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1

State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information This list was compiled by the federal government's Interagency...

2

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are hosting their 59th Annual Fall Convention in Pendleton, Oregon. The DOE Office of Indian Energy is sponsoring a workshop for tribal leaders and...

3

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-Year Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) is a regional organization comprised of American Indians in the states of Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Nevada, Northern California, and Alaska....

4

Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

6

Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sponsored by the Association on American Indian Affairs, this one-day conference is for federal, state, and local government officials and business leaders who have a need to develop working relationships with tribes and organizations.

7

Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

District Date(s) Tribe(s) State(s) Program/Project Tribal Issues/Concerns Status Lakes & Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Oklahoma Cherokee Nation (OK) Chickasaw Nation (OK) Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Citizen Potawatomi Nation (OK) Shawnee Tribe (OK) United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma Wyandotte Nation (OK of Cherokee Indians (NC) Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota Kickapoo Traditional Tribe

US Army Corps of Engineers

9

Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to collect preliminary site data. A report was prepared by Alaska Power & Telephone (Larry Coupe) including preliminary layouts, capacities, potential environmental issues, and projected costs. Findings and Conclusions Wind Energy The average wind resources measured at both sites were marginal, with annual average wind speeds of 13.6-14.0 mph at a 65-meter hub height, and wind shears of 0.08-0.13. Using GE 1.5 MW wind turbines with a hub height of 65 meters, yields a net capacity factor of approximately 0.19. The cost-of-energy for a commercial project is estimated at approximately 9.6 cents per kWh using current costs for capital and equipment prices. Economic viability for a commercial wind power station would require a subsidy of 40-50% of the project capital cost, loans provided at approximately 2% rate of interest, or a combination of grants and loans at substantially below market rates. Recommendations: Because the cost-of-energy from wind power is decreasing, and because there may be small pockets of higher winds on the reservation, our recommendation is to: (1) Leave one of the two anemometer towers, preferably the 50-meter southern unit MCC, in place and continue to collect data from this site. This site would serve as an excellent reference anemometer for the Olympic Peninsula, and, (2) If funds permit, relocate the northern tower (MCB) to a promising small site closer to the transmission line with the hope of finding a more energetic site that is easier to develop. Small Hydroelectric There are a very limited number of sites on the reservation that have potential for economical hydroelectric development, even in conjunction with water supply development. Two sites emerged as the most promising and were evaluated: (1) One utilizing four creeks draining the north side of the Cape Flattery peninsula (Cape Creeks), and (2) One on the Waatch River to the south of Neah Bay. The Cape Creeks site would be a combination water supply and 512 kW power generation facility and would cost a approximately $11,100,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 1,300,0

RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

Troge, Michael [Project Manager

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Nez Perce Tribe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Jay Hesse Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries salmon abundance and productivity have been and continue to be influenced by construction and operation related to productivity; (1) adult abundance, (2) hatchery programs, (3) management actions, and (4

13

Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in an unprecedented set of agreements designed to improve habitat and strengthen fish stocks in the upper Columbia River Basin over the next 10 years. The new agreement...

15

Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report provides a concise retrospective and summary of all facets of the Sheldon Jackson College electrical Infrastructure Renovation portion of the Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska. The Project Overview describes the origins of the project, the original conditions that provided the impetus for the grant funding, how the grant amendment was developed, the conceptual design development, and the actual parameters of the final project as it went out to bid. The Project Overview also describes the ''before and after'' conditions of the project. The Objectives division of this Final Technical Report describes the amendment-funded goals of the project. It also describes the milestones of project development and implementation, as well as, the rationale behind the milestone array. The Description of Activities Performed division of this report provides an in-depth chronological analysis of progressive project implementation. Photographs will provide further illustration of particular functional aspects of the renovation project within project parameters. The Conclusions and Recommendations division of this report provides a comprehensive retrospective analysis of the project.

Rebecca Garrett

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Microsoft Word - CX_Priest_River_Acquistiont.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Kalispell) for purchase of Priest River (Flesher) property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-061-00, Contract BPA-004991 Categorical Exclusion...

17

Train, Henrichs, and Archer: Medicinal Uses of Plants by Indian Tribes of Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tribes of Nevada. Percy Train. James R. Henrichs. and W.prepared by the wife of Percy Train (now deceased), declares

Zigmond, Maurice L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

CA-TRIBE-YUROK TRIBE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

YUROK TRIBE Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-YUROK CA TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Yurok Tribe of California proposes to conduct...

19

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Strategic Energy Planning (Area 1) Consultants Reports to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Federally Recognized Indian Tribe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assets that Citizen Potawatomi Nation holds were evaluated to help define the strengths and weaknesses to be used in pursuing economic prosperity. With this baseline assessment, a Planning Team will create a vision for the tribe to integrate into long-term energy and business strategies. Identification of energy efficiency devices, systems and technologies was made, and an estimation of cost benefits of the more promising ideas is submitted for possible inclusion into the final energy plan. Multiple energy resources and sources were identified and their attributes were assessed to determine the appropriateness of each. Methods of saving energy were evaluated and reported on and potential revenue-generating sources that specifically fit the tribe were identified and reported. A primary goal is to create long-term energy strategies to explore development of tribal utility options and analyze renewable energy and energy efficiency options. Associated goals are to consider exploring energy efficiency and renewable economic development projects involving the following topics: (1) Home-scale projects may include construction of a home with energy efficiency or renewable energy features and retrofitting an existing home to add energy efficiency or renewable energy features. (2) Community-scale projects may include medium to large scale energy efficiency building construction, retrofit project, or installation of community renewable energy systems. (3) Small business development may include the creation of a tribal enterprise that would manufacture and distribute solar and wind powered equipment for ranches and farms or create a contracting business to include energy efficiency and renewable retrofits such as geothermal heat pumps. (4) Commercial-scale energy projects may include at a larger scale, the formation of a tribal utility formed to sell power to the commercial grid, or to transmit and distribute power throughout the tribal community, or hydrogen production, and propane and natural-gas distribution systems.

Smith, Marvin; Bose, James; Beier, Richard; Chang, Young Bae

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

BIA Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Download the Bureau of Indian Affairs Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes, due November 29.

22

Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be? Harbor Branch launches new study of humans who eat fish and live around the estuary By Scott Wyland Tuesday, May 22, 2012 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A 20-year-old man fishes local waters every day for his meals and scoffs

Belogay, Eugene A.

23

DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects, Fall 2012 (Newsletter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Fall 2012.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Robertson, Shawn W.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...

28

MHK Projects/Colorado River Indian Tribes IRR DI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:Luz IILynnM Setek85

29

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

President Theodore Roosevelt and the American Indian, 1901-1909  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This legislation was to have a 19 profound impact on Indian affairs for many years. The act defined Indian country as areas outside any state boundaries; the overwhelming 20 bulk of such land lay to the west of the Mississippi River. The practice of issuing... lands that had been secured by the United States through treaties with the several Indian tribes. It was now decreed that annuities should be paid to the chiefs or other designated representatives rather than to individual Indians. The previous policy...

Davis, David Harris

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1986. Renegade Tribe: The Palouse Indians and the Invasionthe Spokane, Yakima, Palouse, and Coeur d’Alene peoples.

Barnd, Natchee Blu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Oneida Tribe Energy Audits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

Olson, Ray [Energy Controls Manager; Schubert, Eugene [Policy Analyst

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to and from the tribal medical, dental, behavioral health and massage clinics. Often the demand-response requests that come to STTS are for one to three passengers at a time;...

35

Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper Quy-Toan Do (The World ABSTRACT Water pollution levels in many developing countries remain significantly higher than in the developed world. While such pollution is often a byproduct of economic activity, it also imparts a health

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

36

Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Indian tribe organized pursuant to the 1934 Wheeler-Howard Act (“Indian Reorganization Act”). The Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation lies along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri River pursuant to the Pick Sloan Act. The grid accessible at the Big Bend Dam facility operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is less than one mile of the wind farm contemplated by the Tribe in this response. The low-head hydroelectric turbines further being studied would be placed below the dam and would be turned by the water released from the dam itself. The riverbed at this place is within the exterior boundaries of the reservation. The low-head turbines in the tailrace would be evaluated to determine if enough renewable energy could be developed to pump water to a reservoir 500 feet above the river.

Shawn A. LaRoche; Tracey LeBeau; Innovation Investments, LLC

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Energy Audits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will conduct energy audits of nine Tribally-owned governmental buildings in three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to provide a basis for evaluating and selecting the technical and economic viability of energy efficiency improvement options. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will follow established Tribal procurement policies and procedures to secure the services of a qualified provider to conduct energy audits of nine designated buildings. The contracted provider will be required to provide a progress schedule to the Tribe prior to commencing the project and submit an updated schedule with their monthly billings. Findings and analysis reports will be required for buildings as completed, and a complete Energy Audit Summary Report will be required to be submitted with the provider?s final billing. Conducting energy audits of the nine governmental buildings will disclose building inefficiencies to prioritize and address, resulting in reduced energy consumption and expense. These savings will allow Tribal resources to be reallocated to direct services, which will benefit Tribal members and families.

Holt, Jeffrey W.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT in water and sediment of the Indian River Lagoon, Florida - 1977 to 1978  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water and sediment samples collected during 1977 to 1978 from the Indian River lagoon between Vero Beach, Indian River County, and Fort Pierce, Saint Lucie County, Florida were analyzed for PCBs and DDT. Sample locations were chosen on the basis of proximity to major tributaries, sewage outfalls, or municipal area. Concentrations in water samples were below 0.01 ppB sigma DDT and 0.5 ppB PCBs. Small amounts of PCBs and DDT were found in most sediment samples, ranging from less than 1.0 ppB to 0.63 ppM Aroclor 1254 and from less than 0.1 ppB to 0.081 ppM sigma DDT. Samples from the Taylor Creek tributary and from the Fort Pierce power plant and municipal docking area contained higher PCB concentrations than did samples from other locations. DDT and PCB levels in most samples indicate little contamination by these compounds of the Indian River Waterway between Vero Beach and Fort Pierce.

Wang, T.C.; Johnson, R.S.; Bricker, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

White Sturgeon Management Plan in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams; Nez Perce Tribe, 1997-2005 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

White sturgeon in the Hells Canyon reach (HCR) of the Snake River are of cultural importance to the Nez Perce Tribe. However, subsistence and ceremonial fishing opportunities have been severely limited as a result of low numbers of white sturgeon in the HCR. Hydrosystem development in the Columbia River Basin has depressed numbers and productivity of white sturgeon in the HCR by isolating fish in impounded reaches of the basin, restricting access to optimal rearing habitats, reducing the anadromous forage base, and modifying early life-history habitats. Consequently, a proactive management plan is needed to mitigate for the loss of white sturgeon production in the HCR, and to identify and implement feasible measures that will restore and rebuild the white sturgeon population to a level that sustains viability and can support an annual harvest. This comprehensive and adaptive management plan describes the goals, objectives, strategies, actions, and expected evaluative timeframes for restoring the white sturgeon population in the HCR. The goal of this plan, which is to maintain a viable, persistent population that can support a sustainable fishery, is supported by the following objectives: (1) a natural, stable age structure comprising both juveniles and a broad spectrum of spawning age-classes; (2) stable or increasing numbers of both juveniles and adults; (3) consistent levels of average recruitment to ensure future contribution to reproductive potential; (4) stable genetic diversity comparable to current levels; (5) a minimum level of abundance of 2,500 adults to minimize extinction risk; and (6) provision of an annual sustainable harvest of 5 kg/ha. To achieve management objectives, potential mitigative actions were developed by a Biological Risk Assessment Team (BRAT). Identified strategies and actions included enhancing growth and survival rates by restoring anadromous fish runs and increasing passage opportunities for white sturgeon, reducing mortality rates of early life stages by modifying flows in the HCR, reducing mortality imposed by the catch and release fishery, augmenting natural production through translocation or hatchery releases, and assessing detrimental effects of contaminants on reproductive potential. These proposed actions were evaluated by assessing their relative potential to affect population growth rate and by determining the feasibility of their execution, including a realistic timeframe (short-term, mid-term, long-term) for their implementation and evaluation. A multi-pronged approach for management was decided upon whereby various actions will be implemented and evaluated under different timeframes. Priority management actions include: Action I- Produce juvenile white sturgeon in a hatchery and release into the management area; Action G- Collect juvenile white sturgeon from other populations in the Snake or Columbia rivers and release them into the management area; and Action D- Restore white sturgeon passage upriver and downriver at Lower Snake and Idaho Power dams. An integral part of this approach is the continual monitoring of performance measures to assess the progressive response of the population to implemented actions, to evaluate the actions efficacy toward achieving objectives, and to refine and redirect strategies if warranted.

Nez Perce Tribe Resources Management Staff, (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe's comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

Peso, F.

1992-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was greatly extended by calibrating wireline logs from 113 wells with incomplete or older-vintage logging suites to wells with a full suite of modern logs. The model for the fault block architecture was derived by 3D palinspastic reconstruction. This involved field work to construct three new cross-sections at key areas in the Field; creation of horizon and fault surface maps from well penetrations and tops; and numerical modeling to derive the geometry, chronology, fault movement and folding history of the Field through a 3D restoration of the reservoir units to their original undeformed state. The methodology for predicting fracture intensity and orientation variations throughout the Field was accomplished by gathering outcrop and subsurface image log fracture data, and comparing it to the strain field produced by the various folding and faulting events determined through the 3D palinspastic reconstruction. It was found that the strains produced during the initial folding of the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations corresponded well without both the orientations and relative fracture intensity measured in outcrop and in the subsurface. The results have led to a 15% to 20% increase in estimated matrix pore volume, and to the plan to drill two horizontal drain holes located and oriented based on the modeling results. Marathon Oil is also evaluating alternative tertiary recovery processes based on the quantitative 3D integrated reservoir model.

Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

43

BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY RESOURCE TRIBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CERT Tribal Internship Program is part of the education and training opportunities provided by CERT to accelerate the development of American Indian technical professionals available to serve Tribes and expand the pool of these professionals. Tribes are severely impacted by the inadequate number of Indian professionals available to serve and facilitate Tribal participation and support of the energy future of Tribes,and subsequently the energy future of the nation. By providing interns with hands-on work experience in their field of study two goals are accomplished: (1) the intern is provided opportunities for professional enhancement; and (2) The pool of Indian professionals available to meet the needs of Tribal government and Tribal communities in general is increased. As of January 17, 2003, Lance M Wyatt successfully completed his internship with the Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice on the Task Force that specifically focuses their work on Tribal nations. While working as an intern with the National Transportation Program, Albuquerque operations, Jacqueline Agnew received an offer to work for the Alaska Native Health Board in Anchorage, Alaska. This was an opportunity that Ms. Agnew did not feel she could afford to forego and she left her internship position in February 2003. At present, CERT is in the process of finding another qualified individual to replace the internship position vacated by Ms. Agnew. Mr. Wyatt's and Ms. Agnew's final comments are given.

Mary Lopez

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

lighting fixtures and lighting upgrades; conversion of exit signs to light- emitting diode; replacement of T-12 lamps and ballasts; heating, ventilating, and air...

45

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the Flathead Reservation Shawn Jackson, Council Member, The Klamath Tribes Carl W. Johnson, Vice-Chairman, Walker River Paiute Joseph Lucero, Council Member, Pueblo of Isleta...

46

Ute Tribe Energy Conference & Expo  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

An international gathering of energy producing Tribes, governments and companies envisioning a path forward towards a more sustainable future.

47

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, and River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models.

La Pointe, Paul; Parney, Robert; Eiben, Thorsten; Dunleavy, Mike; Whitney, John; Eubanks, Darrel

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

50

Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center is excited to present its first Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop. Whether you are a beginner, an expert, or...

51

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservaton 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1980's the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife developed a management plan for Lake Roosevelt on the restoration and enhancement of kokanee salmon populations using hatchery out plants and the restoration of natural spawning runs. The plan was incorporated into the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) in their 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program as partial mitigation for hydropower caused fish losses resulting from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project, as part of a basin wide effort, is evaluating the status of the natural production kokanee in streams tributary to Lakes Roosevelt and Rufus Woods and is examining entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam. The goal of this project is the protection and enhancement of the natural production kokanee in these two lakes. The project is currently collecting data under four phases or parts. Since 1991, Lake Whatcom Washington origin kokanee have been planted in considerable numbers into the waters of Lake Roosevelt. A natural production kokanee fishery has persisted in the lake since the early 1970's(Cash, 1995), (Scholz, 1991). Historical information alludes to wild Kokanee production in the San Poil River, Nespelem River, Big Sheep Creek, Ora-Pa-Ken Creek, Deep Creek and Onion Creeks. The genetic makeup of the fish within the fishery is unknown, as is their contribution to the fishery. The level of influence by the hatchery out planted stock on wild fish stocks is unknown as well. Project outcomes will indicate the genetic fitness for inclusion of natural production kokanee stocks into current Bonneville Power Administration funded hatchery programs. Other findings may determine contribution/interaction of/between wild/hatchery kokanee stocks found in the waters of Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt.

LeCaire, Richard (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Nespelem, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Red River play, Gulf Canada deal boost Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High levels of activity in the Williston basin are assured this year with an expanding horizontal drilling play for oil in Ordovician Red River. The Red River play, like the Mississippian Lodgepole mound play, is centered in North Dakota. But the Red River play is much larger, extending into eastern Montana and northwestern South Dakota. More than 500 Red River B wells have been staked. One of the most recent companies to position itself in both plays is Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. The company forged an agreement with the Assiniboine and Sioux Indian tribes. The agreement initially provides Gulf access to about 800,000 acres on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, mostly in Roosevelt County, Mont., on the western slope of the Williston basin. Under an option, Gulf`s access could later expand to cover the reservation`s remaining 1.3 million acres. The paper discusses the extent of the Red River play, and Gulf Canada`s role in its development.

NONE

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

A synthesis of ethnohistorical materials concerning the administration of Federal Indian policy among the Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce Indian people: Working draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purposes of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe have been accorded the status of ''Affected Indian Tribe'' and have become party to the proceedings to determine a suitable location for the nation's first commercial waste repository. Each of the Tribes has expressed concerns about the suitability of the Hanford Site in eastern Washington. These concerns, in general, address the proposed repository's effects on traditional spiritual beliefs and cultural practices, on tribal sovereignty and the Tribes' right to self-government, on the natural resources under tribal management jurisdiction, and on the health and socioeconomic characteristics of the Tribes' reservation communities. The Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce have distinctive cultural traditions that may be adversely affected by activities related to the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). Further, the Tribes enjoy a unique relationship with the federal government. Because of their distinctive cultures and governmental status, particular attention will be paid to expressed interests of the Tribes, and to ways in which these interests may be affected by the repository program. Monitoring is needed to describe current conditions among the Affected Tribes' populations, to describe BWIP site characterization activities affecting the Tribes, and to measure any changes in these conditions that may occur as a direct result of site characterization. This paper reports our first efforts at gathering historical information. It summarizes materials contained in two sources: the reports of field agents to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1854-1936), and the dockets of the Indian Claims Commission. 24 refs., 3 figs.

Liebow, E.B.; Younger, C.A.; Broyles, J.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

56

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

58

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

United Tribes Tribal Leaders Summit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The United Tribes Technical College is hosting its 16th Annual Tribal Leaders Summit in Bismarck, North Dakota. This year’s theme is “Education Leading the Way to a Sustainable Tribal Development”...

60

Native Learning Center Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center (NLC) will host this training on Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country. Topics will include, but are not limited to: sustainable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS). Phase 1 feasibility study report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation`s nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe`s comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

Peso, F.

1992-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

62

Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

DOI Bureau of Indian Affairs Mineral Development Grants to Help with Development of Tribal Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) is offering grants to federally-recognized Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that help the development of a tribal energy and mineral resource inventory, a tribal energy and mineral resource on Indian land, or for the development of a report necessary to the development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands.

64

Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Summer 2012. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes - five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States - to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects as part of DOE-IE's Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. START finalists were selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with their projects or community. Technical experts from DOE and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and assist the Tribes in moving their projects forward. In Alaska, the effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide additional assistance and expertise, as well as funding to fuel the Alaska START initiative.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ute Tribe Energy Conference & Expo  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Save the date for this international gathering of energy-producing Tribes, governments, and companies envisioning a path forward toward a more sustainable future. This two-day conference and expo will provide information on national policy and budget, state oil and gas, tribal energy companies and tribal policies for success.

66

In cooperation with Fort Peck Tribes Office of Environmental Protection Delineation of Brine Contamination in and near the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;Delineation of Brine Contamination in and near the East Poplar Oil Field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation citation: Thamke, J.N., and Smith, B.D., 2014, Delineation of brine contamination in and near the EastIn cooperation with Fort Peck Tribes Office of Environmental Protection Delineation of Brine

Torgersen, Christian

67

Microsoft Word - CX_Okanogan_River.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Confederated Tribes for the purchase of two parcels of land along the Okanogan River. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-224-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

68

American Indian reservations: A showplace for renewable energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indian Energy Resource Development Program, authorized by Title XXVI of the 1992 Energy Policy Act, provides funding to American Indian tribes to develop Indian renewable energy and other energy resources. In fiscal years 1994 and 1995, 35 grants totaling $6.5 million were awarded to 29 tribes and Alaskan native corporations in 13 states. The projects cover the development range from feasibility studies to purchase and installation of equipment for commercial projects. Technologies include photovoltaics, biomass, wind, building energy efficiency, hydroelectricity, integrated resource planning, coal-fired cogeneration, and multi-sector natural gas. The Title XXVI program provides an important opportunity for assessing the technical and economic feasibility of renewable energy on Indian lands, and also for demonstrating DOE-developed technologies in real-life settings.

Sargent, S.L. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States). Denver Regional Support Office; Chabot, E.J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Technical and Financial Assistance

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Yerington Paiute Tribe Energy Plan Version 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yerington Paiute Tribe has made energy management and planning a priority. The Tribal Council has recognized that energy is an important component of their goal of self-sufficiency. Recognizing energy development as a component of the Tribe’s natural resources provides for needed economic development.A number of priorities have been identified for energy development. These range from immediate housing needs such as weatherization and solar to interest in energy as economic development.

Consulting, BB9 [BB9 Consulting; Director, Environmental

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

apache indian reservation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

survival or death 1. However, these statistical methods are constrained Sudarshan, S. 2 Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Environmental...

71

DOI - Policy on Consultation with Indian Tribes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)CrowleyEnergyMasse) Jump

72

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI:Fresno U.S.Energy OrderOil, andEnergy

73

ant tribe camponotini: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including government tourism units, travel agencies, bus operators, local culture and tourism industry associations, as well as tribe B & B industry. 5. The tourists for tribe...

74

Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade |...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The building now serves as the tribe's economic development center. | Courtesy of Forest County Potawatomi Community Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve...

75

Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White House Tribal Nations Conference Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White House Tribal Nations...

76

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

77

Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency...

78

Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians Energy Conservation and Options Analysis - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians was awarded a grant through the Department of Energy First Steps program in June of 2006. The primary purpose of the grant was to enable the Tribe to develop energy conservation policies and a strategy for alternative energy resource development. All of the work contemplated by the grant agreement has been completed and the Tribe has begun implementing the resource development strategy through the construction of a 1.0 MW grid-connected photovoltaic system designed to offset a portion of the energy demand generated by current and projected land uses on the Tribe’s Reservation. Implementation of proposed energy conservation policies will proceed more deliberately as the Tribe acquires economic development experience sufficient to evaluate more systematically the interrelationships between conservation and its economic development goals.

Paul Turner

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

CTUIR Grande Ronde River Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1995-1999 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contract agreement beginning in 1996 to fund watershed restoration and enhancement actions and contribute to recovery of fish and wildlife resources and water quality in the Grande Ronde River Basin. The CTUIR's habitat program is closely coordinated with the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program and multiple agencies and organizations within the basin. The CTUIR has focused during the past 4 years in the upper portions of the Grande Ronde Subbasin (upstream of LaGrande, Oregon) on several major project areas in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek watersheds and along the mainstem Grande Ronde River. This Annual Report provides an overview of individual projects and accomplishments.

Childs, Allen B.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Tribe of Jen-Wae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scolpreS5 the tribe of a STAR TREK fanzine by MEG WRIGHT 4~ Tribe of Jen-Ime, price :C1.80 within the 'G.K., is put out by Sco~'press and is available from Sheila Clark 6 CraigmUl CottagerJ Strathmartine by Dtl.nclee Scotland. rOTs-iBn rates - U.S"A" $9.00 (?4.3u) 8-irmail~ Australia 9 i~4.6S...

Wright, Meg

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Plan and Energy Options Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy planning document to assist the Karuk Tribe in making educated decisions about future energy priorities and implementation.

Ramona Taylor, Karuk Tribe; David Carter, Winzler and Kelly

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

A multistakeholder perspective on human interactions with the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Crystal River, Florida, U.S.A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . Property owned by Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Swim corridor to King Spring initial outcomes of manatee encounters Dimensions used by SMC to judge harassment Outcome of manatee encounters using the USFWS definition of harassment 10 12 27...

Sorice, Michael Gregory

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EUCI Tribal and Indian Country Energy Development: Collaborating for Successful Transactions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hosted by the Electric Utility Consultants, Inc. (EUCI), this conference will provide practical tips for mutually beneficial collaboration between tribes and utility companies. The conference will focus on the fundamental concepts on how to network and collaborate in renewable energy such as solar, wind, biomass, and natural gas in Indian Country.

84

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patterns of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

88

Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

Jones, Ira; McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Comparative cytotaxonomy in the tribe Bovini studied by banding techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee: Dr. James E. Womack Chromosomes of eight species of the tribe Bovini were studied by G ? banding, C ? banding and silver staining techniques. The results of this comparative cytogenetic study support the theory that Robertsonian fusion... in the tribe Bovini whose species appear to differ by a series of centromeric fusions. The phylogenetic tree derived from the cytogenetic data of this study is not consistent with morphological and behavioral trees previously described for the tribe Bovini...

Rich, Donna Carol

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

Council of Energy Resources Tribes 1993 summer internship report: Nez Perce Tribe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is designed to be a working part of a larger project which would deal with the topic of Tribal interests affected by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program and the approaches by which those Tribal interests can be advanced. Topics discussed in this paper include: background history of the Nez Perce Tribe`s relations with the US government; a Nez Perce view of tribal interests affected by DOE activities at Hanford; and a Nez Perce framework for private/governmental/tribal interest.

Crow, J.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Tribes Eligible to Apply for REDI Initiative Funding: Applications...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

communities, including Tribes, to deploy smart grid tools and technologies to advance climate preparedness and resiliency of the electricity delivery infrastructure through the...

92

Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of clean electricity; A 2.0 megawatt anaerobic digester to convert food waste into biogas; An LED lighting project at the tribe's parking facilities that reduced electricity...

93

Robinson Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan; Middletown Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Scotts Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Elem Indian Colony Strategic Energy Plan, Upperlake Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Big Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians is located in Lake County in Northern California. Similar to the other five federally recognized Indian Tribes in Lake County participating in this project, Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians members are challenged by generally increasing energy costs and undeveloped local energy resources. Currently, Tribal decision makers lack sufficient information to make informed decisions about potential renewable energy resources. To meet this challenge efficiently, the Tribes have committed to the Lake County Tribal Energy Program, a multi Tribal program to be based at the Robinson Rancheria and including The Elem Indian Colony, Big Valley Rancheria, Middletown Rancheria, Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake and the Scotts Valley Pomo Tribe. The mission of this program is to promote Tribal energy efficiency and create employment opportunities and economic opportunities on Tribal Lands through energy resource and energy efficiency development. This program will establish a comprehensive energy strategic plan for the Tribes based on Tribal specific plans that capture economic and environmental benefits while continuing to respect Tribal cultural practices and traditions. The goal is to understand current and future energy consumption and develop both regional and Tribe specific strategic energy plans, including action plans, to clearly identify the energy options for each Tribe.

