National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for river plain aquifer

  1. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aquifer THE INL & THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER underneath the Idaho National Laboratory is one of the most productive groundwater resources in the U.S. Each year about 2 million acre-feet of water is drawn from the aquifer. Approximately 95 percent of the water withdrawn from the aquifer is used for irrigation, 3 per- cent for domestic water, and 2 percent for industrial purposes. The aquifer is the primary water source for more than 280,000 people in

  2. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    The unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are made up of at least 178 basalt-flow groups, 103 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 4 rhyolite domes. Stratigraphic units identified in 333 wells in this 890-mile{sup 2} area include 121 basalt-flow groups, 102 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 1 rhyolite dome. Stratigraphic units were identified and correlated using the data from numerous outcrops and 26 continuous cores and 328 natural-gamma logs available in December 1993. Basalt flows make up about 85% of the volume of deposits underlying the area.

  3. A comparative evaluation of conceptual models for the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) are used to evaluate the existing ground water monitoring well network completed in the upper portion of the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) beneath the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The USGS data analyzed and compared in this study include: (a) lithologic, geophysical, and stratigraphic information, including the conceptual geologic models intrawell, ground water flow measurement (Tracejector tests) and (c) dedicated, submersible, sampling group elevations. Qualitative evaluation of these data indicate that the upper portion of the SRPA is both heterogeneous and anisotropic at the scale of the ICPP monitoring well network. Tracejector test results indicate that the hydraulic interconnection and spatial configuration of water-producing zones is extremely complex within the upper portion of the SRPA. The majority of ICPP monitoring wells currently are equipped to sample ground water only the upper lithostratigraphic intervals of the SRPA, primarily basalt flow groups E, EF, and F. Depth-specific hydrogeochemical sampling and analysis are necessary to determine if ground water quality varies significantly between the various lithostratigraphic units adjacent to individual sampling pumps.

  4. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer at test area north, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Bowers, B.

    1995-06-01

    A complex sequence of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds underlies Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho. Wells drilled to depths of at least 500 feet penetrate 10 basalt-flow groups and 5 to 10 sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 940,000 to 1.4 million years. Each basalt-flow group consists of one or more basalt flows from a brief, single or compound eruption. All basalt flows of each group erupted from the same vent, and have similar ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium contents, and natural-gamma emissions. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated for hundreds to hundreds of thousands of years during periods of volcanic quiescence. Basalt and sediment are elevated by hundreds of feet with respect to rocks of equivalent age south and cast of the area, a relation that is attributed to past uplift at TAN. Basalt and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 200 feet below land surface. Rocks below this depth are saturated and make up the Snake River Plain aquifer. The effective base of the aquifer is at a depth of 885 feet below land surface. Detailed stratigraphic relations for the lowermost part of the aquifer in the depth interval from 500 to 885 feet were not determined because of insufficient data. The stratigraphy of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in the upper 500 feet of the unsaturated zone and aquifer was determined from natural-gamma logs, lithologic logs, and well cores. Basalt cores were evaluated for potassium-argon ages, paleomagnetic properties, petrographic characteristics, and chemical composition. Stratigraphic control was provided by differences in ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium content, and natural-gamma emissions of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds.

  5. Geologic Controls of Hydraulic Conductivity in the Snake River Plain Aquifer At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. R. Anderson; M. A. Kuntz; L. C. Davis

    1999-02-01

    The effective hydraulic conductivity of basalt and interbedded sediment that compose the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) ranges from about 1.0x10 -2 to 3.2x10 4 feet per day (ft/d). This six-order-of-magnitude range of hydraulic conductivity was estimated from single-well aquifer tests in 114 wells, and is attributed mainly to the physical characteristics and distribution of basalt flows and dikes. Hydraulic conductivity is greatest in thin pahoehoe flows and near-vent volcanic deposits. Hydraulic conductivity is least in flows and deposits cut by dikes. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity at and near the INEEL are similar to those measured in similar volcanic settings in Hawaii. The largest variety of rock types and the greatest range of hydraulic conductivity are in volcanic rift zones, which are characterized by numerous aligned volcanic vents and fissures related to underlying dikes. Three broad categories of hydraulic conductivity corresponding to six general types of geologic controls can be inferred from the distribution of wells and vent corridors. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows probably is increased by localized fissures and coarse mixtures of interbedded sediment, scoria, and basalt rubble. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows is decreased locally by abundant alteration minerals of probable hydrothermal origin. Hydraulic conductivity varies as much as six orders of magnitude in a single vent corridor and varies from three to five orders of magnitude within distances of 500 to 1,000 feet. Abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivity over short distances suggest the presence of preferential pathways and local barriers that may greatly affect the movement of ground water and the dispersion of radioactive and chemical wastes downgradient from points of waste disposal.

  6. Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976) Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

  7. Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

  8. Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain;...

  9. Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River...

  10. Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Micro-Earthquake At Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Snake River...

  11. Enhanced Geothermal System Potential for Sites on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert K Podgorney; Thomas R. Wood; Travis L McLing; Gregory Mines; Mitchell A Plummer; Michael McCurry; Ahmad Ghassemi; John Welhan; Joseph Moore; Jerry Fairley; Rachel Wood

    2013-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle and represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America (Blackwell and Richards, 2004). This makes the Snake River Plain (SRP) one of the most under-developed and potentially highest producing geothermal districts in the United States. Elevated heat flow is typically highest along the margins of the topographic SRP and lowest along the axis of the plain, where thermal gradients are suppressed by the Snake River aquifer. Beneath this aquifer, however, thermal gradients rise again and may tap even higher heat flows associated with the intrusion of mafic magmas into the mid-crustal sill complex (e.g., Blackwell, 1989).

  12. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Snake River Plain Region ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Compound and Elemental Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  14. Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Reflection Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  15. Snake River Plain FORGE Site Characterization Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Robert Podgorney

    2016-04-18

    The site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. This collection includes data on seismic events, groundwater, geomechanical models, gravity surveys, magnetics, resistivity, magnetotellurics (MT), rock physics, stress, the geologic setting, and supporting documentation, including several papers. Also included are 3D models (Petrel and Jewelsuite) of the proposed site. Data for wells INEL-1, WO-2, and USGS-142 have been included as links to separate data collections. These data have been assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Other contributors include the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CEAS), the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming, University of Oklahoma, Energy and Geoscience Institute-University of Utah, US Geothermal, Baker Hughes Campbell Scientific Inc., Chena Power, US Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geological Survey, and Mink GeoHydro.

  16. Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Simulation analysis of the...

  17. Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake River...

  18. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for WO-2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Robert Podgorney

    1991-07-29

    Well data for the WO-2 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, and rock strength parameters for the WO-2 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  19. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for INEL-1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Robert Podgorney

    1979-03-01

    Well data for the INEL-1 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes caliper logs, lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, full color logs, fracture analysis, photos, and rock strength parameters for the INEL-1 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  20. Slim Holes At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Slim Holes At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  1. Field Mapping At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake...

  2. Core Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  3. Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake...

  4. Grouting project to protect Snake River Plain Aquifer completed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a cement-based grout into 21 buried waste locations at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), a radioactive waste landfill at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Surrounding...

  5. The INL and the Snake River Plain Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent monitoring by the U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho Department of Environmental ... Previous monitoring at the INL did not allow for collection of samples at the depths these ...

  6. Snake River Plain Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis - Phase 1 Raster Files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Shervais

    2015-10-09

    Snake River Plain Play Fairway Analysis - Phase 1 CRS Raster Files. This dataset contains raster files created in ArcGIS. These raster images depict Common Risk Segment (CRS) maps for HEAT, PERMEABILITY, AND SEAL, as well as selected maps of Evidence Layers. These evidence layers consist of either Bayesian krige functions or kernel density functions, and include: (1) HEAT: Heat flow (Bayesian krige map), Heat flow standard error on the krige function (data confidence), volcanic vent distribution as function of age and size, groundwater temperature (equivalue interval and natural breaks bins), and groundwater T standard error. (2) PERMEABILTY: Fault and lineament maps, both as mapped and as kernel density functions, processed for both dilational tendency (TD) and slip tendency (ST), along with data confidence maps for each data type. Data types include mapped surface faults from USGS and Idaho Geological Survey data bases, as well as unpublished mapping; lineations derived from maximum gradients in magnetic, deep gravity, and intermediate depth gravity anomalies. (3) SEAL: Seal maps based on presence and thickness of lacustrine sediments and base of SRP aquifer. Raster size is 2 km. All files generated in ArcGIS.

  7. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  8. Flow and Transport in the Hanford 300 Area Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-13

    Contaminant migration in the 300 Area unconfined aquifer is strongly coupled to fluctuations in the Columbia River stage. To better understand the interaction between the river, aquifer, and vadose zone, a 2-D saturated-unsaturated flow and transport model was developed for a vertical cross-section aligned west-east across the Hanford Site 300 Area, nearly perpendicular to the river. The model was used to investigate water flow and tracer transport in the vadose zone-aquifer-river flow system, in support of the ongoing study of the 300 Area uranium plume. The STOMP simulator was used to model 1-year from 3/1/92 to 2/28/93, a period when hourly data were available for both groundwater and river levels. Net water flow to the river (per 1-meter width of shoreline) was 182 m3/y in the base case, but the cumulative exchange or total flow back and forth across the riverbed was 30 times greater. The low river case had approximately double the net water and Groundwater tracer flux into the river as compared to the base case.

