsurface groundwater {sup 129}I. (2) Develop analytical techniques for measurement of total {sup 129}I that eliminate the necessity of collecting and shipping large samples of groundwater. (3) Develop and evaluate ways to manipulate areas with organic-rich soil, such as wetlands, to maximize {sup 129}I sorption, minimizing releases during anoxic conditions. (4) Develop analytical techniques that can identify the various {sup 129}I species in the subsurface aqueous and solid phases at ambient concentrations and under ambient conditions. (5) Identify the mechanisms and factors controlling iodine-natural organic matter interactions at appropriate environmental concentrations. (6) Understand the biological processes that transform iodine species throughout different compartments of subsurface waste sites and the role that these processes have on {sup 129}I flux.

Denham, M.; Kaplan, D.; Yeager, C.

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

106

Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

How to accelerate the Fernald remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fernald Environmental Management Project is unique among Department of Energy (DOE) sites by virtue of successful efforts by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) and DOE-Fernald Area Office (FN) in securing a stak-eholder-assisted final site closure vision and all Record of Decisions (ROD) or Interim RODs required to set the stage for final remediation. DOE and FERMCO have agreed in principle on a Ten Year Plan which accelerates all activities to remediate the site in approximately half the target schedule. This paper presents the path that led to the current Ten Year Plan, the key elements of the plan and the implementation strategies.

Yates, M.K. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Reising, J. [USDOE Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

MATERIALS HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION April 13, 2004 Prepared for. Wright Street Littleton, CO 80127 #12;MATERIALS HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION PLAN CSMRI Site Remediation By: Date: Robert Krumberger Project Manager New Horizons Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By

109

Groundwater remediation at a former oil service site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for computer modeling and remediation strategy evaluation. Computer models were used to simulate site conditions and assist in remedy design for the site. Current pump-and-treat systems were evaluated by the model under various scenarios. Recommendations were...

Han, Liping

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

Remediation of Centre Pier, Port Hope, Ontario: Historical, Logistical, Regulatory and Technical Challenges - 13118  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Centre Pier is a 3.9 ha property owned by the Commissioners of the Port Hope Harbour in the Municipality of Port Hope, Ontario, Canada. It is centrally located on the Port Hope waterfront and is bounded on the west by the Port Hope Harbour, on the east by the Ganaraska River, on the south by Lake Ontario, and on the north by a railway corridor. The property is currently leased by the Commissioners of the Port Hope Harbour to the Cameco Corporation which owns the four onsite building that are used as warehouse space for their uranium conversion facility located on the western side of the Harbour. Remediation of this site forms part of the Port Hope Project being undertaken by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) as part of the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI). Soil impacts include radiological, metals and petroleum hydrocarbons resulting from long term historical industrial use. Radiological impacts in soil extend across most of the site primarily within the upper metre of fill. Metals-contaminated soil is present across the entire site in the underlying fill material. The metals-contaminated fill extends to a maximum depth of 2.0 m below grade at the north end of the site which is underlain by peat. However, the metals-contaminated soil could extend to the top of the bedrock on the remainder of the site. Based on the elevation of the bedrock in the adjacent river and Harbour Basin, the metals-contaminated soil may extend to a depth of 5.6 m or 6.5 m below existing grade. Petroleum-contaminated soil is present on the southeast side of the site, where a storage tank farm was previously located. Challenges include: - The complex history of the site both relating to site use and Pier construction. Pier development began in the 1800's and was undertaken by many different entities. Modifications and repairs were made over the years resulting in several different types of Pier walls and fill that must be considered during remediation. A wide variety of industrial activity on the Pier including extensive foundry operations as well as the industrial nature of the fill used to construct the Pier has resulted in extensive contamination distribution. The Pier structure will require reinforcement to permit both the remediation of the Pier and the adjacent Harbour and remediation techniques will need to be well suited to minimize disruption of wall structures as well as being able to deal with fill ranging from ash to boulders. - Multiple stakeholders are responsible for building demolition, remediation of radiological impacts, remediation of industrial impacts and the use of the site as a staging area for Harbour sediment remediation. The successful remediation of the Centre Pier will require careful negotiation and planning for the various remediation activities noted above. - The depth of contamination on the Pier would result in the complete removal of the Pier if all contamination were to be excavated. Therefore, a Risk Assessment will be conducted to determine the appropriate means for in situ risk management for materials to be left in place below a proposed depth of 1.5 m below current grade. With the concurrence of the property owners and Provincial regulators, the Risk Assessment will be undertaken in accordance with the Provincial requirements that will ensure adequate protection of the environment and future users of the site. - The end use of the Pier has yet to be confirmed by the Municipality. (authors)

Ferguson Jones, Andrea [MMM Group Limited, 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, Ontario, L3T 0A1 (Canada)] [MMM Group Limited, 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, Ontario, L3T 0A1 (Canada); Case, Glenn [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, Ontario, L1A 3S4 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, Ontario, L1A 3S4 (Canada); Lawrence, Dave [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, Ontario, L1A 3S4 (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, Ontario, L1A 3S4 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

River Protection Project FY 2000 Multi Year Work Plan Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The River Protection Project (RPP), formerly the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), is a major part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP). The ORP was established as directed by Congress in Section 3139 of the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The ORP was established to elevate the reporting and accountability for the RPP to the DOE-Headquarters level. This was done to gain Congressional visibility and obtain support for a major $10 billion high-level liquid waste vitrification effort.

LENSEIGNE, D.L.

1999-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

113

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractor’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Procurement under Superfund remedial cooperative agreements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides guidance on procuring services during remedial-response activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), or Superfund, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The topics covered in the guidance include procurement requirements; procurement of engineering services, including types of services provided; procurement of construction contractors; and subagreement administration.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

117

Remediation and Recovery of Uranium from Contaminated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remediation and Recovery of Uranium from Contaminated Subsurface Environments with Electrodes K E L that Geobacter species can effectively remove uranium from contaminated groundwater by reducing soluble U was stably precipitated until reoxidized in the presence of oxygen. When an electrode was placed in uranium

Lovley, Derek

118

Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

119

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven FOR U.S. Department of Energy March 2009 #12;i OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA..................................................................................................................4 4.0 Building 96 ­ Operational Background

120

Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

122

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science Plateau Remediation Contractor Tank Operations Contractor Analytical Services Contractor Waste Treatment Plant (WTP;HANFORDSMALLBUSINESSCOUNCIL Richland Operations Office Sally A. Sieracki Small Business Program Manager E-mail: sally

123

Disentangling dam impacts in river networks1 Kris Van Looy, Thierry Tormos and Yves Souchon2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

justified guidelines for restoration and remediation of impairments14 requires better understanding integrity; macroinvertebrates; fish; trait metrics.46 47 48 49 50 51 Author-produced version of the article the rehabilitation of river systems and53 water allocation for a sustainable provision of services of freshwater

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

124

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Platte River Cooperative Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platte River Cooperative Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY,...

126

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

127

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

128

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

129

Remediation of a large contaminated reactor cooling reservoir: Resolving and environmental/regulatory paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of a former reactor cooling water reservoir, PAR Pond, located Savannah River Site. PAR Pond, a 2640 acre, man-made reservoir was built in 1958 and until 1988, received cooling water from two DOE nuclear production reactors, P and R. The lake sediments were contaminated with low levels of radiocesium (CS-137) and transuranics in the late 1950s and early 1960s because of leaking fuel elements. Elevated levels of mercury accumulated in the sediments from pumping water from the Savannah River to maintain a full pool. PAR Ponds` stability, size, and nutrient content made a significant, unique, and highly studied ecological resource for fish and wildlife populations until it was partially drained in 1991 due to a depression in the downslope of the earthen dam. The drawdown, created 1340 acres of exposed, radioactively contaminated sediments along 33 miles of shoreline. This led US EPA to declare PAR Pond as a CERCLA operable unit subject to remediation. The drawdown also raised concerns for the populations of aquatic plants, fish, alligators, and endangered species and increased the potential for off-site migration of contaminated wildlife from contact with the exposed sediments. Applicable regulations, such as NEPA and CERCLA, require wetland loss evaluations, human health and ecological risk assessments, and remediation feasibility studies. DOE is committed to spending several million dollars to repair the dam for safety reasons, even though the lake will probably not be used for cooling purposes. At the same time, DOE must make decisions whether to refill and expend additional public funds to maintain a full pool to reduce the risks defined under CERCLA or spend hundreds of millions in remediation costs to reduce the risks of the exposed sediments.

Bowers, J.A.: Gladden, J.B.; Hickey, H.M.; Jones, M.P.; Mackey, H.E.; Mayer, J.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Doswell, A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste Handling Building System houses the system, and provides the facility, safety, and auxiliary systems required to support operations. The system receives power from the Waste Handling Building Electrical System. The system also interfaces with the various DC systems.

N.D. Sudan

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

None available

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Rethinking remediation technologies for desertified landscapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shrub-dominated communities have replaced native grasslands throughout much of the arid Southwest during the past 120 years. Most currently available remediation technologies are uneconomical due to large inputs of energy, fertilizers, herbicides and labor, or are ecologically ineffective due to harsh environments and the highly competitive nature of these native shrubs. Our analysis of these historical remediation technologies together with new information on ecosystem processes has led us to pursue an ecologically-based approach in which more limited inputs are targeted to promote natural processes of regeneration. Advantages to this approach include lower costs, reduced reliance on agronomic practices, and maintenance of natural landscape features. Disadvantages include longer time required for desired changes to occur, and a need for increased understanding of arid land processes.

Herrick, J.E.; Havstad, K.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Coffin, D.P. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Tank waste remediation system mission analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and analyzes the technical requirements that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) must satisfy for the mission. This document further defines the technical requirements that TWRS must satisfy to supply feed to the private contractors` facilities and to store or dispose the immobilized waste following processing in these facilities. This document uses a two phased approach to the analysis to reflect the two-phased nature of the mission.

Acree, C.D.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

Rhia, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

Riha, Brian D.

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

Remedial design through effective electronic associations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black and Veatch Special Projects Corp. (BVSPC) used an environmental data management system (EDMS) to consolidate x-ray fluorescence (XRF), global positioning system (GPS), and laboratory analytical data into a unique and flexible electronic database. Cost savings were acknowledged in all phases of the remedial design due to the development and use of the EDMS and its distinct associations with various electronic software packages. The EDMS allowed effective and efficient completion of the remedial design investigation of the Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site. The Site is a 125-year old mining community in Jasper County, Missouri. Approximately 6,500 residences are now located within the 60 square-mile Superfund Site where lead and zinc were mined. Smelting and mining activities were conducted in several areas throughout the community. These operations left approximately 9 million tons of mine wastes at the Site upon completion of the mining activities. The purpose of the remedial design investigation was to quantify and identify the residential yards that were adversely affected by these activities.

Deis, J.L.; Wankum, R.D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using American  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to remove contaminants and protect the Columbia River. Construction of a pump-and-treat system near the D Reactors on the Hanford Site began in July 2009. The 20 million...

142

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Main Body  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

US DOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

US DOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Salmon Site Remediation Investigation Report, Appendix A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

US DOE /Nevada Operations Office

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

US DOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Evaluation Of Glass Density To Support The Estimation Of Fissile Mass Loadings From Iron Concentrations In SB8 Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy – Savannah River (DOE-SR) has provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of that guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft® Excel® spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) glass based on the iron (Fe) concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that the necessary density information be provided to allow SRR to update the Excel® spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes an upper bound for the density of SB8-based glasses. Thus, these bounding density values are to be used to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel-based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB8. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB8 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample.

Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE Awards Contract for Environmental Remediation Services at...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to CDM, A Joint Venture, of Fairfax, Virginia, to provide environmental remediation services for the Energy Technology Engineering Center at the Santa Susana Field...

155

area remedial investigation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to PD MacMillan, Andrew 104 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

156

act cercla remedial: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to PD MacMillan, Andrew 86 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

157

antimalarial herbal remedies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to PD MacMillan, Andrew 105 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

158

active chemical remediation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to PD MacMillan, Andrew 142 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

159

area including remediation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to PD MacMillan, Andrew 117 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

160

assess remediation performance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

object of this project was to investigate the long time effectiveness of different radon remedial methods. The ten years project started 1991. From start the investigation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

advanced remediation technologies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to PD MacMillan, Andrew 374 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

162

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter establishes remediation standards for land, other than standards for water quality, hazardous conditions, underground storage tanks, and groundwater protection, which are discussed in...

163

Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials with Coatings Technology available for licensing: An autogenic pyrolysis process to convert plastic waste into...

164

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY) WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSE'ITS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

165

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

166

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION BAYSIDE, NEW YORK VW. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

167

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OF ARIZONA (U.S. BUREAU OF MINES) TUCSON, ARIZONA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

168

Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground Storage Tank Branch Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah...

169

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

170

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making. Led by the...

171

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Barriers: Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) hpwgwembrittlementsteelssofronis.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: I2CNER: An...

172

Historical hydronuclear testing: Characterization and remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the most current literature and information available on characterization and remediation technologies that could be used on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) historical hydronuclear test areas. Historical hydronuclear tests use high explosives and a small amount of plutonium. The explosion scatters plutonium within a contained subsurface environment. There is currently a need to characterize these test areas to determine the spatial extent of plutonium in the subsurface and whether geohydrologic processes are transporting the plutonium away from the event site. Three technologies were identified to assist in the characterization of the sites. These technologies are the Pipe Explorer{trademark}, cone penetrometer, and drilling. If the characterization results indicate that remediation is needed, three remediation technologies were identified that should be appropriate, namely: capping or sealing the surface, in situ grouting, and in situ vitrification. Capping the surface would prevent vertical infiltration of water into the soil column, but would not restrict lateral movement of vadose zone water. Both the in situ grouting and vitrification techniques would attempt to immobilize the radioactive contaminants to restrict or prevent leaching of the radioactive contaminants into the groundwater. In situ grouting uses penetrometers or boreholes to inject the soil below the contaminant zone with low permeability grout. In situ vitrification melts the soil containing contaminants into a solid block. This technique would provide a significantly longer contaminant immobilization, but some research and development would be required to re-engineer existing systems for use at deep soil depths. Currently, equipment can only handle shallow depth vitrification. After existing documentation on the historical hydronuclear tests have been reviewed and the sites have been visited, more specific recommendations will be made.