McGinnis and Associates LLC

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

FACEBOOK GAMES: THE POINT WHERE TRIBES AND CASUAL GAMES MEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACEBOOK GAMES: THE POINT WHERE TRIBES AND CASUAL GAMES MEET Di Loreto Ines Università degli Studi in Facebook. Our assumption is that the success of games in the Facebook context is linked to the blending and will then describe some practical examples from the Facebook context. KEYWORDS Social games, casual games, tribes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded: ? The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA"). ? Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization. ? An intern program. ? Staff training. ? Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

John D. Jones

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate “the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values” (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and CA

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Microsoft Word - ProvisionsFundsColvilleConfederatedTribesPurchaseLoup...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Confederated Tribes for purchase of the Loup Loup Creek and Aeneas Creek properties. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-104-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

100

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable on Tribal Energy Policy convened at 8:30 a.m., Tuesday, April 5th, at the downtown Phoenix Hyatt. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by the Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Approximately thirty?eight people attended the meeting, including representatives of ten different tribes, as well as representatives of the Colorado Indian Tribes, the All Indian Pueblo Council and the Inter?Tribal Council of Arizona. Interested state, federal, university, NGO and industry representatives also were present. A full list of attendees is at the end of this summary. DOE representatives were Tracey LeBeau, Directory of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, and David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs.

none,

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nez Perce Tribe Energy Efficient Facilities Installation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although Idaho's electrical rates are among the lowest in the country, the Nez Perce Tribe's electrical bills take a large bite out of the operating budget every year. Tribal programs are located in forty some buildings, in six counties, in two states. Ninety-five percent, or more, are heated electrically. The age of the Tribal office buildings located in Lapwai, Idaho vary from forty to over a hundred years old. Only sporadic updates, in the buildings themselves, have been made over the years. Working with the Tribe's electrical provider (Avista Corporation), it was determine that a minimum financial commitment could reap large rewards in the form of lower operating costs.

Terry Kinder

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft EA: Public Comment Period Ends 03/05/2015Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to restore portions of the Kootenai River near the town of Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed project involves installing structures on the river banks, excavating areas in the river to create deeper pools, and developing and enhancing islands that would be planted with native vegetation.

108

Socioeconomic conditions in cultural communities: The Nez Perce Tribe, the confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and the confederated tribes and bands of the Yakima Indian Nation: Interim profile report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of BWIP Socioeconomic Profile Reports are being prepared. This report is one of the first set of five separate BWIP Profile Reports, which cover: economic/demographic conditions; fiscal conditions; housing characteristics; public services and facilities; and socioeconomic conditions in cultural communities. The BWIP Socioeconomic Profile Reports are designed to provide information about the characteristics of the communities in which socioeconomic impacts from BWIP may occur. The Profile Reports present a compilation of historical information about socioeconomic conditions in the affected communities. These reports are designed to provide a transition between the BWIP EA, published in 1986, the Monitoring Reports, and other technical reports associated with the BWIP SMMP and CSP. The principal objectives of the Profile Reports are to update the DOE BWIP socioeconomic database by compiling available secondary and primary data and to make this information available to both the DOE program and other interested parties. The initial Profile Reports will help identify the need for additional data. The database developed for the profiles will assemble socioeconomic data in a uniform, readily accessible format. 16 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

Stokowski, P.A.; Friedli, E.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - american indian tribes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or community attachment. AMERICAN ... Source: Kaminsky, Werner - Center for Nanotechnology and NanoTechnology & Department of Chemistry, University of Washington at Seattle...

110

Nez Perce Tribe Formaldehyde Study 2011 Kayla Warden and Etta Axtell-Northwest Indian College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR Acknowledgements: This research was funded by EPA/FaST DOE and NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). I

Collins, Gary S.

111

Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Indian Housing Training Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

To register for the conference and see a preliminary agenda, visit the Native Learning Center website.

112

25 U.S.C. 477: Incorporation of Indian Tribes, Charter, Ratification by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin:YBR14Information 20Election | Open

113

25 U.S.C. 81: Contracts and Agreements with Indian Tribes | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin:YBR14Information 20Election |

114

ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information Of TheFixed UtilitiesHandbook | Open

115

Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull trout and other species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathan Pershingrelocates 18-ton machineWednesday, July 11,

116

Methamphetamine and Tribal Criminal Jurisdiction on the Wind River Reservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The drug methamphetamine is creating an epidemic on Tribal reservations. Non-Indian drug dealers are targeting vulnerable addicted populations, including the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming in hopes to replace the alcohol ...

Cisneros, Mandy

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

Rapp, Jim [Parametrix] [Parametrix; Duncan, Ken [San Carlos Apache Tribe] [San Carlos Apache Tribe; Albert, Steve [Parametrix] [Parametrix

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The tribe Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of America north of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, p. 6,9; Syst. Ceramb., l861j., p. 3!?!?. Lacordaire, Gen. Col., IX, 1872, p. 7!?9, 762. Leng and Hamilton, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., XXIII, 1896, p. ll?. Lagochirus Erichson. LeConte, Smiths. Misc. Coll., XI (265) 1873, p. 337. Horn, Trans. Amer..., ....................... ....... .......................It Characteristics of the Tribe................ .............. .....? Morphological Features.......... ........................... . . . . 6 Phraseology.................................................... 9 Summary...

Dillon, Lawrence S.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY Science academies play a crucial role in promoting, recognizing and bring out proceedings and monographs. The academies promote public awareness and understanding the country. In this section the growth of the Indian National Science Academy and its functions

Srinivasan, N.

120

QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and federal agency, and energy groups together to discuss the challenges surrounding this key planning issue on recommendations from state and federal fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes in the Northwest,but anyone of natural gas-fired generation, as well as an emphasis on energy efficiency and development of renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Indians and Guns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concomitant freedom to devise gun policy that works forof Angela R. Riley, Indians and Guns, 100 g eo . l.J. 1675 (Ludwig & Adam M. Samaha, Gun Control After Heller: Threats

Riley, Angela R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

123

Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Knight, Tawnie [Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Interior Department Awards $3.7 Million to 13 Tribes for Renewable...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for their communities. IEED selected six geothermal, four biomass, and three hydroelectric power projects for tribes located in the states of California, Minnesota, Montana,...

125

Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Tribal Energy Program, and State Energy Program to help Tribes tap into their abundant renewable energy resources. Webinar attendees will also hear about Montana's Confederated...

126

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Indian Gaming 2013 Tradeshow & Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Indian Gaming Association will host its annual tradeshow and convention on March 24-27 in Phoenix, Arizona. Be sure to visit the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth at the event.

128

Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7Department of EnergyDepartmentTribe's

129

File:Regs-tribes2008.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to: navigation, search FileProof1.pdfRegs-tribes2008.pdf

130

HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

131

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-035 Spatial Emergence of Genotypical Tribes in an Animat Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an Animat Simulation Model K. A. Hawick and C. J. Scogings and H. A. James 2007 We observe the spontaneous Tribes in an Animat Simulation Model}, booktitle = {Proc. 2007 Winter Simulation Conference 2007 (WSC2007 Tribes in an Animat Simulation Model K.A. Hawick, C.J. Scogings and H.A. James Institute of Information

Hawick, Ken

132

Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MWCommission of Indian Affairs

133

American Indian Heritage Month  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ November 15, 2013 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 "Lunchtime with Cherokee Recording Artist, Michael Jacobs" 11:30 am ­ 1 pm, Multicultural Center (MCC), Squires Student Center Award-winning Cherokee recording artist An enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Lloyd Arneach was born and reared on the Cherokee

Virginia Tech

134

Full-Fledged Indian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lee Stafford is in his seventh summer as a counselor at Camp Arrowdance. While Lee enjoys his status as one of the most popular staff members at camp, he begins to wonder if he's in danger of going "Full-Fledged Indian", ...

Hart, Josh Benjamin

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Be sure to visit booths 2751 and 2752 to learn about resources for Tribes offered by the U.S. Department of Energy:

136

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DOE Office of Indian Energy Announces New Indian Country Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Indian Community: Barney Enos, Jr., District 4 Community Council Ho-Chunk Nation: Susan Weber, Representative "The Working Group is honored to welcome these new members and would...

139

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CA-TRIBE-ROBINSON RANCHERIA OF POMO INDIANS Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- ROBINSON RANCHERIA OF POMO INDIANS CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project...

140

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CA-TRIBE-FEDERATED INDIANS OF GRATON RANCHERIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- FEDERATED INDIANS OF GRATON RANCHERIA CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the laws applicable to rivers or river systems, including electric power facilities related thereto, other of the state and federal governments, which identifies specific actions the Parties agreed to take during government-to- government negotiations. The Yakama Nation believes the Accords are a long overdue step toward

142

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

Konopacky, Richard C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MI-TRIBE-SAULT STE. MARIE TRIBE OF CHIPPEWA INDIANS OF MICHIGAN Location: Tribe MI-TRIBE-SAULT STE. MARIE TRIBE OF CHIPPEWA INDIANS OF MICHIGAN MI American Recovery and...

145

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OK-TRIBE-PONCA TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE-PONCA TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery...

146

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Block Grant Program Project Title OK-TRIBE-ABSENTEE-SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- ABSENTEE- SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA OK American...

147

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OK-TRIBE-ABSENTEE-SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- ABSENTEE- SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed...

148

Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the fifth annual Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Conference, tribal leaders and professionals will discuss the significant opportunities for energy development in Indian Country, as...

149

A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Bee Tribe Epeolini, with a Review of the Genus Triepeolus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generic-level cladistic analysis of the cleptoparasitic bee tribe Epeolini (Apinae: Nomadinae) is presented. One hundred and two characters of adult external morphology are identified and coded for 32 species representing ...

Rightmyer, Molly Greer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Wisconsin Tribe Performing State-Wide Audits on 'Energy Wasters...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

it, like the solar panels at the tribal office building in Black River Falls and the energy-efficient homes being built in Winnebago Heights. Their latest project is helping the...

151

Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

40th Indian Law Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Bar Association is hosting the 40th Annual Indian Law Conference. This two-day conference focuses on the significant changes that have occurred in the relationship between Tribal Nations and the United States in the last four decades. The conference will cover several topics, including climate change, Indian Law, tribal courts, and more.

153

Dissecting the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau : a study of landslides, erosion and river incision in a transient landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau is characterized by large rivers dissecting regional topography that has been uplifted in association with the continued convergence of the Indian subcontinent and Eurasia. In this ...

Ouimet, William Burke

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), was founded in 1971 and is located on 164 acres in northwest Albuquerque, New Mexico in the center of New Mexico`s agricultural and high-tech corridors. SIPI became accredited as a community college in 1993, serves Native Americans nationwide, and is governed by a nationally-tribally appointed Board of Regents (Jicarilla Apache, Joint Oklahoma Tribes, Mescalero Apache, Navajo Nation-Arizona, Navajo Nation-New Mexico, Ten Southern Pueblos, and Eight Northern Pueblos, Southern Ute, Inter-tribal Council of Arizona, and Oglala Sioux). In 1993, The US Department of Education, TRIO Programs no longer funded the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) Summer Math and Science Enrichment Program. However, with US Department of Energy funding SIPI was able to continue service to the Native American community under the new title of College Bound American Indian Math and Science (AIMS) Enrichment Program. This new program continued the goals and objectives of the TRIO program with an expanded focus that included students from more Native American communities nationwide. The program also interfaced with a teacher enrichment program (Rural American Indian Science Education-RAISE) sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Sandia National Labs (SNL). SIPI in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) Laboratory established a mathematics and science enrichment program at SIPI for students attending rural high schools serving predominantly Native American populations. The primary goal of the program was to provide 9th--12th grade students, mostly Native American, the skills and knowledge, interest and motivation, and strategies to remain in high school and pursue a college education in a math, science, or technology based field. Each year, the program included a six-week intensive residential summer program located at SIPI as well as academic year support activities at the student`s high school. A summary of the program activities during the grant period is given.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Quality site seasonal report: Cherokee Indian Hospital, SFBP 4058, December 1984 through April 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and space heating system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The hospital serves the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokee Indian Tribe in Cherokee, North Carolina, near the eastern entrance to the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Solar energy is used to preheat domestic hot water (the cafeteria is the principal load) and for space heating. The hospital is expected to have a normal year-round occupancy of 200 people (patients, medical and maintenance personnel) with some 2775 expected visitors per year. The drainback solar system has 320 Owens-Illinois evacuated-tube collectors with a gross area of 5517 square feet. Solar energy is stored in a 6335-gallon storage tank. Solar energy from storage is supplied to a 700-gallon DHW preheat tank through a heat exchanger in the storage tank, and directly to heat exchangers in the heating ducts. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two large oil-fired boilers. Performance of the system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital during the period December 1984 through April 1985 are reported.

Raymond, M.G.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

ancient indian wisdom: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Indian Ocean Zhang, Yi 180 FACT SHEET: INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: FACT SHEET: - INDIAN...

158

Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book), DOE Office of Indian Energy  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite--FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 13, 2000

159

Arizona Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project, Spring / Summer 2014 (Newsletter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Spring / Summer 2014.

Not Available

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Identifying Oil Exploration Leads using Intergrated Remote Sensing and Seismic Data Analysis, Lake Sakakawea, Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, Willistion Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, inhabited by the Arikara, Mandan and Hidatsa Tribes (now united to form the Three Affiliated Tribes) covers a total area of 1530 mi{sup 2} (980,000 acres). The Reservation is located approximately 15 miles east of the depocenter of the Williston basin, and to the southeast of a major structural feature and petroleum producing province, the Nesson anticline. Several published studies document the widespread existence of mature source rocks, favorable reservoir/caprock combinations, and production throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas indicating high potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. This technical assessment was performed to better define the oil exploration opportunity, and stimulate exploration and development activities for the benefit of the Tribes. The need for this assessment is underscored by the fact that, despite its considerable potential, there is currently no meaningful production on the Reservation, and only 2% of it is currently leased. Of particular interest (and the focus of this study) is the area under the Lake Sakakawea (formed as result of the Garrison Dam). This 'reservoir taking' area, which has never been drilled, encompasses an area of 150,000 acres, and represents the largest contiguous acreage block under control of the Tribes. Furthermore, these lands are Tribal (non-allotted), hence leasing requirements are relatively simple. The opportunity for exploration success insofar as identifying potential leads under the lake is high. According to the Bureau of Land Management, there have been 591 tests for oil and gas on or immediately adjacent to the Reservation, resulting in a total of 392 producing wells and 179 plugged and abandoned wells, for a success ratio of 69%. Based on statistical probability alone, the opportunity for success is high.