  9. Snake River Plain Play Fairway Analysis – Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John W.; Glen, Jonathan M.; Liberty, Lee M.; Dobson, Patrick; Gasperikova, Erika

    2015-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province (SRP) overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle; it represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America. Our goals for this Phase 1 study are to: (1) adapt the methodology of Play Fairway Analysis for geothermal exploration to create a formal basis for its application to geothermal systems, (2) assemble relevant data for the SRP from publicly available and private sources, and (3) build a geothermal play fairway model for the SRP and identify the most promising plays, using software tools that are standard in the petroleum industry. The success of play fairway analysis in geothermal exploration depends critically on defining a systematic methodology that is grounded in theory (as developed within the petroleum industry over the last two decades) and within the geologic and hydrologic framework of real geothermal systems. Our preliminary assessment of the data suggests that important undiscovered geothermal resources may be located in several areas of the SRP, including the western SRP (associated with buried lineaments defined by gravity or magnetic anomalies, and capped by extensive deposits of lacustrine sediment), at lineament intersections in the central SRP (along the Banbury-Hagerman trend NW of Twin Falls, and along the northern margin of the Mt Bennett Hills-Camas Prairie area), and along the margins of the eastern SRP. Additional high temperature resources are likely associated with rhyolite domes and crypto-domes in the eastern SRP, but are masked by shallow groundwater flow leading to low upper crustal heat flow values. These blind resources may be exploitable with existing deep drilling technology. Groundwater modeling planned for later phases of the PFA project will address whether temperatures at viable producing depths are sufficient to support electricity production.

  10. Snake River Plain Play Fairway Analysis - Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, John W.; Glen, Jonathan M.; Liberty, Lee M.; Dobson, Patrick; Gasperikova, Erika; Sonnenthal, Eric; Visser, Charles; Nielson, Dennis; Garg, Sabodh; Evans, James P.; Siler, Drew; DeAngelo, Jacob; Athens, Noah; Burns, Erick

    2015-09-02

    The Snake River volcanic province (SRP) overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle; it represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America. Our goals for this Phase 1 study are to: (1) adapt the methodology of Play Fairway Analysis for geothermal exploration to create a formal basis for its application to geothermal systems, (2) assemble relevant data for the SRP from publicly available and private sources, and (3) build a geothermal play fairway model for the SRP and identify the most promising plays, using software tools that are standard in the petroleum industry. The success of play fairway analysis in geothermal exploration depends critically on defining a systematic methodology that is grounded in theory (as developed within the petroleum industry over the last two decades) and within the geologic and hydrologic framework of real geothermal systems. Our preliminary assessment of the data suggests that important undiscovered geothermal resources may be located in several areas of the SRP, including the western SRP (associated with buried lineaments defined by gravity or magnetic anomalies, and capped by extensive deposits of lacustrine sediment), at lineament intersections in the central SRP (along the Banbury-Hagerman trend NW of Twin Falls, and along the northern margin of the Mt Bennett Hills-Camas Prairie area), and along the margins of the eastern SRP. Additional high temperature resources are likely associated with rhyolite domes and crypto-domes in the eastern SRP, but are masked by shallow groundwater flow leading to low upper crustal heat flow values. These blind resources may be exploitable with existing deep drilling technology. Groundwater modeling planned for later phases of the PFA project will address whether temperatures at viable producing depths are sufficient to support electricity production.

  11. Building Conceptual Models of Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport in a Dynamic Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.

    2008-12-04

    Subsurface simulation is being used to build, test, and couple conceptual process models to better understand controls on a 0.4 km by 1.0 km uranium plume that has persisted above the drinking water standard in the groundwater of the Hanford 300 Area over the last 15 years. At this site, uranium-contaminated sediments in the vadose zone and aquifer are subject to significant variations in water levels and velocities driven by the diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and episodic Columbia River stage dynamics. Groundwater flow reversals typically occur twice a day with significant exchange of river water and groundwater in the near-river aquifer. Mixing of the dilute solution chemistry of the river with the groundwater complicates the uranium sorption behavior as the mobility of U(VI) has been shown experimentally to be a function of pH, carbonate, calcium, and uranium. Furthermore, uranium mass transfer between solid and aqueous phases has been observed to be rate-limited in the context of the high groundwater velocities resulting from the river stage fluctuations and the highly transmissive sediments (hydraulic conductivities ~1500 m/d). One- and two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional simulations of variably-saturated flow and reactive transport, based on laboratory-derived models of distributed rate mass transfer and equilibrium multicomponent surface complexation, are used to assess uranium transport at the dynamic vadose zone – aquifer interface as well as changes to uranium mobility due to incursions of river water into the aquifer.

  12. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, Joshua L.

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  13. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  14. Seismic Reflection Project Near the Southern Terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi Faults, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. M. Jackson; G. S. Carpenter; R. P. Smith; J. L. Casper

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen seismic reflection lines were processed and interpreted to determine the southern terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi faults along the northwest boundary of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The southernmost terminations of the Arco and Howe segments were determined to support characterization of the Lost River and Lemhi fault sources, respectively, for the INL probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Keywords:Keywords are required forExternal Release Review*Keywords  Keywords *Contacts (Type and Name are required for each row) Type ofContactContact Name  POC Editor RecordFour commercial seismic reflection lines (Arco lines 81-1 and 81-2; Howe lines 81-3 and 82-2) were obtained from the Montana Power Company. The seismic data were collected in the early 1980’s using a Vibroseis source with station and shot point locations that resulted in 12-fold data. Arco lines 81?1 and 81?2 and Howe lines 81?3 and 82?2 are located within the basins adjacent to the Arco and Howe segments, respectively. Seven seismic lines (Arco lines A1, A2, A3, and A4 and Howe lines H1, H2, and H3) were acquired by EG&G Idaho, Inc. Geosciences for this study using multiple impacts with an accelerated weight drop source. Station and shot point locations yielded 12-fold data. The seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. Two seismic lines (Arco line S2 and Howe line S4) were obtained from Sierra Geophysics. In 1984, they acquired seismic reflection data using an accelerated weight drop source with station and shot point locations that yielded 6-fold data. The two seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. In 1992 for this study, Geotrace Technologies Inc. processed all of the seismic reflection data using industry standard processing techniques. The

  15. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of underflow into the

  16. A Three-Year Study of Ichyoplankton in Coastal Plains Reaches of the Savannah River Site and its Tributaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.

    2007-03-05

    Altering flow regimes of rivers has large effects on native floras and faunas because native species are adapted to the natural flow regime, many species require lateral connectivity with floodplain habitat for feeding or spawning, and the change in regime often makes it possible for invasive species to replace natives (Bunn & Arthington 2002). Floodplain backwaters, both permanent and temporary, are nursery areas for age 0+ fish and stable isotope studies indicate that much of the productivity that supports fish larvae is autochthonous to these habitats (Herwig et al. 2004). Limiting access by fish to floodplain habitat for feeding, spawning and nursery habitat is one of the problems noted with dams that regulate flow in rivers and is considered to be important as an argument to remove dams and other flow regulating structures from rivers (Shuman 1995; Bednarek 2001). While there have been a number of studies in the literature about the use of floodplain habitat for fish reproduction (Copp 1989; Killgore & Baker 1996; Humphries, et al. 1999; Humphries and Lake 2000; Crain et al. 2004; King 2004) there have been only a few studies that examined this aspect of stream ecology in more than a cursory way. The study reported here was originally designed to determine whether the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site was having a negative effect on fish reproduction in the Savannah River but its experimental design allowed examination of the interactions between the river, the floodplain and the tributaries entering the Savannah River across this floodplain. This study is larger in length of river covered than most in the literature and because of its landscape scale may be in important indicator of areas where further study is required.

  17. Baseline Mapping Study of the Steed Pond Aquifer and Crouch Branch Confining Unit Beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON, DENNISG.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents the results of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this report is to map the distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized material) within each hydrogeologic unit from the surface down to the top of the Crouch Branch aquifer beneath the A/M Area. The distribution of mud layers and variations in the percentage of clay and silt within the strata is extremely important in order to fully characterize the extent of DNAPL beneath the A/M Area and determine the geometry of the contaminant plumes emanating from them. Precision mapping of these layers can aid in locating areas where contamination is most likely to have migrated into the saturated zone. In addition, this information can be used to refine the current remediation systems or assist in designing new remedial systems.

  18. Heavy mineral delineation of the Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene stratigraphic sections at the Savannah River Site, Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathcart, E.M. . Dept. of Geology); Sargent, K.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina consists of a fluvial-deltaic and shallow marine complex of unconsolidated sediments overlying the crystalline basement rocks of the North American continent. Because of the lateral and vertical variability of these sediments, stratigraphic boundaries have been difficult to distinguish. Portions of the Cretaceous, Paleocene, and eocene stratigraphic sections from cores recovered during the construction of two monitoring wells at the Savannah River Site were studied to determine if heavy mineral suites could be utilized to distinguish boundaries. The stratigraphic sections include: the Late Cretaceous Middendorf, Black Creek, and Steel Creek Formations, the Paleocene Snapp Formation, the late Paleocene-Early Eocene Fourmile Branch Formation, and the Early Eocene Congaree formation. In previous studies composite samples were taken over 2.5 ft. intervals along the cores and processed using a heavy liquid for heavy mineral recovery. During this study, heavy mineral distributions were determined by binocular microscope and the mineral identifications confirmed by x-ray diffraction analysis of hand-picked samples. The heavy mineral concentration data and grain size data were then compared to the stratigraphic boundary positions determined by other workers using more classical methods. These comparisons were used to establish the utility of this method for delineating the stratigraphic boundaries in the area of study.

  19. Aquifer Sampling Tube Results for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Peterson, Robert E.

    2003-10-27

    This report presents and discusses results of the fiscal year 2003 sampling event associated with aquifer tubes along the Columbia River in the northern Hanford Site. Aquifer tube data help define the extent of groundwater contamination near the river, determine vertical variations in contamination, monitor the performance of interim remedial actions near the river, and support impact studies.

  20. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  1. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  2. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  3. Groundwaters of Florence (Italy): Trace element distribution and vulnerability of the aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bencini, A.; Ercolanelli, R.; Sbaragli, A.