Shaulis, L.; Wilson, G.; Jacobson, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Retrospection of Chernobyl nuclear accident for decision analysis concerning remedial actions in Ukraine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is considered the efficacy of decisions concerning remedial actions when of-site radiological monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases was absent or was not informative. There are examples of such situations in the former Soviet Union where many people have been exposed: releases of radioactive materials from 'Krasnoyarsk-26' into Enisey River, releases of radioactive materials from 'Chelabinsk-65' (the Kishtim accident), nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, the Chernobyl nuclear accident etc. If monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases is absent the decisions concerning remedial actions are usually developed on the base of permanent monitoring. However decisions of this kind may be essentially erroneous. For these cases it is proposed to make retrospection of radiological data of the early and intermediate phases of nuclear accident and to project decisions concerning remedial actions on the base of both retrospective data and permanent monitoring data. In this Report the indicated problem is considered by the example of the Chernobyl accident for Ukraine. Their of-site radiological monitoring in the early and intermediate phases was unsatisfactory. In particular, the pasture-cow-milk monitoring had not been made. All official decisions concerning dose estimations had been made on the base of measurements of {sup 137}Cs in body (40 measurements in 135 days and 55 measurements in 229 days after the Chernobyl accident). For the retrospection of radiological data of the Chernobyl accident dynamic model has been developed. This model has structure similar to the structure of Pathway model and Farmland model. Parameters of the developed model have been identified for agricultural conditions of Russia and Ukraine. By means of this model dynamics of 20 radionuclides in pathways and dynamics of doses have been estimated for the early, intermediate and late phases of the Chernobyl accident. The main results are following: - During the first year after the Chernobyl accident 75-93% of Commitment Effective Dose had been formed; - During the first year after the Chernobyl accident 85-90% of damage from radiation exposure had been formed. During the next 50 years (the late phase of accident) only 10-15% of damage from radiation exposure will have been formed; - Remedial actions (agricultural remedial actions as most effective) in Ukraine are intended for reduction of the damage from consumption of production which is contaminated in the late phase of accident. I.e. agricultural remedial actions have been intended for minimization only 10 % of the total damage from radiation exposure; - Medical countermeasures can minimize radiation exposure damage by an order of magnitude greater than agricultural countermeasures. - Thus, retrospection of nuclear accident has essentially changed type of remedial actions and has given a chance to increase effectiveness of spending by an order of magnitude. This example illustrates that in order to optimize remedial actions it is required to use data of retrospection of nuclear accidents in all cases when monitoring in the early and (or) intermediate phases is unsatisfactory. (author)

Georgievskiy, Vladimir [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Insitute', Kurchatov Sq., 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium.

Yeh, Gour T. [Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (Taiwan); National Central Univ. (Taiwan); Univ. of Central Florida (United States); Gwo, Jin Ping (Jack) [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Rockville, MD (United States); Siegel, Malcolm D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Li, Ming-Hsu [National Central Univ. (Taiwan); ; Fang, Yilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Fan [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Luo, Wensui [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2013-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Portsmouth Remedial Actions Documents | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiativesNationalNuclearRockyServicesFindings andRemedial Actions

176

Proposed ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the US DOE water resources protection strategy for the Green River, Utah mill tailings disposal site. The modifications in the original plan are based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. All aspects are discussed in this report.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

RCRA Information Brief, June 1996: Conditional remedies under RCRA correction action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes conditional remedies under RCRA corrective action. The definition of conditional remedies, criteria that must be met, applications to DOE facilities, applicable clean-up standards, and implementation of conditional remedies are discussed in the document.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Access to Courts and Preemption of State Remedies in Collective Action Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application of preemption doctrine to state judicial remedies. This article applies a “collective action” framework for preemption analysis to the issue of remedial preemption. Our analysis suggests that while remedial preemption may be justified in some...

Glicksman, Robert L.; Levy, Richard E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

Nelson, L. O.

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Canadian River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

182

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop% · Contractor share: 25% · Barriers ­ Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water

183

Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis Submitted of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Environmental Engineering Section May 2011 #12;ii Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis

Hansen, René Rydhof

184

DEMONSTRATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES-INDUCED COMPLEXATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project Team is submitting this Topical Report on the results of its bench-scale demonstration of ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) and in particular the Induced Complexation (ECRTs-IC) process for remediation of mercury contaminated soils at DOE Complex sites. ECRTs is an innovative, in-situ, geophysically based soil remediation technology with over 50 successful commercial site applications involving remediation of over two million metric tons of contaminated soils. ECRTs-IC has been successfully used to remediate 220 cu m of mercury-contaminated sediments in the Union Canal, Scotland. In that operation, ECRTs-IC reduced sediment total mercury levels from an average of 243 mg/kg to 6 mg/kg in 26 days of operation. The clean up objective was to achieve an average total mercury level in the sediment of 20 mg/kg.

Barry L. Burks

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY - NEW APPROACHES FOR IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated pilot-scale active caps composed of apatite, organoclay, biopolymers, and sand for the remediation of metal-contaminated sediments. The active caps were constructed in Steel Creek, at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Monitoring was conducted for 12 months. Effectiveness of the caps was based on an evaluation of contaminant bioavailability, resistance to erosion, and impacts on benthic organisms. Active caps lowered metal bioavailability in the sediment during the one-year test period. Biopolymers reduced sediment suspension during cap construction, increased the pool of carbon, and lowered the release of metals. This field validation showed that active caps can effectively treat contaminants by changing their speciation, and that caps can be constructed to include more than one type of amendment to achieve multiple goals.

Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Roberts, J.

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120­130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. Published 2011. This article known as emerging contaminants (ECs) to surrounding groundwater and surface water. ECs consist

187

Prioritization and accelerated remediation of groundwater contamination in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE), occupies about 1,450 km{sup 2} (560 mi{sup 2}) of the southeastern part of Washington State north of the confluence of the Yakima and Columbia Rivers. The Hanford Site is organized into numerically designated operational areas. The 200 Areas, located near the center of the Hanford Site, encompasses the 200 West, East and North Areas and cover an area of over 40 km{sup 2}. The Hanford Site was originally designed, built, and operated to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons using production reactors and chemical reprocessing plants. Operations in the 200 Areas were mainly related to separation of special nuclear materials from spent nuclear fuel and contain related chemical and fuel processing and waste management facilities. Large quantities of chemical and radioactive waste associated with these processes were often disposed to the environment via infiltration structures such as cribs, ponds, ditches. This has resulted in over 25 chemical and radionuclide groundwater plumes, some of which have reached the Columbia River. An Aggregate Area Management Study program was implemented under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order to assess source and groundwater contamination and develop a prioritized approach for managing groundwater remediation in the 200 Areas. This included a comprehensive evaluation of existing waste disposal and environmental monitoring data and the conduct of limited field investigations (DOE-RL 1992, 1993). This paper summarizes the results of groundwater portion of AAMS program focusing on high priority contaminant plume distributions and the groundwater plume prioritization process. The objectives of the study were to identify groundwater contaminants of concern, develop a conceptual model, refine groundwater contaminant plume maps, and develop a strategy to expedite the remediation of high priority contaminants through the implementation of interim actions.

Wittreich, C.D.; Ford, B.H.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

River Protection Project (RPP) Environmental Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Program Plan was developed in support of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System Plan (ISMS) (RPP-MP-003), which establishes a single, defined environmental, safety, and health management system that integrates requirements into the work planning and execution processes to protect workers, the public, and the environment. The ISMS also provides mechanisms for increasing worker involvement in work planning, including hazard and environmental impact identification, analysis, and control; work execution; and feedback/improvement processes. The ISMS plan consists of six core functions. Each section of this plan describes the activities of the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System) Environmental organization according to the following core functions: Establish Environmental Policy; Define the Scope of Work; Identify Hazards, Environmental Impacts, and Requirements; Analyze Hazards and Environmental Impacts and Implement Controls; Perform Work within Controls; and Provide Feedback and Continuous Improvement.

POWELL, P.A.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action 1993 Roadmap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1993 Roadmap for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project office is a tool to assess and resolve issues. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office uses the nine-step roadmapping process as a basis for Surface and Groundwater Project planning. This is the second year the Roadmap document has been used to identify key issues and assumptions, develop logic diagrams, and outline milestones. This document is a key element of the DOE planning process. A multi-interest group used the nine-step process to focus on issues, root cause analysis and resolutions. This core group updated and incorporated comments on the basic assumptions, then used these assumptions to identify issues. The list of assumptions was categorized into the following areas: institutional, regulatory compliance, project management, human resource requirements, and other site-specific assumptions. The group identified 10 issues in the analysis phase. All of the issues are ranked according to importance. The number one issue from the 1992 Roadmap, ``Lack of sufficient human resources,`` remained the number one issue in 1993. The issues and their ranking are as follows: Lack of sufficient human resources; increasing regulatory requirements; unresolved groundwater issues; extension of UMTRCA through September 30, 1998; lack of post-UMTRA and post-cell closure policies; unpredictable amounts and timing of Federal funding; lack of regulatory compliance agreements; problem with states providing their share of remedial action costs; different interests and priorities among participants; and technology development/transfer. The issues are outlined and analyzed in detail in Section 8.0, with a schedule for resolution of these issues in Section 9.0.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Dover Municipal Well 4, Morris County, Dover, NJ. (First remedial action), September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dover Municipal Well 4 (DMW-4) site is located within the 500-year floodplain of the Rockaway River, in the Town of Dover, Morris County, New Jersey. Surrounding land use is mixed residential and commercial/light industrial. In 1980, sampling and analysis of ground water from DMW-4 identified the presence of VOCs-specifically, chlorinated solvents-above federal and state drinking water standards. Subsequently, DMW-4 was voluntarily removed from service by the Town, and standby Well 3 was activated as a potable water production well. The sources of VOC contamination have been traced to the Howmet Turbine Components Corporation (Dover Casting Division) and the New Jersey Natural Gas Company, both of which are under state administrative consent orders to remediate their individual properties. The ROD addresses remediation of the contaminated ground water in the shallow, intermediate, and deep aquifers at the DMW-4 site, as OU1. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs, including benzene, PCE and TCE, and, metals including lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes onsite pumping and treatment of contaminated ground water from both the intermediate and deep aquifers using air stripping to remove VOCs; discharging the treated water offsite to the public water supply system to be used for potable water, with reinjection of surplus quantities.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comment and response document for the ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) responses to comments from both the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Utah are provided in this document. The Proposed Ground Water Protection Strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah, presents the proposed (modified) ground water protection strategy for the disposal cell at the Green River disposal site for compliance with Subpart A of 40 CFR Part 192. Before the disposal cell was constructed, site characterization was conducted at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to determine an acceptable compliance strategy. Results of the investigation are reported in detail in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a). The NRC and the state of Utah have accepted the final RAP. The changes in this document relate only to a modification of the compliance strategy for ground water protection.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTERACTION OF GROUNDWATER WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 100-D AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater beneath much of Hanford's 100 Areas is contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) as a consequence of treating reactor cooling water to prevent corrosion. Several treatment systems are in place to remove Cr{sup +6} from the groundwater; however, these systems currently do not reduce Cr{sup +6} to concentrations below aquatic standards. Of concern is the transport of Cr{sup +6} to areas within the channel of the river, as sensitive species inhabit the river and its associated transition zone. The aquatic standard for Cr{sup +6} is currently 11 ug/l under the Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Action and Department of Energy (DOE) currently plans to pursue remediation of the groundwater to achieve the 11 ug/l standard. Because the compliance wells used to monitor the current remediation systems are located some distance from the river, they may not provide an accurate indication of Cr{sup +6} concentrations in the water that reaches the riverbed. In addition, because salmon spawning areas are considered a high priority for protection from Hanford contaminants, it would be advantageous to understand (1) to what extent Cr{sup +6} discharged to the near-shore or river ecosystems is diluted or attenuated and (2) mechanisms that could mitigate the exposure of the river ecosystems to the discharging Cr{sup +6}. The current concentration target for Cr{sup +6} at near-river groundwater monitoring locations is 20 {micro}g/L; it is assumed that this groundwater mixes with river water that contains virtually no chromium to meet Washington Department of Ecology's (Ecology) water quality standard of 10 {micro}g/L in the river environment. This dynamic mixing process is believed to be driven by daily and seasonal changes in river stage and groundwater remediation system operations, and has been validated using analytical data from numerous groundwater samples obtained adjacent to and within the banks of the river. Although the mean mixing factor of river water and site groundwater in this zone has been estimated to be equal parts of groundwater and river water, a wide range of mixing ratios likely occurs at various times of the day and year. The degree of mixing and dilution appears to be greatly influenced by the river stage and other groundwater/surface water interaction. The extent of mixing, thus, has implications for the design and operation of the groundwater remediation systems. Improved understanding of this 'dilution' mechanism is needed to design an optimum 'systems approach' to accelerate remediation of the near-shore contaminant plumes. More information on the pathway from near-river mapped plumes to riverbed receptor locations is also needed to develop a defensible proposed plan for a future ROD for final remedial action of contaminated groundwater. In April 2008, an expert panel of scientists was convened to review existing information and provide observations and suggestions to improve the current understanding of groundwater surface water interactions in the 100 Areas (primarily focusing on 100-D Area), and to identify what additional analyses or approaches may provide critical information needed to design and implement remediation systems that will minimize impacts to river aquatic systems. Specific objectives provided to the panel included: (1) comment on approaches and methods to improve the current understanding of groundwater-surface water interactions, specifically how contaminated groundwater enters the riverbed and how this relates to remediation of chromate in the groundwater in the 100 Areas; (2) evaluate past and current data collection methods, data analysis techniques, assumptions, and groundwater transport and mixing mechanisms; (3) evaluate the current monitoring network (monitoring wells, aquifer tubes, and shoreline/river monitoring); (4) evaluate the role played by modeling; and (5) suggest additional research to fill data gaps and perform modeling.

PETERSEN SW

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Environmental remediation of contamination sites at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts currently are under way to remediate the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. Because of the complexity and extent of environmental contamination that has resulted from decades of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal practices, an innovative approach to remediating the site was required. A comprehensive study of waste disposal and environmental monitoring data with field investigations, referred to as the 200 Aggregate Area Management Study (AAMS) program, was conducted in 1992 to assess the scope of the remediation effort and to develop a plan to expedite the cleanup progress.

Wittreich, C.D.; Johnson, W.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costly remediation alternatives is capping of surface impoundments such as lagoons, ponds or old quarries

Aydilek, Ahmet

199

Remedial action selection report Maybell, Colorado, site. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The site is 2.5 mi (4 km) northeast of the Yampa River on relatively flat terrain broken by low, flat-topped mesas. U.S. Highway 40 runs east-west 2 mi (3.2 km) south of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. The site is situated between Johnson Wash to the east and Rob Pit Mine to the west. Numerous reclaimed and unreclaimed mines are in the immediate vicinity. Aerial photographs (included at the end of this executive summary) show evidence of mining activity around the Maybell site. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [ml]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd 3 (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3}(420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}).