Scott R. Reeves; Randal L. Billingsley

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatementNOTElectricity

162

Arizona Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project, Spring / Summer 2014 (Newsletter), Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012)Tie Ltd |Line, LLC:LLC 87185-5400 AprilFailures |ON THE

163

"American Indian Freedom Controversy:" Political and Social Activism by Southern California Mission Indians, 1934-1958  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Eastern Band of Cherokees," American Indian Quarterlyand the Eastern Band of Cherokee," American Indian Quarterlysocialist. Jeannette Costo (Cherokee), wife of Rupert Costo,

Daly, Heather Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

Sivakumar, Gayathri

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

Holderman, Charles

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

HANDBOOK FOR CONDUCTING ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWS RELATED TO TRIBAL AND INDIAN PARTICIPATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND CLEANUP OF THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There were three major projects undertaken at the outset of the DOE/EM 22 Cooperative Agreement back in September 1995. There was a project relating to Tribal oral histories. Another project of the Cooperative Agreement related to technology and Tribal values and needs. This project by analogy could apply to issues of technology, environmental cleanup and other indigenous peoples internationally. How can Indian Tribes participate in defining the need for technology development rather than merely learning to adapt themselves and their situations and values to technology developed by others with differing needs, values and economic resources? And the third project was the placement of a Tribal intern in EM-22.

Cristann Gibson; Mervyn L. Tano; Albert Wing

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribe’s own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The program’s centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Extremes of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, ENSO and equatorial Indian Ocean oscillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremes of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, ENSO and equatorial Indian Ocean oscillation with suppression/enhancement over the eastern part and associated changes in the anomaly of the zonal wind along), Extremes of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, ENSO and equatorial Indian Ocean oscillation, Geophys. Res

Gadgil, Siddhartha

169

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

171

Colorado River Indian Irr Proj | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS) | OpenEnergyGovernor s Energy OfficeIrr Proj

172

Indian River Shores, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (botPolicy:7.7166964°, -80.3842173°

173

Indian River County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip: 55344ESMAPIndian National

174

Welcome Indian Gaming Phoenix 2013 Attendees!  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Thank you for visiting the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth. Below are links to our booth materials and resources.

175

Assessment of Biomass Energy Opportunities for the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessment of biomass energy and biobased product manufacturing opportunities for the Red Lake Tribe.

Scott Haase (McNeil Technologies, Inc)

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE 560080  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080 NOTICE INVITING TENDER SEALED ITEM RATE TENDERS are invited for the execution of the following work, 1. Proposed renovation for guest room at Indian Academy ­ 560042 Phone: 09916381210 5. Last date of receipt of tender 02.09.2011 before 3.00 pm at Indian Academy

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

177

Indian Calendrical Calculations Nachum Dershowitz1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Indian day count, a generic solar calendar that generalizes various calendars including the mean Indian solar calendar, the true and astronomical Indian solar calendars, a generic lunisolar calendar holidays. The months of the Hindus are lunar, their years are solar; therefore their new year's day must

Dershowitz, Nachum

178

Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Video Highlights How Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is Cutting Energy Costs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of a U.S. Department of Energy grant and in partnership with the Clallam County Public Utility District, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is saving money on their utility bills after installing ductless heat pumps in 42 tribal members’ homes.

180

change in the indian mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and policy support in India. The results make very Change Communication in collaboration with GlobeScan Incorporated. Fieldwork in India was conducted by C and should inform stakeholders across India. Dr. Leiserowitz has asked the Indian public a series

Haller, Gary L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ATNI Mid-year Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

182

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations in the Northwest are decreasing. Genetic diversity is being lost at an alarming rate. The Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe) strives to ensure availability of genetic samples of the existing male salmonid population by establishing and maintaining a germplasm repository. The sampling strategy, initiated in 1992, has been to collect and preserve male salmon and steelhead genetic diversity across the geographic landscape by sampling within the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin, assuming a metapopulation structure existed historically. Gamete cryopreservation conserves genetic diversity in a germplasm repository, but is not a recovery action for listed fish species. The Tribe was funded in 2000 by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to coordinate gene banking of male gametes from Endangered Species Act listed steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River basin. In 2000, a total of 349 viable chinook salmon semen samples from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Lookingglass Hatchery (Imnaha River stock), Rapid River Hatchery, Lake Creek, the South Fork Salmon River weir, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery, and Sawtooth Hatchery (upper Salmon River stock) were cryopreserved. Also, 283 samples of male steelhead gametes from Dworshak Hatchery, Fish Creek, Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery and Oxbow Hatchery were also cryopreserved. The Tribe acquired 5 frozen steelhead samples from the Selway River collected in 1994 and 15 from Fish Creek sampled in 1993 from the U.S. Geological Survey, for addition into the germplasm repository. Also, 590 cryopreserved samples from the Grande Ronde chinook salmon captive broodstock program are being stored at the University of Idaho as a long-term archive, half of the total samples. A total of 2,420 cryopreserved samples from Snake River basin steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon, from 1992 through 2000, are stored in two independent locations at the University of Idaho and Washington State University. Two large freezer tanks are located at each university, each of which holds approximately 25% of the cryopreserved sperm. One tank at each university is considered long-term archival storage, while the other is short-term. Fertility trials were conducted at each university to test the viability of the cryopreserved chinook salmon sperm. The experiments on the 2000 frozen and thawed sperm at both universities found a fertility rate of 60-70%. This document also summarizes 1999-2000 steelhead genetic analysis report. The results of mitochondrial, nuclear DNA and microsatellite analysis found differences and shared haplotypes between the stocks of fish sampled for cryopreservation. Recommendations for future gene banking efforts include the need for establishment of a regional genome resource bank, a greater emphasis on cryopreserving wild fish, continued fertility trials, exploring field cryopreservation and genetic analysis on all fish represented in the germplasm repository.

Armstrong, Robyn; Kucera, Paul A. [Nez Perce Tribe. Dept. of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID (US)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-GRINDSTONE INDIAN RANCHERIA OF WINTUN-WAILAKI Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- GRINDSTONE...

184

Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Energy Program. This grant aimed to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce each building’s energy consumption by 30%. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use were selected for this study and included the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration Building, Bay Mills Community College main campus, Bay Mills Charter School and the Waishkey Community Center buildings. These five sites are the largest energy consuming Community buildings and comprised the study area of this project titled “Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community”. The end objective of this study, plan and the Tribe is to reduce the energy consumption at the Community’s most energy intensive buildings that will, in turn, reduce emissions at the source of energy production, reduce energy expenditures, create long lasting energy conscious practices and positively affect the quality of the natural environment. This project’s feasibility study and resulting plan is intended to act as a guide to the Community’s first step towards planned energy management within its buildings/facilities. It aims to reduce energy consumption by 30% or greater within the subject facilities with an emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency. The energy audits and related power consumption analyses conducted for this study revealed numerous significant energy conservation and efficiency opportunities for all of the subject sites/buildings. In addition, many of the energy conservation measures require no cost and serve to help balance other measures requiring capital investment. Reoccurring deficiencies relating to heating, cooling, thermostat setting inefficiencies, powering computers, lighting, items linked to weatherization and numerous other items were encountered that can be mitigated with the energy conservation measures developed and specified during the course of this project.

Kushman, Chris

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

185

FTA Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) announces the availability of approximately $5 million in funding is to support planning, capital, and, in limited circumstances, operating assistance for tribal public transit services. Eligible applicants include federally recognized Tribes or Alaska Native villages, groups, or communities.

186

Former Tribal Energy Program Intern Guides Tribes Toward a More Sustainable Path  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Suzanne Singer is working at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as an Energy and Thermal Fluids Analyst where she has an ongoing project to produce Sankey diagrams to analyze energy data and life cycle flows on tribal lands. Applying the knowledge and insights she gained from her work at LLNL, her internship, and her science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, Singer is educating Tribes on how to use their own resources and land to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

187

EPA Indian Environmental General Assistance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking grant proposals for the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) for FY 2016 work plan program development activities.

188

EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory, New York EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory, New York...

189

american indian youth: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been used for Indian script characters. Terminal In Partial; Jyotirmoy Saikia; To The 1999-01-01 279 Indian Railways Backbone of Information Transport in India Computer...

190

American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Services Communication & Engagement Tribal Programs American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive...

191

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

192

EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training...

193

EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory, Chautauqua County, Irving, New York EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory,...

194

Society of American Indian Government Employees Annual National Training Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Event includes plenary session, American Indian law classes, Native American youth workshops, cultural presentations, and a veterans program. Sponsored by the Society of American Indian Government...

195

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

196

Platte River Cooperative Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platte River Cooperative Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY,...

197

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

198

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

199

How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA)...

200

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation is hosting the Special Institute on Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country. This two-day conference will cover laws, policies, and practices regarding natural resources development in Indian Country and how they've evolved in the recent years.

202

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND BHEL REGARDING THE `THERMAL POWER PLANT ENGINEERING CHAIR' This Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) made on 25th day of august 1986 between Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (IITD) and M/s Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, 18

Prasad, Sanjiva

203

Indian Policy and Westward Expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the in vestigation of his activity on that committee led to a study of Indian policy in the Trans-Mississippi Valley and its relation to the westward movement. This latter problem, begun as a phase of Atchison's career in the Senate, de veloped into one... policy and its relation to westward expansion now furnish a frame-work upon which the history of the Trans-Mississippi Valley before the Civil War may be written. The period is given a unity otherwise impossible and a foundation is laid upon which...

Malin, James Claude

1921-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Outline of power plan provisions of the Northwest Power Act First in a series of briefings/discussions, in three parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided by the Federal Columbia River Power system, (A) conservation and efficiency in the use of electric River system (including federal and state fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes), and the public: Council is to adopt and transmit to Bonneville a "regional conservation and electric power plan." Timing

205

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the tower�s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribe�s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribe�s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north by Highway 30 and on the south by 305th Street, a street which runs along a meandering west-south-west heading from this intersection with Highway 30. In relation to Settlement landmarks, it is 300 meters west of the Meskwaki water tower found in front of the Meskwaki Public Works Department, and is due north of the athletic playing fields of the Meskwaki Settlement School. The accompanying maps (in the Site Resource Maps File) use a red pushpin marker to indicate the exact location, both in the overview frames and in the close-up frame. 1.2.4 Long Term Energy Vision The Meskwaki Tribe is committed to becoming energy self-sufficient, improving the economic condition of the tribe, and maintaining Tribal Values of closeness with Grandmother Earth. The details of the Tribe�s long-term vision continues to evolve. A long term vision exists of: 1) a successful assessment program; 2) a successful first wind turbine project reducing the Tribe�s cost of electricity; 3) creation of a Meskwaki Tribal Power Utility/Coop under the auspices of the new tribal Corporation, as we implement a master plan for economic and business development; 4), and opening the doors for additional wind turbines/renewable energy sources on the community. The additional turbines could lead directly to energy self-sufficiency, or might be the one leg of a multi-leg approach using multiple forms of renewable energy to achieve self-sufficiency. We envision current and future assessment projects providing the data needed to qualify enough renewable energy projects to provide complete coverage for the entire Meskwaki Settlement, including meeting future economic development projects� energy needs. While choosing not to engage in excessive optimism, we can imagine that in the future the Iowa rate-setting bodies will mandate that grid operators pay fair rates (tariffs) to renewable suppliers. We will be ready to expand renewable production of electricity for export, when that time comes. The final report includes the Wind

Lasley, Larry C. [Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School 1501 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM 87505 P.O. Box 5340 Santa Fe, NM 87502 Main: (505) 989-6300 www.sfindianschool.org Main and only Entrance...

211

Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association Annual Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Join more than 2,500 industry professionals from all over the country at the 2012 Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association (OIGA) Conference and Trade Show specifically devoted to all aspects of the...

212

The nineteenth century discourse on Indian architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis deals with the subject of the marginalization of Indian architecture. The particular issue that it takes up is the tendency in the current criticism to attribute this marginalization to the "Orientalist " biases ...

Bafna, Sonit

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities...

214

Canadian River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

215

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - avant-garde indian drama Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ADMINISTRATION Summary: Elementary (Indian Education) Drama Education Secondary Education French Education Music Education Health... Science Indian Health Studies Sociology and...

217

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CA-TRIBE-COLD SPRINGS RANCHERIA OF MONO INDIANS OF CALIFORNIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-COLD SPRINGS RANCHERIA OF MONO INDIANS OF CALIFORNIA CA American Recovery and Reinvestment...

218

Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ani edenes indian: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

you use. 3. If F is a field, show that the ring of n Hagen, Thomas 303 INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai...

220

ani nitab indian: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

you use. 3. If F is a field, show that the ring of n Hagen, Thomas 271 INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02 Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and...

222

Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Names Director for Office of Indian Energy Policy and Makes Available 2 Million for Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian...