    1993-11-01

    Geochemical and hydrogeological research has been carried out in Florence, to evaluate conductivity and main chemistry of groundwaters, the pattern of some possible pollutant chemical species (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}), and the vulnerability of the aquifers. The plain is made up of Plio-Quaternary alluvial and lacustrine sediments for a maximum thickness of 600 m. Silts and clays, sometimes with lenses of sandy gravels, are dominant, while considerable deposits of sands, pebbles, and gravels occur along the course of the Arno river and its tributary streams, and represent the most important aquifer of the plain. Most waters show conductivity values around 1000-1200 {mu}S, and almost all of them have an alkaline-earth-bicarbonate chemical character. In western areas higher salt content of the groundwaters is evident. Heavy metal and NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3} analyses point out that no important pollution phenomena affect the groundwaters; all mean values are below the maximum admissible concentration (MAC) for drinkable waters. Some anomalies of NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, Fe, Mn, and Zn are present. The most plausible causes can be recognized in losses of the sewage system; use of nitrate compounds in agriculture; oxidation of well pipes. All the observations of Cr, Cu, and Pb are below the MAC; the median values of <3, 3.9, and 1.1 {mu}g/l, respectively, could be considered reference concentrations for groundwaters in calcareous lithotypes, under undisturbed natural conditions. Finally, a map of vulnerability shows that the areas near the Arno river are highly vulnerable, for the minimum thickness (or lacking) of sediments covering the aquifer. On the other hand, in the case of pollution, several factors not considered could significantly increase the self-purification capacity of the aquifer, such asdilution of groundwaters, bacteria oxidation of nitrogenous species, and sorption capacity of clay minerals and organic matter. 31 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Peculiarities of Environment Pollution as a Special Type of Radioactive Waste: Field Means for Comprehensive Characterization of Soil and Bottom Sediments and their Application in the Survey at the Flood plain of Techa River - 13172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Oleg; Danilovich, Alexey; Potapov, Victor; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Sergey; Volkovich, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Contamination of natural objects - zone alarm fallout, zones and flood plains near production sites (the result of technological accidents and resource extraction) occupy large areas. Large area and volume of contaminated matter, moderate specific activity (as low - medium-level wastes) make such objects specific types of radioactive waste. These objects exist for a long time, now they are characterized by a bound state of nuclides with the matrix. There is no cost-effective ways to remove these waste, the only solution for the rehabilitation of such areas is their isolation and regular monitoring through direct and indirect measurements. The complex of instruments was developed to field mapping of contamination. It consists of a portable spectrometric collimated detector, collimated spectrometric borehole detector, underwater spectrometer detector, spectrometer for field measurements of the specific activity of Sr-90, connected to a portable MCA 'Colibry (Hummingbird)'. The complex was used in settlements of Bryansk region, rivers Techa and Yenisei. The effectiveness of the developed complex considered by the example of characterization of the reservoir 10 (artificial lake) in Techinsky cascade containing a huge amount of radioactive waste. The developed field means for comprehensive characterization of soil and bottom sediments contamination are very effective for mapping and monitoring of environment contamination after accidents. Especially in case of high non-uniformity of fallout and may be very actual in Fukushima area. (authors)

  5. Plain Writing Implementation Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Writing Implementation Plan Plain Writing Implementation Plan Plain Writing Implementation Plan July 13, 2011.pdf (120.01 KB) More Documents & Publications Plain Language Compliance Report (2012) PLAIN LANGUAGE COMPLIANCE REPORT (2013) Plain Language Compliance Report (2014

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains ... Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy ... and their daughters Allison Moore (husband ...

  7. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    African Researcher Visits Oklahoma As a follow-up to the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) ... Niamey, Niger, to the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. Dr. ...

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANLEVSNL-06-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains...

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site has helped to correct problems related to signal interference. The WACR is a 95-GHz system designed for a unique purpose -...

  11. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters

  12. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an ... August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National ...

  13. Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in 2013 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Road Tripping through the Geothermal Frontier Road Tripping through the Geothermal Frontier November 18, 2015 - 9:58am Addthis Geothermal Well Head, Utah 1 of 5 Geothermal Well Head, Utah This geothermal well head is located near the University of Utah's FORGE candidate site. The area is already renewables-friendly, with a wind farm nearby. Image: Elisabet Metcalfe, EERE Snake River Plain, Idaho 2 of 5 Snake River Plain, Idaho The mountainous view captures INL's Snake River Plain candidate site

  14. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Geothermal Reservoir ...

  15. Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, S; Hao, Y; Aines, R

    2009-03-27

    Carbon storage in deep saline reservoirs has the potential to lower the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere and to mitigate global warming. Leakage back to the atmosphere through abandoned wells and along faults would reduce the efficiency of carbon storage, possibly leading to health and ecological hazards at the ground surface, and possibly impacting water quality of near-surface dilute aquifers. We use static equilibrium and reactive transport simulations to test the hypothesis that perturbations in water chemistry associated with a CO{sub 2} gas leak into dilute groundwater are important measures for the potential release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Simulation parameters are constrained by groundwater chemistry, flow, and lithology from the High Plains aquifer. The High Plains aquifer is used to represent a typical sedimentary aquifer overlying a deep CO{sub 2} storage reservoir. Specifically, we address the relationships between CO{sub 2} flux, groundwater flow, detection time and distance. The CO{sub 2} flux ranges from 10{sup 3} to 2 x 10{sup 6} t/yr (0.63 to 1250 t/m{sup 2}/yr) to assess chemical perturbations resulting from relatively small leaks that may compromise long-term storage, water quality, and surface ecology, and larger leaks characteristic of short-term well failure.

  16. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-04 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Site Operations Manager to Retire Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operations manager Jim Teske has announced that he will retire in October

  17. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the

  18. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnershipmore » Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However

  19. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the

  20. The Tritium Under-flow Study at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, Robert A.

    2008-01-15

    trans-river flow is eastward or westward depends primarily on the position of the Savannah River as it meanders back and forth within the flood plain and is limited to narrow sections of land adjacent to the river. With respect to the only location of westward trans-river flow that has a recharge area within the SRS, the new evaluations of hypothetical pumping scenarios indicated that only a very slight impact is incurred, even under the most extreme groundwater extraction scenario. The updated model did not result in a significant change in the location of the recharge areas at SRS and the only impact was measured in slight changes in the travel times associated with the travel path. The median groundwater travel times for particles released under each of the 4 groundwater extraction scenarios ranged from 366 to 507 years while. Under the most extreme scenario, that under which SRS groundwater extraction is discontinued, the shortest travel time was reduced from 90 to 79 years. It should be emphasized that the groundwater transit times do not include the time required for groundwater to migrate vertically downward across the uppermost aquifer (i.e. at the recharge area), thus the actual groundwater travel times could be up to several decades longer than what was calculated in the model. The exhaustive evaluations that have been conducted indicates that it is highly unlikely that tritiated groundwater originating at the SRS could migrate into Georgia and explain the low tritium activity levels that were originally observed in certain domestic water supply wells. Considering that those wells were located at some distance (several km) from the Savannah River, a far more likely explanation is that tritiated rainfall infiltrated the subsurface and recharged the shallow aquifer within which the well was finished.

  1. Wellbore and groundwater temperature distribution eastern Snake River

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plain, Idaho: Implications for groundwater flow and geothermal potential (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Wellbore and groundwater temperature distribution eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho: Implications for groundwater flow and geothermal potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wellbore and groundwater temperature distribution eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho: Implications for groundwater flow and geothermal potential A map of groundwater temperatures from

  2. Radium-226 and low pH in groundwater due to oxidation of authigenic pyrite; Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KUBILIUS, WALTER

    2005-12-21

    The origin of elevated radium-226 in groundwater beneath a sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was investigated. Nearly one hundred monitoring wells are developed in the Steed Pond Aquifer (SPA), which consists of 100-150 ft of Coastal Plain sand, iron oxides, and minor clay. Wells screened in the upper and middle portions of the aquifer have average Ra-226 between 0.5 and 2.5 pCi/L, and average pHs above 4.7. However, wells screened near the base of the aquifer exhibit higher average Ra-226 concentrations of 2.5 to 4.6 pCi/L, with some measurements exceeding the MCL of 5 pCi/L, and show average pHs of 4.1 to 4.7. These wells are not downgradient of the landfill, and are not impacted by landfill leachate. The Crouch Branch Confining Unit (CBCU) underlies the aquifer, and is composed partly of reduced gray/brown clay with lignite and authigenic pyrite. Gamma ray logs show that the SPA has low gamma counts, but the CBCU is consistently elevated. Groundwater with high radium/low pH also contains elevated sulfate concentrations. pH calculations indicate that sulfate is in the form of sulfuric acid. A model for the origin of elevated Ra-226 levels in deeper SPA wells envisions infiltration of oxygenated SPA groundwater into reduced pyritic CBCU sediments, with consequent oxidative pyrite dissolution, and acidification of groundwater. Then, naturally occurring CBCU radium dissolves, and mixes into the Steed Pond Aquifer.

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Hosts Instrument Team Meeting The SGP central facility hosted the biennial ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Instrument Team Meeting on August 2-4, 2005. Almost 50 instrument mentors, site

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ACRF Instrument Team Meets at SGP The ARM Program has had unprecedented success in operating a large array of sophisticated

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb./Mar. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-02 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. New Shipping and Receiving Building Dedicated The SGP central facility is operating more efficiently with a newly completed Shipping and Receiving building. The SGP Shipping and

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-01 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ARM Archive Sets Record for User Accounts The ARM Archive stores and distributes the large quantities of data generated by routine

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-07 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Infrared Sky Imager Takes a Shot in the Dark Imaging technologies help scientists correlate and compare visual data with the non-visual data retrieved by

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-09 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Multifilter Radiometer Added to Cessna Payload Downward-facing multifilter radiometers (MFRs) are instruments used to measure the

  9. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-07 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Global Dimming: A Hot Climate Topic Global dimming, also referred to as solar dimming, is a new buzz word in the scientific community. Coined

  10. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-03 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. 2004 ARM Science Team Meeting Sets Attendance Record A record-breaking 316 scientists and researchers from 22 different

  11. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-11 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Flare Field Campaign Aims to Rid Data of Clutter A series of aircraft flares were ignited on the ground at the SGP on October 19 and 20,

  12. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-09 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Will Explore New Locales For some time, scientists have wanted to expand the reach of the ARM Program to additional

  13. Plain Language Training Classes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Language Training Classes Plain Language Training Classes February 18, 2016 7:30AM to 10:30AM MST Plain Language Training Classes When you write, do you write what you want ...