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Containment remedies: Minimizing hazard, not just exposure, cuts liabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important consequence of the trend to reduce Superfund cleanup costs has been a definite shift away from treatment to pure containment remedies. The issue that merits more attention, however, is whether reductions in short term costs may be offset by longer term liabilities. Containment remedies that focus entirely on reducing exposures and hence risk are vulnerable to various failures of key components that may not necessarily be prevented by operation and maintenance programs. A sensible alternative is to also include some hazard reduction, especially by in situ technology. By doing so, longer term liabilities associated with various failure modes of containment remedies can be greatly reduced. Corporate accounting systems ignore such liabilities. The insurance industry, large companies, brownfield developers, and the government are currently ignoring liabilities that inevitably will become all too real, because pure containment remedies are not permanently effective.

Hirschhorn, J.S. [Hirschhorn and Associates, Wheaton, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation - 13211  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance. (authors)

Truex, Mike; Oostrom, Mart; Carroll, K.C.; Bunn, Amoret; Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Environmental Remediation Strategic Planning of Fukushima Nuclear Accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmntal Remediation Assessment and other respons decision making on Environmental monitoring, experiments and assessment. Preliminary assessment to grasp the overall picture and determine critical locations, phenomena, people, etc. Using simple methods and models.

Onishi, Yasuo

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

204

Saving a Dwindling River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Remediation of Uranium Impacted Sediments in a Watercourse - 12486  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, remediation was initiated for a non-operational fuel cycle facility previously used for government contract work. Between 2009 and the spring of 2011, remediation efforts were focused on demolition of contaminated buildings and removal of contaminated soil. In the late spring of 2011, the last phase of remediation commenced involving the removal of contaminated sediments from portions of a 1,200 meter long gaining stream. Planning and preparation for remediation of the stream began in 2009 with submittal of permit applications to undertake construction activities in a wetland area. The permitting process was lengthy and involved securing permits from multiple agencies. However, early and frequent communication with stakeholders played an integral role in efficiently obtaining the permit approvals. Frequent communication with stakeholders throughout the planning and remediation process also proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. The remediation of the stream involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation and disposal. Many safeguards were employed to protect several species of concern in the work area, water management during project activities, challenges encountered during the project, methods of Final Status Survey, and stream restoration. The planning and permitting effort for the Site Brook remediation began in May 2009 and permits were approved and in place by February 2011. The remediation and restoration of the Site Brook began in April 2011 and was completed in November 2011. The remediation of the Site Brook involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation, disposal, FSS, and restoration. Early and frequent communications with stakeholders proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. Challenges encountered during the remediation effort were overcome by proper planning and having preparedness procedures in place prior to executing the work. With the remediation and restoration successfully completed, the only remaining task is to monitor/maintain the restoration for 10 years. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H.; Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB, Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Conduct of OperationsMatrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conduct of Operations (CONOPS) matrix incorporates the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) CONOPS matrix (BHI-00746, Rev. 0). The ERDF CONOPS matrix has been expanded to cover all aspects of the RAWD project. All remedial action and waste disposal (RAWD) operations, including waste remediation, transportation, and disposal at the ERDF consist of construction-type activities as opposed to nuclear power plant-like operations. In keeping with this distinction, the graded approach has been applied to the developmentof this matrix.

M. A. Casbon.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

208

The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

Post, Thomas C. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Strom, Dean [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Beulow, Laura [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

210

V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental program to test the full size strip (V5) and extraction (V10) centrifugal contactors and the associated strip and extraction effluent coalescers to determine the hydraulic and mass transfer characteristics with the NGS. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the carryover phases using several analytical methods. Provisions were also made to enable an evaluation of coalescer performance. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined using Cs mass transfer measurements. Using 20 millimolar (mM) extractant (instead of 50 mM), the nominal D(Cs) measured was 16.0-17.5. The data indicate that equilibrium is achieved rapidly and maintained throughout sampling. The data showed good stage efficiency for extraction (Tests 1A-1D), ranging from 98.2% for Test 1A to 90.5% for Test 1D. No statistically-significant differences were noted for operations at 12 gpm aqueous flow when compared with either 4 gpm or 8 gpm of aqueous flow. The stage efficiencies equal or exceed those previously measured using the baseline CSSX solvent system. The nominal target for scrub Cs distribution values are {approx}1.0-2.5. The first scrub test yielded an average scrub value of 1.21 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 0.78. Both values are considered acceptable. Stage efficiency was not calculated for the scrub tests. For stripping behavior, six tests were completed in a manner to represent the first strip stage. For three tests at the baseline flow ratios (O:A of 3.75:1) but at different total flow rates, the D(Cs) values were all similar at {approx}0.052. Similar behavior was observed for two tests performed at an O:A ratio of 7:1 instead of 3.75:1. The data for the baseline strip tests exhibited acceptable stage efficiency, ranging from 82.0% for low flow to 89-90% for medium and high flow. The difference in efficiency may be attributable to the low volume in the contactor housing at lower flow rates. The concentrations of Isopar L{reg_sign} and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA

Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

213

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department ofThe U.S. Department

214

Audit of Groundwater Remediation Plans at Savannah River, ER-B-96-02  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3--Logistical5/08 Attendance List1-02Evaluation Report TheU.S. DEPARTMENT AUDIT

215

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data for the inactive uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meterological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs of the remedial actions.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Initial Site-wide Groundwater remediation Strategy of the Hanford Site, WA: Its Application, Lessons Learned and Future Path forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed an agreement to clean up the Hanford Site, located in the state of Washington. By 1995, the three parties developed an initial comprehensive site wide groundwater remediation strategy with a vision to address contaminated plumes of hazardous and radioactive waste. The Hanford Site has more than 170 square miles of contaminated groundwater. Almost half exceeds the state and federal drinking water standards. The plumes are often commingled. The remediation is challenged by limited technologies, poor understanding of conceptual models, and subsurface contaminant behavior. This paper briefly describes the basic principles of the initial strategy, its application, the results of the decade-long operation, and the future path forward. The initial strategy was based on a qualitative assessment to reduce immediate risk to human health and the environment; to support commonly held values of stakeholders, including tribal nations and the public; and to deploy available remediation technologies. Two different approaches were used for two distinct geographic, the river shore reactor areas and the central plateau few miles away. The strategy was to cleanup the major groundwater plumes in the reactor areas next to the Columbia River where chromium, strontium-90, and uranium already entering the river and to contain the plumes of chlorinated solvents and radionuclides in the central plateau. The strategy acknowledges the lack of cost-effective technologies to address the contaminants, and asked DOE to develop, test, and deploy cost-effective alternative technologies wherever applicable. After more than a decade, the results are mixed. While the pump and treat provided a meaningful approach to address certain contaminants, it was too small in scale. Efforts to scale up these operations enhance characterization, and to deployment innovative technologies are progressing; albeit slowly due to budget constraints. A number of innovative technologies were identified to address source control and groundwater remediation across the Hanford Site. In the 10 years since the initial strategy was developed, additional severe groundwater and vadose zone contaminations were discovered under the waste storage tanks on the central plateau and river corridor areas. These problems required changes to the strategy. Changes include complete integration of vadose zone and groundwater characterization and remediation activities and immediate needs for technologies to address the deep vadose zone source areas, as well as thick aquifer contamination - especially for chlorinated solvents and technetium-99. The successes of the initial strategy show that even a strategy based on incomplete information can make progress on difficult issues. The regulatory agencies identified these issues early and provided the needed direction to DOE to move forward with the overall mission of clean up. The cleanup of the Hanford site is a big challenge, not only for DOE, but also for the regulators, to ensure the tri-party agencies achieve the desired goals. (authors)

Goswami, D.; Hedges, J.; Whalen, C. [Nuclear Waste Program, Washington State Department of Ecology, WA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Remediation of contaminated soils and sediments using Daramend bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils and sediments containing polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, chlorinated phenols, pesticides, herbicides and phthalates, either individually or in combination, have been difficult to remediate in the past. Not only the species of contaminant, but contaminant concentrations were roadblocks to successful use of bioremediation. Daramend{sup Tm} remediation has removed many of these obstacles through extensive research. Bench-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations have been conducted at a variety of industrial sites. At a manufactured gas site, 295 days of Daramend remediation reduced concentrations of chrysene and fluoranthene from 38.9 mg/kg to 5.9 mg/kg and 84.6 mg/kg to 7.8 mg/kg respectively. Elsewhere, the total PAH concentration in a silty soil was reduced from 1,442 mg/kg to 36 mg/kg. Concentrations of even the most refractory PAHs (e.g. pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene) were reduced to below the established clean-up guidelines. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) have also been reduced from 8,700 mg/kg to 34 mg/kg after 182 days of treatment. Similarly, in a clay soil contaminated by crude oil processing, the concentrations of high molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons were rapidly reduced (138 days) to below the remediation criteria. Demonstrations with wood treatment site soils have proven Daramend remediation effective in enhancing the target compound degradation rates. Soils containing 2170 mg PCP/kg were shown to contain only 11 mg PCP/kg after 280 days of Darmend remediation. The issue of toxicity of soil containing increased amounts of pentachlorophenols was solved. Performance data collected during these projects indicate that Daramend remediation provides a cost effective method for clean-up of soils and sediments containing a variety of organic compounds.

Burwell, S.W.; Bucens, P.G.; Seech, A.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remediation, and Carbon Sequestration References Anderson,Remediation, and Carbon Sequestration rhizosphere byRemediation, and Carbon Sequestration Figure 1. Examples of

Bernard, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, “Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,” submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate-scale tests will be used to bridge the gap between the small-scale foam transport studies and the field-scale demonstration. Numerical simulation studies on foam delivery under vadose conditions will be performed to simulate observed foam transport behavior under vadose zone conditions and predict the foam delivery performance at field-scale.

Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health problem threatening the lives of over 140 million people worldwide. In Bangladesh alone, up to 57 million people drink arsenic-laden water from shallow wells. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation(ECAR) overcomes many of the obstacles that plague current technologies and can be used affordably and on a small-scale, allowing for rapid dissemination into Bangladesh to address this arsenic crisis. In this work, ECAR was shown to effectively reduce 550 - 580 mu g=L arsenic (including both As[III]and As[V]in a 1:1 ratio) to below the WHO recommended maximum limit of 10 mu g=L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater containing relevant concentrations of competitive ions such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Arsenic removal capacity was found to be approximately constant within certain ranges of current density, but was found to change substantially between ranges. In order of decreasing arsenic removal capacity, the pattern was: 0.02 mA=cm2> 0.07 mA=cm2> 0.30 - 1.1 mA=cm2> 5.0 - 100 mA=cm2. Current processing time was found to effect arsenic removal capacity independent of either charge density or current density. Electrode polarization studies showed no passivation of the electrode in the tested range (up to current density 10 mA=cm2) and ruled out oxygen evolution as the cause of decreasing removal capacity with current density. Simple settling and decantation required approximately 3 days to achieve arsenic removal comparable to filtration with a 0.1 mu m membrane. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) showed that (1) there is no significant difference in the arsenic removal mechanism of ECAR during operation at different current densities and (2) the arsenic removal mechanism in ECAR is consistent with arsenate adsorption onto a homogenous Fe(III)oxyhydroxide similar in structure to 2-line ferrihydrite. ECAR effectively reduced high arsenic concentrations (100 - 500 mu g=L) in real Bangladesh tube well water collected from three regions to below the WHO limit of 10 mu g=L. Prototype fabrication and field testing are currently underway.

Addy, Susan Amrose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Application of a World Wide Web technology to environmental remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo District, is responsible for overseeing the remediation of several sites within its jurisdiction. FUSRAP sites are largely privately held facilities that were contaminated by activities associated with the nuclear weapons program in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. The presence of soils and structures contaminated with low levels of radionuclides is a common problem at these sites. Typically, contaminated materials must be disposed of off-site at considerable expense (up to several hundred dollars per cubic yard of waste material). FUSRAP is on an aggressive schedule, with most sites scheduled for close-out in the next couple of years. Among the multitude of tasks involved in a typical remediation project is the need to inform and coordinate with active stakeholder communities, including local, state, and federal regulators.

Johnson, R.; Durham, L. A.

2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

PORFLOW MODELING FOR A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF NEW SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT DESIGNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRNL has analyzed the expected performance obtained from using seven 32 million gallon Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs) in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) to store future saltstone grout. The analysis was based on preliminary SDU final design specifications. The analysis used PORFLOW modeling to calculate the release of 20 radionuclides from an SDU and transport of the radionuclides and daughters through the vadose zone. Results from this vadose zone analysis were combined with previously calculated releases from existing saltstone vaults and FDCs and a second PORFLOW model run to calculate aquifer transport to assessment points located along a boundary 100 m from the nearest edge of the SDF sources. Peak concentrations within 12 sectors spaced along the 100 m boundary were determined over a period of evaluation extending 20,000 years after SDF closure cap placement. These peak concentrations were provided to SRR to use as input for dose calculations.

Smith, F.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tank SY-102 remediation project summary report: ASPEN modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. As a part of this program, personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flow sheet to remediate tank SY-102, which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. In the conceptual design report issued earlier, an ASPEN plus{trademark} computer model of the flow sheet was presented. This report documents improvements in the flow sheet model after additional thermodynamic data for the actinide species were incorporated.

Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Yarbro, S.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Effects of Behaviorist and Constructivist Instruction on Student Performance in College-level Remedial Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for quality remedial mathematics classes is also growing. Institutions that place learners into remedial classes must also fund these same programs and are increasingly faced with disgruntled students, the appearance of having lower standards, and a...

Cox, Murray William

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

Recommendation 170: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ORSSAB Recommendation to DOE on a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park.

229

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

230

Shiprock case study 1986 annual DOE Remedial Action Programs meeting, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains primarily reproductions of slides presented at the 1986 Annual Doe Remedial Action Programs Meeting, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Themelis, J.; Baker, K.; Meyer, R.; Thiers, J.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex, Shoshone County, ID. (First remedial action), August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex site is a 21 square-mile area centered around an inactive industrial mining and smelting site, and includes the cities of Kellogg, Smelterville, Wardner, Pinehurst, and Page, in Shoshone County, Idaho. The inactive industrial complex includes the Bunker Hill mine and mill, a lead smelter, a zinc smelter and a phosphoric acid fertilizer plant, all totalling several hundred acres. Initially, most of the solid and liquid residue from the complex was discharged into the river. When the river flooded, these materials were deposited onto the valley floor, and have leached into onsite soil and ground water. The selected remedial action for the site includes soil sampling; excavating contaminated soil and sod exceeding 1,000 mg/kg lead on approximately 1,800 residential properties, and replacing it with clean soil and sod; disposing of the contaminated soil and sod at an onsite repository; and capping the repository.