223

Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the major programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER FOR : PROPOSED HOSTEL BLOCK AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, FELLOWS RESIDENCY NEXT TO ISRO QUARTERS, JALAHALLI AND PLUMBING WORKS : 136-138 #12;3 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080 NOTICE INVITING TENDER SEALED

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

225

CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER : PROPOSED INTERIORS FOR CABIN CUM MEETING ROOM AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, C V RAMAN AVENUE, BANGALORE COMPLEX, KAMARAJ ROAD, II CROSS, BANGALORE - 560042 #12;INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

226

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Improving Communications with Tribes along U.S. Department of Energy Shipping Routes: Preparing for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes efforts by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to initiate, coordinate, and improve communications with Native American Tribes along potential shipping routes to the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Office of National Transportation (ONT) within OCRWM is taking a collaborative approach that builds upon past working relationships between DOE and Tribal Nations. This paper focuses on those relationships, vehicles such as the Tribal Topic Group of the DOE Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC), and other recent interactions that ONT has been pursuing to strengthen existing partnerships and build new ones. It also offers lessons learned and goals for the future as ONT looks ahead to ensure appropriate coordination with Tribes on future shipments to Yucca Mountain. (authors)

Jones, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Office of National Transportation, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Portner, W. E. [Science Applications International Corporation, 2109 Air Park Drive, SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 (United States); Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, SW, Washington, DC 20024 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

229

Saving a Dwindling River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080 QUOTATIONS FROM entry fees will be paid by the Academy against production of coupons. 5. Rates for outstation trips. 8. The Academy will pay 10 paise hike for every extra rupee rise in fuel charges and vice versa

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

231

Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080 QUOTATIONS FROM TRAVEL AGENTS FOR PROVIDING TRANSPORT. Parking charges and other entry fees will be borne by the Academy on production of coupons. 5. Rates. The Academy will pay 10 paise hike for every extra rupee rise in fuel charges and vice versa during the year

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

232

INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MADRAS CHENNAI600036  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engg. Trade Apprentices ITI Certificate Holders Fitter, Sheet Metal Worker, Electrician the Principals of Polytechnic Tamil Nadu/Puducherry Sir/Madam, Sub: Engagement of Trade Apprentices/Technician ApprenticesReg. Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai600 036 is looking to engage

Mittal, Anurag

233

Indian Monsoon Depression: Climatology and Variability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The monsoon climate is traditionally characterized by large seasonal rainfall and reversal of wind direction (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Most importantly this rainfall is the major source of fresh water to various human activities such as agriculture. The Indian subcontinent resides at the core of the Southeast Asian summer monsoon system, with the monsoon trough extended from northern India across Indochina to the Western Tropical Pacific (WTP). Large fraction of annual rainfall occurs during the summer monsoon season, i.e., June - August with two distinct maxima. One is located over the Bay of Bengal with rainfall extending northwestward into eastern and central India, and the other along the west coast of India where the lower level moist wind meets the Western Ghat Mountains (Saha and Bavardeckar 1976). The rest of the Indian subcontinent receives relatively less rainfall. Various weather systems such as tropical cyclones and weak disturbances contribute to monsoon rainfall (Ramage 1971). Among these systems, the most efficient rain-producing system is known as the Indian monsoon depression (hereafter MD). This MD is critical for monsoon rainfall because: (i) it occurs about six times during each summer monsoon season, (ii) it propagates deeply into the continent and produces large amounts of rainfall along its track, and (iii) about half of the monsoon rainfall is contributed to by the MDs (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Therefore, understanding various properties of the MD is a key towards comprehending the veracity of the Indian summer monsoon and especially its hydrological process.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Huang, Wan-Ru (Judy) [Judy

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

234

INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit Bangalore Announces Certification Program for SIX SIGMA.isi@gmail.com, sanjitisi@yahoo.co.in #12;EXPECTATION! Six Sigma is like that old Wella Balsam shampoo commercial: `She Magazine, October 1997) Six Sigma initiative has become a rage. Every organization wants to implement Six

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

235

INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit Bangalore Announces Certification Program for SIX SIGMA.isi@gmail.com, sanjitisi@yahoo.co.in 6th - 8th, 12th ­ 14th September; 2014 Bangalore #12;EXPECTATION! Six Sigma is like, Dean Witter, Discover & Co. (Report on Business Magazine, October 1997) Six Sigma initiative has

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

236

Training & Research in the Indian Power Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training & Research in the Indian Power Sector An academic perspective Rangan Banerjee, Energy requirements, financing investments, providing reliable electricity at affordable costs #12;Need for Training France ­ Power Generation & Transmission Group ­ Average 80 hours of training/year (14% of budget) 3

Banerjee, Rangan

237

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

238

Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

239

Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan discusses the current energy use on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation, the current status of the Tribe's energy program, as well as the issues and concerns with energy on the reservation. This plan also identifies and outlines energy opportunities, goals, and objectives for the Tribe to accomplish. The overall goal of this plan is to address the energy situation of the reservation in a holistic manner for the maximum benefit to the Tribe. This plan is an evolving document that will be re-evaluated as the Tribe's energy situation changes.

Bryan Hoover

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (Council). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2001 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake, fertilization of Pettit and Alturas lakes was suspended for this year; (3) conduct kokanee (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation interactions between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

242

PACIFIC NORTHWEST ELECTRIC POWER PLANNING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Columbia River System (including Federal and State fish and wildlife agencies and appropriate Indian tribes to energy conservation, renewable resources, other resources, and protecting, mitigating, and enhancing fish and local governments, electric utility systems, water management agencies, and other non-Federal entities

243

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

244

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999-2000. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this project. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin.

Close, David A.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

N /A

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fi h d Wildlif PFish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Burbot) Kootenai River Operation Mitigation & Evaluation Building on Success · All Tribal projects objectives, and to guide and refine future project design and implementation Monitoring Corrective Evaluation Meets objectives Does not meet objectives Corrective action #12;4/11/2013 5 Integrated Ecosystem Based

247

Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

America, I hereby order as follows: Section 1. Policy. The United States has a unique political and legal relation- ship with the federally recognized American Indian and Alaska...

248

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

249

Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, including background, goals, mission, activities, and initiatives.

Not Available

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall/Winter 2014 | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

with START Support Message from the Director: Pilar Thomas Sharing Knowledge: Native Student Interns Make A Difference in Indian Country Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar...

251

Overview of Indian Hydrogen Program and Key Safety Issues of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues of Hydrogen Fuel Presentation given by Dilip Chenoy of the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009...

252

DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 24: Live Webinar on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country: Natural Resources and Agriculture Webinar Webinar Sponsors: White House Office of Public Engagement, White...

253

DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. May 1: Live Webinar on Climate Change Impacts and Indian...

254

DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Impacts and Indian Country: Built Systems and Other Infrastructure Webinar sponsors: White House Office of Public Engagement, White House Council on Environmental Quality, and...

255

EUCI Tribal and Indian Country Energy Development: Collaborating...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

The conference will focus on the fundamental concepts on how to network and collaborate in renewable energy such as solar, wind, biomass, and natural gas in Indian Country...

256

Indian Country Solar Energy Potential Estimates & DOE IE Updates  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pathways to Sustained Energy Development in Oklahoma Oklahoma Tribal Leader Forum - August 2012 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1 Office of Indian Energy Goals and Objectives * Promote...

257

Overview of Indian Hydrogen Program and Key Safety Issues of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

wheeler & Small Cars O i P j t * Ongoing Projects * Hydrogen fueling station by Indian Oil Corporation * SIAM Demonstration Project on Hydrogen-CNG vehicles in partnership with...

258

american indians living: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

positive correlations with the Indian Chang, Chih-Pei 262 Developing solutions for sustainable living-the Urban Living Laboratory: The world's largest 'living laboratory'...

259

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Project Title Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program WA-TRIBE-COWLITZ INDIAN TRIBE Location:...

260

National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC’s) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - apache indian nation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in its earliest deci- sions regarding the interpretation of Indian treaties (Cherokee Nation v... upon the dependence of Indians on the federal government. Furthermore,...

262

DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials Implementing adequate institutional programs and validating preparedness for emergency response to radiological transportation incidents along or near U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shipping corridors poses unique challenges to transportation operations management. Delayed or insufficient attention to State and Tribal preparedness needs may significantly impact the transportation operations schedule and budget. The DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) has successfully used a cooperative planning process to develop strong partnerships with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs to support responder preparedness across the United States. DOE TEPP has found that building solid partnerships with key emergency response agencies ensures responders have access to the planning, training, technical expertise and assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to a radiological transportation accident. Through the efforts of TEPP over the past fifteen years, partnerships have resulted in States and Tribal Nations either using significant portions of the TEPP planning resources in their programs and/or adopting the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program into their hazardous material training curriculums to prepare their fire departments, law enforcement, hazardous materials response teams, emergency management officials, public information officers and emergency medical technicians for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. In addition, through strong partnerships with Federal Agencies and other national programs TEPP provided technical expertise to support a variety of radiological response initiatives and assisted several programs with integration of the nationally recognized MERRTT program into other training venues, thus ensuring consistency of radiological response curriculums delivered to responders. This presentation will provide an overview of the steps to achieve coordination, to avoid redundancy, and to highlight several of the successful partnerships TEPP has formed with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs. Events, accident scenarios, and training where TEPP was proven to be integral in building the radiological response capabilities for first responders to actual radiological incidents are also highlighted. Participants will gain an appreciation for the collaborative efforts States and Tribes are engaging in with the DOE to ensure that responders all along the DOE transportation corridors are adequately prepared to respond to shipments of radioactive materials through their communities.

Marsha Keister

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

http://www.sil.si.edu/SILpublications/AfricanAmericanIndiansBibliography.pdf1 AFRICAN AMERICAN INDIANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Tarcher/Putnam, 2002. Halliburton, R. Jr. Red Over Black: Black Slavery among the Cherokee Indians: Greenwood Press, 1977. May, Katja. African Americans and the Native Americans in the Creek and Cherokee of Cherokee Society, 1540-1866. 1st ed. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1979. Porter, Kenneth

Mathis, Wayne N.

265

SAOT signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Indian CSIR-Institute ,,Indian Institute of Petroleum"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Petroleum" The Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) of the University Erlangen of Understanding - MoU) with the Indian Institute of Petroleum (IIP) which is one of 37 constituent institutes of Petroleum, Dr. M O Garg (left), and Prof. Dr. A. Leipertz (right), accompanied on the left-hand side by Dr

Fiebig, Peter

266

Department of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 3Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing Institute of Technology Kanpur 4Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing Networks · Whenever you of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 6Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing

Singh Yatindra Nath

267

Indian Academy of Sciences NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for catering services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

268

Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations for catering services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations for catering services 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for Catering Services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

269

Hierarchical Beta Processes and the Indian Buffet Romain Thibaux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Beta Processes and the Indian Buffet Process Romain Thibaux Computer Science Division Department of Statistics November 5, 2006 Abstract We show that the beta process is the de Finetti mixing distribution underlying the Indian buffet process of [2]. This result shows that the beta process plays

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

270

Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program at Argonne  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program for Renewable Energy at Argonne National Laboratory. Principal Contacts; Harold Myron (ANL), Anthony Dvorak (ANL), Freddie Cardenas (BIA). Supported by; United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Education, and Argonne National Laboratory

None

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Cancels DOE O 1230.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-6-09, cancels DOE O 144.1.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Cancels DOE O 1230.2.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advancing Energy Development in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Bureau of Indian Affairs- Supai Village, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Havasupai Indian Reservation village of Supai, Arizona, is located approximately 40 miles northwest of Grand Canyon Village, AZ. It is one of the most remote Native American communities in the nation. Most supplies must be either flown in by helicopter or trekked in on horseback or by mule trains. Three photovoltaic (PV) energy systems will supply up to 2 kilowatts of electrical power each to three facilities, which include a school, a jail, and a government complex that houses local teachers and police officers.

276

Indian Energy Beat | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergyImportant| Department-EnergyIndian

277

Indian Energy News Archive | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergyImportant|News Archive Indian Energy

278

Indian Energy Program Initiatives | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergyImportant|News Archive Indian

279

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Indian Creek Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000Technology |TheoryTufteTakeIndian Creek

280

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2007 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eleventh season (1997-2007) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the ninth season (1999-2007) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2007, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from 3/5/07 through to 4/17/07 and a total of 230,010 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2005 egg source and included captive brood (24,604) and conventional (205,406) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2007 began May 14th. The first Chinook was captured on June 2, 2007 and the last Chinook was captured on September 25, 2007. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2007. A total of 637 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 240 natural origin fish and 397 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 41 natural and 81 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 403 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and only hatchery origin jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek in underseeded habitat. Of the 122 adult fish retained for broodstock, 20 natural females and 40 supplementation females were represented in spawning. The eggs from these females produced a total of 267,350 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 86.73% which yielded a total of 231,882 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,456 eggs per female. These eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until they are smolts in the spring of 2009. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2009. Due to the success of the 2007 egg collection, the number of fish produced exceeded program needs and facility capabilities. As a result, there are plans to outplant fry in 2008 and parr in early 2009 to underseeded habitat in the Wallowa River.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Smith River Rancheria's Development of an Energy Organization Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smith River Rancheria (SRR), for some time, has had a strong commitment to attaining energy selfsufficiency, to reduce overall energy costs and concurrently initiate economic development within the community. Early on it was recognized that the development of an energy organization was important and for this reason was made part of the SRR's strategic review not only for economic development but also the reduction of energy costs. Towards this end, SRR retained Werner G. Buehler of W.G. Buehler & Associates to investigate the many phases or steps required to establish such an energy organization and determine, if in fact, it could benefit the Tribe. The basic phases are delineated as: (1) Identify potential sources of wholesale power and transmission paths; (2) Evaluating the various forms of energy organizations; (3) Determining the benefits (and disadvantages) of each form of organization; (4) Gathering costs to organize and operate the selected form or energy organization; (5) Performing an economic analysis of forming and operating an energy organization; and (6) Develop an implementation plan.

W.G Buehler & Associates

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

282

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

283

Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

284

P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and Stream Restoration Pierre Y. Julien Hong Kong - December 2004 River Engineering and Stream Restoration I - Stream Restoration Objectives Brief overview of River Engineering and Stream Restoration with focus on : 1. River Equilibrium; 2. River Dynamics; 3. River

Julien, Pierre Y.

285

Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 1, 2004 through to April 14, 2004 and a total of 250,249 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2002 egg source and included captive brood (133,781) and conventional (116,468) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2004 began May 10, the first Chinook was captured on May 19, 2004 and the last Chinook was captured on September 16, 2004. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2004. A total of 1,091 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 299 natural origin fish and 792 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 46 natural and 69 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to Lookingglass Hatchery for holding and spawning, 537 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 447 hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 107 adults retained (eight additional hatchery females were collected and then later returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally) for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 22 natural females and 30 supplementation females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 221,889 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 94.9% which yielded a total of 210,661 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,267 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage and then transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they will be reared to the fingerling stage. They will then be transported back to LGH and reared to the smolt stage and then transported to the Lostine acclimation facility for release in the spring of 2006. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from February 27, 2006 through to April 10, 2006 and a total of 240,568 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2004 egg source and included captive brood (40,982) and conventional (199,586) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2006 began May 15th, the first Chinook was captured on June 14, 2006 and the last Chinook was captured on September 27, 2006. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2006. A total of 534 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 205 natural origin fish and 329 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 33 natural and 120 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning and 397 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally. In 2006, no hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and out planted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in under seeded habitat. In order to meet egg take goals for the conventional portion of the program, a determination was made that approximately 147 adults were needed for broodstock. As a result 16 (8 males and 8 females) of the 153 fish collected for broodstock were returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally. Females that were spawned and provided the brood source were made up of 12 natural females and 45 supplementation females. One of these females tested positive for high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease and consequently this females eggs were destroyed. The remaining females produced a total of 241,372 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 85.47% which yielded a total of 206,309 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,162 eggs per female. The brood year 2006 eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

US Army Corps of Engineers

289

Rainfall-River Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2Rainfall-River Forecasting Joint Summit II NOAA Integrated Water Forecasting Program · Minimize losses due management and enhance America's coastal assets · Expand information for managing America's Water Resources, Precipitation and Water Quality Observations · USACE Reservoir Operation Information, Streamflow, Snowpack

US Army Corps of Engineers

290

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-LOS COYOTES BAND OF CAHUILLA AND CUPENO INDIANS Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-LOS...