  14. Great Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Plains Wind Farm Facility Great Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  15. Plain Language Compliance Report (2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and...

  16. Plain Language Compliance Report (2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  17. PLAIN LANGUAGE COMPLIANCE REPORT (2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  18. Plain Language Compliance Report (2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative.

  19. Plain Language Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plain Language Training Plain Language Training The Department has an active and popular Plain Language Training Program. Between April 2013 and March 2014, there were six Plain Language Training Classes at Forrestal and two at Germantown, attended by a total of 189 employees and contractors. Classes generally reach their size limit, and overflows are placed in the next scheduled class. Since August 2011, there have been 23 Plain Language Classes at Forrestal and eight at Germantown. In April

  20. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  1. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Change.org Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  2. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Fallon Sanford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean ...

  3. Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dollars | Department of Energy Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of Dollars Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of Dollars November 25, 2015 - 12:20pm Addthis SRNS operators Stanley Creech (left) and Paul Dobson monitor the injection of silver chloride into an aquifer at SRS. SRNS operators Stanley Creech (left) and Paul Dobson monitor the injection of silver chloride into an aquifer at SRS. AIKEN, S.C. - The EM program

  4. Effects of uranium-mining releases on ground-water quality in the Puerco River Basin, Arizona and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Metre, P.C.; Wirt, L.; Lopes, T.J.; Ferguson, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe: (1) the water quality of the Puerco River alluvial aquifer, (2) the movement of water between the Puerco River and underlying alluvial aquifer, and (3) changes in the water quality of the alluvial and bedrock aquifers related to releases of contaminants by uranium-mining activities. This report focuses on the alluvial aquifer near the reach of the Puerco River that was subjected to continuous flow containing mine-dewatering effluents and to flow containing mine-dewatering effluents and to flow from the tailings-pond spill.

  5. High Plains Tech Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Owner High Plains Tech Center Energy Purchaser High Plains Tech Center Location Woodward OK Coordinates 36.40645133, -99.4282195 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  6. ITC Great Plains, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ITC Great Plains, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: ITC Great Plains, LLC Place: Kansas Phone Number: Topeka (785) 783-2226 or Dodge City (620) 371-6534 or (785) 783-2226...

  7. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma | Department of Energy Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Block Plains & Eastern Clean Line Arkansas and Oklahoma 06-08-15.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block

  8. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  9. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory RELATED IMAGES http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3749/9827580556_473a91fd78_t.jpg Enlarge http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2856/9804364405_b25f74cbb2_t.jpg En

  10. Intermittent Elevated Radium Concentrations in Coastal Plain Groundwater of South Carolina, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, Miles; Millings, Margaret; Noonkester, Jay

    2005-09-22

    To learn the cause of intermittent radium concentrations in groundwater of Coastal Plain aquifers, 31 groundwater wells in South Carolina, U.S.A. were sampled for radium and other geochemical parameters. Sediments cored from near the well screens were also sampled to examine any relationship between sediment properties and radium concentration in the groundwater. Elevated radium concentrations only occurred in groundwater with low electrical conductivity and pH values below 6.3. The adsorption edge for radium on hematite--a major surface active mineral in these aquifers--is at a pH value of about 6. Near this value, small changes in pH can result in significant adsorption or desorption of radium. In groundwater with initially low alkalinity, small intermittent decreases in partial pressure of carbon dioxide in groundwater cause decreases in pH and desorption of radium. The result is intermittent elevated radium concentrations.

  11. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign ...

  12. High Plains Bioenergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    owned subsidiary of Seaboard Foods, is a renewable energy company focused on producing alternative fuels from the Seaboard Foods integrated system. References: High Plains...

  13. Western Plains Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Western Plains Energy LLC Place: Oakley, Kansas Zip: 67748 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates: 40.714855, -111.298899 Show Map...

  14. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains Ethanol Place: Chancellor, South Dakota Zip: 57015 Product: Limited liability company owned by its 500 members which owns and...

  15. Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rhyolite ignimbrite eruptions, with single eruptions producing up to 2500 cubic km of ash. Island Park Caldera, measuring 18 miles (29 km) by 23 miles (37 km), may be the...

  16. Snake River Plain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Geothermal Project Profile Developer Standard Steam Trust Project Type Hydrothermal GEA Development Phase Phase I - Resource Procurement and...

  17. White Plains, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in White Plains, New York 3 Registered Financial Organizations in White Plains, New York 4 References US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in White Plains, New York Power Authority...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night Experiment: Doppler Lidar Operations Related Campaigns ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection at Night...

  19. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on ...

  20. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean ...

  1. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Mr. Garrett Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Rutherford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Campbell

  2. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of ...

  3. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: ... of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain, a 5 percent ...

  4. Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment...

  5. City of West Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plains, Missouri (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of West Plains Place: Missouri Phone Number: 417-256-7176 Website: westplains.nethallelectricde Twitter:...

  6. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Downwind, LLC Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Crystal Yarbrough

  7. Naturener USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy) Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111...

  8. High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Solar Power Plant Facility High Plains Ranch Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Sun Power Location Carizzo Plain, California Coordinates 35.1913858,...

  9. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register ...

  10. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  11. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  12. An evaluation of aquifer intercommunication between the unconfined and Rattlesnake Ridge aquifers on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, E.J.

    1987-10-01

    During 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study of a portion of the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer (confined aquifer) that lies beneath the B Pond - Gable Mountain Pond area of the Hanford Site. The purpose was to determine the extent of intercommunication between the unconfined aquifer and the uppermost regionally extensive confined aquifer, referred to as the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer. Hydraulic head data and chemical data were collected from the ground water in the study area during December 1986. The hydraulic head data were used to determine the effects caused by water discharged to the ground from B Pond on both the water table of the unconfined aquifer and the potentiometric surface of the confined aquifer. The chemical data were collected to determine the extent of chemical constituents migrating from the unconfined aquifer to the confined aquifer. Analysis of chemical constituents in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer demonstrated that communication between the unconfined and confined aquifers had occurred. However, the levels of contaminants found in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer during this study were below the DOE Derived Concentration Guides.

  13. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Configuration Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Well

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground ...

  15. Groundwater Discharge along a Channelized Coastal Plain Stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaSage, Danita M; Sexton, Joshua L; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Fryar, Alan E; Greb, Stephen F

    2015-10-01

    In the Coastal Plain of the southeastern USA, streams have commonly been artificially channelized for flood control and agricultural drainage. However, groundwater discharge along such streams has received relatively little attention. Using a combination of stream- and spring-flow measurements, spring temperature measurements, temperature profiling along the stream-bed, and geologic mapping, we delineated zones of diffuse and focused discharge along Little Bayou Creek, a channelized, first-order perennial stream in western Kentucky. Seasonal variability in groundwater discharge mimics hydraulic-head fluctuations in a nearby monitoring well and spring-discharge fluctuations elsewhere in the region, and is likely to reflect seasonal variability in recharge. Diffuse discharge occurs where the stream is incised into the semi-confined regional gravel aquifer, which is comprised of the Mounds Gravel. Focused discharge occurs upstream where the channel appears to have intersected preferential pathways within the confining unit. Seasonal fluctuations in discharge from individual springs are repressed where piping results in bank collapse. Thereby, focused discharge can contribute to the morphological evolution of the stream channel.

  16. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer. I. Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawter, Amanda R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wang, Guohui; Shao, Hongbo; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-08-04

    Capture and deep subsurface sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Batch and column experiments combined with wet chemical extractions were conducted to evaluate these risks to groundwater quality and to understand effects of CO2 leakage on aquifer chemistry and mineralogy. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, a confined sandstone aquifer, were used to study time-dependent release of major, minor and trace elements when exposed to CO2 gas. Results showed that Ca, Ba, Si, Mg, Sr, Na, and K increased either instantaneously or followed nonlinear increasing trends with time, indicating dissolution and/or desorption reactions controlled their release. Other elements, such as Mn and Fe, were also released from all sediments, creating a potential for redox reactions to occur. Results from acid extractions confirmed sediments had appreciable amounts of contaminants that may potentially be released into the aqueous phase. However, results from the batch and column experiments demonstrated that only a few trace elements (e.g., As, Cu, Cr, Pb) were released, indicating the risk of groundwater quality degradation due to exposure to leakage of sequestered CO2 is low. Concentrations of Mo were consistently higher in the control experiments (absence of CO2) and were below detection in the presence of CO2 indicating a possible benefit of CO2 in groundwater aquifers. These investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  17. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and

  18. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  19. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  20. plain-language-compliance-report-2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plain-language-compliance-report-2016 plain-language-compliance-report-2016 The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative. The areas referenced in this report are only a few of the successes we have encountered as we continue to implement the Act. Plain Language Compliance Report 2016.pdf (182.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Plain

  1. Summary of three dimensional pump testing of a fractured rock aquifer in the western Siberian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glalolenko, Y.V.; Mokrov, Y.G.; Ivanov, I.A.; Glagolev, A.V.; Vasil`kova, N.A.

    1996-10-30

    A group of scientists from the Savannah River Technology Center and Russia successfully completed a 17 day field investigation of a fractured rock aquifer at the MAYAK PA nuclear production facility in Russia. The test site is located in the western Siberian Basin near the floodplain of the Mishelyak river. The fractured rock aquifer is composed of orphyrites, tuff, tuffbreccia and lava and is overlain by 0.5--12 meters of elluvial and alluvial sediments. A network of 3 uncased wells (176, 1/96, and 2/96) was used to conduct the tests. Wells 176 and 2/96 were used as observation wells and the centrally located well 1/96 was used as the pumping well. Six packers were installed and inflated in each of the observation wells at a depth of up to 85 meters. The use of 6 packers in each well resulted in isolating 7 zones for monitoring. The packers were inflated to different pressures to accommodate the increasing hydrostatic pressure. A straddle packer assembly was installed in the pumping well to allow testing of each of the individual zones isolated in the observation wells. A constant rate pumping test was run on each of the 7 zones. The results of the pumping tests are included in Appendix A. The test provided new information about the nature of the fractured rock aquifers in the vicinity of the Mishelyak river and will be key information in understanding the behavior of contaminants originating from process wastes discharged to Lake Karachi. Results from the tests will be analyzed to determine the hydraulic properties of different zones within the fractured rock aquifer and to determine the most cost effective clean-up approach for the site.