Not Available

1991-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Microsoft Word - SRR-CWDA-2011-00118_R0  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 -3 Subject: TankINL1 3. EFFECTIVE8 Revision 0

233

Microsoft Word - SRR-CWDA-2011-00119_Rev 0  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 -3 Subject: TankINL1 3. EFFECTIVE8 Revision 09

234

Microsoft Word - SRR-CWDA-2011-00120_R0  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 -3 Subject: TankINL1 3. EFFECTIVE8 Revision 0920

235

Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Reconnaissance soil geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont County.....................................................................................................................................................link Figures Figure 1. Location of 19 soil samples collected from the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial

Fleskes, Joe

236

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Managing site remediation using pathway analysis, application to a semi-arid site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of pathway analysis methodology to evaluate alternatives associated with remediation of a semi-arid site. Significant aspects of remediation include potential land uses, soil cleaning techniques and restoration alternatives. Important environmental transport pathways and dominant radionuclides are identified using pathway analysis. The remediation strategy is optimized based on results of the analysis.

Rutz, E.E.; Ijaz, T.; Wood, R.P.; Eckart, R.E. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash M. Melih for retardation of petroleum contaminants in barrier applications. Sorbed amounts measured in batch scale tests on remediation efficiency. INTRODUCTION Remediation of groundwater contaminated with petroleum-based products has

Aydilek, Ahmet

239

FY-95 technology catalog. Technology development for buried waste remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program, which is now part of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA), supports applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies dealing with underground radioactive and hazardous waste remediation. These innovative technologies are being developed as part of integrated comprehensive remediation systems for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste sites throughout the DOE complex. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and Waste Management (EM-30) needs and objectives. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50), BWID and LSFA work with universities and private industry to develop technologies that are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. This report contains the details of the purpose, logic, and methodology used to develop and demonstrate DOE buried waste remediation technologies. It also provides a catalog of technologies and capabilities with development status for potential users. Past FY-92 through FY-94 technology testing, field trials, and demonstrations are summarized. Continuing and new FY-95 technology demonstrations also are described.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as follows. Over a period of several weeks, electrical energy is introduced to the contaminated soil usingChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei Lapin and Rex Westbrook 1.1 Background Recently, a method for removing contaminants from soil (several

Lapin, Sergey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ method for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal.

Peters, Robert W. (Naperville, IL); Frank, James R. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Feng, Xiandong (West Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Biogeochemical Considerations Related To The Remediation Of I-129 Plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report were to: provide a current state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport at the Hanford Site; conduct a review of Hanford Site data dealing with groundwater {sup 129}I; and identify critical knowledge gaps necessary for successful selection, implementation, and technical defensibility in support of remediation decisions.

Kaplan, D. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Yeager, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory , Los Alamos, NM (United States); Denham, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Zhang, S. [Texas A& amp; M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Xu, C. [Texas A& amp; M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Schwehr, K. A. [Texas A& amp; M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Li, H. P. [Texas A& amp; M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Brinkmeyer, R. [Texas A& amp; M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Santschi, P. H. [Texas A& amp; M University, Galveston, TX (United States)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

244

Adapting Advances in Remediation Science to Long-Term Surveillance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several facets of groundwater remediation stand to gain from the advances made during recent years in disciplines that contribute to remediation science. Engineered remedies designed to aggressively remove subsurface contamination should benefit from this progress, and more passive cleanup methods and the long-term monitoring of such passive approaches may benefit equally well if not more. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) has adopted a strategic plan that is designed to take advantage of technological improvements in the monitoring and assessment of both active and passive groundwater remedies. Flexible adaptation of new technologies, as they become available, to long-term surveillance at LM sites is expected to reduce site stewardship costs while ensuring the future protection of human health and the environment. Some of the technologies are expected to come from government initiatives that focus on the needs of subsurface monitoring. Additional progress in monitoring science will likely result from continual improvements in our understanding of contaminant fate-and-transport processes in the groundwater and the vadose zone.

Peterson, Dave [S.M. Stoller Corporation

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

National conference on environmental remediation science and technology: Abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was held September 8--10, 1998 in Greensboro, North Carolina. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on methods and site characterization technologies for environmental monitoring and remedial action planning of hazardous materials. This report contains the abstracts of sixty-one papers presented at the conference.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Remedial action work plan for the Colonie site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colonie site is a DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site located in the Town of Colonie, New York, and consisting of an interim storage site and several vicinity properties. The Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) is the former National Lead (NL) Industries plant located at 1130 Central Avenue. There are 11 vicinity properties that received remedial action in 1984: 7 located south of the site on Yardboro and Palmer Avenues just across the Colonie-Albany town limits in Albany, and 4 located northwest of the site along Central Avenue in Colonie. Of these properties, nine are residences and two are commercial properties. This document describes the engineering design, construction, and associated plans for remedial action on the vicinity properties and the interim storage site. These plans include both radiological and chemical work. Radiological work includes: excavating the above-guideline radioactive wastes on the vicinity properties; designing required facilities for the interim storage site; preparing the interim storage site to receive these contaminated materials; transporting the contaminated materials to the interim waste storage stockpile; and preparing necessary schedules for accomplishing the remedial actions. Chemical work involves: developing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure plans; neutralizing chemical hazards associated with plating solutions; inventorying on-site chemicals; and disposal of chemicals and/or residues. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE SITE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE SITE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY May 15, 2007 · The Colorado School of Mines Research Institute Site (the "Site) has been undergoing additional investigation 400 cubic yards of the dredged material had been buried in the "Clay Pits" area south of the Colorado

249

In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by poor levels of sanitation and inadequate water and wastewater management. Pressure from urban areas12 In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement: An Opportunity, the implementation of sanitation infrastructure is also necessary. With the increase of the negative environmental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

250

IMPROVED NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research conducted during Budget Period One on the project ''Improved Natural Gas Storage Well Remediation''. The project team consisted of Furness-Newburge, Inc., the technology developer; TechSavants, Inc., the technology validator; and Nicor Technologies, Inc., the technology user. The overall objectives for the project were: (1) To develop, fabricate and test prototype laboratory devices using sonication and underwater plasma to remove scale from natural gas storage well piping and perforations; (2) To modify the laboratory devices into units capable of being used downhole; (3) To test the capability of the downhole units to remove scale in an observation well at a natural gas storage field; (4) To modify (if necessary) and field harden the units and then test the units in two pressurized injection/withdrawal gas storage wells; and (5) To prepare the project's final report. This report covers activities addressing objectives 1-3. Prototype laboratory units were developed, fabricated, and tested. Laboratory testing of the sonication technology indicated that low-frequency sonication was more effective than high-frequency (ultrasonication) at removing scale and rust from pipe sections and tubing. Use of a finned horn instead of a smooth horn improves energy dispersal and increases the efficiency of removal. The chemical data confirmed that rust and scale were removed from the pipe. The sonication technology showed significant potential and technical maturity to warrant a field test. The underwater plasma technology showed a potential for more effective scale and rust removal than the sonication technology. Chemical data from these tests also confirmed the removal of rust and scale from pipe sections and tubing. Focusing of the underwater plasma's energy field through the design and fabrication of a parabolic shield will increase the technology's efficiency. Power delivered to the underwater plasma unit by a sparkplug repeatedly was interrupted by sparkplug failure. The lifecycle for the plugs was less than 10 hours. An electrode feed system for delivering continuous power needs to be designed and developed. As a result, further work on the underwater plasma technology was terminated. It needs development of a new sparking system and a redesign of the pulsed power supply system to enable the unit to operate within a well diameter of less than three inches. Both of these needs were beyond the scope of the project. Meanwhile, the laboratory sonication unit was waterproofed and hardened, enabling the unit to be used as a field prototype, operating at temperatures to 350 F and depths of 15,000 feet. The field prototype was extensively tested at a field service company's test facility before taking it to the field site. The field test was run in August 2001 in a Nicor Gas storage field observation well at Pontiac, Illinois. Segmented bond logs, gamma ray neutron logs, water level measurements and water chemistry samples were obtained before and after the downhole demonstration. Fifteen tests were completed in the field. Results from the water chemistry analysis showed an increase in the range of calcium from 1755-1984 mg/l before testing to 3400-4028 mg/l after testing. For magnesium, the range increased from 285-296 mg/l to 461-480 mg/l. The change in pH from a range of 3.11-3.25 to 8.23-8.45 indicated a buffering of the acidic well water, probably due to the increased calcium available for buffering. The segmented bond logs showed no damage to the cement bond in the well and the gamma ray neutron log showed no increase in the amount of hydrocarbons present in the formation where the testing took place. Thus, the gas storage bubble in the aquifer was not compromised. A review of all the field test data collected documents the fact that the application of low-frequency sonication technology definitely removes scale from well pipe. Phase One of this project took sonication technology from the concept stage through a successful ''proof-of-concept'' downhole application in a natural gas storage field

James C. Furness; Donald O. Johnson; Michael L. Wilkey; Lynn Furness; Keith Vanderlee; P. David Paulsen

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase IV Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of areas with the potential for UXO at the Idaho National Laboratory. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. Five areas within the Naval Proving Ground that are known to contain UXO include the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, the Mass Detonation Area, the Experimental Field Station, The Rail Car Explosion Area, and the Land Mine Fuze Burn Area. The Phase IV remedial action will be concentrated in these five areas. For other areas, such as the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range, ordnance has largely consisted of sand-filled practice bombs that do not pose an explosion risk. Ordnance encountered in these areas will be addressed under the Phase I Operations and Maintenance Plan that allows for the recovery and disposal of ordnance that poses an imminent risk to human health or the environment.

R. P. Wells

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Moses, John M. (Dedham, MA); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

255

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

256

P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and Stream Restoration Pierre Y. Julien Hong Kong - December 2004 River Engineering and Stream Restoration I - Stream Restoration Objectives Brief overview of River Engineering and Stream Restoration with focus on : 1. River Equilibrium; 2. River Dynamics; 3. River

Julien, Pierre Y.

257

Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DOE-EMSP Final Report: Characterization of Changes in Colloid and DNAPL Affecting Surface Chemistry and Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste disposal to the M-area basin and A-14 outfall at the Savannah River Department of Energy facility in Aiken SC (USA) included a wide variety of inorganic aqueous flows and organic solvents in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The DNAPL has migrated through the subsurface resulting in widespread groundwater contamination. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify processes that could have affected the migration and remediation of the DNAPL in the subsurface. It was hypothesized that the variety of waste disposed at this site could have altered the mineral, microbial and DNAPL properties at this site relative to other DNAPL sites. The DNAPL was determined to have a very low interfacial tension and is suspected to be distributed in fine grained media, thereby reducing the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation efforts. Although the DNAPL is primarily comprised of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethane, it also contains organic acids and several heavy metals. Experimental results suggest that iron from the aqueous and DNAPL phases undergoes precipitation and dechlorination reactions at the DNAPL-water interface, contributing to the low interfacial tension and acidity of the DNAPL. Biological activity in the contaminated region can also contribute to the low interfacial tension. PCE degrading bacteria produce biosurfactants and adhere to the DNAPL-water interface when stressed by high tetrachloroethene or low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The presence of iron can reduce the interfacial tension by nearly an order of magnitude, while the PCE degraders reduced the interfacial tension by nearly 50%. Abiotic changes in the mineral characteristics were not found to be substantially different between contaminated and background samples. The research completed here begins to shed some insight into the complexities of DNAPL fate and migration at sites where co-disposal of many different waste products occurred. Quantifying the low interfacial tension of the SRS DNAPL helps to formulate a new conceptual picture of the subsurface DNAPL migration and provides an explanation of the limited effectiveness of remediation efforts. Alternative designs for remediation that are more effective for sites with DNAPL in fine grained media are required.

Susan E. Powers; Stefan J. Grimberg; Miles Denham

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

US Army Corps of Engineers

260

Improving Remedial Planning Performance: The Rattlesnake Creek Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo District, has responsibility for characterizing and remediating radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Most of these FUSRAP sites include radionuclide contamination in soils where excavation and offsite disposal is the selected remedial action. For many FUSRAP soil remediation projects completed to date, the excavated contaminated soil volumes have significantly exceeded the pre-excavation volume estimates that were developed for project planning purposes. The exceedances are often attributed to limited and sparse datasets that are used to calculate the initial volume estimates. These volume exceedances complicate project budgeting and planning. Building on these experiences, the USACE took a different approach in the remediation of Rattlesnake Creek, located adjacent to the Ashland 2 site, in Tonawanda, New York. This approach included a more extensive pre-design data collection effort to improve and reduce the uncertainty in the pre-excavation volume estimates, in addition to formalizing final status survey data collection strategies prior to excavation. The final status survey sampling was fully integrated with the pre-design data collection, allowing dual use of the pre-design data that was collected (i.e., using the data to close out areas where contamination was not found, and feeding the data into volume estimates when contamination was encountered). The use of real-time measurement techniques (e.g., X-ray fluorescence [XRF] and gamma walkover surveys) during pre-excavation data collection allowed the USACE to identify and respond to unexpected contamination by allocating additional data collection to characterizing new areas of concern. The final result was an estimated soil volume and excavation footprint with a firm technical foundation and a reduction in uncertainty. However, even with extensive pre-design data collection, additional contamination was found during the excavation that led to an increase in the soil volume requiring offsite disposal. This paper describes the lessons learned regarding improving remedial planning performance from the Rattlesnake Creek experience and evaluates the level of project uncertainty reduction achieved through pre-design data collection. (authors)

Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L.; Andrews, S.M. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Durham, L. A.; Johnson, R. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., EVS 900, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Racino, R. R. [Cabrera Services, Inc., 29 Railroad Avenue, Middletown, NY 10940 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate • 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and • their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: • TODAM and FLESCOT’s theories and mathematical formulations • TODAM and FLESCOT model structures • Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications • Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. • Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including • PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities • Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics • Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment • EMSL tour • Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

Onishi, Yasuo

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Rainfall-River Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2Rainfall-River Forecasting Joint Summit II NOAA Integrated Water Forecasting Program · Minimize losses due management and enhance America's coastal assets · Expand information for managing America's Water Resources, Precipitation and Water Quality Observations · USACE Reservoir Operation Information, Streamflow, Snowpack

US Army Corps of Engineers

263

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

The South Wilmington Area remedial cost estimating methodology (RCEM) -- A planning tool and reality check for brownfield development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The South Wilmington Area (SWA), which is comprised of 200 acres of multi-use urban lowlands adjacent to the Christina River, is a brownfields area that has been targeted for redevelopment/restoration as part of a major waterfront revitalization project for the City of Wilmington, Delaware. The vision for this riverfront development, which is being promoted by a state-funded development corporation, includes plans for a new harbor, convention and entertainment facilities, upscale residences, an urban wildlife refuge, and the restoration of the Christina River. However, the environmental quality of the SWA has been seriously impacted by an assortment of historic and current heavy industrial land-uses since the late 1800`s, and extensive environmental cleanup of this area will be required as part of any redevelopment plan. Given that the environmental cleanup cost will be a major factor in determining the overall economic feasibility of brownfield development in the SWA, a reliable means of estimating potential preliminary remedial costs, without the expense of costly investigative and engineering studies, was needed to assist with this redevelopment initiative. The primary chemicals-of-concern (COCs) area-wide are lead and petroleum compounds, however, there are hot-spot occurrences of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, and other heavy metals such as arsenic and mercury.