292

Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Sherman Indian School  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs has found a good way to reduce energy costs, replace inefficient lighting and aging building equipment, and install renewable energy systems without huge increases in the BIA budget. The agency is doing all this by making use of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) at BIA schools and facilities throughout the country.

293

American Indian Women of the Plains and Northern Woodlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~slons. Instead, I will discuss some of the roles and status vanauons Indian women have occupied in the past and, by analyzingdata from the 1~80 Cen~us ~d from an ethnographicstudy of the Kickapoo of Oklahoma examine the situation of AmericanIndian womentoday... of these data are manifold. 12 American IndianWomen For example, the Oklahoma Kickapoo tribal members, discussed below, continually evade to be registration in the US census and their reluctance has historical origins. It is related to their historic strategy...

Kuhlmann, Annette

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring; Hydroacoustic Assessment of Chinook Salmon Escapement to the Secesh River, Idaho, 2002-2004 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate determination of adult salmon spawner abundance is key to the assessment of recovery actions for wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha), a species listed as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Program, the Nez Perce Tribe operates an experimental project in the South Fork of the Salmon River subbasin. The project has involved noninvasive monitoring of Chinook salmon escapement on the Secesh River between 1997 and 2000 and on Lake Creek since 1998. The overall goal of this project is to accurately estimate adult Chinook salmon spawning escapement numbers to the Secesh River and Lake Creek. Using time-lapse underwater video technology in conjunction with their fish counting stations, Nez Perce researchers have successfully collected information on adult Chinook salmon spawner abundance, run timing, and fish-per-redd numbers on Lake Creek since 1998. However, the larger stream environment in the Secesh River prevented successful implementation of the underwater video technique to enumerate adult Chinook salmon abundance. High stream discharge and debris loads in the Secesh caused failure of the temporary fish counting station, preventing coverage of the early migrating portion of the spawning run. Accurate adult abundance information could not be obtained on the Secesh with the underwater video method. Consequently, the Nez Perce Tribe now is evaluating advanced technologies and methodologies for measuring adult Chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River. In 2003, the use of an acoustic camera for assessing spawner escapement was examined. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in a collaborative arrangement with the Nez Perce Tribe, provided the technical expertise to implement the acoustic camera component of the counting station on the Secesh River. This report documents the first year of a proposed three-year study to determine the efficacy of using an acoustic camera to count adult migrant Chinook salmon as they make their way to the spawning grounds on the Secesh River and Lake Creek. A phased approach to applying the acoustic camera was proposed, starting with testing and evaluation in spring 2003, followed by a full implementation in 2004 and 2005. The goal of this effort is to better assess the early run components when water clarity and night visibility preclude the use of optical techniques. A single acoustic camera was used to test the technology for enumerating adult salmon passage at the Secesh River. The acoustic camera was deployed on the Secesh at a site engineered with an artificial substrate to control the river bottom morphometry and the passage channel. The primary goal of the analysis for this first year of deployment was to validate counts of migrant salmon. The validation plan involved covering the area with optical video cameras so that both optical and acoustic camera images of the same viewing region could be acquired simultaneously. A secondary test was contrived after the fish passage was complete using a controlled setting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in which we tested the detectability as a function of turbidity levels. Optical and acoustic camera multiplexed video recordings of adult Chinook salmon were made at the Secesh River fish counting station from August 20 through August 29, 2003. The acoustic camera performed as well as or better than the optical camera at detecting adult Chinook salmon over the 10-day test period. However, the acoustic camera was not perfect; the data reflected adult Chinook salmon detections made by the optical camera that were missed by the acoustic camera. The conditions for counting using the optical camera were near ideal, with shallow clear water and good light penetration. The relative performance of the acoustic camera is expected to be even better than the optical camera in early spring when water clarity and light penetration are limited. Results of the laboratory tests at the Pacific North

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Mueller, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2003 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the seventh season (1997-2003) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the fifth season (1999-2003) of acclimating the resultant progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2003, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 3, 2003 through to April 14, 2003 and a total of 242,776 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2001 egg source and included captive broodstock (141,860) and conventional broodstock (100,916) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2003 began April 30th, the first Chinook was captured on May 16, 2003 and the last Chinook was captured on September 21, 2003. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2003. A total of 464 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 239 natural origin fish and 225 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 45 natural and 4 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 366 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 49 hatchery origin adult jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 49 adults retained for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 21 natural females and no hatchery origin females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 106,609 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 95.50% which yielded a total of 101,811 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 5,077 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage. At eye they were transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they were reared to the fingerling state at which time they were transported back to LGH until they were smolts in the spring of 2005. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2005.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CA-TRIBE-BEAR RIVER BAND OF THE ROHNERVILLE RANCHERIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-BEAR RIVER BAND OF THE ROHNERVILLE RANCHERIA CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed...

297

Giant Sequoia Management Strategies on the Tule River Indian Reservation1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while maintaining cultural and esthetic values. Strategies for managing giant sequoia forests have been resources has provided the Reservation community with recreational opportunities, cultural values, and economic benefits for many years. Forest management activities are planned in response to Tribal Council

Standiford, Richard B.

298

INEOS-New Planet: Indian River Bioenergy Center | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness Plan Competition |

299

DOE Partners with Other Federal Agencies Working on the Wind River Indian  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof Energy DOEDOEAVAILABLE ONLINE AT:

300

MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClick here Current /TidalITRI WEC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially devised based on various assumptions about (1) subbasin carrying capacity, (2) survival rates for selected life history stages, and (3) historic and current escapements of wild, natural, and hatchery stocks of anadromous salmonids to the Hood River subbasin. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife began funding a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) project in December 1991 to collect the quantitative biological information needed to (1) more accurately assess the validity of these assumptions and (2) evaluate the proposed hatchery supplementation component of the HRPP. Bonneville Power Administration assumed funding of the M&E project in August 1992. The M&E project was initially confined to sampling anadromous salmonids escaping to an adult trapping facility operated at Powerdale Dam; which is located at River Mile (RM) 4.5 on the mainstem of the Hood River. Stock specific life history and biological data was collected to (1) monitor subbasin spawner escapements and (2) collect pre-implementation data critical to evaluating the newly proposed HRPP's potential biological impact on indigenous populations of resident fish. The scope of the M&E project was expanded in 1994 to collect the data needed to quantify (1) subbasin smolt production and carrying capacity, (2) smolt to adult survival rates, and (3) the spatial distribution of indigenous populations of summer and winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon. A creel was incorporated into the M&E project in December 1996 to evaluate the HRPP with respect to its defined subbasin and spawner escapement objectives for Hood River stocks of wild and hatchery summer and winter steelhead and for natural and Deschutes stock hatchery spring chinook salmon. In 1996, the M&E project also began monitoring streamflow at various locations in the Hood River subbasin. Streamflow data will be used to correlate subbasin smolt production with summer streamflows. Data collected from 1991-1999 is reported in the following annual progress reports: Olsen et al. (1994), Olsen et al

Olsen, Erik

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

american indian community: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cherokee were also the first American Indian nation to create and finance its own police, fire, and sanitary departments... Swafford, Tamrala Greer 2004-03-01 128 Logging the...

303

american indian communities: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cherokee were also the first American Indian nation to create and finance its own police, fire, and sanitary departments... Swafford, Tamrala Greer 2004-03-01 128 Logging the...

304

New Webinar Series to Address Climate Change Impacts in Indian...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Impacts in Indian Country March 26, 2014 - 7:32pm Addthis On Thursday, April 3, the White House and eight federal agencies will launch a four-part webinar series focused on...

305

Indian Energy & Energy Infrastructure to be Showcased at RES...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to discuss economic development. Indian energy and energy infrastructure are at the heart of our conversations that will be happening at RES. Tracey LeBeau, the Director of our...

306

DETERMINANTS OF INTERNATIONAL NEWS COVERAGE BY INDIAN ENGLISH- LANGUAGE NEWSPAPERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant. Table 4. Infrastructure News Contribution Frequency Percent API/AFP/Reuters 123 42.7 Indian News Agency 96 33.3 Indian Correspondents 40 13.9 Foreign News Org. 22 7.6 Collaboration 7 2.4 Total 288 100.0 Researchers identified... 4 World of Determinants 5 Religion and Science & Technology 7 National Threat and National Traits 8 Relatedness and Cultural Affinity 9 Deviance, Involvement, and Prominence...

Gupta, Alok

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hood River Passive House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

Hales, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Counterpoint: Promoting Tribal Self-Determination in a Post-Oliphant World: An Alternative Road Map  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article considers a potential congressional "fix" for the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indian Tribe, 435 U.S. 191 (1978), where the Court held that Indian tribes do not have criminal jurisdiction ...

Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

312

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

313

Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

314

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

315

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

316

South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

317

Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the...

318

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rivers may fall under the categories of natural, scenic, or recreational. These rivers are designated, acquired, and preserved by the state, and development on or adjacent to these rivers is...

319

"The cream on the pudding..." : An analysis of the Clean Development Mechanism in the Indian wind power sector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis examines the effects of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), a flexible mechanism under the Kyoto Protocol, on the Indian wind power sector. Indian… (more)

Turkanovic, Zlata

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

RIVER RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS River Res. Applic. 21: 849864 (2005)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assimilate wastewater treatment plant effluent. Our study illustrates the types of changes that river of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily

Poff, N. LeRoy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DISCLAIMERS SECTION 14 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 14-1 December 14. 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; · authorize the appropriation of water by any federal, state or local agency, Indian tribe or any other entity States, states, Indian tribes or any person with respect to any water or water-related right; · affect or individual; · affect the rights or jurisdictions of the United States, the states, Indian tribes or other

322

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - November...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site On November 14, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to...

323

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

324

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

325

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

326

New Savannah River Site Deputy Manager Named  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. – DOE’s Savannah River Operations Office selected Terrel “Terry” J. Spears as the deputy manager of the Savannah River Site (SRS) this month.

327

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

328

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

329

Forever Changed: Boarding School Narratives of American Indian Identity in the U.S. and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This essay examines personal narratives to identify experiences at boarding schools. These collective experiences forged new American Indian identities due to a white educational system forced upon these Indian students. While stories remain part...

Smith, Maureen

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Intermediate-depth circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans measured by autonomous floats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,runs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans using the EstimatingIndian and (right) Pacific Oceans from the JPL–ECCO data-

Davis, Russ E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE Office of Indian Energy Partners with ACEP to Study Wind...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE Office of Indian Energy Partners with ACEP to Study Wind-Diesel Systems in Alaska DOE Office of Indian Energy Partners with ACEP to Study Wind-Diesel Systems in Alaska February...

332

Alternative Energy Development in Indian Country: Lighting the Way for the Seventh Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies increasingly show that Indian country may be uniquely positioned to develop alternative energy. Indian country in general constitutes a significant portion of land in the United States. In recognition of the increasing interest...

Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hood River Passive House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

Hales, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Phillips: "Bringing Them under Subjection:" California's Tejón Indian Reservation and Beyond, 1852-1864  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and London: University of Oklahoma Press. 1997 Indians and1849-1852. Norman and London: University of Oklahoma Press.

Johnson, John R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Reformers Revealed: American Indian Progressives at Haskell Institute, Lawrence, Kansas, 1884-1909  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The Road to Self-Determination Since 1928 (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1974); and Vu?kovi?, Voices from Haskell. 4 Hertzberg, American Indian Identity, esp. Chs. 1 & 2; Eduardo Duran and Bonnie Duran, Native American Postcolonial..., American Indian Identity, Chs. 2 & 5; Adams, Education for Extinction, Ch. 9; Coleman, American Indian Children, Ch. 10; Szasz, ed., Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1994). 5 helping...

Anderson, Eric P.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

337

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 No. : IASc/ /13 System' The Indian Academy of Sciences is in need of `Multi-point Video Conference System: The Purchase In-charge, Indian Academy of Sciences latest by 30th December 2013 by 15:00 PM. Technical

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

339

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

340

Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details the Indian Solar City Programme, provides an overview of one city's Master Plan and implementation progress, describes NREL's support of the Indian Solar City Programme, and outlines synergies and differences between the Indian and American programs including unique challenges and opportunities India is facing.

Kandt, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307­313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp , and Dennis R. Decoteau1 Abstract - Sixteen selections of Apocynum cannabinum (Indian Hemp) and nine, adaxial stipple, similar to symptoms ascribed to ambient ozone in the field. Indian Hemp was more

Decoteau, Dennis R.

342

The Indians in the works of William Faulkner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role u Excel Lent discussions of Sara Fathers, a part-Indian, pc& t- Negro character, especially signi ficunt in Fcutknur&s "The Boar, hcve app& ared in c& i I icaL work s. Rober't I'unn ??on &?c& cc I vr'- i xvs Som F?L I~a& s ae lb" i ah?ri 'Lo... treaty with the United States in 7788, in which the opening article stated that the Choctaw nation should restore all the Negroes taken from whites before 19 the treaty. Accor ding to Vi, L, Miner, race prejudice had never occurred to the Indians unti...

Nigliazzo, Marc Anthony

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Framing Cinematic Indians within the Social Construction of Place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and identity from the very place itself. The intimacy, significance and legitimacy of space and place grounds the Indian (Tinker 1996). Place also allows us to consider the non-Indian settler, for whom place is transformed as "property." In this sense, land...'s Television Network, 2002. DVD. Slotkin, Richard. 1998. Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twenti eth-Century America. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. Smith, Henry Nash. 1950. Virgin Land: The American West as Symbol and Myth. Cambridge...

Coleman, Cynthia-Lou

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

US Army Corps of Engineers

345

RiverFalls,Wisconsin SolarinSmall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the local government, and the citizens of River Falls have made energy conservation and renewable energy. Inspiring Interest in Renewables River Falls' energy conservation efforts benefit from RFMU's membership energy within the community.v Bringing Solar to River Falls The success of the River Falls Renewable

346

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Georgia, University of

347

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

348

Hydrogeologic aspects of brine disposal in the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The East Poplar Oil Field encompasses about 70 square miles in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Oil production began in 1952 from the Mississippian Madison Group. Production depths range from about 5,500 to 6,000 feet below land surface. Large quantities of brine (water having a dissolved-solids concentration greater than 35,000 milligrams per liter) have been produced with the oil. The brine has a dissolved-solids concentration of as much as 160,000 milligrams per liter. Most of the brine has been disposed of by injection into shallower subsurface formations (mainly the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone at depths of about 3,300 feet and the Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation at depths of about 1,000 feet). Smaller quantities of brine have been directed to storage and evaporation pits. Handling, transport, and disposal of the brine have resulted in its movement into and migration through shallow Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits along the Poplar River valley. Locally, domestic water supplies are obtained from these deposits. The major point, sources of shallow ground-water contamination probably is leakage of brine from corroded disposal-well casing and pipelines. Using electromagnetic geophysical techniques and auger drilling, three saline-water plumes in alluvial deposits and one plum in glacial deposits have been delineated. Dominant constituents in plume areas are sodium and chloride, whereas those in nonplume areas are sodium and bicarbonate.

Craigg, S.D.; Thamke, J.N. (Geological Survey, Helena, MT (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Quinault Indian Nation Renewable Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Quinault Indian Nation (Nation) initiated this study on conservation and production of renewable energy because this approach created the opportunity: • To become self-sufficient and gain greater control over the energy the Nation uses; • To generate jobs and businesses for its members; • To better manage, sustain, and protect its resources; • To express the cultural values of the Nation in an important new arena. The Nation has relatively small energy needs. These needs are concentrated at two separate points: the Quinault Beach Resort and Casino (QBRC) and Taholah on the Quinault Indian Reservation (QIR). Except for the town of Queets, energy needs are small and scattered. The needs vary greatly over the season. The small scale, widely dispersed, and variable nature of these needs presents a unique challenge to the Nation. Meeting these needs requires a resource and technology that is flexible, effective, and portable. Conservation is the most cost-effective way to meet any need. It is especially effective in a situation like this where production would leave a high per unit cost. This plan is based on first gaining energy savings through conservation. Major savings are possible through: 1. Upgrading home appliances on the QIR. 2. Weatherizing homes and facilities. 3. Changes in lighting/ventilation in the QBRC pool room. These elements of the plan are already being implemented and promise to save the Nation around a quarter of its present costs. Wood biomass is the best resource available to the QIN for energy production either on-site or for commercial development. It is abundant, flexible and portable. Its harvesting has high job potential and these jobs are a good fit for the present “skill set” of the QIN. This plan focuses on using wood biomass to produce energy and other value-added products. Our study considered various technologies and approaches to using wood for energy. We considered production for both on-site and commercial production. This plan calls for commercial-scale production only, with the QIN being the first “customer” for the product. This plan favors employing the pyrolysis technology to produce bio-oil, heat, and char. We favor this approach and technology because it is the most cost effective way to use the available resource. Its main product, bio-oil, has proven utility for the production of heat and electricity. It has promise for use as an alternative fuel, which is a much higher value than present uses of wood and it meets the QIN need for flexibility, scalability, and portability. Char, the secondary product from the pyrolysis process, has proven value-added uses. In addition to these direct benefits, the use of biomass in pyrolysis technology has significant indirect benefits. These benefits include the fact that the technology is a good fit with the Nation’s cultural values, i.e., environmental protection and the holistic use of a resource. It fits well with current QIN enterprises. For example, char could be processed into a charcoal co-product for QIN fish. Finally, the QIN can become a leader in developing and demonstrating this innovative approach to the use of wood. This plan proposes key organization steps to insure both excellent implementation of the plan and taking the best advantage of the processes and facilities put in place. This plan calls for two new QIN organizations: an energy production/distribution corporation and a community development corporation. The production/distribution corporation can be either a utility or a business enterprise that develops and markets renewable energy. The community development corporation can be a not-for-profit to support the QIN in taking best advantage of its energy opportunities. The production and distribution corporation is the subject of a further business planning effort now underway. This plan envisions a community development corporation that works directly with the Business Committee on research, education, and project development. Specifically, this corporation can seek grant funding to research energy m

Don Hopps, Institute for Washington's Future; Jesse Nelson, Institute for Washington's Future

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea,...

352

Case Studies in River Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

Julien, Pierre Y.

353

Star Lakes and Rivers (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An association organized for the purpose of addressing issues on a specific lake or river, a lake improvement district, or a lake conservation district may apply to the Star Lake Board for...

354

A portrait of everyday life in an Indian village>>  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A portrait of everyday life in an Indian village>> Indrani Medhi, Digital Green, Microsoft Research Pradesh, India; helping out with Digital Green activities -Staying on a partner NGO campus -Close ablutions in fields -Have 1 cup of tea -Wife, daughter-in-law prepare food; do seed grading in sowing season

Narasayya, Vivek

355

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: American Indian Religious Freedom Act  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Reference Book contains a copy of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act and guidance for DOE compliance with the statute. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Foreign direct investment in the electricity sector: the Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

So far, India is losing out in the competition against other emerging economies to attract more foreign direct investment to its electricity sector. This is in large part because the Indian approach towards power sector reforms is more haphazard than the more orderly and sensitive growth model of Singapore and Latin American economies. (author)

Sharma, A.K.; Vohra, Ekta

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the Indian Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the Indian Economy Sourangsu Banerji Visiting study the effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) with respect to India and its economy. We try interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

First Generation Indian External Sector Reforms in Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

India's first generation external sector reforms are a fascinating case study of emergence from a post-Independence socialist-style economy to the world’s largest free market democracy. Part I of this article reviews the Indian license Raj system...

Bhala, Raj

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Research Investments in Large Indian Software Companies Pankaj Jalote  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the company can use to improve the business. Research is typically not a business or a profit center to bring out newer products in the market place. But why does a service company need investment in researchResearch Investments in Large Indian Software Companies Pankaj Jalote Professor, Department

Jalote, Pankaj

360

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENTSavannah River Site Savannah RiverSite

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

362

Enforcement Documents - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to...

363

Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Vigilante Electric Coop. Northern  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Farmers Electric Riverside Electric Minidoka Soda Springs Idaho Falls Lower Valley Energy Lost River Electric Coop. Fall River Rural Electric Coop. Salmon River Electric...

364

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

365

Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

366

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

367

Market-Based Indian Grid Integration Study Options: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indian state of Gujarat is forecasting solar and wind generation expansion from 16% to 32% of installed generation capacity by 2015. Some states in India are already experiencing heavy wind power curtailment. Understanding how to integrate variable generation (VG) into the grid is of great interest to local transmission companies and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. This paper describes the nature of a market-based integration study and how this approach, while new to Indian grid operation and planning, is necessary to understand how to operate and expand the grid to best accommodate the expansion of VG. Second, it discusses options in defining a study's scope, such as data granularity, generation modeling, and geographic scope. The paper also explores how Gujarat's method of grid operation and current system reliability will affect how an integration study can be performed.

Stoltenberg, B.; Clark, K.; Negi, S. K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

Jimenez, A. C.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

River System Hydrology in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,700 86,700 Proctor Leon River USACE 1963 59,400 54,702 310,100 Belton Leon River USACE 1954 457,600 432,978 640,000 Stillhouse Hollow Lampasas River USACE 1968 235,700 224,279 390,660 Georgetown San Gabriel R USACE 1980 37,100 36,980 87,600 Granger... San Gabriel R USACE 1980 65,500 50,540 162,200 Somerville Yequa Creek USACE 1967 160,110 154,254 337,700 Hubbard Creek Hubbard Creek WCTMWD 1962 317,750 317,750 í Post NF Double Mt WRMWD proposed 57,420 í í Alan Henry SF Double Mt Lubbock 1993 115...

Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

An Inside Look at River Corridor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

372

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

19, 2002 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Safety Basis and Radiation Protection Violations at the Savannah River Site, On March 19, 2002, the U.S....

373

Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

374

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

375

Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

376

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 5, 1997 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to an Unplanned Radioactive Material Intake at the Savannah River Site, (EA-97-12) On December 5, 1997, the...

377

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Federal and Indian oil and gas royalty valuation and management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book covers: Royalty management-an M.M.S. overview; Payor/operator/lessee royalty liability; Royalty issues for OCS lessees; Royalty valuation procedures; Gas marketing royalty issues - industry perspective; Gas marketing royalty issues - M.M.S. perspective; Settlements of gas contract disputes Royalty reporting issues; Production reporting issues; Indian royalty issues; Litigation/regulatory updates; Over/under production on federal leases, units, and communitized areas; Audit program; and M.M.S. Reference Handbook.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (IREEED) developed in collaboration by the United States Department of Energy and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. IREEED provides succinct summaries of India's central and state government policies and incentives related to renewable energy and energy efficiency. The online, public database was developed under the U.S.- India Energy Dialogue and the Clean Energy Solution Center.

Bushe, S.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Translating Indian miniature paintings into a time-based medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Carol LaFayette Committee Members, Weiling He Michael Greenwald Head of Department, Tim McLaughlin May 2008 Major Subject...: Visualization Sciences iii ABSTRACT Translating Indian Miniature Paintings into a Time-based Medium. (May 2008) Aradhana Vaidya, B.Arch., Nagpur University, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Prof. Carol LaFayette The purpose of this research...

Vaidya, Aradhana

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

On the Electrical and Magnetic Properties of some Indian Spices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have made experimental measurements of electrical conductivity, pH and relative magnetic susceptibility of the aqueous solutions of 24 indian spices. The measured values of electrical conductance of these spices are found to be linearly related to their ash content and bulk calorific values reported in literature. The physiological relevance of the pH and diamagnetic susceptibility of spices when consumed as food or medicine will be also discussed.

Samson. K. Baby; T. E. Girish

2010-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Tools from the French and Indian War sloop Boscawen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1996 Major Subject: Anthropology TOOLS FROM THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR SLOOP 80SCA 8XW A Thesis by DAVID MITCHELL GRANT Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulgllment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS Approved.... . . . , Tools and Blacksmithing Equipment Sent to Crown Point . . . . 67 68 69 70 Tools Sent from Fort George to Crown Point. 72 British Axe Suppliers from the Mid-Eighteenth Century . . . . . 125 Tools Recovered &om the Boscawen. 139 CHAPTER I...

Grant, David Mitchell

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy from Elizabeth C. Chimento |Lessons LearnedSpring 2013Office of Indian

385

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

387

851 SW Sixth Avenue, Suite 300 | Pacific First Building | Portland, OR 97204-1339 Phone: 503-229-0191 | Fax: 503-229-0443 | Website: www.cbfwa.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and restoration of fish, wildlife, and their habitat in the Columbia River Basin. The Authority is comprised of the following tribes and fish and wildlife agencies: Burns Paiute Tribe Coeur d'Alene Tribe Confederated Salish Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Idaho Department of Fish and Game Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

388

SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

Georgia, University of

389

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

390

A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares Introduction Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - abortions indian case Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Laboratory Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 54 Sex Selective Abortions, Fertility and Birth Spacing Claus C Portner Summary: Indian women...

392

Positive income shocks and accidental deaths among Cherokee Indians: a natural experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economic effects of Harrah’s Cherokee casino and hotel onand fertility timing among Cherokee and white youth inand accidental deaths among Cherokee Indians: a natural

Bruckner, Tim A; Brown, Ryan A; Margerison-Zilko, Claire

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

"If This Great Nation May Be Saved?" The Discourse of Civilization in Cherokee Indian Removal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis examined the rhetoric and discourse of the elite political actors in the Cherokee Indian Removal crisis. Historians such as Ronald Satz and… (more)

Watson, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Through Native Lenses: American Indian Vernacular Photographies and Performances of Memories, 1890-1940  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1977. Bass, Althea. A Cherokee Daughter of Mount Holyoke.Public Indians, Private Cherokees: Tourism and Tradition onlast updated 1/28/99. Cherokee Nation. Official Website.

Strathman, Nicole Dawn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CREATING DOMESTIC DEPENDENTS: INDIAN REMOVAL, CHEROKEE SOVEREIGNTY AND WOMEN’S RIGHTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??What, this project asks, are the impacts of the alliance between women and Native Americans in the nineteenth century debate over Indian Removal? How might… (more)

Collins-Frohlich, Jesslyn R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Deep Signatures of Southern Tropical Indian Ocean Annual Rossby Waves* GREGORY C. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Signatures of Southern Tropical Indian Ocean Annual Rossby Waves* GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA Environmental Laboratory Contribution Number 3671. Corresponding author address: Gregory C. Johnson, NOAA

Johnson, Gregory C.

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian indian adolescents Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Curriculum Guide Produced by the Department of Enrollment Services Summary: Asian Philosophy PHILOS ELECTIVE PHI 203 American Indian Philosophies PHILOS 271 ELECTIVES (6...

398

EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications to provide training, and technical and outreach support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program.

399

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200880000 ISRP FAN1B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Accords) are ten-year agreements between the federal action agencies and states and tribes. The Accords supplement the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and are intended substantial biological benefits for Columbia Basin fish. The Accords also acknowledge the tribes' and states

400

Tribal Renewable Energy Development under the Hearth Act: An Independently Rational, but Collectively Deficient Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Indian country for potential energy development opportunities. Such attention on potential energy development opportunities in Indian country is warranted, as abundant alternative and renewable energy sources exist within Indian country. Many tribes...

Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Disappearing rivers — The limits of environmental assessment for hydropower in India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mountain rivers of the Indian Himalaya possess a vast potential for hydropower generation. After decades of comparatively modest development recent years have seen a major intensification in the construction of new hydropower dams. Although increasingly portrayed as a form of renewable energy generation, hydropower development may lead to extensive alterations of fluvial systems and conflicts with resource use patterns of local communities. To appraise and reduce adverse effects is the purpose of statutory Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) and corresponding mitigation plans. However, in the light of ambitious policies for hydropower expansion conventional approaches of environmental assessment are increasingly challenged to keep up with the intensity and pace of development. This paper aims to explore the systemic limitations of environmental assessment for hydropower development in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. Based on a qualitative methodology involving interviews with environmental experts, document reviews and field observations the study suggests that the current practice of constraining EIAs to the project level fails to address the larger effects of extensive hydropower development. Furthermore, it is critically discussed as to what extent the concept of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) might have the potential to overcome existing shortcomings.