  2. John Seaman | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seaman Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home John Seaman Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-0977 office (803) 725-3309 fax seaman(at)uga.edu Dr. Seaman's research interests include a number of active agricultural and environmental research areas: the land application of animal waste and coal combustion by-products; solute and contaminant transport modeling; reclamation of Cr(VI) contaminated aquifers and soils; in situ contaminant

  3. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luttrell, S.P.; Newcomer, D.R.; Teel, S.S.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify the ground-water and contaminant mass discharge to the Columbia River; and provide data that may be useful for a three-dimensional model of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the Hanford Townsite study area. The majority of ground-water contamination occurs within the unconfined aquifer; therefore, ground-water and contaminant discharge from the unconfined aquifer is the emphasis of this study. The period of study is primarily from June 1990 through March 1992.

  4. ARM - Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomPublicationsSouthern Great Plains Newsletter Archive Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive 2011 March PDF - 2.7MB 2010 September PDF - 1.6MB 2009 January PDF - 472KB February PDF - 472KB 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 January PDF - 7.4MB

  5. Savannah River

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements.

  6. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) | Department of Energy Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) (654.41 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line

  7. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hughes | Department of Energy from Marshall Hughes Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Marshall Hughes 07-10-15.pdf (14.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Patti McCutchen

  8. Savannah River Site 1991 Road Erosion Inventory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Cliff.

    2007-06-22

    Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 28 pp. Abstract - This paper explains the rationale and results of a 1991 road erosion inventory conducted by members of the USDA Forest Service – Savannah River (FS-SR) and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The inventory provided information for the Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR) to justify the need for developing an erosion and sediment control program with appropriate funding, personnel, and equipment. Federally managed since the early 1950’s, the SRS is located on 198,344 acres (80,301 hectares) in the South Carolina counties of Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale. Located along the eastern border of the Savannah River, the SRS is located within the Upper and Lower Coastal Plains of South Carolina.

  9. Ground-water solutes and eolian processes: An example from the High Plains of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Eolian dunes associated with saline-lake basins are important geologic features in arid and semiarid areas. The authors propose that eolian processes may also be important in controlling solute concentration and composition of ground water in these environments. A study of Double Lakes on the Southern High Plains of Texas suggests that approximately 200 megagrams of chloride enters this topographically closed basin from the surrounding water table aquifer, direct precipitation and surface runoff. Solute-transport simulation suggest that approximately 70 of the 200 megagrams of the chloride annually leaves the basin by diffusion and ground-water advection through a 30 meter-thick shale underlying the lake. The remaining 130 megagrams is hypothesized to be removed by eolian processes. Closed water-table contours around the lake and a hydrologic analysis suggest that it is improbable that solutes will reach the surrounding water-table aquifer by ground-water transport from this lake system. The conceptual eolian-transport model is further supported by observed chloride profiles in the unsaturated zone. When analyzed with estimates of recharge fluxes, these profiles suggest that approximately 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride enter the unsaturated zone downwind of the lake annually. Thus two independent methods suggest that 130 to 150 megagrams of chloride are removed from the basin annually by eolian process and redeposited downwind of the lake. Eolian input to the ground water is consistent with the observed plume shape as well as with the solute and isotopic composition of ground water in the water-table aquifer downwind of the lake basin.

  10. 30 TAC 213 - Edwards Aquifer | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    13 - Edwards Aquifer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 30 TAC 213 - Edwards AquiferLegal Published NA Year...

  11. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  12. Geochemical Triggers of Arsenic Mobilization during Managed Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recharge | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Geochemical Triggers of Arsenic Mobilization during Managed Aquifer Recharge Monday, February 29, 2016 Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an increasingly used water enhancement strategy, which involves subsurface storage of water supplies in groundwater aquifers. While MAR projects have the potential to alleviate water deficits, they can also adversely impact groundwater quality by altering the native geochemistry of the aquifer and

  13. Application of the Ferris test methods for estimating hydraulic properties near a river boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, T.J.; Spane, F.A. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Standard hydraulic test methods, such as constant-rate pumping tests, may be impractical for characterizing hazardous waste sites located near fluctuating hydrologic boundaries such as rivers or oceans. An alternate approach for hydrologic characterization at these locations is to analyze the groundwater responses associated with river-stage or tidal fluctuations to aquifer properties (i.e., hydraulic diffusivity). Based on this approach, aquifer properties were determined for an area adjoining the Columbia River on the Hanford Site using two sinusoidal analysis techniques described in Ferris (1952, 1963). The first method uses the observed groundwater time-lag response, the second uses the amplitude ratio of well water level to river stage. Both techniques assume the river fluctuations can be approximated by a sinusoidal pattern. A range for hydraulic conductivity was calculated based on the hydraulic diffusivity estimates obtained from the methods together with the known aquifer thickness (50 ft) and assumed specific yield (0.1). The analysis methods produced two overlapping hydraulic conductivity ranges, with the Ferris time-lag analysis method forming the upper bound of the range, and the Ferris well water-level/river-stage amplitude ratio method forming the lower bound. Results from a nearby standard constant-rate discharge aquifer test were also examined for comparison. These results were within the upper bound of the hydraulic conductivity range.

  14. Application of three aquifer test methods for estimating hydraulic properties within the 100-N Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, T.J.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Newcomer, D.R.; Sherwood, C.R.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose if this study was to better define the range of saturated horizontal hydraulic conductivities in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington for use in a numerical groundwater model. Three methods were used for determining aquifer properties and are discussed within this report (1) reanalysis of past pumping test data using a pressure derivative method to identify the data in the radial flow regime for analysis by traditional graphical techniques, (2) sinusoidal analysis techniques described in Ferris that utilize water-table responses to river-level variations, and (3) the basic flow equation for groundwater.

  15. Metabolic interdependencies between phylogenetically novel fermenters and respiratory organisms in an unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrighton, Kelly C.; Castelle, Cindy; Wilkins, Michael J.; Hug, Laura A.; Sharon, I.; Thomas, Brian C.; Handley, Kim M.; Mullin, Sean W.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Singh, Andrea; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-07-08

    Fermentation-based metabolism is an important ecosystem function often associated with environments rich in organic carbon, such as wetlands, sewage sludge, and the mammalian gut. The diversity of microorganisms and pathways involved in carbon and hydrogen cycling in sediments and aquifers and the impacts of these processes on other biogeochemical cycles remain poorly understood. Here we used metagenomics and proteomics to characterize microbial communities sampled from an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River at Rifle, Colorado, USA, and document interlinked microbial roles in geochemical cycling. The organic carbon content in the aquifer was elevated via two acetate-based biostimulation treatments. Samples were collected at three time points, with the objective of extensive genome recovery to enable metabolic reconstruction of the community. Fermentative community members include genomes from a new phylum (ACD20), phylogenetically novel members of the Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes, as well as candidate phyla genomes (OD1, BD1-5, SR1, WWE3, ACD58, TM6, PER, and OP11). These organisms have the capacity to produce hydrogen, acetate, formate, ethanol, butyrate, and lactate, activities supported by proteomic data. The diversity and expression of hydrogenases suggests the importance of hydrogen currency in the subsurface. Our proteogenomic data further indicate the consumption of fermentation intermediates by Proteobacteria can be coupled to nitrate, sulfate, and iron reduction. Thus, fermentation carried out by previously unstudied members of sediment microbial communities may be an important driver of diverse subsurface biogeochemical cycles.

  16. PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 » PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric

  17. New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight December 16, 2015 - 10:04am Addthis New Hydropower, Hidden in Plain Sight Timothy J. Welch Hydropower Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office What You Need to Know About Section 242 Funding The Energy Department began accepting applications today from hydropower owners and operators that produced hydroelectric power in 2014 from new equipment added to an existing dam or conduit since 2005. Applications for

  18. Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric transmission

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: ... Section 1002 of ANILCA deferred a decision on the management of oil and gas exploration ...

  20. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Dr. Contreras ...

  1. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ms. Callahan Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Callahan Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Ms. Callahan ...

  2. Des Plaines, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    10th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Des Plaines, Illinois Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) NARI National...

  3. Green Plains Renewable Energy Inc GPRE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Inc GPRE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Plains Renewable Energy Inc (GPRE) Place: Omaha, Nebraska Zip: 68114 Product: Nebraska-based publicly traded...

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Convection at Night Experiment: Doppler Lidar Operations 2015.06.01, Turner, SGP Comments? ... Lead Scientist : David Turner For data sets, see below. Abstract The Plains Elevated ...

  5. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil ...

  6. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the ...

  7. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Camelina Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains (The Camelina Company) Place: Montana Zip: MT 59911 Product: Manufacturer and marketer of biodiesel from...

  8. Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line ... through the Southwestern Power Administration ... NEPA Website, and through other channels of communication. ...

  9. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. ...

  10. GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region J. Braun, T. Van ... and characterize the four-dimensional distribution of water vapor within the atmosphere. ...

  11. Analysis of temperatures and water levels in wells to estimatealluvial aquifer hydraulic conductivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Grace W.; Jasperse, James; Seymour, Donald; Constantz, Jim

    2003-06-19

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from <0.28C in two wells to {approx}88C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers.

  12. Regional hydrology of the Green River-Moab area, northwestern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, F.E.; Whitfield, M.S.; Hart, I.M.