Yancheski, T.B. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Christiana, DE (United States); Swanson, J.E. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

none,

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program annual progress report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Programs (HAZWRAP), a unit of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., supports the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office in broadly environmental areas, especially those relating to waste management and environmental restoration. HAZWRAP comprises six program areas, which are supported by central administrative and technical organizations. Existing programs deal with airborne hazardous substances, pollution prevention, remedial actions planning, environmental restoration, technology development, and information and data systems. HAZWRAP's mission to develop, promote, and apply-cost-effective hazardous waste management and environmental technologies to help solve national problems and concerns. HAZWRAP seeks to serve as integrator for hazardous waste and materials management across the federal government. It applies the unique combination of research and development (R D) capabilities, technologies, management expertise, and facilities in the Energy Systems complex to address problems of national importance. 24 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ? Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ? Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ? Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ? Mathematical models can be used to help us understand the chemistry and processes.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Chattopadhyay, Sandip, E-mail: Sandip.Chattopadhyay@tetratech.com [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

DOE/NV

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Savannah River Site Footprint Reduction Results under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - 13302  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, managed and operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. Construction of SRS began in the early 1950's to enhance the nation's nuclear weapons capability. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950's, eventually utilizing five production reactors constructed to support the national defense mission. Past operations have resulted in releases of hazardous constituents and substances to soil and groundwater, resulting in 515 waste sites with contamination exceeding regulatory thresholds. More than 1,000 facilities were constructed onsite with approximately 300 of them considered radiological, nuclear or industrial in nature. In 2003, SRS entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with its regulators to accelerate the cleanup using an Area Completion strategy. The strategy was designed to focus cleanup efforts on the 14 large industrial areas of the site to realize efficiencies of scale in the characterization, assessment, and remediation activities. This strategy focuses on addressing the contaminated surface units and the vadose zone and addressing groundwater plumes subsequently. This approach streamlines characterization and remediation efforts as well as the required regulatory documentation, while enhancing the ability to make large-scale cleanup decisions. In February 2009, Congress approved the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) to create jobs and promote economic recovery. At SRS, ARRA funding was established in part to accelerate the completion of environmental remediation and facility deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). By late 2012, SRS achieved 85 percent footprint reduction utilizing ARRA funding by accelerating and coupling waste unit remediation with D and D of remnant facilities. Facility D and D activities were sequenced and permitted with waste unit remediation activities to streamline regulatory approval and execution. Achieving footprint reduction fulfills the Government's responsibility to address legacy contamination; allows earlier completion of legally enforceable compliance agreement milestones; and enables future potential reuse of DOE resources, including land and infrastructure for other missions. Over the last 3.5 years significant achievements were met that contributed to footprint reduction, including the closure of 41 waste units (including 20 miles of radiologically contaminated stream) and decommissioning of 30 facilities (including the precedent setting in situ closure of two former production reactors, the first in the DOE Complex). Other notable achievements included the removal of over 39,750 cubic meters of debris and 68,810 cubic meters of contaminated soils, including 9175 cubic meters of lead-contaminated soil from a former site small arms testing range and treatment of 1,262 cubic meters of tritium-laden soils and concrete using a thermal treatment system. (authors)

Flora, Mary [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Angelia [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Pope, Robert [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action fiscal year 1992 roadmap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is funded and managed as two separate projects: Surface remediation (UMTRA-S) and Groundwater compliance (UMTRA-G). Surface remediation is a Major System Acquisition and has been completed at 10 sites, 7 sites are under construction, and 7 sites are in the planning stage. The planning stages of the UMTRA-G Project, a major project, began in April 1991. A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) has been started. Site characterization work and baseline risk assessment will begin FY 1993. Thus, the UMTRA-S Project is a mature and ongoing program with the roles of various organizations well defined, while the UMTRA-G Project is still being formulated and the interfaces between the DOE, states and tribes, and the EPA are being established. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) directed that all projects under its authority develop roadmaps for their activities. The UMTRA Project Roadmap was developed by the UMTRA Project Office with input from the TAC, RAC, the GJPO, and assistance from SAIC. A single roadmap has been prepared for both the UMTRA-S and UMTRA-G Projects. This was deemed appropriate due to the close relationship between the projects and to the fact that the same Government and contractor personnel are preparing the roadmaps. Roadmap development is a planning process that focuses on issue identification, root-cause analysis, and issues resolution. The methodology is divided into three phases: assessment, analysis, and issues resolution.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The UMTRA PEIS: A strategy for groundwater remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) was initiated in 1992 for the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) program. The PEIS kicked off the groundwater restoration phase of UMTRA, a project involving remediation of 24 sites in ten states and tribal lands contaminated with tailings from uranium mining and milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed, in early 1992, that a PEIS was an appropriate strategy to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for this second, groundwater phase of the project. This decision recognized that although a parallel effort was being undertaken in preparing a PEIS for DOE's Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) program, characteristics and the maturity of the UMTRA project made it more appropriate to prepare a separate PEIS. The ER/WM PEIS is intended to examine environmental restoration and waste management issues from a very broad perspective. For UMTRA, with surface remediation completed or well under way at 18 of the 24 sites, a more focused programmatic approach for groundwater restoration is more effective than including the UMTRA project within the ER/WM environmental impact statements. A separate document allows a more focused and detailed analysis necessary to efficiently tier site-specific environmental assessments for groundwater restoration at each of the 24 UMTRA former processing sites.

Burt, C.; Ulland, L.; Weston, R.F.; Metzler, D. (DOE, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

UMTRA -- The US Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1970s, the United States (US) established the first comprehensive regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of wastes produced from its domestic uranium processing industry. This regulatory framework was established through the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, often referred to as UMTRCA. This legislation created the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project and assigned the US Department of Energy (DOE) the lead in conducting the required remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium ore processing sites. With the majority of these 22 sites complete, the DOE`s UMTRA Project has established a distinguished reputation for safely and effectively remediating these low-level waste sites in a complex regulatory and socioeconomic environment. This paper describes the past accomplishments and current status of the UMTRA Project and discusses the DOE`s plans for addressing ground water contamination associated with these sites and its commitment to continuing the long-term care and management of these disposal cells.

Lightner, R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Cormier, C. [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bierley, D. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project site management manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this manual is to summarize the organizational interfaces and the technical approach used to manage the planning, design development, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance, engineering, and remedial action required to stabilize and control the designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. This manual describes the Project's objective, participants' roles and responsibilities, technical approach for accomplishing the objective, and planning and managerial controls to be used in performing the site work. The narrative follows the flow of activities depicted in Figure 1.1, which provides the typical sequence of key Project activities. A list of acronyms used is presented at the end of the manual. The comparable manual for UMTRA Project vicinity properties is the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual'' (VPMIM) (UMTRA-DOE/AL-050601). Together, the two manuals cover the remedial action activities associated with UMTRA Project sites. The UMTRA Project's objective is to stabilize and control the uranium mill tailings, vicinity property materials, and other residual radioactive materials at the designated sites (Figure 1.2) in a safe and environmentally sound manner in order to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. 26 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Environmental restoration and remediation technical data management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tasks performed in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan for each Hanford Site operable unit must meet the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et. al 1992). An extensive amount of data will be generated in the evaluation and remediation of hazardous waste sites at the Site. The data must be of sufficient quality, as they will be used to evaluate the need, select the method(s), and support the full remediation of the waste sites as stipulated in the Tri-Party Agreement. In particular, a data management plan (DMP) is to be included in an RI/FS work plan for managing the technical data obtained during the characterization of an operable unit, as well as other data related to the study of the operable unit. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) sites are involved in the operable unit. Thus, the data management activities for the operable unit should be applied consistently to RCRA sites in the operable unit as well. This DMP provides common direction for managing-the environmental technical data of all defined operable units at the Hanford Site during the RI/FS activities. Details specific to an operable unit will be included in the actual work plan of that operable unit.

Key, K.T.; Fox, R.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Remediation cleanup options for the Hoe Creek UCG site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy must restore groundwater quality at the Hoe Creek, Wyoming, underground coal gasification site using the best proven practicable technology. Six alternative remediation methods are evaluated in this project: (1) excavation, (2) three variations of groundwater plume containment, (3) in situ vacuum extraction, (4) pump and treat using a defined pattern of pumping wells to obtain an effective matrix sweep, (5) in situ flushing using a surfactant, and (6) in situ bioremediation. Available site characterization data is insufficient to accurately project the cost of remediation. Several alternative hypothetical examples and associated costs are described in the text and in the appendices. However, not enough information is available to use these examples as a basis for comparison purposes. Before a cleanup method is selected, core borings should be taken to define the areal extent and depth of contaminated matrix material. Segments of these core borings should be analyzed for organic contaminants in the soil (e.g., benzene) and their relationship to the groundwater contamination. These analyses and subsequent treatability studies will show whether or not the contaminants can be effectively removed by surface on in situ volatilization, leached from the matrix using washing solutions, or removed by bioremediation. After this information is obtained, each technology should be evaluated with respect to cost and probability of success. A decision tree for implementing remediation cleanup at the Hoe Creek site is presented in this report. 26 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Nordin, J.; Griffin, W.; Chatwin, T.; Lindblom, S.; Crader, S.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Formerly Used Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) W. R. Grace Building 23 Remedial Action-Challenges and Successes - 12247  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monazite sand processing was conducted at the W. R. Grace Curtis Bay Facility (Baltimore, Maryland) from mid-May 1956 through the spring of 1957 under license to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), for the extraction of source material in the form of thorium, as well as rare earth elements. The processing was conducted in the southwest quadrant of a ca. 100 year old, five-story, building (Building 23) in the active manufacturing portion of the facility. Building components and equipment in the southwest quadrant of Building 23 exhibited residual radiological activity remaining from the monazite sand processing. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) conducted a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) and prepared a Record of Decision (ROD) to address residual radioactivity on building components and equipment in the southwest quadrant of Building 23. The remedy selected for the southwest quadrant of Building 23, which was documented in the ROD (dated May 2005), was identified as 'Alternative 2: Decontamination With Removal to Industrial Use Levels'. The selected remedy provided for either decontaminating or removing areas of radioactivity to meet the RGs. Demonstration of compliance with the selected ARAR was performed using the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) and other appropriate guidance, as well as appropriate dose modeling codes where necessary. USACE-Baltimore District along with its private industry partner worked together under the terms of a 2008 Settlement Agreement to implement the remedial action (RA) for the southwest quadrant of Building 23. The RA was conducted in two phases: Phase 1 was completed to improve the building condition for support of subsequent remedial action and decrease scope uncertainty of the remedial action, and Phase 2 included decontamination and removal activities to meet the RGs and demonstration of compliance with the selected ARAR. Challenges encountered during the RA include: coordination with stakeholders, coordination between multiple RA contractors, addressing unique structural challenges for Building 23, nonradiological hazards associated with the RA, weather issues, and complex final status survey (FSS) coordination. The challenges during the Phase 1 RA were handled successfully. The challenges for the Phase 2 RA, which is anticipated to be complete by late-summer of 2012, have been handled successfully so far. By fall of 2012, USACE is expecting to finalize a robust RA Closure Report, including the Final Status Survey Report, which summarizes the RA activities and documents compliance with the ROD. During the ongoing RA at Building 23, there have been and still are many challenges both technically and from a project management perspective, due in part to the nature and extent of impact at the site (residual radioactivity within an active processing building), dual oversight by the property owner and USACE, and site-specific challenges associated with a complex RA and multiple contractors. Currently, USACE and its industry partner are overseeing the completion of RA field activities. RA closure documentation for the remediation of Building 23 to address residual contamination in building materials will be reviewed/approved by USACE and its industry partner upon completion of the field activities. USACE and its industry partner are working well together, through the Settlement Agreement, to conduct a cost-efficient and effective remedial action to address the legacy issues at Building 23. This cooperative effort has set a firm foundation for achieving a successful RA at the RWDA using a 'forward think' approach, and it is a case study for other sites where an industry partner is involved. The collaborative effort led to implementation of an RA which is acceptable to the site owner, the regulators, and the public, thus allowing USACE to move this project forward successfully in the FUSRAP program. (authors)

Barber, Brenda; Honerlah, Hans [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Baltimore District, 10 S. Howard St., Baltimore, Maryland, 21201 (United States); O'Neill, Mike [EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, 15 Loveton Circle, Baltimore, Maryland, 21152 (United States); Young, Carl [Cabrera Services, Inc., 1106 N. Charles St., Suite 300, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix B (Part 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix B (Part 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hood River Passive House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

Hales, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Remediation progress at the Iron Mountain Mine Superfund site, California. Information Circular/1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report was prepared by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to present a brief history of the listing of Iron Mountain Mine as a Superfund site on the National Priorities List (NPL) and subsequent remedial actions. The mine area is located on 4,400 acres near Redding, CA, and includes underground workings, an open pit area, waste rock dumps, and tailings piles. The property involves multiple sources of acid mine drainage (AMD) that are high in copper, zinc, and cadmium. The selected remedial actions, based on the Record of Decision of 1986, would partially cap the richmond mineralized zone to reduce infiltration of clean water, divert clean surface waters away from contaminated areas, fill surface subsidence areas, and enlarge the Spring Creek debris dam to provide increased surge capacity. Site remediation efforts at Iron Mountain are well into the remedial design-remedial action phase. Details of activities and designs of remedial elements are presented, and future activities, discussed.

Biggs, F.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

animal-based folk remedies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to PD MacMillan, Andrew 143 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

289

EIS-0195: Remedial Actions at Operable Unit 4, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to conduct remedial action at Operable Unit 4 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

290

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CHPlateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site- March 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Plateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

291

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

292

Versatile microbial surface-display for environmental remediation and biofuels production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering microbes for biofuels production. Science 315,xenobiotics remediation and biofuels production. TargetP. putida JS444 E. coli Biofuels Production Cellobiose

Hawkes, Daniel S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The effects of viscosity and subsurface heterogeneity on a brine barrier approach to DNAPL remediation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are a long-term source of groundwater contamination. Difficulties of current remediation methods have led to the study of a novel… (more)

Murphy, Lauren L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - area remediation case Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Short Courses Module F: Remediation... for professionals working in or intending to enter the field of contaminated site assessment, ... Source: Baird, Mark - Climate and...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated remedial strategy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Short Courses Module F: Remediation... for professionals working in or intending to enter the field of contaminated site assessment, ... Source: Baird, Mark - Climate and...

296

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Co., Inc., Hanford – Jan 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Co., Inc., Hanford is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

297

Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

299

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

300

Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

302

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

303

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program: ? Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. ? DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. ? DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state and federal regulators.

Clayton, Christopher [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey [SM Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

304

ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIAL ACTION – ARE WE DOING MORE HARM THAN GOOD?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (1) has stated that interventions i.e., remedial actions should do more good than harm. This paper examines completed cleanup projects to answer the question posed in the title. Various researchers have published that toxins in the environment only cause a small percentage of cancers i.e., 1-3 percent (2,3). Estimates of hypothetical fatal cancers are inflated because primarily it is assumed that people will change their living habits and move onto or near uncontrolled waste sites. An occupancy factor of 100 % is used and by using large populations exposed to miniscule levels of radiation (4) unreal levels of fatal cancers are predicted. What we observe are technically indefensible numbers of cancers being calculated for these hypothetical people. This and other maximizing assumptions inflate the risk. The inflated risk, along with very conservative criteria, drives the removal of large volumes of soil and debris. An unintended consequence of these costly well-intentioned (5) remedial actions is the real fatalities and injuries that occur to workers doing the construction and to members of the public through transportation activities. Even though some analysis include the estimates of worker risk, there is little or no discussion which highlights the fact that real risk is being traded for hypothetical risk. This paper is an attempt to review this situation and through cited literature and case studies, come to a better understanding of what if any good is really being done. Maybe it is time to consider this transfer of risk from hypothetical victims to the real victims in remedial action decision-making.

Bruce W. Church

305

South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

306

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the...

307

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rivers may fall under the categories of natural, scenic, or recreational. These rivers are designated, acquired, and preserved by the state, and development on or adjacent to these rivers is...

308

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Chapter 3, paragraph 2). The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1992, through November 8, 1993. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Activities of HPS standards committee in environmental remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Health Physics Society (HPS) develops American National Standards in the area of radiation protection using methods approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Two of its sections, Environmental Health Physics and Contamination Limits, have ongoing standards development which are important to some environmental remediation efforts. This paper describes the role of the HPS standards process and indicates particular standards under development which will be of interest to the reader. In addition, the authors solicit readers to participate in the voluntary standards process by either joining active working groups (WG) or suggesting appropriate and relevant topics which should be placed into the standards process.

Stencel, J.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

REMEDIATION OF LEON WATER FLOOD, BUTLER COUNTY, KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Leon Water Flood site has undergone one season of soil amendments and growth of specialized plants meant to colonize and accelerate the remediation of the salt-impacted site. The researchers characterized the impacted soil as to chemistry, added soil amendments, and planted several species of seedlings, and seeded the scarred areas. After the first growing season, the surface soil was again characterized and groundcover was also characterized. While plant growth was quite meager across the area, soil chemistry did improve over most of the two scars.

M.L. Korphage; Kelly Kindscher; Bruce G. Langhus

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

313

Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public facility restoration planning traditionally focused on response to natural disasters and hazardous materials accidental releases. These plans now need to integrate response to terrorist actions. Therefore, plans must address a wide range of potential vulnerabilities. Similar types of broad remediation planning are needed for restoration of waste and hazardous material handling areas and facilities. There are strong similarities in damage results and remediation activities between unintentional and terrorist actions; however, the uncertainties associated with terrorist actions result in a re-evaluation of approaches to planning. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in confined industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. Therefore, they arguably involve a superset of drivers, concerns and public agencies compared to other restoration efforts. This superset of conditions increases complexity of interactions, reduces our knowledge of the initial conditions, and even condenses the timeline for restoration response. Therefore, evaluations of alternative restoration management approaches developed for responding to terrorist actions provide useful knowledge for large, complex waste management projects. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the 'adaptive management' paradigm provides a constructive parallel operations paradigm for restoration of facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, multiple/simUltaneous public agency actions, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a facility and surrounding area(s) after a disruptive event suggest numerous advantages over preset linearly-structured plans by incorporating the flexibility and overlap of processes inherent in effective facility restoration. We discuss three restoration case studies (e.g., the Hart Senate Office Building anthrax restoration, Rocky Flats actinide remediation, and hurricane destruction restoration), that implement aspects of adaptive management but not a formal approach. We propose that more formal adoption of adaptive management principles could be a basis for more flexible standards to improve site-specific remediation plans under conditions of high uncertainty.

Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doerr, Ted B [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS;/:4,4 (; .369sy- REMEDIAL

315

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternationalTechnology ValidationMilestoneDepartmentDepartmentthe Remediation

316

RIVER RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS River Res. Applic. 21: 849864 (2005)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assimilate wastewater treatment plant effluent. Our study illustrates the types of changes that river of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily

Poff, N. LeRoy

317

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - November...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site On November 14, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to...

318

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

319

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

320

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Savannah River Site Deputy Manager Named  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – DOE’s Savannah River Operations Office selected Terrel “Terry” J. Spears as the deputy manager of the Savannah River Site (SRS) this month.

322

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

323

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

324

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Public Participation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to explain the Department of Energy`s plan for involving the public in the decision-making process related to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This project was authorized by Congress in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. The Act provides for a cooperative effort with affected states and Indian tribes for the eventual cleanup of abandoned or inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which are located in nine western states and in Pennsylvania. Section 111 of the Act states, ``in carrying out the provisions of this title, including the designation of processing sites, establishing priorities for such sites, the selection of remedial actions and the execution of cooperative agreements, the Secretary (of Energy), the Administrator (of the Environmental Protection Agency), and the (Nuclear Regulatory) Commission shall encourage public participation and, where appropriate, the Secretary shall hold public hearings relative to such matters in the States where processing sites and disposal sites are located.`` The objective of this document is to show when, where, and how the public will be involved in this project.

NONE

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Tank SY-102 remediation project: Flowsheet and conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. A major program in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal. Pretreatment is needed to resolve tank safety issues and to separate wastes into high-level and low-level fractions for subsequent immobilization and disposal. There is a fixed inventory of actinides and fission products in the tank which must be prepared for disposal. By segregating the actinides and fission products from the bulk of the waste, the tank`s contents can be effectively managed. Due to the high public visibility and environmental sensitivity of this problem, real progress and demonstrated efforts toward addressing it must begin as soon as possible. As a part of this program, personnel at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flowsheet to remediate tank SY-102 which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of the flowsheet demonstrations performed with simulated, but radioactive, wastes using an existing glovebox line at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The tank waste was characterized using both a tank history approach and an exhaustive evaluation of the available core sample analyses. This report also presents a conceptual design complete with a working material flow model, a major equipment list, and cost estimates.

Yarbro, S.L.; Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Pope, N.G.; Agnew, S.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Thomas, K.W.; Ortic, E.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Technique for rapid establishment of American lotus in remediation efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique for increasing the establishment rate of American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) and simplifying planting was developed as part of a pond remediation project. Lotus propagation techniques typically require scarification of the seed, germination in heated water, and planting in nursery containers. Then mature (~ 1 yr) nursery-grown stock is transferred to planting site or scarified seed are broadcast applied. Mature plants should grow more quickly, but can be sensitive to handling, require more time to plant, and cost more. Scarified seeds are easier to plant and inexpensive, but have a lag time in growth, can fail to germinate, and can be difficult to site precisely. We developed an intermediate technique using small burlap bags that makes planting easier, provides greater germination success, and avoids lag time in growth. Data on survival and growth from experiments using mature stock, scarified seeds, and bag lotus demonstrate that bag lotus grow rapidly in a variety of conditions, have a high survival rate, can be processed and planted easily and quickly, and are very suitable for a variety of remediation projects

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Goins, Kenneth N [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL; Morris, Gail Wright [ORNL; Riazzi, Adam [Lincoln County HS, Hamlin WV; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Missouri State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations, and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the METC/Vortec program is to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Vortec CMS in remediating soils contaminated with hazardous materials and/or low levels of radionuclides. To convincingly demonstrate the CMS`s capability, a Demonstration Plant will be constructed and operated at a DOE site that has a need for the remediation of contamination soil. The following objectives will be met during the program: (1) establish the glass chemistry requirements to achieve vitrification of contaminated soils found at the selected DOE site; (2) complete the design of a fully integrated soil vitrification demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (3) establish the cost of a fully integrated soil demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (4) construct and operate a fully integrated demonstration plant; (5) analyze all influent and effluent streams to establish the partitioning of contaminants and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable health, safety, and environmental requirements; (6) demonstrate that the CMS technology has the capability to produce a vitrified product that will immobilize the hazardous and radionuclide materials consistent with the needs of the specific DOE waste repositories.

Patten, J.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hood River Passive House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

Hales, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Public Meeting -5/19/2011 Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Public Meeting - 5/19/2011 Remedial Investigation of UMore Park MINNESOTA POLLUTION CONTROL AGENCY University of Minnesota Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East Dakota Trail Rosemount, Minnesota Speakers: Gary Krueger Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Janet Dalgleish

Netoff, Theoden

334

A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera , C. T. Kelley b , C Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA The goal of a hydraulic capture model for remediation purposes is desirable and often influences the choice of solution method. In this paper we present two hydraulic capture

335

Superfund state-lead remedial project-management handbook. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The handbook defines the roles and responsibilities of the Remedial Project Officer (RPM) with regard to State-lead remedial projects at uncontrolled hazardous-waste sites. It also discusses project-management techniques and the resources available to the RPM for accomplishing his mission.

Winter, B.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Superfund federal-lead remedial project-management handbook. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The handbook defines the roles and responsibilities of the Remedial Project Officer (RPM) with regard to Federal-lead remedial projects at uncontrolled hazardous-waste sites. It also discusses project management techniques and the resources available to the RPM for accomplishing his mission.

Hooper, S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT AT 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the remediation methods and technologies applicable for use at 200-PO-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. The 200-PO-I Groundwater au requires groundwater remediation because of the existence of contaminants of potential concern (COPC). A screening was conducted on alternative technologies and methods of remediation to determine which show the most potential for remediation of groundwater contaminants. The possible technologies were screened to determine which would be suggested for further study and which were not applicable for groundwater remediation. COPCs determined by the Hanford Site groundwater monitoring were grouped into categories based on properties linking them by remediation methods applicable to each COPC group. The screening considered the following criteria. (1) Determine if the suggested method or technology can be used for the specific contaminants found in groundwater and if the technology can be applied at the 200-PO-I Groundwater au, based on physical characteristics such as geology and depth to groundwater. (2) Evaluate screened technologies based on testing and development stages, effectiveness, implementability, cost, and time. This report documents the results of an intern research project conducted by Mathew Dado for Central Plateau Remediation in the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The study was conducted under the technical supervision of Gloria Cummins and management supervision of Theresa Bergman and Becky Austin.

DADO MA

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

2.0 Nano-Enabled Remediation Technologies 2.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to enabling technologies such as sensors, remedial technologies are generally much more time of non-radiological contaminants, and sensors than in the area of remediation of radiological material. Having provided this cautionary background, the research involved in preparing this report indicates

339

The effect of CO2 on the plasma remediation of NxOy Ann C. Gentilea)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of CO2 on the plasma remediation of NxOy Ann C. Gentilea) and Mark J. Kushnerb repetitively pulsed dielectric barrier discharges. As combustion effluents contain large percentages of CO2, in this paper we discuss the consequences of CO2 in the gas mixture on the efficiency of remediation

Kushner, Mark

340

Fracture enhanced in-situ foam remediation. Topical report, July 1995-December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the technical feasibility of soil fracturing as an enhancement to transportation of foam and foam-assisted site remediation. This project is part of an overall effort by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to develop technologies for cost-effective, in-situ remediation of soils.

Chowdiah, P.; Misra, B.R.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Plateau Remediation Contract Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Closure 040.02.14 Semi-Works Zone 4 C.2.5.4 Remediation - Closure 040.02.14 Semi-Works Zone 6 C.2.5.3 Remediation Optimization 040.02.15 Solid Waste Zone 4 C.2.5.4...

342

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Environmental remediation 1991: ``Cleaning up the environment for the 21st Century``. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents discussions given at a conference on environmental remediation, September 8--11, Pasco, Washington. Topics include: public confidence; education; in-situ remediation; Hanford tank operations; risk assessments; field experiences; standards; site characterization and monitoring; technology discussions; regulatory issues; compliance; and the UMTRA project. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Wood, D.E. [ed.] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Remediation of old environmental liabilities in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) is a leading institution in all areas of nuclear R and D in the Czech Republic. The NRI's activity encompasses nuclear physics, chemistry, nuclear power, experiments at research nuclear reactors and many other topics. The NRI operates two research nuclear reactors, many facilities as a hot cell facility, research laboratories, technology for radioactive waste (RAW) management, radionuclide irradiators, an electron accelerator, etc. After 50 years of activities in the nuclear field, there are some environmental liabilities that shall be remedied in the NRI. There are three areas of remediation: (1) decommissioning of old obsolete facilities (e.g. decay tanks, RAW treatment technology, special sewage system), (2) treatment of RAW from operation and dismantling of nuclear facilities, and (3) elimination of spent fuel from research nuclear reactors operated by the NRI. The goal is to remedy the environmental liabilities and eliminate the potential negative impact on the environment. Based on this postulate, optimal remedial actions have been selected and recommended for the environmental remediation. Remediation of the environmental liabilities started in 2003 and will be finished in 2012. Some liabilities have already been successfully remedied. The most significant items of environmental liabilities are described in the paper together with information about the history, the current state, the progress, and the future activities in the field of remediation of environmental liabilities in the NRI. (authors)

Podlaha, J. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Site, Richmond, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Biomonitoring results indicated that pesticides were still bioavailable in the water column, and have not been reduced from pre-remediation levels. Annual biomonitoring will continue to assess the effectiveness of remedial actions at the United Heckathorn Site.

Antrim, Liam D.; Kohn, Nancy P.

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump, Operable Unit 2, Ashland, MA. (Second remedial action), September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 35-acre Nyanza Chemical site is a former dye manufacturing facility in Ashland, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Land adjacent to the site is used for industrial, residential, commercial, and recreational purposes. The site overlies an unconsolidated glacial aquifer, which has been affected by site activities. Wastes included process wastewater, chemical sludge, solid process wastes in drums, solvent recovery distillation residue in drums, off-specification products, and un-recyclable process chemicals including phenol, nitrobenzene, and mercuric sulfate. The dye waste stream and wastewater were discharged to an onsite concrete 'vault' or settling basin adjacent to the main processing building. The ROD addresses management of migration as OU2, and constitutes an interim remedy designed to treat the highest ground water contamination and to collect additional data achieving cleanup objectives. A subsequent ROD will address uncontrolled wastewater discharges to the Sudbury River and its tributaries. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and toluene; other organics; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected interim remedial action for the site is included.

Not Available

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Field sampling and analysis plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This field sampling and analysis (S & A) plan has been developed as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The S & A plan has been written in support of the remedial investigation (RI) plan for WAG 2 (ORNL 1990). WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), White Oak Creek embayment (WOCE) on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment (Fig. 1.1). The WOC system is the surface drainage for the major ORNL WAGs and has been exposed to a diversity of contaminants from operations and waste disposal activities in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 acts as a conduit through which hydrologic fluxes carry contaminants from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This document describes the following: an overview of the RI plan, background information for the WAG 2 system, and objectives of the S & A plan; the scope and implementation of the first 2 years of effort of the S & A plan and includes recent information about contaminants of concern, organization of S & A activities, interactions with other programs, and quality assurance specific to the S & A activities; provides details of the field sampling plans for sediment, surface water, groundwater, and biota, respectively; and describes the sample tracking and records management plan.

Boston, H.L.; Ashwood, T.L.; Borders, D.M.; Chidambariah, V.; Downing, D.J.; Fontaine, T.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Miller, D.E.; Moore, G.K.; Suter, G.W.; Tardiff, M.F.; Watts, J.A.; Wickliff, D.S.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

US Army Corps of Engineers

350

RiverFalls,Wisconsin SolarinSmall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the local government, and the citizens of River Falls have made energy conservation and renewable energy. Inspiring Interest in Renewables River Falls' energy conservation efforts benefit from RFMU's membership energy within the community.v Bringing Solar to River Falls The success of the River Falls Renewable

351

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Georgia, University of

352

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

353

Massachusetts state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Massachusetts. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

None

1981-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

A systematic look at Tank Waste Remediation System privatization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program is to store, treat, immobilize, and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford radioactive tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost effective manner. Highly radioactive Hanford waste includes current and future tank waste plus the cesium and strontium capsules. In the TWRS program, as in other Department of Energy (DOE) clean-up activities, there is an increasing gap between the estimated funding required to enable DOE to meet all of its clean-up commitments and level of funding that is perceived to be available. Privatization is one contracting/management approach being explored by DOE as a means to achieve cost reductions and as a means to achieve a more outcome-oriented program. Privatization introduces the element of competition, a proven means of establishing true cost as well as achieving significant cost reduction.

Holbrook, J.H.; Duffy, M.A.; Vieth, D.L.; Sohn, C.L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Tank waste remediation system functions and requirements document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Functions and Requirements Document derived from the TWRS Technical Baseline. The document consists of several text sections that provide the purpose, scope, background information, and an explanation of how this document assists the application of Systems Engineering to the TWRS. The primary functions identified in the TWRS Functions and Requirements Document are identified in Figure 4.1 (Section 4.0) Currently, this document is part of the overall effort to develop the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline, and contains the functions and requirements needed to properly define the top three TWRS function levels. TWRS Technical Baseline information (RDD-100 database) included in the appendices of the attached document contain the TWRS functions, requirements, and architecture necessary to define the TWRS Functional Requirements Baseline. Document organization and user directions are provided in the introductory text. This document will continue to be modified during the TWRS life-cycle.

Carpenter, K.E

1996-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

Vollmer, A.T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

California state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of California. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1981-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL's Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

Stapp, D.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Pennsylvania state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Maryland State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Handbook Series Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Enhancement of in situ microbial remediation of aquifers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for remediating subsurface areas contaminated by toxic organic compounds. An innocuous oil, such as vegetable oil, mineral oil, or other immiscible organic liquid, is introduced into the contaminated area and permitted to move therethrough. The oil concentrates or strips the organic contaminants, such that the concentration of the contaminants is reduced and such contaminants are available to be either pumped out of the subsurface area or metabolized by microorganisms. Microorganisms may be introduced into the contaminated area to effect bioremediation of the contamination. The methods may be adapted to deliver microorganisms, enzymes, nutrients and electron donors to subsurface zones contaminated by nitrate in order to stimulate or enhance denitrification. 4 figures.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Brockman, F.J.; Streile, G.P.; Cary, J.W.; McBride, J.F.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Florida state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Florida. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

None

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

Oregon state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oregon state information handbook formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administater, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Iowa state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, By Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Iowa. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations.

None

1981-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Burris, J.A. [C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Clean Slate Environmental Remediation DSA for 10 CFR 830 Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Slate Sites II and III are scheduled for environmental remediation (ER) to remove elevated levels of radionuclides in soil. These sites are contaminated with legacy remains of non-nuclear yield nuclear weapons experiments at the Nevada Test Site, that involved high explosive, fissile, and related materials. The sites may also hold unexploded ordnance (UXO) from military training activities in the area over the intervening years. Regulation 10 CFR 830 (Ref. 1) identifies DOE-STD-1120-98 (Ref. 2) and 29 CFR 1910.120 (Ref. 3) as the safe harbor methodologies for performing these remediation operations. Of these methodologies, DOE-STD-1120-98 has been superseded by DOE-STD-1120-2005 (Ref. 4). The project adopted DOE-STD-1120-2005, which includes an approach for ER projects, in combination with 29 CFR 1910.120, as the basis documents for preparing the documented safety analysis (DSA). To securely implement the safe harbor methodologies, we applied DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref. 5) and DOE-STD-3009-94 (Ref. 6), as needed, to develop a robust hazard classification and hazards analysis that addresses non-standard hazards such as radionuclides and UXO. The hazard analyses provided the basis for identifying Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) level controls. The DOE-STD-1186-2004 (Ref. 7) methodology showed that some controls warranted elevation to Specific Administrative Control (SAC) status. In addition to the Evaluation Guideline (EG) of DOE-STD-3009-94, we also applied the DOE G 420.1 (Ref. 8) annual, radiological dose, siting criterion to define a controlled area around the operation to protect the maximally exposed offsite individual (MOI).

James L. Traynor, Stephen L. Nicolosi, Michael L. Space, Louis F. Restrepo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

MANAGING ENGINEERING ACTIVITIES FOR THE PLATEAU REMEDIATION CONTRACT - HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the primary Hanford clean-up contract transitioned to the CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). Prior to transition, Engineering resources assigned to remediation/Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities were a part of a centralized engineering organization and matrixed to the performing projects. Following transition, these resources were reassigned directly to the performing project, with a loose matrix through a smaller Central Engineering (CE) organization. The smaller (10 FTE) central organization has retained responsibility for the overall technical quality of engineering for the CHPRC, but no longer performs staffing and personnel functions. As the organization has matured, there are lessons learned that can be shared with other organizations going through or contemplating performing a similar change. Benefits that have been seen from the CHPRC CE organization structure include the following: (1) Staff are closely aligned with the 'Project/facility' that they are assigned to support; (2) Engineering priorities are managed to be consistent with the 'Project/facility' priorities; (3) Individual Engineering managers are accountable for identifying staffing needs and the filling of staffing positions; (4) Budget priorities are managed within the local organization structure; (5) Rather than being considered a 'functional' organization, engineering is considered a part of a line, direct funded organization; (6) The central engineering organization is able to provide 'overview' activities and maintain independence from the engineering organizations in the field; and (7) The central engineering organization is able to maintain a stable of specialized experts that are able to provide independent reviews of field projects and day-to-day activities.

KRONVALL CM

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing “failure” in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM’s applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five “crosscutting” themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miquel County. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 63 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 15 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The sites are within 1 mile of each other and are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,300 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}). In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designing site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Y-12 Plant Remedial Action technology logic diagram. Volume I: Technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Program addresses remediation of the contaminated groundwater, surface water and soil in the following areas located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: Chestnut Ridge, Bear Creek Valley, the Upper and Lower East Fork Popular Creek Watersheds, CAPCA 1, which includes several areas in which remediation has been completed, and CAPCA 2, which includes dense nonaqueous phase liquid wells and a storage facility. There are many facilities within these areas that are contaminated by uranium, mercury, organics, and other materials. This Technology Logic Diagram identifies possible remediation technologies that can be applied to the soil, water, and contaminants for characterization, treatment, and waste management technology options are supplemented by identification of possible robotics or automation technologies. These would facilitate the cleanup effort by improving safety, of remediation, improving the final remediation product, or decreasing the remediation cost. The Technology Logic Diagram was prepared by a diverse group of more than 35 scientists and engineers from across the Oak Ridge Reservation. Most are specialists in the areas of their contributions. 22 refs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Deep Vadose Zone Remediation: Technical and Policy Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress in Achieving Cleanup Endpoints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provides a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable the establishment of a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Michelle H.

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS&M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS&M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS&M.

Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Gillespie, Joey [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; Widdop, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; none,

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Owen, P. T.; Webb, J. R.; Knox, N. P.; Goins, L. F.; Harrell, R. E.; Mallory, P. K.; Cravens, C. D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea,...

378

Case Studies in River Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

Julien, Pierre Y.

379

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An association organized for the purpose of addressing issues on a specific lake or river, a lake improvement district, or a lake conservation district may apply to the Star Lake Board for...

380

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D&D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents field activity associated with the collection, preparation, and shipment of fish samples. The purpose of the report is to describe the sampling locations, identify samples collected, and describe any modifications and additions made to the sampling and analysis plan.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

Data Quality Assessment Report for the Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the data quality assessment that was performed on the analytical data generated in connection with the 2008/2009 surface water, sediment, and soil data collection; groundwater upwelling investigation sample collection; and fish tissue sample collection.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Data Quality Assessment Report for the Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the data quality assessment that was performed on the analytical data generated in connection with the 2008/2009 surface water, sediment, and soil data collection; groundwater upwelling investigation sample collection; and fish tissue sample collection.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENTSavannah River Site Savannah RiverSite

387

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

L. Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

Lee Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

A comparison of the RCRA Corrective Action and CERCLA Remedial Action Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a comprehensive side-by-side comparison of the RCRA corrective action and the CERCLA remedial action processes. On the even-numbered pages a discussion of the RCRA corrective action process is presented and on the odd-numbered pages a comparative discussion of the CERCLA remedial action process can be found. Because the two programs have a difference structure, there is not always a direct correlation between the two throughout the document. This document serves as an informative reference for Departmental and contractor personnel responsible for oversight or implementation of RCRA corrective action and CERCLA remedial action activities at DOE environmental restoration sites.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

391

Enforcement Documents - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to...

392

Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Vigilante Electric Coop. Northern  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farmers Electric Riverside Electric Minidoka Soda Springs Idaho Falls Lower Valley Energy Lost River Electric Coop. Fall River Rural Electric Coop. Salmon River Electric...

393

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report. Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

396

Radiological Survey Results for Areas A1 North, A5A, A6, and B2 at the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project, Washington, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania

W.C. Adams

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

397

Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Remedial action plan for the inactive Uranium Processing Site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action plan: Attachment 2, Geology report, Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Working draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section}7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the decontamination process(es). In the case of an entire building, the value may be obvious; it's costly to replace the structure. For a smaller item such as a vehicle or painting, the cost versus benefit of decontamination needs to be evaluated. This will be determined on a case by case basis and again is beyond the scope of this report, although some thoughts on decontamination of unique, personal and high value items are given. But, this is clearly an area that starting discussions and negotiations early on will greatly benefit both the economics and timeliness of the clean up. In addition, high value assets might benefit from pre-event protection such as protective coatings or HEPA filtered rooms to prevent contaminated outside air from entering the room (e.g., an art museum).

Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Neural deficits in children with dyslexia ameliorated by behavioral remediation: Evidence from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neural deficits in children with dyslexia ameliorated by behavioral remediation: Evidence from dyslexia, characterized by unexplained difficulty in reading, is associated with behavioral deficits underlying phonological processing in children and adults with dyslexia. The present study examined whether

Poldrack, Russ

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Operations to be Performed in the Waste Package Dry Remediation Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes planned and proposed operations for remediating damaged and/or out-of-compliance waste packages, casks, DPCs, overpacks, and containers at the Yucca Mountain Dry Transfer Facility.

Norman E. Cole; Randy K. Elwood

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project (DOE/EIS-0198, October 1996). The surface remediation alternatives analyzed in the EIS include on-site disposal of the contaminated materials and off-site disposal at one of three alternative locations in Utah using one or more transportation options: truck, rail, or slurry pipeline.

404

Calculation of the number of cancer deaths prevented by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project has completed remedial action at 22 uranium mill tailings sites and about 5,000 properties (vicinity properties) where tailings were used in construction, at a total cost of $1.45 billion. This paper uses existing data from Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments, and vicinity property calculations, to determine the total number of cancer deaths averted by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The cost-effectiveness of remediating each site, the vicinity properties, and the entire project is calculated. The cost per cancer death averted was four orders of magnitude higher at the least cost-effective site than at the most cost-effective site.

Miller, M.L.; Pomatto, C.B. (Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Cornish, R.E. (Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied phyto-remediation techniques Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baipai D, 2008, Phyto-remediation of chrome-VI of tannery... Trichoderma strains for heavy metal resistance, Letters in Applied Microbiology, 33:112-116 Nagayama K Source:...

406

Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang or domestic animals. It can also be used as a fertilizer or converted to biofuels. The photobioreactor can

Hall, Sharon J.

407

Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final (EPA 1988). The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers) identified in the groundwater sampling and analysis plan for the operable unit (DOE/RL-2001-49, Rev. 1) with additions.

Truex, Michael J.; Dresel, P. EVAN; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Bacterial influence on uranium oxidation reduction reactions : implications for environmental remediation and isotopic composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bacterial influence on the chemistry and speciation of uranium has some important impacts on the environment, and can be exploited usefully for the purposes of environmental remediation of uranium waste contamination. ...