Erlewein, Alexander, E-mail: erlewein@sai.uni-heidelberg.de

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mineral revenues: the 1983 report on receipts from Federal and Indian leases with summary data from 1920 to 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tables and figures abound for: mineral revenue management in 1983; offshore federal mineral revenues; onshore federal mineral revenues; Indian mineral revenues; distribution of federal and Indian mineral revenues; plus appended lease management data. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Impacts of Pacific and Indian Ocean Coupling on Wintertime Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation: A Basin-Coupling CGCM Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the central Indian and Pacific oceans. We notice from FigureIP) Run, (c) the Pacific Ocean (PO) Run, and (d) the Indiantropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. Journal of Climate 10:

Weng, Shu-Ping; Yu, Jin-Yi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

408

The Importance of Historical Trauma & Stress as a Factor in Diabetes and Obesity Prevention among American Indian Adolescents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma. New York: Plenum Press. 19 Maria. Yellow Horse Brave Heart, Lemyra M. DeBruyn, "The American Indian Holocaust: Healing Historical Unresolved Grief," American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research 8, no. 2 (1998... American Indian adults.13 In 2000, the American Diabetes Association alerted the health care community to the growing problem of type II diabetes among children and adolescents.14 The diagnosis of diabetes among American Indian and Alaska Native ages 35...

Hale, Jason William

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080. Indian Academy of the Academy consist of publication of scientific journals, election of Fellows, organizing scientific meetings, initiatives such as promoting science education,etc. The Academy is looking for a suitable person to fill

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

410

Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 The Academy or email before 20 December 2013 to: The Executive Secretary Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue: 1. The Academy reserves the right to restrict the number of candidates for interview to a reasonable

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

411

Closure of the global overturning circulation through the Indian, Pacific and Southern Oceans: schematics and transports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal diapycnal transformation in the deep Indian and Pacific Oceans. All three northern-source Deep and Pacific Oceans; only 0.1 PW is gained at the surface in the Southern Ocean. Thus, while an adiabatic model full participation of the diffusive Indian and Pacific Oceans, with a basin-averaged diffusivity

Talley, Lynne D.

412

Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation by Andrew D. Mills: ___________________________________________ Jane Stahlhut Date #12;Wind Energy in Indian Country A.D. Mills Abstract - ii - Abstract Utility-scale wind projects are increasingly being developed in rural areas of the United States. In the West

Kammen, Daniel M.

413

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

Wang, Yuqing

414

Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indian Solar Cities Programme supports 60 Indian cities in the development of EE and RE projects. Aims to reduce conventional energy demand by 10% by 2013, compared to a baseline year of 2008, and support is provided to municipal corporations for preparing and implementing a master plan.

Kandt, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia J. Lelieveld1-range transport of air pollution from South and Southeast Asia towards the Indian Ocean during the dry monsoon season in January-March 1999. Surprisingly high pollution levels were observed over the entire northern

Dickerson, Russell R.

416

Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase III Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program and Training #12;Acknowledgments The Indian Forest Service Officer Training program coordinators at Colorado University Center for Protected Area Management and Training · Colorado State University Warner College

417

Is the deep Indian Ocean MOC sustained by breaking internal waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the world ocean. [3] Here, the energy budget of the deep Indian Ocean MOC is assessed using a range of the Indian Ocean overturning circulation with estimates of energy sources (winds, tides, and geostrophic are capable of carrying energy from ocean boundaries into the interior, and are generally considered

Naveira Garabato, Alberto

418

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Microsoft Word - C_American Indian Resource Document.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronic Input Options Gary2013C AMERICAN INDIAN

420

Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S. Department of9 ExaminationExecutive07 Indian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment of EnergyScience, SpaceCommittee on Indian Affairs

422

2015 National Indian Timber Symposium | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014 Chief Freedom ofDepartment ofNational Indian Timber

423

Indian Wells, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 ThrottledEnergy Information JumpOpenIndian

424

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

Zusman, Eric

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210, but improvements at pulp mills and waste water treatment plant upgrades are thought to have improved water quality

428

Development of energy-efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of advanced techniques in engineering simulation and economic analysis for the development of efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators is illustrated in this paper. A key feature of this methodology is refrigerator simulation to generate energy savings for a set of energy-efficient design options and life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis with these design options. The LCC of a refrigerator is analyzed as a function of five variables: nominal discount rate, fuel price, appliance lifetime, incremental price, and incremental energy savings. The frequency of occurrence of the LCC minimum at any design option indicates the optimum efficiency level or range. Studies carried out in the US and European Economic Community show that the location of the LCC minimum under different scenarios (e.g., variable fuel price, life-time, discount rate, and incremental price) is quite stable. Thus, an efficiency standard can be developed based on the efficiency value at the LCC minimum. This paper examines and uses this methodology in developing efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators. The potential efficiency standard value is indicated to be 0.65 kWh/day for a 165-liter, CFC-based, manual defrost, single-door refrigerator-freezer.

Bhatia, P.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

US Army Corps of Engineers

430

Leading the Charge: Chairman Vig Champions Progress, Sustainability...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

in Indian Country. Prospects differ from one Tribe to the next, but solar and wind energy are two good examples. Energy crops are also an exciting opportunity for Tribes that...

431

CX-002080: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002080: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date:...

432

CX-004235: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004235: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10152010...

433

The Columbia River System Inside Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

none,

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

435

Methow River Conservation Easement - May 2009.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Yakama Nation to fund the Methow Conservancy's acquisition of a 44-acre conservation easement in the Methow River watershed in Okanogan County, Wash., for fi sh habitat...

436

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

439

South River EMC- Energy Efficient Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

South River EMC offers a variety of rebates encouragings its members to invest in energy efficient appliances, equipment, and home upgrades. Incentives are available for clothes washers,...

440

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

443

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

444

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA) P.O. Box 2065 integrity of the White River ecosystem. To successfully accomplish the vision of UWRWA, a 16-county was formed. It exists to improve and protect water quality on a watershed basis in the larger Upper White

445

Three Rivers Builders The Three Rivers House Project Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further ThirdDOEThree Rivers

446

Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization - Human Capacity Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to create jobs and to provide tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance for energy efficiency. The project will establish a Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program to provide training, outreach and education on energy assistance and conservation to low-income families. The Tribes' mission, under its Strategic Energy Plan of 2008, is to promote tribal efficiency, reduce energy costs, create jobs, economic opportunities, and incorporate energy planning in construction and economic development.

Irenia Quitiquit

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

448

Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

450

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1SandraSavannah River Savannah

451

Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It is the mission ofEconomicSavannah River

452

Columbia River Treaty Review #2 - April 2009.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Columbia River Treaty has provided signifi cant benefi ts to the United States and Canada through coordinated river management by the two countries. It remains the standard...

453

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

454

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

455

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

456

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

457

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste...

458

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

459

Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 January 2012 Follow-up Review of...

460

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 May 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Walkthrough The U.S. Department...

462

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Orientation Visit The U.S....

463

Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear...

464

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site - July 2011 July 2011 Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River...

465

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...

466

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site...

467

The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

468

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

469

allegheny river: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

470

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS Electronic Document...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electronic Document Workflow RECORDS System (EDWS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS Electronic Document Workflow RECORDS System (EDWS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

471

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis...

472

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 22, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 Oversight Scheduling an Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2013-03-25...

473

OHIO RIVER SHORELINE, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, (PADUCAH, KENTUCKY LFPP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 OHIO RIVER SHORELINE, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, (PADUCAH, KENTUCKY LFPP) RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT 22 June and private infrastructure to Paducah, Kentucky, from flooding by the Ohio River through reconstruction

US Army Corps of Engineers

474

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River...

475

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

476

California's Russian River: A Conservation Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Improve weather and river flow forecasting to maximize water captured for reservoirs and fisheries support forecast-based reservoir operations and allow for improved water management. It may also provide's Russian River Habitat Blueprint #12;Restore floodplain habitat through reclamation of abandoned gravel

477

CedarCreekanticlineCedarCreekanticline Yellowstone River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins, United States and Canada #12;Cover. Conceptual block diagram of groundwater flow in the Williston structural basin. #12;Conceptual Model of the Uppermost Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

478

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

Arnett, M.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

479

Restoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the first-ever comprehensive database of more than 37,000 stream and restoration projects nationwideRestoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila Maryland has the largest number of river restoration projects restoration and conservation. On a sweltering July afternoon, an assortment of men and women clad in T

Palmer, Margaret A.

480

INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph. 2332 7311).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

YEAR BOOK 2014 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES #12;Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph Academy of Sciences C.V. Raman Avenue Post Box No. 8005 Sadashivanagar Post Bangalore 560 080 India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Role of the Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Statutes

Dhingra, Narender K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "river indian tribes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - american indian population Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

115,616 112,724 112,978 American Indian & Alskan Native alone 9... ,553 238,201 116,561 110,784 128,992 127,417 American ... Source: Noble, James S. - Department of Industrial and...

482

AMERICAN INDIANS AND THE NEVADA TEST SITE A MODEL OF RESEARCH...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3046-2001 OO1 AMERICAN INDIANS AND THE NEVADA TEST SITE A MODEL OF RESEARCH AND CONSULTATION Richard W. Stoffle, Maria Nieves Zedeno, and David B. Halmo, editors Bureau of Applied...

483

American Indian Heritage Month 2013 "Guiding Our Destiny with Heritage and Traditions"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Lunchtime with Cherokee Recording Artist, Michael Jacobs" 11:30 am ­ 1 pm, Multicultural Center (MCC), Squires Student Center Award-winning Cherokee recording artist Student Center An enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Lloyd

Virginia Tech

484

Patterns of Ethnic, Linguistic, and Geographic Heterogeneity of Palmar Interdigital Ridge Counts in the Indian Subcontinent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published data on palmar interdigital ridge counts (a–b, b–c, and c–d) among 57 populations from the Indian subcontinent were analyzed with reference to ethnic, socioeconomic, linguistic, and geographic affiliations of the ...

Reddy, B. Mohan; Demarchi, Dario A.; Bharati, S.; Kumar, Vikrant; Crawford, Michael H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Production and maintenance planning for electricity generators: modeling and application to Indian power systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and maintenance planning for electricity generators: modeling and application to Indian power systems Debabrata Chattopadhyay Department of Management, University of Canterbury, Private Bag describes the development of an optimization model to perform the fuel supply, electricity generation

Dragoti-Ã?ela, Eranda

486

Life-Cycle Assessment of the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in Indian Locomotives (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With India's transportation sector relying heavily on imported petroleum-based fuels, the Planning Commission of India and the Indian government recommended the increased use of blended biodiesel in transportation fleets, identifying Jatropha as a potentially important biomass feedstock. The Indian Oil Corporation and Indian Railways are collaborating to increase the use of biodiesel blends in Indian locomotives with blends of up to B20, aiming to reduce GHG emissions and decrease petroleum consumption. To help evaluate the potential for Jatropha-based biodiesel in achieving sustainability and energy security goals, this study examines the life cycle, net GHG emission, net energy ratio, and petroleum displacement impacts of integrating Jatropha-based biodiesel into locomotive operations in India. In addition, this study identifies the parameters that have the greatest impact on the sustainability of the system.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Technological learning and the evolution of the Indian pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Indian pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors have been characterised by three features considered analogous to technological stagnation: low R&D investments, "copying" on-patent drugs (legal in India if a novel ...

Srinivas, Smita

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Depositional and diagenetic history of some Jurassic carbonates, Indian Rock-Gilmer Field, Upshur County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the origin of the paleostructure which pro- duced the shallow marine environments during Cotton Valley/Haynesvi lie deposition was a Paleozoic high. The Indian Rock-Gilmer Field was a shallow area in the Jurassic Cotton Valley/Haynesville sea situated...~ ~ ~ 0 '''j DEPOSITIONAL AND DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF SOME JURASSIC CARBONATES, INDIAN ROCK-GILMER FIELD, UPSHUR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY FALL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment...

Fall, Steven Anthony

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

"Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University Patrick Russell LeBeau Motto Realizing the dreams of generations past, through preserving those of the future. Undergraduates... logo depicting the circle of life and situating the colors as we have, the American Indian Studies Program (AISP) at Michigan State University honors the Three Fires People of Michigan, the Chippewa (Ojibwe), Ottawa (Odawa), Pottawatomie (Potawatomie...

LeBeau, Patrick Russell

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a unique clade in South Asia.

Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

491

Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

492

Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribe’s CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

494

Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association Eastern Oregon Irrigators Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to river flows, reservoir elevations and hydroelectric power production. Its results are currently being

495

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

496

Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that connects the pump, distribution tank and holding ponds. As of April 15, 2013, three of the ponds were completed and have been lined with a synthetic liner to prevent seepage and leakage as this was a major problem in early projects. Pecos River WPP...Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update Funding Provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a Clean Water Act §319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S Environmental Protection Agency TR-447 October 2013 Pecos River...

Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497
498

From Activism to Academics: The Evolution of American Indian Studies at San Fransisco State University, 1968-2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the department of American Indian Studies. Students at SFSU such as Wilma Mankiller (Hall of Fame, SFSU), former Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, to current adjunct faculty Joesph Myers (Porno) Director of the National Indian Justice Center, offer a... University Self Study for Reaccredidation, WASC Report, Chapter 10, Enhancing Human Relations, Spring 2001. 13. Ibid. 14. Adjunct faculty Joseph Myers (Porno) is the founder and director of the National Indian Justice Center. Nicole Myers-Urn (Porno...

De La Torre, Joely

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

CAIED Tribal Economic Development Outlook Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Center for American Indian Economic Development (CAIED) is hosting a conference on the impact that business and the economy will have on the next year for Tribes.

500

Intellectual Property Provisions (GNP-115) Grant and Cooperative...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Intellectual Property Provisions (GNP-115) Grant and Cooperative Agreement Research, Development, or Demonstration Non-Federal Entity (State, Local government, Indian tribe,...