    1982-12-01

    The Green River-Moab area encompasses about 7800 square kilometers or about 25% of the Paradox basin. The entire Paradox basin is a part of the Colorado Plateaus that is underlain by a thick sequence of evaporite (salt) beds of Pennsylvanian age. The rock units that underlie the area have been grouped into hydrogeologic units based on their water-transmitting ability. Confining beds consist of evaporite beds of mostly salt, and overlying and underlying thick sequences of rocks with minimal permeability; above and below these confining beds are aquifers. The upper Mesozoic sandstone aquifer, probably is the most permeable hydrogeologic unit of the area and is the subject of this investigation. The principal component of groundwater outflow from this aquifer probably is subsurface flow to regional streams (the Green and Colorado Rivers) and is about 100 million cubic meters per year. All other components of outflow are relatively small. The average annual recharge to the aquifer is about 130 million cubic meters, of which about 20 million cubic meters is from local precipitation. For the lower aquifer, all recharge and discharge probably is by subsurface flow and was not estimated. The aquifers are generally isolated from the evaporite beds by the bounding confining beds; as a result, most ground water has little if any contact with the evaporites. Brines are present in the confining beds, but solution of beds of salt probably is very slow in most parts of the area. No brine discharges have been identified.

  13. Plain Writing Act of 2010 for the Web | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Requirements Plain Writing Act of 2010 for the Web Plain Writing Act of 2010 for the Web The Plain Writing Act requires federal documents to be clear, concise, and ...

  14. Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demonstration Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration ProgramLegal...

  15. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data Authors: Kowalsky, M. B. ; Finsterle, S. ; Commer, M. ; Williams, K. H. ; ...

  16. Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long Valley, California Authors R.O. Fournier, Michael L. Sorey, Robert H. Mariner and Alfred H. Truesdell Published Journal...

  17. Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mjsingleton@lbl.gov

    2004-06-29

    Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

  18. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  19. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burklund, Patrick W.

    1985-10-22

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  20. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  1. Tracer advection by steady groundwater flow in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sposito, Garrison; Weeks, Scott W.

    1997-01-02

    The perfectly stratified aquifer has often been investigated as a simple, tractable model for exploring new theoretical issues in subsurface hydrology. Adopting this approach, we show that steady groundwater flows in the perfectly stratified aquifer are always confined to a set of nonintersecting permanent surfaces, on which both streamlines and vorticity lines lie. This foliation of the flow domain exists as well for steady groundwater flows in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer. In the present model example it is a direct consequence of the existence of a stream function, we then demonstrate that tracer plume advection by steady groundwater flow in a perfectly stratified aquifer is never ergodic, regardless of the initial size of the tracer plume. This nonergodicity, which holds also for tracer advection in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer, implies that stochastic theories of purely advective tracer plume movement err in assuming ergodic behavior to simplify probabilistic calculations of plume spatial concentration moments.

  2. Optimizing multiphase aquifer remediation using ITOUGH2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

    1994-06-01

    The T2VOC computer model for simulating the transport of organic chemical contaminants in non-isothermal multiphase systems has been coupled to the ITOUGH2 code which solves parameter optimization problems. This allows one to use nonlinear programming and simulated annealing techniques to solve groundwater management problems, i.e. the optimization of multiphase aquifer remediation. This report contains three illustrative examples to demonstrate the optimization of remediation operations by means of simulation-minimization techniques. The code iteratively determines an optimal remediation strategy (e.g. pumping schedule) which minimizes, for instance, pumping and energy costs, the time for cleanup, and residual contamination. While minimizing the objective function is straightforward, the relative weighting of different performance measures--e.g. pumping costs versus cleanup time versus residual contaminant content--is subject to a management decision process. The intended audience of this report is someone who is familiar with numerical modeling of multiphase flow of contaminants, and who might actually use T2VOC in conjunction with ITOUGH2 to optimize the design of aquifer remediation operations.

  3. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the

  4. (Ines_Triay)_Final_Testimony.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... These wastes sit above the sole source Snake River Plain Aquifer, which is the size of Lake Erie, and is the irrigation supply for a substantial agricultural industry in the ...

  5. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    47 DOEEIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 4.8.2 SUBSURFACE WATER Subsurface water at INEEL occurs in the under- lying Snake River Plain Aquifer and the vadose zone (area of unsaturated ...

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region.

  7. Plain Energy GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Plain Energy GmbH Place: Munchen, Germany Zip: D-81675 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Germany-based renewable energy investment...

  8. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS Summary Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a ...

  9. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy (MIE) Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  10. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  11. PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE | Department of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the ...

  12. Microsoft Word - Plain Language Compliance Report 2016.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    For example, visitors can enter a search term and find that information on Energy.gov; ... found most user search queries consist of terms that are simple and in Plain Language. ...

  13. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (July 2010) PDF icon Update to Plains & Eastern Clean ...

  14. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Transmission Line - Part 2 Application Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application In addition to conducting a NEPA review of the proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line project, DOE will also conduct due diligence on non-NEPA factors such as the project's technical and financial feasibility and whether the project is in the public interest. DOE will conduct a thorough review that includes making all required statutory

  15. Possible Impacts of Global Warming on Hydrology of the Ogallala Aquifer Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Norman J. ); Epstein, Daniel J. ); Wang, Dahong; Vail, Lance W. ); Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Arnold, J G.

    1998-12-01

    The Ogallala or High Plains aquifer provides water for about 20% of the irrigated land in the United States. About 20 km{sup 3} (16.6 million acre-feet) of water are withdrawn annually from this aquifer. In general, recharge has not compensated for withdrawals since major irrigation development began in this region in the 1940s. The mining of the Ogallala has been pictured as an analogue to climate change in that many GCMs predict a warmer and drier future for this region. We anticipate the possible impacts of climate change on the sustainability of the aquifer as a source of water for irrigation and other purposes in the region. We have applied HUMUS, the Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S. to the Missouri and Arkansas-White-Red water resource regions that overlie the Ogallala. We have imposed three general circulation model (GISS, UKTR and BMRC) projections of future climate change on this region and simulated the changes that may be induced in water yields (runoff plus lateral flow) and ground water recharge. Each GCM was applied to HUMUS at three levels of global mean temperature (GMT) to represent increasing severity of climate change (a surrogate for time). HUMUS was also run at three levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration (hereafter denoted by[CO2]) in order to estimate the impacts of direct CO2 effects on photosynthesis and evapotranspiration. Since the UKTR and GISS GCMs project increased precipitation in the Missouri basin, water yields increase there. The BMRC GCM predicts sharply decreased precipitation and, hence, reduced water yields. Precipitation reductions are even greater in the Arkansas basin under BMRC as are the consequent water yield losses. GISS and UKTR climates lead to only moderate yield losses in the Arkansas. CO2-fertilization reverses these losses and yields increase slightly. CO2 fertilization increases recharge in the base (no climate change) case in both basins. Recharge is reduced under all three GCMs and severities of climate change.

  16. Modeling cross-hole slug tests in an unconfined aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-06-28

    Cross-hole slug test date are analyzed with an extended version of a recently published unconfined aquifer model accounting for waterable effects using the linearized kinematic condition. The use of cross-hole slug test data to characterize aquifer heterogeneity and source/observation well oscillation parameters is evaluated. The data were collected in a series of multi-well and multi-level pneumatic slug tests conducted at a site in Widen, Switzerland. Furthermore, the tests involved source and observation well pairs separated by distances of up to 4 m, and instrumented with pressure transducers to monitor aquifer response in discrete intervals.

  17. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O'Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  18. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer: II. Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Wang, Guohui; Shao, Hongbo; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-08-04

    Large scale deployment of CO2 geological sequestration requires the assessment of the risks. One of the potential risks is the impact of CO2 leakage on shallow groundwater overlying the sequestration site.The understanding of the key chemical processes and parameters are critical for building numerical models for risk assessment. Model interpretation of laboratory and field tests is an effective way to enhance such understanding. Column experiments in which CO2 charged synthetic groundwater flowed through a column packed with material from High Plains aquifer was conducted and concentration of several constituents in the effluent water was analyzed. In this paper, reactive transport model was developed to interpret the observed concentration changes, attempting to shed light on the chemical reactions and key parameters that control the concentration changes of these constituents. The reactive transport model catches the concentration changes of pH, Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cs, As and Pb fairly well. Calcite dissolution and Ca-driven cation exchange reactions are the major drivers for the concentration changes of Ca, Ba, Sr, and Cs. The pH-driven adsorption/desorption reactions lead to a concentration increase of As and Pb. The volume fraction and reactive surface area of calcite, CEC and sorption capacity are key parameters in determining the magnitude of concentration increase. Model results also show that the dissolution of calcite with Ba impurity could be an alternative explanation of the increase in Ba concentration.

  19. Subtask 7.3 - The Socioeconomic Impact of Climate Shifts in the Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc; Tera Buckley; Troy Simonsen

    2007-12-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated the water demand response/vulnerability to climate change factors of regional economic sectors in the northern Great Plains. Regardless of the cause of climatic trends currently observed, the research focused on practical evaluation of climate change impact, using water availability as a primary factor controlling long-term regional economic sustainability. Project results suggest that the Upper Missouri, Red River, and Upper Mississippi Watersheds exhibit analogous response to climate change, i.e., extended drought influences water availability in the entire region. The modified trend suggests that the next period for which the Red River Basin can expect a high probability of below normal precipitation will occur before 2050. Agriculture is the most sensitive economic sector in the region; however, analyses confirmed relative adaptability to changing conditions. The price of agricultural commodities is not a good indicator of the economic impact of climate change because production and price do not correlate and are subject to frequent and irregular government intervention. Project results confirm that high water demand in the primary economic sectors makes the regional economy extremely vulnerable to climatic extremes, with a similar response over the entire region. Without conservation-based water management policies, long-term periods of drought will limit socioeconomic development in the region and may threaten even the sustainability of current conditions.

  20. Sole Source Aquifer Protection Program (EPA) | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sole Source Aquifer Protection Program (EPA) Section 1424(e) of the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-523, 42 U.S.C. 300 et. seq) authorizes the U.S. Environmental ...

  1. Appendix B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data This page intentionally left blank ... 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST I 300 400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST 2 200 250 ...