Mullen, Lisa Maureen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Remediation of brine-contaminated soil using calcium nitrate, gypsum, and straw.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Salt-affected soils from point source brine contamination are common in the active oil field in SE Saskatchewan. A remediation process that included dewatering by sub-surface… (more)

Nielsen, Jennifer I.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

411

Remediation by inspiration : artist-driven models for environmental clean-up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While often seen as utilitarian and technical, environmental remediation efforts have significant cultural, social and physical impacts. Accordingly, they demand responses that utilize a multi-disciplinary approach to the ...

Fain, Jessica (Jessica Elizabeth)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Overview of technology modeling in the Remedial Action Assessment System (RAAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are numerous hazardous waste sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy (DOE). To assist the cleanup of these sites in a more consistent, timely, and cost-effective manner, the Remedial Action Assessment System (RAAS) is being developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). RAAS is a software tool designed to automate the initial technology selection within the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The software does several things for the user: (1) provides information about available remedial technologies, (2) sorts possible technologies to recommend a list of technologies applicable to a given site, (3) points out technical issues that may prevent the implementation of a technology, and (4) provides an estimate of the effectiveness of a given technology at a particular site. Information from RAAS can be used to compare remediation options and guide selection of technologies for further study.

Johnson, C.D.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Chan, T.C.; Lamar, D.A.; Buelt, J.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Skeen, R.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Characterization of anion diffusion in polymer hydrogels used for wastewater remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of anion diffusion in polymer hydrogels used for wastewater remediation Dimitri R pollutants, even at extremely low concentrations, from wastewater effluents are a major environmental need of reactive phosphorus, nitrogen, and sulfur anions from aquaculture production wastewater effluents

Rubloff, Gary W.

414

Microbial dynamics during intrinsic remediation of oil contaminated coastal wetland sediments (a microcosm study)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arabian medium crude oil was applied to historically exposed estuarine sediments contained in a controlled laboratory environment and intrinsically remediated for 56 days. In situ microbial and petroleum dynamics were monitored via Most Probable...

Thornburg, Nathaniel David

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - army environmental remediation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Dallas... of the 100-year Levee Remediation Plan, which is a part of the overall work on which the ... Source: US Army Corps of Engineers - Aquatic Plant Control Research...

417

Smouldering Combustion of Organic Liquids in Porous Media for Remediating NAPL-contaminated Soils   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research investigated the potential of smouldering combustion to be employed as a remediation approach for soil contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Small-scale (~15 cm), proof-of-concept experiments ...

Pironi, Paolo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Consequences of propene and propane on plasma remediation of NOx Rajesh Doraia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consequences of propene and propane on plasma remediation of NOx Rajesh Doraia) Department exhausts with hydrocarbons propane (C3H8) and propene (C3H6) has been investigated. In general

Kushner, Mark

419

UC-70A Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C.Green River,The Secretaryat Grand4100F. a%

420

T.G. Hinton: Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S. Department ofRiverSavannah

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Groundwater Nitrogen Source Identification and Remediation in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater nitroGen source identification and remediation in the texas hiGh plains and rollinG plains reGions Paul Delaune, Bridget R. Scanlon, Robert C. Reedy, Robert C. Schwartz, Louis Baumhardt, Lucas F. Gregory Texas Water Resources... Institute TR-451 September 2013 GROUNDWATER NITROGEN SOURCE IDENTIFICATION AND REMEDIATION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS AND ROLLING PLAINS REGIONS FINAL REPORT FUNDING PROVIDED BY THE TEXAS STATE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION BOARD THROUGH A CLEAN...

Delaune, P.; Scanlon, B.; Reedy, R.; Schwartz, R.; Baumhardt, L.; Gregory, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Facility design philosophy: Tank Waste Remediation System Process support and infrastructure definition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the current facility design philosophy for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process support and infrastructure definition. The Tank Waste Remediation System Facility Configuration Study (FCS) initially documented the identification and definition of support functions and infrastructure essential to the TWRS processing mission. Since the issuance of the FCS, the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has proceeded to develop information and requirements essential for the technical definition of the TWRS treatment processing programs.

Leach, C.E.; Galbraith, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Grant, P.R.; Francuz, D.J.; Schroeder, P.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Remedy Evaluation Framework for Inorganic, Non-Volatile Contaminants in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants in the vadose zone may act as a potential long-term source of groundwater contamination and need to be considered in remedy evaluations. In many cases, remediation decisions for the vadose zone will need to be made all or in part based on projected impacts to groundwater. Because there are significant natural attenuation processes inherent in vadose zone contaminant transport, remediation in the vadose zone to protect groundwater is functionally a combination of natural attenuation and use of other remediation techniques, as needed, to mitigate contaminant flux to groundwater. Attenuation processes include both hydrobiogeochemical processes that serve to retain contaminants within porous media and physical processes that mitigate the rate of water flux. In particular, the physical processes controlling fluid flow in the vadose zone are quite different and generally have a more significant attenuation impact on contaminant transport relative to those within the groundwater system. A remedy evaluation framework is presented herein that uses an adaptation of the established EPA Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) evaluation approach and a conceptual model based approach focused on identifying and quantifying features and processes that control contaminant flux through the vadose zone. A key concept for this framework is to recognize that MNA will comprise some portion of all remedies in the vadose zone. Thus, structuring evaluation of vadose zone waste sites to use an MNA-based approach provides information necessary to either select MNA as the remedy, if appropriate, or to quantify how much additional attenuation would need to be induced by a remedial action (e.g., technologies considered in a feasibility study) to augment the natural attenuation processes and meet groundwater protection goals.

Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Dispersion of Metals from Abandoned Mines and their Effects on Biota in the Methow River, Okanogan County, Washington : Annual Report 3/15/00-3/14/01.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Washington, College of Forest Resources and the Center for Streamside Studies in Seattle, Washington, is being funded by the Bonneville Power Administration to conduct a three-year research project to measure the watershed scale response of stream habitat to abandoned mine waste, the dispersion of metals, and their effects on biota in the Methow River basin. The purpose of this project is to determine if there are processes and pathways that result in the dispersion of metals from their source at abandoned mines to biological receptors in the Methow River. The objectives of this study are the following: (1) Assess ecological risk due to metal contamination from mines near the Methow; (2) Measure impact of metals from mines on groundwater and sediments in Methow River; (3) Measure response of organisms in the Methow River to excess metals in the sediments of the Methow River; (4) Recommend restoration guidelines and biological goals that target identified pathways and processes of metal pollution affecting salmon habitat in the Methow basin; and (5) Submit peer review journal publications. When concluded, this study will contribute to the advancement of current best management practices by describing the processes responsible for the release of metals from small abandoned mine sites in an arid environment, their dispersal pathways, and their chemical and biological impacts on the Methow River. Based on these processes and pathways, specific remediation recommendations will be proposed.

Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium Processing Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contain measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect groundwater quality. Remedial action at the Naturita site must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Colorado. The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to either the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast, or a licensed non-DOE disposal facility capable of handling RRM. At either disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed Dry Flats disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This report discusses environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final. The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers). COC with similar properties were grouped for the screening evaluation. The screening evaluation was conducted in two primary steps. The initial screening step evaluated potential remediation methods based on whether they can be effectively applied within the environmental setting of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit for the specified contaminants. In the second step, potential remediation methods were screened using scoping calculations to estimate the scale of infrastructure, overall quantities of reagents, and conceptual approach for applying the method for each defined grouping of COC. Based on these estimates, each method was screened with respect to effectiveness, implementability, and relative cost categories of the CERCLA feasibility study screening process defined in EPA guidance.

Truex, Michael J.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Dresel, P EVAN.; Murray, Christopher J.

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Tank waste remediation system process engineering instruction manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Process Engineering Instruction Manual is to provide guidance and direction to TWRS Process Engineering staff regarding conduct of business. The objective is to establish a disciplined and consistent approach to business such that the work processes within TWRS Process Engineering are safe, high quality, disciplined, efficient, and consistent with Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation Policies and Procedures. The sections within this manual are of two types: for compliance and for guidance. For compliance sections are intended to be followed per-the-letter until such time as they are formally changed per Section 2.0 of this manual. For guidance sections are intended to be used by the staff for guidance in the conduct of work where technical judgment and discernment are required. The guidance sections shall also be changed per Section 2.0 of this manual. The required header for each manual section is illustrated in Section 2.0, Manual Change Control procedure. It is intended that this manual be used as a training and indoctrination resource for employees of the TWRS Process Engineering organization. The manual shall be required reading for all TWRS Process Engineering staff, matrixed, and subcontracted employees.

ADAMS, M.R.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

431

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

432

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Kaback, Dawn S. (1932 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Chalcogen-Based Aerogels as Sorbents for Radionuclide Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient capture of radionuclides having long half-lives such as technetium-99 (99Tc), uranium-238 (238U), and iodine-129 (129I) is pivotal to prevent their transport into groundwater and/or release into the atmosphere. While different sorbents have been considered for capturing each of them, in the current work, a new nanostructured chalcogen-based aerogel, called a chalcogel, is shown to be very effective to capture ionic forms of 99Tc and 238U, as well as nonradioactive gaseous iodine (i.e., a surrogate for 129I), irrespective of the sorbent polarity. Some of the chalcogels performed better than others but the PtGeS sorbent performed the best with capture efficiencies of 98% and 99.4% for 99Tc and 238U, respectively. All sorbents showed >99% capture efficiency for iodine over the test duration. This unified sorbent would be an attractive option in environmental remediation for various radionuclides associated with legacy wastes from nuclear weapons production, wastes from nuclear power production, or potential future nuclear fuel reprocessing.

Riley, Brian J.; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Lepry, William C.; Matyas, Josef; Olszta, Matthew J.; Li, Xiaohong; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA); Nitao, John J. (Castro Valley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m{sup 3} (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program.

Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Federal government information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the Federal Government. It contains a summary of the organization and responsibilities of agencies within the executive branch of the Federal government which may be relevant to FUSRAP activities; a brief summary of relevant Federal statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the US Congress, identification of the officers, relevant committees and committee chairmen; a description of the Federal legislative process; a summary of legislation enacted and considered in the recently-adjourned 96th Congress; a description of the Federal budgetary process; a summary of the Carter Administration's comprehensive radioactive waste management program; and excerpts from the text of relevant federal statutes and regulations.

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chemical tailoring of steam to remediate underground mixed waste contaminents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to simultaneously remediate mixed-waste underground contamination, such as organic liquids, metals, and radionuclides involves chemical tailoring of steam for underground injection. Gases or chemicals are injected into a high pressure steam flow being injected via one or more injection wells to contaminated soil located beyond a depth where excavation is possible. The injection of the steam with gases or chemicals mobilizes contaminants, such as metals and organics, as the steam pushes the waste through the ground toward an extraction well having subatmospheric pressure (vacuum). The steam and mobilized contaminants are drawn in a substantially horizontal direction to the extraction well and withdrawn to a treatment point above ground. The heat and boiling action of the front of the steam flow enhance the mobilizing effects of the chemical or gas additives. The method may also be utilized for immobilization of metals by using an additive in the steam which causes precipitation of the metals into clusters large enough to limit their future migration, while removing any organic contaminants.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Udell, Kent S. (Berkeley, CA); Bruton, Carol J. (Livermore, CA); Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

440

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river remediation srr" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

River System Hydrology in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,700 86,700 Proctor Leon River USACE 1963 59,400 54,702 310,100 Belton Leon River USACE 1954 457,600 432,978 640,000 Stillhouse Hollow Lampasas River USACE 1968 235,700 224,279 390,660 Georgetown San Gabriel R USACE 1980 37,100 36,980 87,600 Granger... San Gabriel R USACE 1980 65,500 50,540 162,200 Somerville Yequa Creek USACE 1967 160,110 154,254 337,700 Hubbard Creek Hubbard Creek WCTMWD 1962 317,750 317,750 í Post NF Double Mt WRMWD proposed 57,420 í í Alan Henry SF Double Mt Lubbock 1993 115...

Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

An Inside Look at River Corridor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

444

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

19, 2002 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Safety Basis and Radiation Protection Violations at the Savannah River Site, On March 19, 2002, the U.S....

445

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

446

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

447

Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

448

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 5, 1997 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to an Unplanned Radioactive Material Intake at the Savannah River Site, (EA-97-12) On December 5, 1997, the...

449

The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted interim groundwater remedial activities on the Hanford Site since the mid-1990s for several groundwater contamination plumes. DOE established the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project (Technologies Project) in 2006 to evaluate alternative treatment technologies. The objectives for the technology project are as follows: develop a 300 Area polyphosphate treatability test to immobilize uranium, design and test infiltration of a phosphate/apatite technology for Sr-90 at 100-N, perform carbon tetrachloride and chloroform attenuation parameter studies, perform vadose zone chromium characterization and geochemistry studies, perform in situ biostimulation of chromium studies for a reducing barrier at 100-D, and perform a treatability test for phytoremediation for Sr-90 at 100-N. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the Technologies Project. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is based on the quality assurance requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the technology project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

Fix, N. J.

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

451

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

452

Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated with Organics and Radionuclides - An Innovative Approach Eases Traditional Hurdles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional approaches to the remediation of contaminated groundwater, such as pump-and-treat, have been used for many years for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with various organics. However the treatment of groundwater contaminated with organics and radionuclides has been considerably more challenging. Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) was recently faced with these challenges while designing a remediation system for the remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater and soil at the RMI Extrusion Plant in Ashtabula, OH. Under contract with RMI Environmental Services (RMIES), SEC teamed with Regenesis, Inc. to design, implement, and execute a bioremediation system to remove TCE and associated organics from groundwater and soil that was also contaminated with uranium and technetium. The SEC-Regenesis system involved the injection of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC), a natural attenuation accelerant that has been patented, designed, and produced by Regenesis, to stimulate the reductive dechlorination and remediation of chlorinated organics in subsurface environments. The compound was injected using direct-push Geoprobe rods over a specially designed grid system through the zone of contaminated groundwater. The innovative approach eliminated the need to extract contaminated groundwater and bypassed the restrictive limitations listed above. The system has been in operation for roughly six months and has begun to show considerable success at dechlorinating and remediating the TCE plume and in reducing the radionuclides into insoluble precipitants. The paper will provide an overview of the design, installation, and initial operation phase of the project, focusing on how traditional design challenges of remediating radiologically contaminated groundwater were overcome. The following topics will be specifically covered: a description of the mechanics of the HRC technology; an assessment of the applicability of the HRC technology to contaminated groundwater plumes and other potential remediation opportunities; a discussion of how the implementation of the HRC technology eased permitting issues and other challenges of remediating groundwater contaminated with radionuclides and organics; an overview of the remedial