  2. Underground helium travels to the Earth's surface via aquifers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tweet EmailPrint Before it can put the party in party balloons, helium is carried from deep within the Earth's crust to the surface via aquifers, according to new research...

  3. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of Radionuclide Monitoring in the CSRA Savannah River NERP Research ... Upcoming Seminars The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory is a research unit of the ...

  4. Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Experiment Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D; Parsons, D; Geerts, B

    2015-03-01

    The Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment is a large field campaign that is being supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with contributions from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Atmospheric and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The overarching goal of the PECAN experiment is to improve the understanding and simulation of the processes that initiate and maintain convection and convective precipitation at night over the central portion of the Great Plains region of the United States (Parsons et al. 2013). These goals are important because (1) a large fraction of the yearly precipitation in the Great Plains comes from nocturnal convection, (2) nocturnal convection in the Great Plains is most often decoupled from the ground and, thus, is forced by other phenomena aloft (e.g., propagating bores, frontal boundaries, low-level jets [LLJ], etc.), (3) there is a relative lack of understanding how these disturbances initiate and maintain nocturnal convection, and (4) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well. This leads to significant uncertainties in predicting the onset, location, frequency, and intensity of convective cloud systems and associated weather hazards over the Great Plains.

  5. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.M.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is an aquifer modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24 percent, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  6. 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report for BPA Grant Exp Restore Walla Walla River Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, Bob

    2009-07-10

    WWBWC and its partners have been working on a wide variety of conservation and aquifer recharge related activities including: monitoring groundwater and surface water conditions, creating a geospatial database for the Walla Walla River valley (project focal area), expanding aquifer recharge testing at the HBDIC site and conducting an extensive outreach/education program by which to share the information, ideas and potential solutions to our current water management issues in this basin. This report is an outline of those activities and is accompanied by individual program-component (attached as appendices) reports for the areas that BPA is assisting to fund these on-the-ground projects along with the innovative research and monitoring being done to further aquifer recharge as a water management tool for the Pacific Northwest.

  7. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3­?type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra­-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  8. EPA Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Plain English Guide to the Clean Air Act Author...

  9. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for ...

  10. Snake River Plain Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis - Phase 1 KMZ files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Shervais

    2015-10-10

    This dataset contain raw data files in kmz files (Google Earth georeference format). These files include volcanic vent locations and age, the distribution of fine-grained lacustrine sediments (which act as both a seal and an insulating layer for hydrothermal fluids), and post-Miocene faults compiled from the Idaho Geological Survey, the USGS Quaternary Fault database, and unpublished mapping. It also contains the Composite Common Risk Segment Map created during Phase 1 studies, as well as a file with locations of select deep wells used to interrogate the subsurface.

  11. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education

  12. NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement EXECUTION VERSION PARTICIPATION AGREEMENT among THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and PLAINS AND EASTERN CLEAN LINE HOLDINGS LLC, ARKANSAS CLEAN LINE LLC, PLAINS AND EASTERN CLEAN LINE OKLAHOMA LLC and certain of their Affiliates (as set forth herein) dated as of March 25, 2016 NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement Table of Contents Article I Defined Terms and Definitions

  13. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Dr. Contreras 6-10-15.pdf (608.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras

  14. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Save The

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ozarks | Department of Energy from Save The Ozarks Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Save The Ozarks Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment by Save the Ozarks 07-13-15.pdf (112.79 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains and

  15. EIS-0390: Eastern Plains Transmission Project, Colorado and Kansas.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for Western Area Power Administration's proposal to participate with Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. (Tri-State), to construct the proposed Eastern Plains Transmission Project (Project). Western’s participation with Tri-State would be in exchange for capacity rights on the transmission lines.

  16. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1982-01-01

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24%, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  17. Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home ... Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Precision analytical ...

  18. Wildflowers of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seger, Tona

    2015-08-01

    This guidebook is a resource to help field personnel (nonbotanists) identify plants on the Savannah River Site (SRS) premises. Although not a complete flora guide, this publication contains information about 123 plant species found on the SRS. Plants are listed by their common names and arranged by the color of the flower. The SRS supports a diverse array of plant communities. Land use history, the establishment of the SRS, and current land management practices have shaped the flora presently found on the SRS. Located south of Aiken, SC, SRS spans 198,344 acres with land covering Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties. Situated on the Upper Coastal Plain and Sandhills physiographic provinces, the SRS has more than 50 distinct soil types. The topography is rolling to flat with elevation ranges from 50 to 400 feet above sea level.

  19. Anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX in aquifer material. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borden, R.C.; Hunt, M.J.; Shafer, M.B.; Barlaz, M.A.

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted in two petroleum-contaminated aquifers to examine the anaerobic biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers (BTEX) under ambient conditions. Aquifer material was collected from locations at the source, mid-plume and end-plume at both sites, incubated under ambient conditions, and monitored for disappearance of the test compounds. In the mid-plume location at the second site, in-situ column experiments were also conducted for comparison with the laboratory microscosm and field-scale results. In the end-plume microcosms, biodegradation was variable with extensive biodegradation in some microcosms and little or no biodegradation in others.

  20. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  1. Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath aperennial river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2007-05-15

    The presence of an unsaturated region beneath a streambedduring groundwater pumping near streams reduces the pumping capacity whenit reaches the well screens, changes flow paths, and alters the types ofbiological transformations in the streambed sediments. Athree-dimensional, multi-phase flow model of two horizontal collectorwells along the Russian River near Forestville, California was developedto investigate the impact of varying the ratio of the aquifer tostreambed permeability on (1) the formation of an unsaturated regionbeneath the stream, (2) the pumping capacity, (3) stream-water fluxesthrough the streambed, and (4) stream-water travel times to the collectorwells. The aquifer to streambed permeability ratio at which theunsaturated region was initially observed ranged from 10 to 100. The sizeof the unsaturated region beneath the streambed increased as the aquiferto streambed permeability ratio increased. The simulations also indicatedthat for a particular aquifer permeability, decreasing the streambedpermeability by only a factor of 2-3 from the permeability wheredesaturation initially occurred resulted in reducing the pumpingcapacity. In some cases, the stream-water fluxes increased as thestreambed permeability decreased. However, the stream water residencetimes increased and the fraction of stream water that reached that thewells decreased as the streambed permeability decreased, indicating thata higher streambed flux does not necessarily correlate to greaterrecharge of stream water around the wells.

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 1997 and replaced with two other areas, both located in the Savannah River swamp. ... on the natural levy that parallels the Savannah River. Area: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...

  3. River Corridor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Corridor Richland Operations Office Richland Operations Office River Corridor B Reactor 300 Area 324 Building 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds C Reactor D and DR Reactors F ...

  4. River Corridor Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Closure Hanford and previous contractors have completed much of the cleanup work in the River Corridor, shown here.

  5. QER- Comment of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To: Members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U.S. Department of Energy Enclosed please find comments submitted on behalf of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. for the record of the QER’s August 21, 2014 Infrastructure Siting and Permitting Meeting in Cheyenne, WY. Feel free to contact me if you need anything further regarding this communication.

  6. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 | Department of Energy Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 The Department of Energy (DOE) requests public comment on the first complete application submitted in response to its June 10, 2010 Request for Proposals for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 in the Federal

  7. Alluvial plains and earthquake recurrence at the Coalinga anticline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, A.B. ); Donahue, D.J.; Jull, A.J.T ); Payen, L.A. ); Atwater, B.F.; Trumm, D.A.; Tinsley, J.C. III; Stein, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Having approached 0.5 m during the May 2 earthquake, the uplift of Quaternary deposits on the Coalinga anticline may provide evidence of the average repeat time of similar earthquakes during the recent geologic past. Stein and King (1984) estimated the average late Quaternary repeat time to be 500 to 1,500 yr from the degree of folding in the upper Pliocene and Pleistocene Tulare Formation; in addition, they estimated the average Holocene repeat time to be at least 200 to 600 yr on the basis of an alluvial-plain profile near Los Gatos Creek, whose arroyo extends across the Coalinga anticline from the synclinal Pleasant Valley into the synclinal San Joaquin Valley. In this chapter, the authors estimate an average repeat time from the stratigraphy of Holocene alluvium exposed in the walls of that arroyo. Largely deposited overbank, this alluvium reveals the approximate configuration of former alluvial plains whose present configuration over the anticline should reflect the rate of anticlinal growth. Resulting constraints on the Holocene uplift rate, though made uncertain by possible differences in the initial configuration of the alluvial plains, suggest an average repeat time of at least 200 to 1,000 yr for major (M = 6-7) Coalinga-area earthquakes during the late Holocene.

  8. Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift.

  9. Fractured rock aquifer tests in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1997-10-01

    A series of multi-zone pumping tests was conducted in a contaminated fractured rock aquifer in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia. The tests were conducted adjacent to the Mishelyak River floodplain in fractured Paleozoic porphyrites, tufts, tuff breccia, and lava typical of the Ural mountain complex. Geophysical logs, borehole photography, core samples, and results from previous borehole contamination studies were used to identify the zones to be tested. A network of three uncased wells was tested using a system of inflatable packers, pressure transducers and data loggers. Seven zones were isolated and monitored in two of the uncased wells. A straddle packer assembly was used to isolate individual zones within the pumping well. Eight constant rate pumping tests were conducted. Results of the testing indicate that shallow groundwater migrates primarily in two intervals that are separated by an interval with low lateral conductivity. The water bearing intervals have moderate to high specific capacities (1.3 and 30 L/min/m). Several processes are responsible for fracturing present in the lower interval. The network of compound fractures produced a complex array of fracture intersections yielding a fractured media with hydraulic behavior similar to porous media. Models used for the analysis of pumping tests in porous media provide a good estimation of the hydraulic response of the lower interval to pumping. Future work will include more complex analysis of the data to determine hydraulic conductivity ellipses.

  10. Office of River Protection - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of River Protection Office of River Protection Office of River Protection Office of River Protection Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease...

  11. Plain Language: A Commitment to Writing You Can Understand | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Plain Language: A Commitment to Writing You Can Understand Plain Language: A Commitment to Writing You Can Understand The Plain Writing Act of 2010 requires federal agencies to write "clear Government communication that the public can understand and use." President Obama also emphasized the importance of establishing "a system of transparency, public participation, and collaboration" in his January 21, 2009, Memorandum on Transparency and Open Government. We here

  12. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development

  13. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. An analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.

  14. Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Hubbard, S.S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this paper is to provide new insights into processes affecting riverbank filtration (RBF). We consider a system with an inflatable dam installed for enhancing water production from downstream collector wells. Using a numerical model, we investigate the impact of groundwater pumping and dam operation on the hydrodynamics in the aquifer and water production. We focus our study on two processes that potentially limit water production of an RBF system: the development of an unsaturated zone and riverbed clogging. We quantify river clogging by calibrating a time-dependent riverbed permeability function based on knowledge of pumping rate, river stage, and temperature. The dynamics of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1) riverbed permeability is the dominant factor affecting infiltration needed for sustainable RBF production; (2) dam operation can influence pumping efficiency and prevent the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed only under conditions of sufficient riverbed permeability; (3) slow river velocity, caused by dam raising during summer months, may lead to sedimentation and deposition of fine-grained material within the riverbed, which may clog the riverbed, limiting recharge to the collector wells and contributing to the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed; and (4) higher river flow velocities, caused by dam lowering during winter storms, scour the riverbed an thus increase its permeability. These insights can be used as the basis for developing sustainable water management of a RBF system.

  15. Stormwater runoff policy on the Spokane/Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E.O.

    1990-01-01

    The Panhandle Health District, in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, is developing a stormwater runoff control program under the US EPA Wellhead Protection Program. The goal of the project is to protect the Spokane Valley/Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer from widespread subsurface disposal of stormwater runoff via shallow injection wells. Studies conducted by the health district in 1976 and 1977 established that areas downgradient from urban land uses had elevated nitrate level sand that the aquifer is vulnerable to contamination from surface activities. The stormwater runoff controls are being developed in conjunction with similar programs, such as chemical storage and use, solid waste and subsurface sewage disposal. The expected result will be a groundwater management system that protects the resource by preventing contamination rather than a program that responds to poor water quality with costly remedial action.

  16. EIS-0486: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of participating with Clean Line Energy Partners LLC (Clean Line) in the proposed Plains & Eastern Project. The proposed project would include an overhead ± 600 kilovolt (kV) high voltage direct current (HVDC) electric transmission system and associated facilities with the capacity to deliver approximately 3,500 megawatts (MW) primarily from renewable energy generation facilities in the Oklahoma Panhandle region to load-serving entities in the Mid-South and Southeast via an interconnection with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

  17. In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the

  18. River and Plateau Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village August 18, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village Alison LaBonte Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager To date, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is the only company to have built, operated and delivered power to a utility grid from a hydrokinetic tidal project, and to a local microgrid from a hydrokinetic

  19. Savannah River National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance 'Tin whiskers' suppression method Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a treatment method that slows or prevents the formation of whiskers in lead-free solder. Tin whiskers spontaneously grow from thin films of tin, often found in microelectronic devices in the form of solders and platings. Background This problem was

  20. Savannah River Site A/M Area Southern Sector Characterization Cone Penetrometer Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raabe, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is located in the Atlantic Coastal Plaingeologic province. This area is characterized by low relief, predominantly unconsolidated sediments of Cretaceous though Tertiary age. A multiple aquifer system underlies the A/M Area and affects the definition and distribution of a contaminant plume. The water table and uppermost confined aquifer (Steed Pond Aquifer) are contaminated with elevated concentrations of trichloroethylene(TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their associated compounds. The deeper aquifers in this area have less widely spread chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.Cone penetrometer testing was selected as the method of investigation because it is minimally invasive, offers advanced technological capabilities in gathering lithologic data, and offers groundwater sampling capabilities. CPT testing utilizes a hydraulic push tool system. The probe collects real-time data that is processed by computer into soil/lithology classifications. The system can also be used to collect sediment and soil vapor samples although these features were not utilized during this project. Advantages of the CPT system include a small borehole diameter which minimizes cross-contamination of lithologic units, virtual elimination of drill cuttings and fluids that require disposal, collection of various types of undisturbed sediment and water samples and plotting of hydrostratigraphic and lithologic data while in the field.

  1. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  2. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  3. River of Power (1987)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  4. Use of natural radionuclides to predict the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, N.; Laul, J.C.; Perkins, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    In appropriate aquifers the natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series are important sources of information about the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers. The Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate and Granite Wash aquifers in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle are prime examples of such aquifers. Sampling and analysis for key radionuclides in the ground waters of these aquifers are quite feasible and have been accomplished. Key early results are: (1) Ra does not appear to be retarded by sorption, (2) Th appears to be strongly sorbed, (3) kinetics seem to be different on time scales of days to months than on ones of hundreds of thousands of years, and (4) U and Th behave similarly when the time scales (half-lives) are similar, leading to the suggestion that uranium is in the +4 valence state in these aquifers. 10 references, 3 figures.

  5. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  6. Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Lower Colorado River Authority's communications requirements Lower Colorado River Authority (134.07

  7. about Savannah River National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The EDM capability at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is unique to the Savannah River Site. It allows for very fine, precise cutting of metal without destroying ...

  8. Savannah River Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Savannah River

  9. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  10. Summertime Low-Level Jets over the Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stensrud, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The sky over the southern Great Plains Cloud and Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during the predawn and early morning hours often is partially obstructed by stratocumulus, stratus fractus, or cumulus fractus that are moving rapidly to the north, even through the surface winds are weak. This cloud movement is evidence of the low-level jet (LLJ), a wind speed maximum that occurs in the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere. Owing to the wide spacing between upper-air sounding sites and the relatively infrequent sounding launches, LLJ evolution has been difficult to observe adequately, even though the effects of LLJs on moisture flux into North America are large. Model simulation of the LLJ is described.

  11. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  12. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  13. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous

  14. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  15. River and Harbors Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 U.S.C. 403) prohibits the unauthorized obstruction or alteration of any navigable water of the United States.

  16. Savannah river site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to supply and process tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen that is a vital component of nuclear weapons. SRS loads tritium and non-tritium...

  17. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river drainage, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Henriette I.; Baskaran, Latha M.; Schweizer, Peter E.; Turhollow, Anthony F.; Brandt, Craig C.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2014-05-15

    We study that the mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remain a significant concern for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.

  18. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river basin, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha Malar; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    The mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remain a significant concern for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.

  19. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river drainage, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jager, Henriette I.; Baskaran, Latha M.; Schweizer, Peter E.; Turhollow, Anthony F.; Brandt, Craig C.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2014-05-15

    We study that the mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remainmore » a significant concern for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.« less

  20. Forecasting changes in water quality in rivers associated with growing biofuels in the Arkansas-White-Red river basin, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jager, Yetta; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha Malar; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    The mid-section of the Arkansas-White-Red (AWR) river basin near the 100th parallel is particularly promising for sustainable biomass production using cellulosic perennial crops and residues. Along this longitudinal band, precipitation becomes limiting to competing crops that require irrigation from an increasingly depleted groundwater aquifer. In addition, the deep-rooted perennial, switchgrass, produces modest-to-high yields in this region with minimal inputs and could compete against alternative crops and land uses at relatively low cost. Previous studies have also suggested that switchgrass and other perennial feedstocks offer environmentally benign alternatives to corn and corn stover. However, water quality implications remain a significant concernmore » for conversion of marginal lands to bioenergy production because excess nutrients produced by agriculture for food or for energy contribute to eutrophication in the dead-zone in the Gulf of Mexico. This study addresses water quality implications for the AWR river basin. We used the SWAT model to compare water quality in rivers draining a baseline, pre-cellulosic-bioenergy and post-cellulosic-bioenergy landscapes for 2022 and 2030. Simulated water quality responses varied across the region, but with a net tendency toward decreased amounts of nutrient and sediment, particularly in subbasins with large areas of bioenergy crops in 2030 future scenarios. We conclude that water quality is one aspect of sustainability for which cellulosic bioenergy production in this region holds promise.« less

  1. Composite refraction-reflection stack sections: Tracing faults in the Atlantic coastal plain sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, D.E.; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.

    1993-05-01

    Seismic data from the Atlantic Coastal Plain are reprocessed and composite refraction-reflection stack sections produced to investigate basement faults that penetrate upward into Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments in South Carolina. Reprocessing recovered reflections from within the deep crust to the Moho as well as from within thin veneer (300) of the Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments. One of the major objectives of this paper is to discuss the use of shallow refracted arrivals to construct a composite refraction- reflection stack that allows better imaging of the subsurface at shallow depths.

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beech-Hardwood Forest As one of the original habitat reserves, this 119-acre (48.2 ha) Set-Aside was selected to represent bottomland floodplain and ravine forest habitats associated with the lower reaches of the relatively nonimpacted Upper Three Runs Creek. This Area is unique because some of the tree species found here are not common in the Coastal Plain and are more likely to be found in the Piedmont or Mountain physiographic provinces. This Area also has a small number of beech trees (Fagus

  3. Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  4. Flambeau River Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flambeau River Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Flambeau River Biofuels Place: Park Falls, Wisconsin Sector: Biomass Product: A subsidiary of Flambeau River Papers LLC...

  5. Raft River Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Raft River Geothermal Facility General Information Name Raft River Geothermal Facility Facility Raft River...

  6. Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place: Hudson, South Dakota Zip: 57034 Product: Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

  7. Office of River Protection - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of River Protection Office of River Protection About ORP ORP Projects & Facilities Newsroom Contracts & Procurements Contact ORP Office of River Protection Email Email Page...

  8. Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Savannah River Site FY 2016 FY 2016 Performance Evaluation Plan, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC FY 2015 FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Savannah River Nuclear ...

  9. Wing River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name Wing River Wind Farm Facility Wing River Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wing River...

  10. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste ...