Sample records for river basin south

  1. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  2. History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Colorado State University 25th South Platte Forum Longmont, CO October 22, 2014 #12;Acknowledgment: Thanks is it -- the History Annual Peak Flows S. Platte River at Julesburg 1902-2013 #12;#12;#12;Now, let's head upstream

  3. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  4. Provenance study and environments of deposition of the Pennslyvanian-Permian Wood River Formation, south-central Idaho, and the paleotectonic character of the Wood River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Christopher William

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and provenance of the conglomerates in the Big Wood River and Fish Creek Reservoir regions of south-central Idaho is needed. Distinguishing between marine and non-marine strata and determining source terranes will aid in reconstructing Wood River basin... paleogeography and paleo- tectonics. Three source areas have been postulated in recent years: 1, The Antler highland to the west, containing volcanics and low grade metamorphic rocks (Bissell, 1960; Churkin, 1962; Roberts and Thomasson, 1964). 2. The stable...

  5. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  6. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  7. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  8. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  9. The Climate of the South Platte Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Climate of the South Platte Basin Colorado Climate Center http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;Key Features of the Climate of the South Platte Basin #12;Temperature Cold winters Hot summers #12;Precipitation Monthly Average Precipitation for Selected Sites in the South Platte Basin 0.00 0

  10. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  11. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  12. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  13. Lance water injection tests adjacent to the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Myer, L.; Moridis, G.; Cook, P.; James, A.; Pellerin, L.; Pruess, K.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale field demonstration of waste isolation using viscous- liquid containment barriers has been planned for the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. The 281-3H basin is a shallow retention/seepage basin contaminated mainly by radionuclides. The viscous-liquid containment barrier utilizes the permeation of liquid grout to either entomb the contaminants within a monolithic grout structure or to isolate the waste by drastically reducing the permeability, of the soils around the plume. A clear understanding of the hydrogeologic setting of the retention basin is necessary for proper design of the viscous liquid barrier. To aid in the understanding of the hydrogeology of the 281-3H retention basin, and to obtain critical parameters necessary for grout injection design, a series of tests were undertaken in a region immediately adjacent to the basin. The objectives of the LWIT were: 1. To evaluate the general performance of the Lance Injection Technique for grout emplacement at the site, including the range and upper limits of injection pressures, the flow rates applicable for site conditions, as well as the mechanical forces needed for lance penetration. 2. To obtain detailed information on the injectability of the soils immediately adjacent to the H-area retention basin. 3. To identify any high permeability zones suitable for injection and evaluate their spatial distribution. 4. To perform ground penetrating radar (GPR) to gain information on the structure of the soil column and to compare the results with LWIT data. This report will focus on results pertinent to these objectives.

  14. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  15. South River EMC- Energy Efficient Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC offers a variety of rebates encouragings its members to invest in energy efficient appliances, equipment, and home upgrades. Incentives are available for clothes washers,...

  16. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  17. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  18. Geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth for each basin, is tabulated. Background heat flow in the Wind River Basin is generally insufficient to produce high conductive gradients. Only where hydrologic systems re-distribute heat through mass movement of water will high temperatures occur at shallow depths. Aquifers which may have the confinement and structural characteristics necessary to create such geothermal systems are the Lance/Fort Union, Mesa Verde, Frontier, Muddy, Cloverly, Sundance, Nugget, Park City, Tensleep, Amsden, Madison, Bighorn, and Flathead Formations. Of these the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison Limestone are the most attractive in terms of both productivity and water quality. Most of the identified geothermal anomalies in the Wind River Basin occur along complex structures in the southwest and south. The most attractive geothermal prospects identified are anomalous Areas 2 and 3 north of Lander, Sweetwater Station Springs west of Jeffrey City, and the thermal springs southwest of Dubois. Even in these areas, it is unlikely temperatures in excess of 130 to 150/sup 0/F can be developed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  19. South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

  20. Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear...

  1. Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; Böhner, Jürgen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

  2. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  3. Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan Joseph K. Goode,1 the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south central Kyrgyzstan central Kyrgyzstan, Tectonics, 30, TC6009, doi:10.1029/2011TC002910. 1. Introduction [2] Deformation

  4. The Ecohydrology of South American Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Michael

    The Ecohydrology of South American Rivers and Wetlands edited by Michael E. McClain Department research integrating the physical processes of hydrology with the biological processes of ecology. Together

  5. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  6. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  7. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  8. Cenozoic uplift of south Western Australia as constrained by river profiles N. Barnett-Moore , N. Flament, C. Heine, N. Butterworth, R.D. Mller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Cenozoic uplift of south Western Australia as constrained by river profiles N. Barnett-Moore , N an explanation. Applying an inverse algorithm to river profiles of south Western Australia reveals including preserved shallow-marine sediment outcrops across the Eucla Basin and south Western Australia. We

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP), located at Aiken, South Carolina. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The following topics are discussed: general site information; air, soil, surface water and ground water; hydrogeology; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; release of tritium oxides; radioactivity in milk; contamination of ground water and wildlife; pesticide use; and release of radionuclides into seepage basins. 149 refs., 44 figs., 53 tabs.

  10. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  11. Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources Gary Stone, Extension Educator, University://www.wrds.uwyo.edu/wrds/nrcs/snowprec/snowprec.html - the University of Wyoming Water Resources Data System - scroll down to the Upper and Lower North Platte River. Seminoe is the first reservoir on the North Platte River in central Wyoming. Glendo is the second

  12. Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

  13. Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

  14. Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

    been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

  15. african river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 121 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  16. amazon river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 149 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  17. arkansas river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 191 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  18. The distribution of organic carbon in the Brazos River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, James Mark

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN A Thesis by James Nark Brooks Submitted to the Graduate College of. Texas ASYi Hniversity in partial fulfillment. of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August..., 1970 Najor Subject: Oceanography THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN A Thesis by James Mark Brooks Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Commrttee) (Head o Depa tme ) (Member) kJ. ( &. ) i & (Member...

  19. Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

  20. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  1. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  2. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  3. Petroleum geology of the Zhu-1 depression, Pearl River Mouth Basin, People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilera, C.L.; Huizinga, B.J.; Lomando, A.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pearl River Mouth basin, located in the South China Sea between Hainan Island and Taiwan has been the focus of an intense exploration effort during the l980s. In 1979 the international oil industry, acquired over 60,000 km of seismic, gravity, and magnetic data covering an area of approximately 240,000 km{sup 2}. Three major subbasins, Zhu-1, Zhu-2, and Zhu-3 were defined. Chevron in partnership with Texaco and AGIP (ACT group), concentrated their effort on the Zhu-1 depression which was interpreted to contain as much as 7,800 m of sedimentary section. This subbasin, bounded by the Wansha and Donsha massifs to the north and south, is the most inboard of the three depressions, thereby possibly prolonging anoxic lacustrine conditions prior to the Neogene marine incursion. Additionally, the Zhu- 1 depression should have directly received Miocene sediment potentially supplying the subbasin with high-quality reservoirs. Within the Zhu-1 depression, the ACT group focused in on Block 16/08, which covered the deepest part of the Zhu-1 depression. The block was awarded to the consortium in January 1983. Structuring within the block ranges from Paleogene tensional block faulting created during the early formation of the overall Pearl River Mouth basin to draping over basement highs and carbonate buildups during the Neogene. The Pearl River Mouth basin exhibits classic rift basin geometry with early nonmarine continental fluvial/lacustrine deposition (Zhuhai Formation) during the Oligocene and capped by a lower Miocene marine incursion (Zhu Jiang Formation). Integrated interpretations, exploration drilling, and constant refinement of the geological model led to the discovery of two oil fields, Huizhou/21-1 and Huizhou/26-1, both of which are currently under development and will represent the first commercial oil production from the entire Pearl River Mouth basin.

  4. Glacier Meltwater Contributions and Glaciometeorological Regime of the Illecillewaet River Basin, British Columbia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dan

    Glacier Meltwater Contributions and Glaciometeorological Regime of the Illecillewaet River Basin This study characterizes the meteorological parameters influencing glacier runoff and quantifies recent glacier contributions to streamflow in the Illecillewaet River basin, British Columbia. The Illecillewaet

  5. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

  6. South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River J. Michael Jess Platte, and Arkansas rivers, for example, have been resolved through litigation brought before the U and Kansas are examples. In the Platte River watershed the State of Nebraska has experience allocating water

  7. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  8. Greater Platte River Basins Symposium PROGRAM Thursday, October 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of the Niobrara River in the National Scenic Reach, Nebraska ­ Jason Alexander, US Geological Survey ­ Nebraska and Computational Investigations of Sandbar Dynamics ­ Paul Kinzel, U.S. Geological Survey ­ Colorado Water Science and Values in the Niobrara Basin: Does Water Flow to Money? ­ Steven Shultz, University of Nebraska-Omaha 2

  9. Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

  10. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

  11. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  12. Fast Facts About the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration, the federal agency that markets the electricity generated at federal dams in the Columbia River Energy Regulatory Commission; electric utilities; and state energy regulatory agencies. State, tribal directs more than $220 million annually in federal electricity revenues to implement more than 400

  13. South River EMC- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is providing rebates to encourage their customers to install solar water heating systems. To be eligible for the rebate solar collectors must have...

  14. South River EMC- Business Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC (SREMC) offers a rebate to eligible business customers who wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of lighting systems. The business must upgrade from an older, less efficient system...

  15. South River EMC- Energy Star Homes Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC offers incentives to home buyers and builders who purchase or construct Energy Star certified single-family site built homes, manufactured homes, and multi-family dwellings. Energy...

  16. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River estuary was a high-energy environment dominated by physical forces, with extensive sand Riddell November 28, 2000 ISAB 2000-5 #12;ISAB 2000-5 Estuary Report i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Northwest to an informed response to the Council. Consequently, this report has been prepared as a preliminary reply

  17. Regional tree growth and inferred summer climate in the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Michael N.

    changes in summer climate within the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783. The basin drains parts the center of their range usually exhibit a more complex relationship with climate (Hughes, 2002Regional tree growth and inferred summer climate in the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783

  18. A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    outlook ~Pt t 1 Trinity River Basin EconoInic outlook ~Pt t 1 Neches River Basin 10 10 Economic outlook 10 ~Pt t 1 Sabine River Basin Economic outlook 12 I I I. THE WATER RESOURCES DF THE NECHES AND RED RIVER BASINS 14 Neches River Basin 14..., '' is a general discussion of the economic factors as they are related to demand for water in each basin. In addition to a statewide outlook, a separate discussion for each basin is presented which includes future population projections. In closing...

  19. South Atlantic sag basins: new petroleum system components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, S.G. [GeoLearn, Houston, TX (United States)] Mohriak, W.U. [Petroleo Brasileiro, S.A., Exploration and Production, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mello, M.R. [Petroleo Brasieiro, S.A., Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newly discovered pre-salt source rocks, reservoirs and seals need to be included as components to the petroleum systems of both sides of the South Atlantic. These new components lie between the pre-salt rift strata and the Aptian salt layers, forming large, post-rift, thermal subsidence sag basins. These are differentiated from the older rift basins by the lack of syn-rift faulting and a reflector geometry that is parallel to the base salt regional unconformity rather than to the Precambrian basement. These basins are observed in deep water regions overlying areas where both the mantle and the crust have been involved in the extension. This mantle involvement creates post-rift subsiding depocenters in which deposition is continuous while proximal rift-phase troughs with little or no mantle involvement are bypassed and failed to accumulate potential source rocks during anoxic times. These features have been recognized in both West African Kwanza Basin and in the East Brasil Rift systems. The pre-salt source rocks that are in the West African sag basins were deposited in lacustrine brackish to saline water environment and are geochemically distinct from the older, syn-rift fresh to brackish water lakes, as well as from younger, post-salt marine anoxic environments of the drift phase. Geochemical analyses of the source rocks and their oils have shown a developing source rock system evolving from isolated deep rift lakes to shallow saline lakes, and culminating with the infill of the sag basin by large saline lakes to a marginally marine restricted gulf. Sag basin source rocks may be important in the South Atlantic petroleum system by charging deep-water prospects where syn-rift source rocks are overmature and the post-salt sequences are immature.

  20. The use of turbulent jets to destratify the Charles River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, Jeffrey H. (Jeffrey Harrison)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the feasibility of using turbulent jets to destratify the Lower Charles River Basin between the Longfellow and Craigie Bridges between Boston and Cambridge. The basin is currently filled with salt water ...

  1. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

  2. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  3. Energy development and water options in the Yellowstone River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayanan, R.; MacIntyre, D.D.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a mixed-integer programming model, the impacts of institutional constraints on the marginal capacity for energy development in the Yellowstone River Basin and consequent hydrologic changes were examined. Under average annual flow conditions, energy outputs in the Yellowstone Basin can increase roughly nine times by 1985 and 12 to 18 times by 2000. In contrast, water availability is limiting energy development in the Tongue and Powder River Basins in Wyoming. Variability in hydrologic regime causes model solutions to change drastically. If flows decrease to 80 and 60% of average annual levels, the energy production is decreased by 17 and 95%, respectively. If development strategies in the basin are followed on the basis of 80% average annual flows, the Buffalo Bill enlargement (271,300 acre-ft), Tongue River Modification (58,000 acre-ft), and the two reservoirs at Sweetgrass Creek (each 27,000 acre-ft) will be necessary, in addition to several small storage facilities, to best meet the instream flow needs in Montana and to deliver the waters apportioned by compact between Wyoming and Montana. Furthermore, the results indicate that relaxing the instream flow requirements from recommended levels by 10% could increase regional energy output by 19% in 1985 and 35% in 2000. This model illustrates that modifications in institutional restrictions to achieve greater water mobility between users in a given state, as well as flexible practices for transferring water between states, can assist economic growth. Thus, the probability for restricted energy development at this juncture appears to be affected to a greater degree by institutional constraints than by water availability constraints.

  4. Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haglund, Karl T

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

  5. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  6. Sandstone-carbonate cycles in Tensleep Formation, eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittersbacher, D.J.; Wheeler, D.M.; Horne, J.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop and core study of the Tensleep Formation in the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin has revealed cyclic deposits of eolian sandstone and marine carbonate. These cycles, several meters to tens of meters thick, represent the rise and fall of sea level on the Wyoming shelf during Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. Falling sea level was marked by development of a sharp scour surface at the base of each cycle and progradation of eolian dunes over an exposed, shallow carbonate shelf. Subsequent sea level rise resulted in the reworking of eolian sand through wave activity and burrowing organisms. Subtidal carbonates overlies the reworked eolian sands and are sandy at the base, grading upward into fossiliferous dolomite mudstones to wackestones. The sharp scour surface, normally present directly on the subtidal carbonates, indicates that erosion eliminated any regressive marine deposits by deflation to the ground-water table during shoreline progradation or by deflation related to abrupt drop in sea level. Relative sea level changes on the low-relief Wyoming shelf affected large areas during Tensleep deposition. This resulted in widespread sandstone-carbonate cycles that provide the basis for regional correlations of the Tensleep Formation throughout the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin.

  7. Analysis of salt concentrations in the Brazos River Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganze, Charles Keith

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , it is not best suited for evaluating mean monthly salt loads and discharges. WA P3 Modelin S stem The WASP3 system consists of two stand alone computer programs, DYNHYD3 and WASP3, that can be run in conjunction or separately. The hydrodynamics program... data cover water years 1964 through 1986. Annual means prior to 1964 are also cited for those stations for which such data is available. Table 1 lists the 39 USGS streamflow gaging stations in the Brazos River Basin which include mean monthly salt...

  8. Geology of the South Mason-Llano River area, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duvall, Victor Martin

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ILLUSTRATIONS Plate Page I. Geologic Map of the South Mason-Llano River Area, Mason County, Texas. . . . . II. Structure secttons. pocket pocket III. Index map of the South Mason-Llano River Area, Mason County, Texas. following page iv IV. Fig. 1: Tufa... VIII. Fig. 1: Pebbles in basal Hickory sand- stone. Fig. 2: Intraformational conglomerate in upper Hickory. following page 23 IX. Fig. 1: Shale xone in middle Hickory. . . Fig. 2: Cross-bedding in Hickory sand- stone. following page 24 X. Fig. 1...

  9. CERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Selected Plan provides approximately 170,000 acre-feet of above-ground storage volume in a twoCERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida 23 August 2007 Abstract: The purpose of the Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Reservoir project

  10. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  11. Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin Gregory J. Mc (2007), Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin, Geophys. Res; published 27 November 2007. [1] The high demand for water, the recent multiyear drought (1999

  12. A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavelle, Jenna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF THE CITARUM RIVER BASINE. , Afiff, S. A. , The Ecology of Java and Bali, Singapore:

  13. Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loope, David B.

    Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska that the Nebraska Sand Hills once migrated across the North and South Platte rivers and dammed the largest tributary of the South Platte River, have compositions intermediate between the Nebraska Sand Hills (quartz

  14. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  15. Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources is responsible for maintaining a state water plan, intended to implement state policies for water management. A portion of the plan...

  16. EIS-0184: South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Seattle City Light, a Department of the City of Seattle proposal to construct a hydroelectric project with an installed capacity of 15 MW on the South Fork Tolt River near the town of Carnation located in King County in the State of Washington.

  17. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  18. South Snyderville Basin, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiver ElecSouth

  19. Incorporating safety into surface haulage in the Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, W.; Jennings, C.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) coal deposit extends from southeast Montana to northeast Wyoming. This paper describes a number of haulage practices and tools in use at several mines of the southern PRB and the way in which safety has been designed into and implemented for surface haulage of coal and overburden. Experiences described herein focus on the northeastern corner of Wyoming. All the mines in this area rely on safe and efficient movement of enormous volumes of material, and the results achieved in safety underscore the planning and attention to detail present in the PRB. There are currently 12 large surface mines (those greater than 10.0MM tons/year) operating in this area. In 1995, these mines produced over 230.0MM tons of coal.

  20. South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

  1. Water quality modelling for recreational use in the Kallang River Basin, Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeles, Justin Victor V. (Justin Victor Velayo)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Singapore's Active, Beautiful, and Clean Waters Programme (ABC) aims to provide functional use of its water bodies to the public. The Kallang River Basin, being part of the ABC Programme, will be used for recreational ...

  2. Precipitation analysis for a flood early warning system in the Manafwa River Basin, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecinati, Francesca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communities living in the Manafwa River Basin experience frequent floods threatening their lives and property. Climate change and anthropogenic perturbations to the natural environment increase flooding frequency. This ...

  3. Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Water conservation is a critical issue in Texas today. This publication explores the relationship between ecosystem health and land stewardship in the Trinity River Basin. It also describes how responsible land stewardship can be applied in urban...

  4. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and utilization. Water in the three main stream reservoirs is unsuitable for municipal use without costly desalinization processes. The quality of the river improves significantly in the lower basin with dilution from good quality tributaries. Population...

  5. The future of the Salton Sea under proposed lower Colorado River basin water management scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelland, Michael Edward

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salton Sea, situated in the Lower Colorado River Basin (LCRB), is under duress due to, among other things, increased water demands of cities like San Diego, California and Mexicali, Mexico. This research developed a tool to investigate...

  6. Characteristics of warm season precipitating storms in the Arkansas–Red River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Li, Xingong

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Analysis of a multisensor precipitation product enables us to extract the precipitation from individual storms in the Arkansas–Red River drainage basin over a period of 11 years. We examine the year-to-year and ...

  7. Geoarchaeology and Late Quaternary Geomorphology of the Middle South Platte River, Northeastern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    Geoarchaeology and Late Quaternary Geomorphology of the Middle South Platte River, Northeastern Investigations were conducted along the middle South Platte River to better define the geomorphic contexts and Mountain, 1960;Wheat, 1972,1979; Wilmsen and Roberts, 1978;Stanford, 1978). Someare along the middleSouthPlatte

  8. Response surfaces of vulnerability to climate change: the Colorado River Basin, the High Plains, and California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the vulnerability of water supply to shortage for the Colorado River Basin and basins of the High Plains, it becomes ever more important to assess the vulnerability of current and future water supplies to shortage more likely to experience water shortages (Barnett et al. 2004; Barnett and Pierce 2008, 2009; Cayan et

  9. Record of Decision/Remedial Alternative Selection for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  10. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Diverting a Portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    TR-1 1967 A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Diverting a Portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins J.H. Cook Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  11. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

  12. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  13. A Comparison of AMSR-E/Aqua Snow Products with in situ Observations and MODIS Snow Cover Products in the Mackenzie River Basin, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Jinjun; Velicogna, Isabella

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alpine watershed of western Canada inferred from spatially-Basin, British Columbia, Canada. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci.Mackenzie River Basin, Canada. Adv. Water Resour. Derksen,

  14. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

  15. Floodplain River Foodwebs in the Lower Mekong Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Chouly

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics in tropical rivers undergo significant seasonal shifts and emphasizes that river food webs are altered by dams and flow regulation. Seston and benthic algae were the most important production sources supporting fish biomass during the dry season...

  16. Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    150 miles of shoreline and hundreds of acres of marsh, mudflat, and shallow water habitats. The river

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  18. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

  19. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    TR-47 1973 Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor G.L. Curry J.C. Helm Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  20. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Office of River Protection, K Basin Sludge Waste System.

  1. CRAD, Management- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Management at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

  2. DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PD DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  3. FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  4. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  5. SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  6. COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  7. ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PA ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  8. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  9. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT Prepared for the Northwest Power Planning Council October 1997 97-15 #12;Published October 1997 by the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 503-222-5161 Toll Free

  10. Helminth Parasites of Freshwater Fishes of the Pnuco River Basin, East Central Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercado-Silva, Norman

    Helminth Parasites of Freshwater Fishes of the Pµnuco River Basin, East Central Mexico GUILLERMO Biologi´a, Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Apartado Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Me´xico D. F., Mexico (e-mail: gsalgado@mail.ibiologia.unam.mx), 2 Laboratorio de Ictiologi´a y Limnologi´a, Escuela

  11. Without proper controls, consolidation could influence performance in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, S.; Nelson, P.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American coal industry is in a period of consolidation. Fewer firms with larger production are replacing a more dispersed industry. Because of the southern Powder River Basin's great importance as source of coal, there is a need to monitor the performance of southern PRB coal producers.

  12. RECONCILING HYDROPOWER AND ENVIRONMENTAL WATER USES IN THE LEISHUI RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    RECONCILING HYDROPOWER AND ENVIRONMENTAL WATER USES IN THE LEISHUI RIVER BASIN X. S. AIa,b , S of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA b State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower alternative policies to improve the water supply for two conflicting uses, hydropower and environmental, using

  13. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

  14. Groundwater Resources Use and Management in the Amu Darya River Basin (Central Asia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Groundwater Resources Use and Management in the Amu Darya River Basin (Central Asia) Shavkat) 1183-1193" DOI : 10.1007/s12665-009-0107-4 #12;2 Abstract This paper analyses groundwater resources use nations for sustaining their vital agricultural productions started to use groundwater during the recent

  15. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  16. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  17. Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    development in the South Caspian Basin is generally linked to faults, which in some instances are detached at the basement level. By using interpreted seismic surfaces it is possible to determine relative time of mud flows from the mud volcanoes. Timing of mud...

  18. Extension in NW Iran driven by the motion of the South Caspian Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernant, Philippe

    Extension in NW Iran driven by the motion of the South Caspian Basin F. Masson a,, Y. Djamour b , S, Iran c International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, Farmanieh, Dibaji, Arghavan St., N° 27, 19531 Tehran, Iran d Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts

  19. Inverse groundwater modelling in the Willunga Basin, South Australia Ian Knowles & Michael Teubner & Aimin Yan &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Ian W.

    Inverse groundwater modelling in the Willunga Basin, South Australia Ian Knowles & Michael Teubner flow, based on a functional minimization technique, has been used to calibrate a groundwater flow model is the location of extensive viticulture, irrigated primarily by groundwater, the levels and quality of which have

  20. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, James Howard

    Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan C) of this area, the presence of gas hydrates. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates consists of a shallow (300, and is interpreted as the top of the gas hydrate layer. Similarly, a high-amplitude Rc

  1. An entropy-based morphological analysis of river basin networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorentino, Mauro; Claps, Pierluigi; Singh, Vijay P.

    related to the logarithm of the magnitude of the basin network. This relation leads to a nonlinear relation between the network diameter and magnitude, where the exponent is found to be related to the fractal dimension of the drainage network. Also...

  2. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Project Number 200845800 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposes to take advantage of iteroparity in natural-origin (NOR) steelhead populations to increase,000 fish) between 1941-1954 (Mullan et al. 1992). Subsequent to this dramatic increase, wild stock escapements to the Columbia Basin have fluctuated widely. Wild stock productivity and abundance declined again

  3. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Robert Bereskin

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Anastamosing, low gradient distributary channels produce {approx}30 gravity, paraffinic oils from the Middle Member of the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation in the south-central portion of the Uinta Basin. This localized depocenter was situated along the fluctuating southern shoreline of Lake Uinta, where complex deposits of marginal-lacustrine to lower delta plain accumulations are especially characteristic. The Middle Member contains several fining-upward parasequences that can be recognized in outcrop, core, and downhole logs. Each parasequence is about 60 to 120 feet thick and consists of strata deposited during multiple lake level fluctuations that approach 30 to 35 feet in individual thickness. Such parasequences represent 300,000-year cycles based on limited absolute age dating. The subaerial to subaqueous channels commonly possess an erosional base and exhibit a fining upward character. Accordingly, bedding features commonly range from large-scale trough and planar cross bedding or lamination at the base, to a nonreservoir, climbing ripple assemblage near the uppermost reservoir boundary. The best reservoir quality occurs within the laminated to cross-stratified portions, and the climbing ripple phase usually possesses more deleterious micas and/or detrital clays. Diagenesis also exerts a major control on reservoir quality. Certain sandstones were cemented by an early, iron-poor calcite cement, which can be subsequently leached. Secondary intergranular porosity (up to 20%) is largely responsible for the 10 -100 millidarcy rock, which represents petrophysical objectives for both primary and secondary production. Otherwise, intense compaction, silicic and iron-rich carbonate cements, and authigenic clays serve to reduce reservoir quality to marginal economic levels.

  4. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  5. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  6. Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

  7. Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coming soon. Native Grassland Restoration in the Middle Trinity River Basin was published early in August #30;#29;#28;#30; for landowners in the Blackland Prairie and Post Oak Savannah ecoregions. Publications currently available in the Texas A...20 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Blake Alldredge and Danielle Kalisek Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin Fall 2012 tx H2O 21 ] The shores of Lake...

  8. Stresses and fractures in the Frontier Formation, Green River Basin, predicted from basin-margin tectonic element interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural fractures and in situ stresses commonly dictate subsurface reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, as well as the effectiveness of stimulation techniques in low-permeability, natural gas reservoirs. This paper offers an initial prediction for the orientations of the fracture and stress systems in the tight gas reservoirs of the Frontier Formation, in the Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming. It builds on a previous report that addressed fractures and stresses in the western part of the basin and on ideas developed for the rest of the basin, using the principle that thrust faults are capable of affecting the stress magnitudes and orientations in little-deformed strata several hundreds of kilometers in front of a thrust. The prediction of subsurface stresses and natural fracture orientations is an undertaking that requires the willingness to revise models as definitive data are acquired during drilling. The predictions made in this paper are offered with the caveat that geology in the subsurface is always full of surprises.

  9. Climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, S.A.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the method used to generate a climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. The scenario considers climate patterns that may change if the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2), or its greenhouse gas equivalent, were to double over pre-Industrial Revolution values. A composite approach was taken to generate a climate scenario that considers knowledge of current regional climate controls, available output from general circulation and regional climate models, and observed changes in climate.

  10. Plant biomass in the Tanana River Basin, Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, B.R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation biomass tables are presented for the Tanana River Basin. Average biomass for each species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in the 13 forest and 30 nonforest vegetation types is shown. These data combined with area estimates for each vegetation type provide a tool for estimating habitat carrying capacity for many wildlife species. Tree biomass is reported for the entire aboveground tree, thereby allowing estimates of total fiber content.

  11. Land Use in Relation to Sedimentation in Reservoirs : Trinity River Basin, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Garin, Alexis N.

    1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cash in advance foY docks, fishing camps, et cetera. Few permanent. imprdvements, how- ever, and the period of time since the construction of the reservoir has been so short that not much road construction has been possible. *That is, annual...LIBRARY. ' A & M COLLEGE. 1 - k TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas 'ULLETIN NO. 597 JANUARY 1941 LAND USE IN RELATION TO SEDIMENTA- TION IN RESERVOIRS, TRINITY RIVER BASIN, TEXAS I I 1...

  12. 8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited. Moreover, water pollution is serious, with significant wastewater reuse for irrigation within the basin. Lastly, water is being transferred from agriculture to the urban and industrial sectors, without due

  13. Basin Electric Power Coop (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France:Barstow, California:Baseline Wind EnergyBasin

  14. Hydrocarbon potential of the Lamu basin of south-east Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyagah, K.; Cloeter, J.J.; Maende, A. (National Oil Corp. of Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lamu basin occupies the coastal onshore and offshore areas of south-east Kenya. This fault bounded basin formed as a result of the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic phase of rifting that developed at the onset of Gondwana dismemberment. The resultant graben was filled by Karroo (Permian-Early Jurassic) continental siliciclastic sediments. Carbonate deposits associated with the Tethyan sea invasion, dominate the Middle to Late Jurassic basin fill. Cessation of the relative motion between Madagascar and Africa in the Early Cretaceous, heralded passive margin development and deltaic sediment progradation until the Paleogene. Shallow seas transgressed the basin in the Miocene when another carbonate regime prevailed. The basin depositional history is characterized by pulses of transgressive and regressive cycles, bounded by tectonically enhanced unconformities dividing the total sedimentary succession into discrete megasequences. Source rock strata occur within Megasequence III (Paleogene) depositional cycle and were lowered into the oil window in Miocene time, when the coastal parts of the basin experienced the greatest amount of subsidence. The tectono-eustatic pulses of the Tertiary brought about source and reservoir strata into a spatial relationship in which hydrocarbons could be entrapped. A basement high on the continental shelf has potential for Karroo sandstone and Jurassic limestone reservoirs. Halokinesis of Middle Jurassic salt in Miocene time provides additional prospects in the offshore area. Paleogene deltaic sands occur in rotated listric fault blacks. A Miocene reef Play coincides with an Eocene source rock kitchen.

  15. Hydrocarbon potential of the Lamu basin of south-east Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyagah, K.; Cloeter, J.J.; Maende, A. [National Oil Corp. of Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lamu basin occupies the coastal onshore and offshore areas of south-east Kenya. This fault bounded basin formed as a result of the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic phase of rifting that developed at the onset of Gondwana dismemberment. The resultant graben was filled by Karroo (Permian-Early Jurassic) continental siliciclastic sediments. Carbonate deposits associated with the Tethyan sea invasion, dominate the Middle to Late Jurassic basin fill. Cessation of the relative motion between Madagascar and Africa in the Early Cretaceous, heralded passive margin development and deltaic sediment progradation until the Paleogene. Shallow seas transgressed the basin in the Miocene when another carbonate regime prevailed. The basin depositional history is characterized by pulses of transgressive and regressive cycles, bounded by tectonically enhanced unconformities dividing the total sedimentary succession into discrete megasequences. Source rock strata occur within Megasequence III (Paleogene) depositional cycle and were lowered into the oil window in Miocene time, when the coastal parts of the basin experienced the greatest amount of subsidence. The tectono-eustatic pulses of the Tertiary brought about source and reservoir strata into a spatial relationship in which hydrocarbons could be entrapped. A basement high on the continental shelf has potential for Karroo sandstone and Jurassic limestone reservoirs. Halokinesis of Middle Jurassic salt in Miocene time provides additional prospects in the offshore area. Paleogene deltaic sands occur in rotated listric fault blacks. A Miocene reef Play coincides with an Eocene source rock kitchen.

  16. Pathways of migration of oil and gas in south Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Mississippi salt basin is one of three interior basins characterized by structures formed by movement of the Late Jurassic Louann Salt. An analysis of pathways of migration within the basin has revealed that it is possible to explain why hydrocarbons have accumulated in some structures, yet are absent from others that would appear to be favorable. Seventy-four of the more than 840 fields within the basin, including the largest known accumulations, have hydrocarbons in stacked reservoirs belonging in more than one formation. These stacked reservoirs result from vertical migration facilitated by faulting. In more than 750 fields, hydrocarbons are confined to a single formation in traps associated with four distinct trends of production that decrease in age systematically from the margin of the basin into the interior. The hydrocarbons in these trends have accumulated by intrastratal migration (without the agency of faulting) from a nearby source in the same unit as the reservoir. On the northwest side of the basin, migration between units brought into contact along unconformities has resulted in 10 fields. Vertical migration brought about by faulting around shallow salt diapirs has allowed hydrocarbons to escape, so that only 5 of 56 such structures have produced oil or gas. These conclusions, derived from geologic deductions, are supported by preliminary geochemical data; more extensive and detailed geochemical analyses of oils from the various sources are under way.

  17. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

  18. Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unminable coal beds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this report is to provide a final topical report on enhanced coal bed methane recovery and CO2 sequestration to the U.S. Department of Energy in fulfillment of a Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership milestone. This report summarizes work done at Idaho National Laboratory in support of Phase II of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. Research that elucidates the interaction of CO2 and coal is discussed with work centering on the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Sorption-induced strain, also referred to as coal swelling/shrinkage, was investigated. A new method of obtaining sorption-induced strain was developed that greatly decreases the time necessary for data collection and increases the reliability of the strain data. As coal permeability is a strong function of sorption-induced strain, common permeability models were used to fit measured permeability data, but were found inadequate. A new permeability model was developed that can be directly applied to coal permeability data obtained under laboratory stress conditions, which are different than field stress conditions. The coal permeability model can be used to obtain critical coal parameters that can be applied in field models. An economic feasibility study of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming was done. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 Mg) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin, they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

  19. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  20. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  1. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  2. RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, G.; Millings, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of these basins. There are also several cement and ammonia plants near the basins. Sixteen coal fired power plants are present on or adjacent to the basins which could support a low pipeline transportation cost. The current geological information is not sufficient to quantify specific storage reservoirs, seals, or traps. There is insufficient hydrogeologic information to quantify the saline nature of the water present within all of the basins. Water data in the Dunbarton Basin of the Savannah River Site indicates dissolved solids concentrations of greater than 10,000 parts per million (not potential drinking water). Additional reservoir characterization is needed to take advantage of the SGFAR trend for anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage. The authors of this report believe it would be appropriate to study the reservoir potential in the deeper basins that are in close proximity to the current larger coal fired power plants (Albany-Arabi, Camilla-Ocilla, Alamo-Ehrhardt, and Jedburg basin).

  3. OligoceneMiocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific Ocean: Evidence from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    investigated parts of the southwest Pacific Ocean. It is a region of remnant volcanic arcs, plateaus and basins of the study area in the SW Pacific Ocean, showing geographic names and dredge locations from ChurkinOligocene­Miocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific

  4. The political aspects of institutional developments in the water sector: South Africa and its international river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    (meaning the Lion). He left an indelible imprint on my life. His love of the wide-open spaces of this continent, and his intense pride at being an African in every sense of the word (he spent his childhood became intensely interested in river basins and the complex web of life that they support as they meander

  5. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

  6. Design of a sediment quality assessment for the tidal Christina River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, K.; Allen, R.; Williams, S. [Delaware State Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Dover, DE (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed baseline sediment study was designed and conducted within the tidal portion of the Christina River Basin, Delaware. A complementary battery of field-screening and laboratory analyses was established in order to obtain substantial coverage of the basin at reasonable cost. The approach provided for 180 sediment sample locations from a 15 mile stretch of the Christina River, the proximal reaches of its tributaries, and associated wetlands. Analytical parameters consisted of physiochemical measurements (TOC, grain size distribution, and redox potential), total metals, major anions, carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pH, and metals partitioning analysis. Toxicity indicators included in the study were: SEM/AVS analysis, IQ{reg_sign} toxicity tests, Microtox{reg_sign}, and Hyalella azteca 10-day acute toxicity tests. This basin-wide approach successfully established a database of sediment information that allowed for the determination of: contaminants of concern; contaminant spatial distribution; potential ecological impacts; contaminant/indicator relationships; and potential upland contaminant source areas. The incorporation of low cost field and analytical methods permitted the use of short-spaced systematic sampling thus eliminating stratified random sampling methods and the need to focus on localized reaches. The database was sufficiently large to allow for statistically valid analyses of the results. Additionally, it will aid in the delineation of relevant strata for subsequent monitoring, provide a comparative baseline for future investigations, and guide state decision-making.

  7. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  8. Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

    The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River...

  9. Lead exposure of waterfowl ingesting Coeur d`Alene River Basin sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyer, W.N.; Morton, A. [Geological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States). Patuxent Wildlife Research Center; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States). Coeur d`Alene Basin NRDA and Restoration Office; LeCaptain, L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Klamath Basin Ecosystem Restoration Office

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feces from tundra swans [Bygnus columbianus (Ord)], Canada geese [Branta canadensis (L.)], and mallards [Anas platrhynchos (L.)] were collected from the Coeur d`Alene River Basin and two reference areas in Idaho to estimate exposure to lead from mining activities and relate that exposure to the ingestion of contaminated sediments. The average acid-insoluble ash content of the feces, a measure of sediment ingestion, was 18% for Canada geese and tundra swans, and 12% for ducks. The 18% value corresponded to an estimated 9% sediment ingestion rate (dry weight). The 90th percentile for acid-insoluble ash in feces of tundra swans-corresponded to an estimated 22% sediment in the diet. The average lead concentration (dry weight) of tundra swan feces from all Coeur d`Alene River Basin wetlands sampled was 880 mg/kg, compared to 2.1 mg kg{sup {minus}1} from reference areas. the 90th percentile of lead in tundra swan feces from the Coeur d`Alene River Basin sites was 2700 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. Fecal lead concentrations of tundra swans were correlated with the acid-insoluble ash content of the feces. The very low lead concentrations in feces having low acid-insoluble ash contents established that the sediment was the primary source of the lead ingested by waterfowl. Sediment lead concentrations at 11 wetland sites were closely correlated with average fecal lead concentrations for all waterfowl, corrected for the average percent acid-insoluble ash in the feces.

  10. Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Resources International

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

  11. Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

  12. What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

  13. Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Christopher Charles

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nam Con Son (NCS) Basin, located offshore of SE Vietnam, is one of several Tertiary rift basins that formed during initial Eocene(?)-Oligocene rifting. Following cessation of rifting at the end of Oligocene time, these basins were subjected...

  14. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department of Renewable Resources

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Mercury Methylation at Mercury Mines In The Humboldt River Basin, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, John E. (U.S. Geological Survey); Crock, James G. (U.S. Geological Survey); Lasorsa, Brenda K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Hg and methylmercury concentrations were measured in mine-waste calcines (retorted ore), sediment, and water samples collected in and around abandoned mercury mines in western Nevada to evaluate Hg methylation at the mines and in the Humboldt River basin. Mine-waste calcines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 14 000?g/g. Stream-sediment samples collected within 1 km of the mercury mines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 170?g/g, whereas stream sediments collected>5 km from the mines, and those collected from the Humboldt River and regional baseline sites, contain total Hg concentrations<0.5?g/g. Similarly, methylmercury concentrations in mine-waste calcines are locally as high as 96 ng/g, but methylmercury contents in stream-sediments collected downstream from the mines and from the Humboldt River are lower, ranging from<0.05 to 0.95 ng/g. Stream-water samples collected below two mines studied contain total Hg concentrations ranging from 6 to 2000 ng/L, whereas total Hg in Humboldt River water was generally lower ranging from 2.1 to 9.0 ng/L. Methylmercury concentrations in the Humboldt River water were the lowest in this study (<0.02-0.27 ng/L). Although total Hg and methylmercury concentrations are locally high in mine-waste calcines, there is significant dilution of Hg and lower Hg methylation down gradient from the mines, especially in the sediments and water collected from the Humboldt River, which is> 8 km from any mercury mines. Our data indicate little transference of Hg and methylmercury from the sediment to the water column due to the lack of mine runoff in this desert climate.

  16. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  17. EIS-0120: Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental consequences of the implementation of modified waste management activities for hazardous, low-level radioactive, and mixed wastes for the protection of groundwater, human health, and the environment at its Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina.

  18. Mass balance for lead in the California South Coast Air Basin: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lankey, R.L.; Davidson, C.I.; McMichael, F.C. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass balance for lead for the year 1989 in the South Coast Air Basin has inputs to the atmosphere of 600 {+-} 190 kg/day and outputs of 580 {+-} 160 kg/day, showing rough agreement. Stationary sources are responsible for only about 5% of the total lead emissions. The bulk of the lead is emitted from vehicles using leaded gasoline (37%) and unleaded gasoline (15%), as well as from resuspension of previously deposited lead on roads (43%). Over half of the total emitted lead deposits on roads and nearby soil, while about one-third is carried out of the basin by wind. A small amount, less than 10%, is deposited on surfaces throughout the basin. These percentages are approximately the same as those in a mass balance for the same region calculated for 1972, when lead emissions from leaded gasoline were about a factor of 70 greater than leaded gas emissions in 1989. When the lead emissions re used as inputs o a simple continuously stirred flow reactor model for the basin, reasonable, agreement is obtained between calculated and measured concentrations.

  19. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  20. South Toms River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiverToms River, New

  1. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

  2. Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

  3. Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

  4. Status Report: USGS coal assessment of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Luppens; Timothy J. Rohrbacher; Jon E. Haacke; David C. Scott; Lee M. Osmonson [USGS, Reston, VA (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication reports on the status of the current coal assessment of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This slide program was presented at the Energy Information Agency's 2006 EIA Energy Outlook and Modeling Conference in Washington, DC, on March 27, 2006. The PRB coal assessment will be the first USGS coal assessment to include estimates of both regional coal resources and reserves for an entire coal basin. Extensive CBM and additional oil and gas development, especially in the Gillette coal field, have provided an unprecedented amount of down-hole geological data. Approximately 10,000 new data points have been added to the PRB database since the last assessment (2002) which will provide a more robust evaluation of the single most productive U.S. coal basin. The Gillette coal field assessment, including the mining economic evaluation, is planned for completion by the end of 2006. The geologic portion of the coal assessment work will shift to the northern and northwestern portions of the PRB before the end of 2006 while the Gillette engineering studies are finalized. 7 refs.

  5. Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco the Cariaco Basin continental shelf and Orinoco delta was investigated in order to constrain the clay was studied using a geo-statistical approach that allows drawing representative clay-mineral distribution maps

  6. Towards application of a climate-index for Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Indonesia Ramon van Bruggen De Bilt, 2013 | Internal report; IR-2013-06 #12;#12;Towards application of a climate-index for dengue incidence Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia Master Thesis during this work and for their warm welcome during my stay in Indonesia. At last my thanks go

  7. Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison of different global data sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the spatio-temporal variations of total terrestrial water storage (the sum of ground water, soil water1 Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison mass variations monitored by GRACE, simulated surface and total water storage from WGHM, water levels

  8. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

  9. Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin Regional Power Plan Touts Efficiency to Meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin Regional Power equivalent of the power use of a city the size of Seattle. Over time, the energy- efficiency target, to meet future demand. The plan's target for the first five years, 1,200 average megawatts, is the energy

  10. Prioritizing Areas of the Conasauga River Sub-basin in Georgia and Tennessee for Preservation and Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    controversial (Simon et al., 2007). Here we define restoration to mean direct modification of stream channels. Because both land preservation and stream restoration are expensive tools, there is a general public and Restoration SETH J. WENGER1,*, MEGAN M. HAGLER2, AND BYRON J. FREEMAN3 1University of Georgia River Basin

  11. Quantification of Water Quality Improvement in Sandy Creek, A Tributary Watershed of Jordan Lake in the Cape Fear River Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Cape Fear River Basin, After Stream and Riparian Restoration and Wetland Treatment Cell Creation: Final to restoration. The Duke Forest Stream and Wetlands Restoration was established to rectify these problems delivery following watershed development, a three-phase stream and floodplain restoration was planned

  12. Bridging river basin scales and processes to assess human-climate impacts and the terrestrial hydrologic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    scales impacts of storm water from urban/suburban development on water quantity and quality have been and implementation of integrated instrumentation, a new generation of models, and a management framework that clearly of our water resources at the river basin scale. This paper concludes with a discussion of how a network

  13. Groundwater availability and flow processes in the Williston and Powder River basins in the Northern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Groundwater availability and flow processes in the Williston and Powder River basins Center, Cheyenne, WY 4 Office of Groundwater, Denver, CO 5 Oklahoma Water Science Center, Oklahoma City in Montana and Wyoming, provides an opportunity to study the water-energy nexus within a groundwater context

  14. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in sediments of the Upper Scheldt River Basin: contamination levels and source apportionment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Author manuscript, published in "Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11, 5 (2009) 1086-1093" DOI : 10 and Antwerp. Anthropogenic activities including textile and chemical industries, transport, coal mining, paper) has been developing an integrated and coordinated water management plan for the whole river basin

  15. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 FY 2008-2009 F&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    among life histories. Specific project objectives include identification of spatiotemporal patterns: technical and/or scientific background At least two genetically distinct subspecies of rainbow trout in the San Poil River Basin exhibit the fluvial or fluvial-adfluvial life history strategy, for the purposes

  16. AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State Astronomical institute. Moscow University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikmachov, Vadim I.

    AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State, that within the limits of the possible Al-Khwarizmi/King basin [3]. The SPA basin thorium map: The using data Lunar Prospector [4] the thorium distribution map demonstrated a hemisphere of the Moon which contains

  17. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-2001 Report : Populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan and Methow River Drainages.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project was to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-2001 was year three (and final year) of a project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-2001 we worked in collaboration with the Wenatchee National Forest to catalog populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan, and Methow River drainages of Washington State.

  18. South River Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiver Elec Member Corp Jump

  19. South River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiver Elec Member Corp

  20. Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas December 31, 2002 Submitted to Texas Water Development Board P.O. Box 13231, Capitol Station 1700 N Congress...

  1. Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

  2. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  3. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

  4. Viability of underground coal gasification in the 'deep coals' of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the PRB coal geology, hydrology, infrastructure, environmental and permitting requirements and to analyze the possible UCG projects which could be developed in the PRB. Project economics on the possible UCG configurations are presented to evaluate the viability of UCG. There are an estimated 510 billion tons of sub-bituminous coal in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. These coals are found in extremely thick seams that are up to 200 feet thick. The total deep coal resource in the PRB has a contained energy content in excess of twenty times the total world energy consumption in 2002. However, only approximately five percent of the coal resource is at depths less than 500 feet and of adequate thickness to be extracted by open pit mining. The balance is at depths between 500 and 2,000 feet below the surface. These are the PRB 'deep coals' evaluated for UCG in this report. The coal deposits in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming are thick, laterally continuous, and nearly flat lying. These deposits are ideal for development by Underground Coal Gasification. The thick deep coal seams of the PRB can be harvested using UCG and be protective of groundwater, air resources, and with minimum subsidence. Protection of these environmental values requires correct site selection, site characterization, impact definition, and impact mitigation. The operating 'lessons learned' of previous UCG operations, especially the 'Clean Cavity' concepts developed at Rocky Mountain 1, should be incorporated into the future UCG operations. UCG can be conducted in the PRB with acceptable environmental consequences. The report gives the recommended development components for UCG commercialization. 97 refs., 31 figs., 57 tabs., 1 app.

  5. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  6. Characterization and fluid flow simulation of naturally fractured Frontier sandstone, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harstad, H. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM (United States); Teufel, L.W.; Lorenz, J.C.; Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant gas reserves are present in low-permeability sandstones of the Frontier Formation in the greater Green River Basin, Wyoming. Successful exploitation of these reservoirs requires an understanding of the characteristics and fluid-flow response of the regional natural fracture system that controls reservoir productivity. Fracture characteristics were obtained from outcrop studies of Frontier sandstones at locations in the basin. The fracture data were combined with matrix permeability data to compute an anisotropic horizontal permeability tensor (magnitude and direction) corresponding to an equivalent reservoir system in the subsurface using a computational model developed by Oda (1985). This analysis shows that the maximum and minimum horizontal permeability and flow capacity are controlled by fracture intensity and decrease with increasing bed thickness. However, storage capacity is controlled by matrix porosity and increases linearly with increasing bed thickness. The relationship between bed thickness and the calculated fluid-flow properties was used in a reservoir simulation study of vertical, hydraulically-fractured and horizontal wells and horizontal wells of different lengths in analogous naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The simulation results show that flow capacity dominates early time production, while storage capacity dominates pressure support over time for vertical wells. For horizontal wells drilled perpendicular to the maximum permeability direction a high target production rate can be maintained over a longer time and have higher cumulative production than vertical wells. Longer horizontal wells are required for the same cumulative production with decreasing bed thickness.

  7. release of SF6 at a depth of 4000 m in the Brazil Basin of the South Atlantic. It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Nathan

    642 release of SF6 at a depth of 4000 m in the Brazil Basin of the South Atlantic. It revealed, excess salinity is "locked" into sinking fin- gers, whereas excess heat tends to leak away. Because SF6. Based on SF6 dispersion, Schmitt et al. deduce a mixing rate for salinity that is approximately double

  8. Magnetic lineations constraints for the back-arc opening of the Late Neogene South Banda Basin (eastern Indonesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyment, Jérôme

    (eastern Indonesia) F. Hinschbergera,*, J.-A. Maloda , J. Dymenta , C. Honthaasb , J.-P. ReÃ?haulta , S 05, France c Departemen Teknik Geologi, Universitas Hasanuddin, Ujung Pandang, Indonesia Abstract The South Banda Basin is located within eastern Indonesia near the triple junction between the Eurasian

  9. An indigenous origin for the South Pole Aitken basin thorium anomaly Ian Garrick-Bethell and Maria T. Zuber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    An indigenous origin for the South Pole Aitken basin thorium anomaly Ian Garrick-Bethell and Maria high abundance of thorium as determined by Apollo and Lunar Prospector gamma-ray spectroscopy that the anomaly is the result of convergence of thorium-enriched ejecta from the Imbrium impact. Examination

  10. Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G. Schuchmann,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of California Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G, Colorado 80208, United States ABSTRACT: California and Federal emissions regulations for 2007 and newer of nitrogen spurring the introduction of new aftertreatment systems. Since 2008, four emission measurement

  11. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

  12. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  13. Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelghani, A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

  14. Genetic and Phenotype [Phenotypic] Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-99 Report : Populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State.

  15. Risk assessment of drain valve failure in the K-West basin south loadout pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The drain valve located in the bottom of the K-West Basin South Loadout Pit (SLOP) could provide an additional leak path from the K Basins if the drain valve were damaged during construction, installation, or operation of the cask loading system. For the K-West Basin SLOP the immersion pail support structure (IPSS) has already been installed, but the immersion pail has not been installed in the IPSS. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the risk of damaging the drain valve during the remaining installation activities or operation of the cask loading system. Valve damage, as used in this analysis, does not necessarily imply large amounts of the water will be released quickly from the basin, rather valve damage implies that the valve's integrity has been compromised. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where best engineering judgement is used to represent each variable in the analysis. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution. The uncertainty is propagated through the analysis by Monte Carlo convolution techniques. The corresponding results are developed as a probability distribution and the risk is expressed in terms of the corresponding complementary cumulative distribution function (''risk curve''). The total risk is the area under the ''risk curve''. The risk of potentially dropping a cask into or on the IPSS and damaging the drain valve is approximately 1 x 10{sup -4} to 2 x 10{sup -5} per year. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve is 3 x 10{sup -2} to 6 x 10{sup -3} per year. Both risks are expressed as drain value failure frequencies. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve can be significantly reduced by an impact limiter and/or installing a gating or plate over the area bounded by the back of the IPSS and the wall of the SLOP. With either of these actions there is a 90 percent confidence that the frequency of drain valve failure would be less than 1 x 10{sup -6} per year.

  16. Depositional environment of lower Green River Formation sandstones (Eocene), Red Wash field (Uinta Basin), Uintah County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Anthony Scott

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) occurred. The resulting increase in water supply to Lake Uinta while sediment remained trapped in the northern basin caused a period of exceptionally high biologic activity. This allowed the deposition of the rich oil shales for which the Green River... brown, brittle shales make up the majority of this unit. Minor amounts of limestone, dolomite, and siltstone are also present. Some of the shales are "oil shales". This 440 ft ( 134 m) thick Member is responsible for most of the production from...

  17. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  18. Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

  19. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  20. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  1. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  2. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  3. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  4. The authors of the ISAB Report Columbia River Basin Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for Fish and Wildlife Restoration (ISAB 2011-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The authors of the ISAB Report Columbia River Basin Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific restoration: Columbia River food webs Abstract. Well-functioning food webs are fundamental for sustaining on restoring habitat structure--without explicitly considering food webs--has been less successful than hoped

  5. Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, J.C.; English, W.R. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Looney, B.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

  6. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  7. The key to minimizing minesite versus utility laboratory analyses on Powder River Basin coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rexin, M.G.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powder River Basin (PRB) coals are continuing to expand their areas of use into regions previously reserved for higher ranked coals. PRB coals are subbituminous by rank. Inherent moisture values of 25 to 30 percent are the norm. PRB coals, being lower rank in nature, also tend to oxidize very easily. These factors combined produce a coal which can cause analysis problems for laboratories unaccustomed to PRB coals. In fact, even laboratories that deal with this type of coal on a daily basis can experience analytical difficulties. Special care needs to be taken by both minesite laboratory and the utility laboratory to ensure accurate analyses. Cooperation between both parties is the key to reproducible analyses. Only by working together can parties fully analyze the situation and develop analytical methods acceptable to both. This paper will describe the methods employed by the Caballo Rojo Mine (CRM) and the Georgia Power Company (GPC) to resolve laboratory analysis differences found during shipments by CRM to GPC beginning in 1994. The following topics are discussed: initial comparative results, analytical investigations, the cooperative process, recent comparative results, and conclusions.

  8. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Chris Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; James Drahovzal; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; John Bocan; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' has reached the mid-point in a two-year research effort to produce a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 exploration and production companies and 6 research team members, including four state geological surveys, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks and one administrative and technology transfer task are being conducted basin-wide by research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined at least once. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 10 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York and Pennsylvania. In addition, three surfaces in that area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. In the Kentucky-Ohio-West Virginia portion of the study area, a velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Fifteen formation tops have been identified on seismic in that area. Preliminary conclusions based on the available seismic data do not support the extension of the Rome Trough into New York state. Members of the stratigraphy task team measured, described and photographed numerous cores from throughout the basin, and tied these data back to their network of geophysical log cross sections. Geophysical logs were scanned in raster files for use in detailed well examination and construction of cross sections. Logs on these cross sections that are only in raster format are being converted to vector format for final cross section displays. The petrology team measured and sampled one classic outcrop in Pennsylvania and ten cores in four states. More than 600 thin sections were prepared from samples in those four states. A seven-step procedure is being used to analyze all thin sections, leading to an interpretation of the sequence of diagenetic events and development of porosity in the reservoir. Nearly 1000 stable isotope geochemistry samples have been collected from cores in four of the five states in the study area. More than 400 of these samples will be analyzed for fluid inclusion and/or strontium isotope analyses, as well. Gas samples have been collected from 21 wells in four states and analyzed for chemical content and isotope analyses of carbon and hydrogen. Because natural gases vary in chemical and isotope composition as a function of their formation and migration history, crossplots of these values can be very revealing. Gas from the Homer field in Kentucky indicates compartmentalization and at least two different sources. Gas from the York field in Ohio also came from at least two discrete compartments. Gas from the Cottontree field in West Virginia is very dry, probably generated from post-mature source rocks. Isotope reversals may be indicative of cracking of residual oil. Gas from Glodes Corners Road field in New York also is post-mature, dry gas, and again isotope reversals may indicate cracking of residual oil in the reservoir. Noble gases are predominantly of crustal origin, but a minor helium component was derived from the mantle. The project web server continues to evolve as the project progresses. The user/password authenticated website has 18 industry partner users and 20 research team users. Software has been installed to track website use. Two meetings of the research team were held to review the status of the project and prepare reports to be given to the full consortium. A meeting of the full consortium--industry partners and researchers--was very successful. However, the ultimate product of the research could be improved if industry members were more forthcoming with proprietary data.

  9. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Fox, J.E. [South Dakota School of Mines, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  10. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  11. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  12. A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General descri tion 14 Rainfall and eva oration Ground water Surface water Runoff Floods ~ua I i t Surface water reservoirs 15 15 15 15 16 17 18 ~ti t td 20 Com uter ro rams 22 Partial duration - inde endent low flow events ro ram 22 Data... cards Card I Card 11 Card 111 and 111. 1 Flow data cards Bod of the ro ram 23 24 24 25 25 25 25 30 Reservoir ield ro ram 34 t d t 4O VI Bod of the ro ram 41 ~ft t 46 Red River Basin 47 General descri tion 47 Rainfall and eva oration...

  13. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200880000 ISRP FAN1B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Accords) are ten-year agreements between the federal action agencies and states and tribes. The Accords supplement the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and are intended substantial biological benefits for Columbia Basin fish. The Accords also acknowledge the tribes' and states

  14. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Tara

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

  15. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  16. NOx EMISSIONS PRODUCED WITH COMBUSTION OF POWDER RIVER BASIN COAL IN A UTILITY BOILER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Nordin; Norman W. Merriam

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to estimate the NOx emissions produced when Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is combusted in a utility boiler. The Clean Air Act regulations specify NOx limits of 0.45 lb/mm Btu (Phase I) and 0.40 lb/mm Btu (Phase II) for tangentially fired boilers, and 0.50 lb/mm 13tu (Phase II) and 0.46 lb/mm Btu (Phase II) for dry-bottom wall-fired boilers. The Clean Air Act regulations also specify other limits for other boiler types. Compliance for Phase I has been in effect since January 1, 1996. Compliance for Phase II goes into effect on January 1, 2000. Emission limits are expressed as equivalent NO{sub 2} even though NO (and sometimes N{sub 2}O) is the NOx species emitted during combustion. Regulatory agencies usually set even lower NOx emission limits in ozone nonattainment areas. In preparing this report, Western Research Institute (WRI) used published test results from utilities burning various coals, including PRB coal, using state-of-the art control technology for minimizing NOx emissions. Many utilities can meet Clean Air Act NOx emission limits using a combination of tight combustion control and low-NOx burners and by keeping furnaces clean (i.e., no slag buildup). In meeting these limits, some utilities also report problems such as increased carbon in their fly ash and excessive furnace tube corrosion. This report discusses utility experience. The theory of NOx emission formation during coal combustion as related to coal structure and how the coal is combusted is also discussed. From this understanding, projections are made for NOx emissions when processed PRB coal is combusted in a test similar to that done with other coals. As will be shown, there are a lot of conditions for achieving low NOx emissions, such as tight combustion control and frequent waterlancing of the furnace to avoid buildup of deposits.

  17. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  18. Hazardous materials in aquatic environment of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into four aspects relating to water pollution problems in the Mississippi River Basin. They are: collaborative cluster research projects, in which investigators employ a synergistic approach to the solution of problems; initiation research projects, in which a single investigator is involved ; technical support activities, which involve anything that is required to support the research; and the research training and education core, which is designed to develop courses with emphasis on environmental studies. This report presents the objectives and accomplishments of the various research projects for July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996.

  19. sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, Michael

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in the J/TR section based on neutron log porosity values. The only zones in Rizer #1 that appear to be porous were fractured diabase units where saline formation water was flowing into the borehole. Two geocellular models were created for the SC and GA study area. Flow simulation modeling was performed on the SC data set. The injection simulation used the newly acquired basin data as well as the Petrel 3-D geologic model that included geologic structure. Due to the new basin findings as a result of the newly acquired data, during phase two of the modeling the diabase unit was used as reservoir and the sandstone units were used as caprock. Conclusion are: 1) the SGR basin is composed of numerous sub-basins, 2) this study only looked at portions of two sub-basins, 3) in SC, 30 million tonnes of CO2 can be injected into the diabase units if the fracture network is continuous through the units, 4) due to the severity of the faulting there is no way of assuring the injected CO2 will not migrate upward into the overlying Coastal Plain aquifers, 5) in Georgia there appears to porous zones in the J/TR sandstones, 6) as in SC there is faulting in the sub-basin and the seismic suggest the faulting extends upward into the Coastal Plain making that area not suitable for CO2 sequestration, 7) the complex faulting observed at both study areas appear to be associated with transfer fault zones (Heffner 2013), if sub-basins in the Georgia portion of the SGR basin can be located that are far away from the transfer fault zones there is a strong possibility of sequestering CO2 in these areas, and 9) the SGR basin covers area in three states and this project only studied two small areas so there is enormous potential for CO2 sequestration in other portions the basin and further research needs to be done to find these areas.

  20. The agricultural systems and soil loss in the Corredor River Basin, Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Roberto

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the South Pacific region. Floods in Villa Nelly. August, 1973 High precipitation in the South Pacific. About 1, 993 people affected and 43 houses destroyed. October, 1973 The road was interrupted between Villa Nelly and San Vito because...

  1. Hardgrove grindability study of Powder River Basin and Appalachian coal components in the blend to a midwestern power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, P.L.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Five coals representing four distinct coal sources blended at a midwestern power station were subjected to detailed analysis of their Hardgrove grindability. The coals are: a low-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal (Pike County, KY); a medium-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Pittsburgh coal (southwestern PA); a low-sulfur, subbituminous Wyodak coal from two mines in the eastern Powder River Basin (Campbell County, WY). The feed and all samples processed in the Hardgrove grindability test procedure were analyzed for their maceral and microlithotype content. The high-vitrinite Pittsburgh coal and the relatively more petrographically complex Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal exhibit differing behavior in grindability. The Pittsburgh raw feed, 16x30 mesh fraction (HGI test fraction), and the {minus}30 mesh fraction (HGI reject) are relatively similar petrographically, suggesting that the HGI test fraction is reasonably representative of the whole feed. The eastern Kentucky coal is not as representative of the whole feed, the HGI test fraction having lower vitrinite than the rejected {minus}30 mesh fraction. The Powder River Basin coals are high vitrinite and show behavior similar to the Pittsburgh coal.

  2. WATER-QUALITY CONDITIONS DURING LOW FLOW IN THE LOWER YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER BASIN, PENNSYLVANIA, OCTOBER 5-7, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James I. Sams, III, Karl T. Schroeder; Terry E. Ackman; J. Kent Crawford; Kim L. Otto

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1998, a chemical synoptic survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, in the Lower Youghiogheny River Basin in Pennsylvania to give a snap-shot of present (1998) water quality during low-flow conditions. Water samples from 38 sites--12 mainstem sites, 22 tributaries, and 4 mine discharges that discharge directly to the Youghiogheny River--were used to identify sources of contaminants from mining operations. Specific conductance, water temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the field at each site and concentrations of major ions and trace elements were measured in the laboratory. Unaccounted for gains and losses in streamflow were measured during the study. Unaccounted for losses in streamflow might be attributed to water loss through streambed fractures. Extensive mine tunnels are present in the basin and loss of water to these tunnels seems likely. Unaccounted for gains in streamflow may be from unmeasured tributaries or surface seeps, but most of the gains are suspected to come from artesian flow through fractures in the streambed from underground mine pools. Influent flows of rust-colored water were noted in some river sections. The pH values for all the samples collected during this survey were above 5.8, and most (33 of 38 samples) were above 7.0. Samples from the four mine-discharge sites also had pH values between 6.3 and 6.7. The lowest pH (5.8) was in a tributary, Galley Run. All 38 sampling sites had net alkalinity. The alkalinity load in the Youghiogheny River increased between Connellsville and McKeesport from 35 to 79 tons per day. Above Smithton, the measured alkalinity load in the Lower Youghiogheny River agreed well with the estimated alkalinity load. Below Smithton, measured alkalinity loads in the Lower Youghiogheny River are greater than calculated loads, resulting in unaccounted for gains in alkalinity. These gains are believed to be from seeps in the streambed. Approximately one-third of the load of total alkalinity in the Youghiogheny River at McKeesport is attributed to Sewickley Creek, which contributes 14 tons per day. Sulfate concentrations in the Youghiogheny River steadily increase from 33 milligrams per liter at Connellsville to 77 milligrams per liter near McKeesport. The measured concentrations of sulfate exceeded Pennsylvania water-quality standards at four tributary sites (Galley Run, Hickman Run, Sewickley Creek, and Gillespie Run) and all four mine-discharge sites but not at any main-stem sites. A large increase in sulfate load between West Newton and Sutersville can be attributed almost entirely to the contribution from Sewickley Creek (49 tons per day). Approximately 25 percent of the load measured between Connellsville and McKeesport is unaccounted for. These gains are believed to be from seeps in the streambed from underground mine pools. Similar patterns also were observed for loads of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. Unmeasured inputs from mine rainage are believed to be the source of these loads. Elevated concentrations (above background levels) of chemicals associated with drainage from coal-mining operations were measured in samples from tributaries, especially from Galley Run, Gillespie Run, and Sewickley Creek, and from the mine-discharge sites. The synoptic survey conducted for this study was successful in identifying generalized reaches of the Youghiogheny River where unaccounted for loads of constituents associated with mining activities are entering the river. However, the survey was not able to pinpoint the location of these loads. Remote-sensing techniques, such as thermal infrared imaging by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, could be useful for determining the precise locations of these inputs.

  3. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  4. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Savannah River Site (USDOE), Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A), Aiken, SC, June 26, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A) (MSSB) is listed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3004(u) solid waste management unit/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) unit in Appendix C of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (FFA 1993) for the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. The selected alternative was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy for MSSB is No Action. Investigation of this operable unit was performed to determine if hazardous substances had been released to the environment. The Baseline Risk Assessment indicated that there were no significant releases to the environment. Therefore, it appears that either there were no significant discharges of hazardous materials to the seepage basin or natural remediation processes (i.e., bioremediation) have reduced the levels of hazardous materials to the extent that they no longer pose risk to human health or the environment. The Baseline Risk Assessment considered both the future residential and future industrial land use scenarios. Benzo(a)pyrene was the only preliminary constituent of concern (human health) detected in the soil at MSSB. Benzo(a)pyrene was detected only in the top foot of soil at levels which give risk values greater than 1 {times} 16{sup {minus}6} (but less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}) for the future adult/child resident. Further uncertainty analysis indicated that benzo(a)pyrene should not be considered a constituent of concern for the MSSB due to: (1) low frequency of detection; (2) unit history that strongly suggests it came from an adjacent source; and (3) conservative methodology was utilized in the risk assessment. No ecological or contaminant migration constituents of concern were identified at this unit. Therefore, No Action is the appropriate remedy and a five year ROD review will not be required. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control has modified the SRS RCRA permit to incorporate the No Action remedy.

  5. Probability of Potential Multi-Canister Overpack Loading System Drop of Proof Load in the K West Basin South Loadout Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of a probabilistic analysis of the potential for load drop during the load test of the K West Basin South Loadout Pit Gantry. The calculations are in support of the cask loading system (CLS) subproject load test of the gantry. The purpose of this calculation note is to document the probabilistic calculation of the per lift potential for drop of a test load by the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Loading System (MLS) during load testing at the K West Basin south loadout pit. The MLS subproject needs to load test the MLS in the K West Basin south loadout pit. To perform this test, a basket mockup weighing approximately 4,500 lb (125% of a fully loaded MCO basket accounting for water displacement) needs to be used for one or more load tests. The test load will comprise a standard basket lifting attachment with several ring-shaped steel segments to provide the required weight. The test load will exceed the K Basin Safety Analysis Report (WHC-SD-WM-SAR-062) (SAR) allowances for load drop in the K West Basin south loadout pit. This probabilistic calculation will be used as part of the basis for seeking U.S. Department of Energy approval to use an MLS test weight that exceeds SAR allowances.

  6. Two Years in the Life of the Indus River Basin [book chapter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Reviews the major challenges and current water and agriculture context, plans, and policies following difficult years of drought and catastrophic monsoon flooding in Pakistan's Indus Basin. The years from 2009 through 2011 ...

  7. LAND RESOURCES AND HOUSEHOLD STRATEGIES IN A CHANGED SOCIO-ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT -SOKOLUK RIVER BASIN (TIEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    BASIN (TIEN SHAN, KYRGYZSTAN) Jyldyz Shigaeva (International University of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek), Almaz Shanazarov (International University of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek), Michael Kollmair (Department of GeographyD study at the International University of Kyrgyzstan in Bishkek funded by the National Centre

  8. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

  9. Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

  10. Effect of Urbanization and Climate Change on Hydrological Processes over the San Antonio River Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    . Another study by Cuo et al. (2011) investigated the change of flows over Puget Sound in the Pacific Northwest under urbaninzation and climate change, respectively. Despite the perspectives gained through the previous studies, knowledge about three... of the Puget Sound basin in Washington State (Cuo et al., 2008, 2009, 2011; Vano et al., 2010). The DHSVM input data includes a digital elevation map (DEM), a basin boundary mask, soil texture information, and land cover types. In this study, the DEM data...

  11. Contribution of vehicle emissions to ambient carbonaceous particulate matter: A review and synthesis of the available data in the South Coast Air Basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cass, G.R.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table of Contents: Executive Summary; Introduction; Ambient Carbonaceous Particulate Matter in the South Coast Air Basin; Measurements of Emissions from In-Use Motor Vehicles in the South Coast Air Basin; Integration of Emissions Measurements into Comprehensive Emissions Inventories; Relating Emissions fom Motor Vehicles to Particulate Air Quality; Synthesis: The Combined Effect of All Vehicle-Related Source Contributions Acting Together; Trends in More Recent Years; Opportunities for Further Research; References; Appendix A: Detailed Mass Emissions Rates for Organic Compounds from Motor Vehicle Exhaust; and Appendix B: Organic Compounds Emitted from Tire Dust, Paved Road Dust, and Brake Lining Wear Dust.

  12. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

  13. Determination of transport parameters of coincident inorganic and organic plumes in the Savannah River Plant M-Area, Aiken, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauffman, Toya Lyn

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis by TOYA. LYN CAUFFMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Geology DETERMINATION OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS OF COINCIDENT INORGANIC AND ORGANIC PLUMES IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT M-AREA, AIKEN& SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis...

  14. Environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system technology demonstration plan for use at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R.D. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drillbit data during drilling operations. This demonstration plan presents information on the EMWD-GRS technology, demonstration design, Cs-137 contamination at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin, responsibilities of demonstration participants, and the policies and procedures for the demonstration to be conducted at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration will consist of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes will pass near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels are known. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling will be compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  15. Soil Conservation in the Yangtze River Basin By Nicholas Gervais 3169537

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    area) · Developed formula to evaluate the value ecological service of forests for hydroelectric power agricultural · Traditional farming · Hydroelectric conservation · Sediment flux · Conclusion Yangtze River decades (Xiubin et al 2007) Study site profile (Xiubin et al 2007) Hydroelectric conservation · Zhongwei

  16. Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffel, Markus

    valve to the entire Syr Darya river system, the Toktogul reservoir in Kyrgyzstan could take over more than four million square kilometres, the post-Soviet states of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan

  17. Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems...

  18. Abundance of the Louisiana Black Bear in the Upper Atchafalaya River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    125 PSB Arkansas Background/Justification the `Delta' · Mississippi River Alluvial Valley of being captured not realistic! M d l t l thi ti Behavior Model -trap happy/shy Heterogeneity Model -age

  19. area sichuan basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 59 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  20. area tarim basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 65 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  1. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy (EG& G Services) [EG& G Services; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy (Advanced Resources International) [Advanced Resources International

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  2. Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    , Rapid City, SD 57702, email: jbednar@usgs.gov Groundwater availability in the Lower Tertiary and Upper in parts of Montana and Wyoming. Both structural basins are in the forefront of energy development associated with measuring streamflow, only fall estimates of base flow were used in the study. A net balance

  3. Climate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along a Mediterranean Basin river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    Populus nigra (Salicaceae) In-channel gravel mining Climate change Dynamic fluvial processes strongly controls on soil depth. Climate in the Drôme basin and in the Mediterranean region is trendingClimate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along

  4. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions 7.3 Impacts of LNG on Air Quality 8. References 9.El Paso at Blythe. Chapter 3: Air Quality Impact AssessmentRespect to the South Coast Air Quality Management District

  5. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4: Modeling Emissions from Natural Gas-Related Sources 4.1Penetration of Liquefied Natural Gas Table ES2: Impacts ontypical summer demand of natural gas in the South Coast Air

  6. Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each...

  7. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R. [Priority Oil & Gas, Denver, CO (United States); Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, C. [Platte River Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the southwest and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S{sub 1} + S{sub 2} = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay.

  8. Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River mussel infestation. We estimated hydropower maintenance costs associated with zebra mussels by examining, and a survey of zebra mussel mitigation costs at other hydropower generation facilities in North America. We

  9. Climate change projection of snowfall in the Colorado River Basin using dynamical downscaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    . Dominguez, M. Durcik, J. Valdes, H. F. Diaz, and C. L. Castro (2012), Climate change projection of snowfall Sungwook Wi,1 Francina Dominguez,2,3 Matej Durcik,3 Juan Valdes,1,3 Henry F. Diaz,4 and Christopher L approximately 85% of the river's 17.2 Ã? 109 m3 annual flow [Christensen and Lettenmaier, 2007; Serreze et al

  10. Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

  11. Hydrodynamic effect on oil accumulation in a stratigraphic trap, Kitty Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larberg, Gregory Martin

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stratigraphic traps in the Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstones on the east flank of the basin (Figure 1). The nine ? township area immediately surrounding Kitty in- cludes Kingsbury and Mill ? Gillette fields and is well ? suited for hydrodynamic study because... understanding of the relationships between pressures, flow, and the rocks themselves. 14 Nethods Subsurface data from the nine township area surround- ing Kitty field is abundant and readily available from in- dustry sources. Over 530 class "A" (analyzable...

  12. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  13. Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippert, Peter Gregory

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

  14. Urban land-use effects on groundwater phosphate distribution in a shallow aquifer, Nanfei River basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    basin, China Jiazhong Qian & Lulu Wang & Hongbin Zhan & Zhou Chen Abstract Groundwater, surface water

  15. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

  16. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  17. Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *Editor's note: This article is cross-posted from Savannah River Remediation's website, where it was posted on September 28, 2012.

  18. Shallow gas in Arkoma basin - Pine Hollow and South Ashland fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woncik, J.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pine Hollow and South Ashland fields located in Pittsburg and Coal Counties, Oklahoma, established a combined reserve exceeding 200 bcf of gas. The Hartshorne Sandstone of early Desmoinesian (Pennsylvanian) age is the producing zone at a depth of 4000 ft (1200 m). Gas, probably of biogenic origin, migrated into the reservoir shortly after deposition. Subsequent folding and faulting of the Ashland anticline resulted in repositioning of the gas in a downthrown fault trap. The upthrown anticline portion of the Hartshorne is water-bearing. Moderate well costs and high individual reserves have resulted in excellent economics. Competitive bidding on federal leases has resulted in a high bid exceeding $1 million for one tract in the South Ashland field.

  19. Status Report of the Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra Trzdentata) in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David A.; Parker, Blaine; James, gary

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread decline of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Pacific Northwest, especially in the Columbia River system has led to concerns and questions from a number of regional agencies, Native American tribes, and the public. To address these concerns, new research efforts must focus on specific problems associated with this understudied species. The preservation and restoration of this species is critical for a number of reasons, including its importance to the tribes and its importance as an indicator of ecosystem health. Historically lamprey have been labeled a pest species due to the problems associated with the exotic sea lamprey, (Petromyzon marinus), invading the Great Lakes.

  20. Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

  1. Population Structure of Columbia River Basin Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Technical Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, E.L.; National Science Foundation (U.S.)

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead trout is presented as an assimilation of the life history forms that have evolved in synchrony with diverse and complex environments over their Pacific range. As poikilotherms, temperature is described as the overwhelming environmental influence that determines what life history options occur and where they are distributed. The different populations represent ecological types referred to as spring-, summer-, fall, and winter-run segments, as well as stream- and ocean-type, or stream- and ocean-maturing life history forms. However, they are more correctly described as a continuum of forms that fall along a temporal cline related to incubation and rearing temperatures that determine spawn timing and juvenile residence patterns. Once new habitats are colonized, members of the founding populations spread through adaptive evolution to assume complementary life history strategies. The related population units are collectively referred to as a metapopulation, and members most closely associated within common temporal and geographic boundaries are designated as first-order metapopulations. Population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin, therefore, is the reflection of the genetic composition of the founding source or sources within the respective region, shaped by the environment, principally temperature, that defines life history evolutionary strategy to maximize fitness under the conditions delineated. The complexity of structure rests with the diversity of opportunities over the elevations that exist within the Basin. Consistent with natural selection, rather than simply attempting to preserve populations, the challenge is to provide opportunities to expand their range to new or restored habitat that can accommodate genetic adaptation as directional environmental changes are elaborated. Artificial propagation can have a critical role in this process, and the emphasis must be placed on promoting the ability for anadromous salmonids to respond to change by assuring that the genetic diversity to facilitate such responses is present. The key in developing an effective recovery program for chinook salmon and steelhead is to recognize that multiple life history forms associated with temperature characterize the species in the Columbia Basin, and recovery measures taken must address the biological requirements of the population unit within the environmental template identified. Unless such measures are given first and highest priority, establishment of biologically self-sustaining populations will be restrained.

  2. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations.

  3. Dual mechanisms of Laramide structural growth: the Bighorn uplift-Powder River basin transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.D. Jr.; Lisenbee, A.L.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bighorn uplift margin from Buffalo to Dayton, Wyoming, consists of a northern monoclinal domain and a southern fault-segmented domain. The Precambrian basement and overlying Paleozoic-Mesozoic strata have been rotated and folded in the monocline, producing a structural relief of 17,000 ft. Range-directed thrusts, formed by compression in the synclinal hinge of the monocline, are responsible for several second-order structures. The monocline may be transported eastward above a Rich-model thrust in the basement. The southern domain displays up to 20,000 ft of structural relief and consists of contiguous fault-bounded blocks with eastern margins 2 to 9 mi long. The largest and northernmost fault-bounded block, the Precambrian-cored Piney block, was transported eastward along a west-dipping reverse fault. Drilling indicates the fault overlies a vertical Cretaceous-Tertiary section underlain by nearly flat strata below the top of the Cretaceous Parkman Sandstone. Wells drilled through the Precambrian-cored Clear Creek thrust block west of Buffalo suggest a similar structural development. Reverse faulting in the southern domain occurred at a late stage, cutting through the synclinal flexure of the monocline, or occurred contemporaneously with the formation of the monocline to the north. Paleocene and Eocene syntectonic conglomerates underlie and front the range-bounding faults and exhibit basal angular unconformities. An arcuate band of conglomerates on the east side of Mowry basin implies the existence of other thrusts beneath Tertiary strata in the topographic basin, a conclusion reinforced by seismic data.

  4. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  5. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  6. Assessments of Environmental Impacts and Beneficial Use of Coalbed Methane Produced Water in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Morris

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact on water quality and the beneficial use of the coal bed methane (CBM) produced water are imminent questions to be answered due to the rapidly growing CBM exploration in the Powder River Basin (PRB). The practice of discharging large volumes of water into drainage channels or using it to irrigate rangeland areas has the potential of causing serious problems. The elevated salinity and sodicity in the CBM water may be detrimental to soils, plants and the associated microbial communities. There are limited studies on CBM water characterization; however, a comprehensive understanding of CBM water influence on the local ecosystem is lacking. It is very important that the water applied to soils meets the favorable combination of salinity and sodicity that will allow the plants to grow at good production levels and that will maintain the structure of the soils. The purpose of this study was to access various CBM water treatment technologies and the influence of the treated water on local biogeochemical settings in order to evaluate and identify the proper technologies to treat the CBM produced water from CBM operations, and use it in an environmentally safe manner. Unfortunately, a suitable field site was not identified and the funds for this effort were moved to a different project.

  7. The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector, January 2000 | Department ofSouthT T

  8. A solute transport model calibration procedure as applied to a tritium plume in the Savannah River Plant F-Area, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, David Arthur

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODEL CALIBRATION PROCEDURE AS APPLIED TO A TRITIUM PLUME IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT F-AREA, SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis by DAVID ARTHUR EDWARDS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfilment... of the requhements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Geology A SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODEL CALIBRATION PROCEDURE AS APPLIED TO A TRITII JM PLUME IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT F-AREA, SOUTH CAROLINA A Thesis by DAVID ARTHUR EDWARDS...

  9. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  10. The dog originated south of Yangtse river less than 16,000 years ago, from numerous wolves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pang, Jun - Feng [STATE KEY LABORATORY OF GENETIC; Kluetsch, Cornelya [KTH-ROYAL INST. OF TECH

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We here present a detailed picture of the origins of the dog, giving strong and precise evidence for 'where and when', and thereby also a first tentative picture of 'how, why and by whom' the wolf was domesticated. Previous studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have failed to definitely establish the time and place of origin because of lack in phylogenetic resolution for the so far studied 582 bp region, and inadequate sampling across the world. We therefore analysed 169 mtDNA genomes, selected from partial sequences (582 bp) from 1,576 dogs worldwide. This shows that dogs universally share a common gene pool, but the three earlier identified universally occurring phylogenetic clades ofhigh age consist often much younger subclades, which originated 5,000-16,000 ya from at least 48 wolf founders. The full range of genetic diversity, all 10 subclades, is found only in south-eastern Asia south of Yangtze River, and the diversity decreases gradually across Eurasia down to only four sub clades in Europe. This establishes that the dog has a single origin in time and space from a large number ofwolves, less than 16,000 ya, probably in China south of Y angtzeRiver. The place and time coincide with the origin of rice agriculture, suggesting an origin among sedentary hunter-gatherers or early rice farmers. The numerous founders indicate that wolf taming was an important cultural trait, and it is noticeable that in this region dogs are since ancient times used as food, offering a possible reason for the wolf domestication.

  11. Neogene uplift of south Western Australia as constrained by river profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Flament, Nicolas; Butterworth, Nathaniel; Müller, R Dietmar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative tectonic quiescence of the Australian continent during the Cenozoicmakes it an excellent natural laboratory to study recent large-scale variations insurface topography and the processes influencing these changes. A part of this landscape is a fluvial network that is sensitive to variations in landscape horizontaland vertical motions. The notion that a river acts as a "tape recorder" for vertical perturbations (Pritchard et al., 2009) suggests that one can deduce changes in spatial and temporal characteristics of uplift via the analysis of river "channel-parallel", or longitudinal, profiles. Here we analysed 21 longitudinal river profiles, around the Australian continent. Steady-state concave upward profiles in northeast Australia indicate an absence of recent uplift. In contrast, pronounced convex upward undulations and major knickpoints within longitudinal profiles of rivers in southwest Australia suggest recent landscape uplift. This requires an explanation given the lackof recent, large-scale ...

  12. Cross borehole induced polarization to detect subsurface NAPL at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Michael B. (Michael Brian), 1980-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral induced polarization measurements were acquired in six cross-borehole panels within four boreholes at the Savannah River Site. The investigation was performed to delineate the presence of dense non-aqueous phase ...

  13. EIS-0108: L-Reactor Operation, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was prepared to provide environmental input into the proposed decision to restart L-Reactor operation at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The Savannah River Plant is a major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) installation for the production of defense nuclear materials. The proposed restart of L–Reactor would provide defense nuclear materials (i.e. , plutonium) to wet current and near-term needs for national defense purposes.

  14. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

  15. Competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on some native and reclamation species in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.B.; Knight, D.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on certain native and reclamation species. The first experiment was initiated by discing three sites in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, at three distances from introduced weed seed sources. Introduced weed colonization was greatest when a seed source was located nearby. Higher weed cover resulted in reductions of percent cover, density, and richness of the native species. The second experiment was conducted in the greenhouse and was designed to determine if there are changes in response of S. kali and the native grasses Agropyron smithii and Bouteloua gracilis to competition and water regime. Both grass species had lower biomass and higher stomatal resistance when growing in mixed culture with S. kali than in pure culture in the dry regime, but there were no significant differences in the wet regime. In general, the difference in plant response between mixed and pure cultures was more pronounced in the dry than in the wet regime. The third study was a greenhouse experiment on germination and competition of S. kali (a C/sub 4/ species) with native species Lepidium densiflorum (C/sub 3/), Chenopodium pratericola (C/sub 3/), A. smithii (C/sub 3/), and B. gracilis (C/sub 4/) under May, June, and July temperature regimes. Salsola kali germinated equally well in all three regimes, but the other C/sub 4/ species had highest germination in the July regime and the C/sub 3/ species in the May and June regimes. The fourth study was designed to examine the effect of weed colonization on the success of mine reclamation. Little effect was observed, but colonization by introduced annuals was very low. (ERB)

  16. Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun W. Lee; Shannon D. Serre; Yongxin Zhao; Sung Jun Lee; Thomas W. Hastings [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg{sup 0}. Concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg0 oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg{sup 0} oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg{sup 0} oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg{sup 0} oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH{sub 3} injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization), Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina.

  18. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  19. StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Resource Information Network - Status of Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Duane A.; Beamesderfer, Raymond C. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Enterprise, OR (United States); Woodard, Bob [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on fish populations, fisheries, and fish habitat is crucial to the success of ongoing program to protect, recover, enhance, and manage fish resources in the Columbia River Basin. However, pertinent data are often difficult to locate because it is scattered among many agencies and is often unpublished. The goal of this annual report is to bring many diverse data types and sources into a single comprehensive report on the status of anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin and the environmental conditions that may affect that status. Brief summaries are provided to identify the type and scope of available information. This synopsis is intended to complement other more detailed reports to which readers are referred for comprehensive treatment of specific subjects. This first report focuses mainly on anadromous salmon and steelhead (primarily through 1994) but the authors intend to expand the scope of future issues to include resident species. This is the first of what the authors intend to be an annual report. They welcome constructive suggestions for improvements. This report is a product of the StreamNet (formerly Coordinated Information System and Northwest Environmental Data Base) project which is a part of the Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The project is called for in the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The project`s objective is to promote exchange and dissemination of information in a standardized electronic format throughout the basin. This project is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission with active participation by tribal, state, and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

  20. Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    @BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

  1. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

  2. EIS-0121: Alternative Cooling Water Systems, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of cooling water systems for thermal discharges from K– and C-Reactors and from a coal-fired powerhouse in the D-Area at the Savannah River Plant (SRP)

  3. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  4. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the U.S. Department of Agriculture?s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the RGBI project, formally titled Efficient Irrigation for Water Conservation in the Rio Grande Basin, involves about 150 researchers, specialists, and county... the project. This team works with local irrigation districts, agricultural producers, homeowners, and other state and federal agencies to address the various water issues in the basin. ?The Rio Grande Basin Initiative is a model outcome- based program...

  5. Biodiversity and the Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Salmon Species in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report of 8 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, C. R. (Cleveland R.)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, and protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.

  6. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim [Geology Programme, School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1–5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

  7. Climate Change and the Episodicity of Sediment Flux of Small California Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Douglas L.; Jenkins, Scott A.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dip slip. The Salinas River basin lies in a synclinali 4.1 j River basin 1. Pajaro 2. Salinas Estrella (Combined)

  8. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

  9. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Powder River Basin for the potential application of a production process patented by Jack W. McIntyre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvasnicka, D.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of a patented (US Patent Office No. 4,766,957) process developed by Jack W. McIntyre for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Powder River Basin. General research, based on a review of published literature from both private and public sources, indicates that the shallow, thick subbituminous coal seams found in the Powder River Basin exhibit significant potential for the application of this patented process. These coal deposits can be characterized, on the basis of established coalbed methane production, as being highly water productive. The desorption and economic recovery of coalbed methane, widely believed to be biogenic in origin, from these low-grade deposits will require the subsequent dewatering of these geologic formations. The patented process, developed by Mr. McIntyre and described in the compendium of this study, may offer a cost-effective means of methane recovery and downhole disposal of produced groundwaters.

  10. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  11. Savannah River Operations Office P.O. Box A Aiken, South Carolina 29802

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principal Investigators PostdoctoralSashaAiken, South

  12. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  13. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  14. Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339350 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339­350 (2002) © EGS Hydrological ), this paper focuses on calibration of the hydrological part of the model and nitrogen (N) dynamics

  15. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Subtask 7.4 - Power River Basin Subbituminous Coal-Biomass Cogasification Testing in a Transport Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the Kellogg Brown and Root transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 3600 hours of operation on 17 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air- and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 90% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and oxygen/fuel ratios. During this series of tests, a previously tested baseline Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming was mixed with 20 wt% biomass. Two types of biomass were used - wood waste and switchgrass. Gas and particulate sampling at several locations in the riser provided information on coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry as a function of residence time, transport gas, and mode of operation. The goal of these tests was to compare the operating data and sample chemistry of the coal-biomass mixture to the PRB coal, with a focus on Fischer-Tropsch coal-to-liquid production in oxygen-blown mode. Data are to be provided to DOE to determine kinetic rates of devolatilization and tar cracking.

  18. Recommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to operate the FCRPS to maximize energy revenue so Bonneville can pay its nuclear power plant gambling debtsRecommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power to the Northwest Power Planning Council's March 14, 2001 request for recommended amendments to the mainstem

  19. Minimizing Characterization - Derived Waste at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Pelt, R. S.; Amidon, M. B.; Reboul, S. H.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) utilize innovative site characterization approaches and technologies that minimize waste generation. Characterization is typically conducted in phases, first by collecting large quantities of inexpensive data, followed by targeted minimally invasive drilling to collect depth-discrete soil/groundwater data, and concluded with the installation of permanent multi-level groundwater monitoring wells. Waste-reducing characterization methods utilize non-traditional drilling practices (sonic drilling), minimally intrusive (geoprobe, cone penetrometer) and non-intrusive (3-D seismic, ground penetration radar, aerial monitoring) investigative tools. Various types of sensor probes (moisture sensors, gamma spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, laser induced and X-ray fluorescence) and hydrophobic membranes (FLUTe) are used in conjunction with depth-discrete sampling techniques to obtain high-resolution 3-D plume profiles. Groundwater monitoring (short/long-term) approaches utilize multi-level sampling technologies (Strata-Sampler, Cone-Sipper, Solinst Waterloo, Westbay) and low-cost diffusion samplers for seepline/surface water sampling. Upon collection of soil and groundwater data, information is portrayed in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) format for interpretation and planning purposes. At the SRS, the use of non-traditional drilling methods and minimally/non intrusive investigation approaches along with in-situ sampling methods has minimized waste generation and improved the effectiveness and efficiency of characterization activities.

  20. Characterization of the chemical variation of feed coal and coal combustion products from a power plant utilizing low sulfur Powder River Basin coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, in collaboration with an Indiana utility, are studying a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin coal. This investigation involves a systematic study of the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a 1,300-megawatt (MW) power unit. The main goal of this study is to characterize the temporal chemical variability of the feed coal, fly ash, and bottom ash by looking at the major-, minor-, and trace-element compositions and their associations with the feed coal mineralogy. Emphasis is also placed on the abundance and modes of occurrence of elements of potential environmental concern that may affect the utilization of these CCPs and coals.

  1. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

  2. Groundwater flow and tritium migration in coastal plain sediments, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, M.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Flach, G.P.; Thayer, P.A. [Univ. of North Carolina (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater modeling was performed to assess groundwater flow and contaminant migration for a tritium plume at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study supports the Corrective Measures Study and Interim Action Plan regulatory documents for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG). Modeling scenarios were designed to provide data for an economic analysis of alternatives, and subsequently evaluate the effectiveness of the selected remedial technologies for tritium reduction to surface waters. Scenarios assessed include no action, vertical and surface barriers, pump-treat-reinject, and vertical recirculation wells. Hydrostratigraphic units in the area consist of fluvial, deltaic, and shallow marine sand, mud, and calcareous sediments that exhibit abrupt facies changes over short distances. The complex heterogeneity of the sediments, along with characterization data, and tritium contaminant source data required a three-dimensional model be developed in order to accurately illustrate the size, shape and orientation of the plume. Results demonstrate that the shallow confining zone in the region controls the migration path of the plume. The size and shape of the plume were modeled in three-dimensions using detailed core, geophysical and cone-penetrometer data, depth-discrete contaminant data, monitoring well data, and seepline/surface water samples. Three-dimensional tritium plume maps were created for the >20,000, >500 and >50 pCi/ml concentration levels. The three-dimensional plume maps and volumetric calculations indicate that 63 percent of the total activity and 12 percent of the volume above 50 pCi/ml resides in a layer less than 6-m thick riding on top of the shallow confining zone.

  3. Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

  5. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

  6. Survey of Artificial Production of Anadromous Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1981-1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, Percy M.

    1985-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to collect, organize, and summarize data concerning anadromous fish culture stations of the Columbia River system for 1981, 1982, and 1983 and to create a data archive system with a means of making this information available to the public.

  7. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and quality of water for this region. For further information, materials, and articles about RGBI, visit riogrande.tamu.edu. Don?t let the river run dry, continued ... conservation; (6) environment, ecology, and water quality protection; (7) saline and wastewater management and reuse; (8) basinwide hydrology, salinity modeling, and technology; and (9) communica- tions and accountability. ?A major strength of the Rio...

  8. Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ................................................................................................... 37 Appendix C. Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Focused on North Florida1 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River: Mark Long) #12;2 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee

  9. Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation, northeast Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation small-scale fining-upward cycles (average 4.5 m thick). Facies architectural elements include channel. Understanding of facies architecture and sand body geometry of this Formation is crucial in examining the issue

  10. amazon river system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Use in indigenous and Colonist Communities of the Palcazu Basin, Peruvian Amazon McClain, Michael 159 Charlotte, Manatee River, Sarasota, Hardee, and Peace River Soil Biology...

  11. assessment columbia river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and disturbances may be ineffective are being spent in the United States on river and stream restoration projects. In the Columbia River basin Montgomery, David R. 311 A...

  12. Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

  13. A design study for the isolation of the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site using the viscous liquid barrier technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Persoff, P.; Apps, J.; James, A.; Oldenburg, C.; McGrath, A.; Myer, L.; Pellerin, L.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a description of the design study for a pilot-scale field demonstration of the Viscous Liquid Barrier (VLB) technology, a new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The demonstration site was Retention Basin 281-3H, a shallow catchment basin at the Savannah River Site, which is contaminated mainly by radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 238}Pu). The goals of the field demonstration were (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier in order to isolate the contaminants, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier. The site was characterized, and preliminary hydraulic conductivity data were obtained from core samples. Based on the site characteristics and the functional requirements, a conceptual model was developed, the barrier specifications were defined, and lance injection was selected as the emplacement method. The injection strategy for the subsurface conditions at the site was determined using numerical simulations. An appropriate variant of Colloidal Silica (CS) was selected as the barrier liquid based on its relative insensitivity to interactions with the site soils, and the formulation for optimum site performance was determined. A barrier verification strategy, including hydraulic, pneumatic, tracer, and geophysical methods, was developed. A lance water injection test was conducted in order to obtain representative estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and its distribution for the design of the barrier emplacement. The water injection test demonstrated the lack of permeable zones for CS injection, and a decision not to proceed with the barrier emplacement was reached.

  14. Using Airborne Geophysics to Improve the Management of Produced Water from Coal Bed Natural Gas Extraction in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana has seen a boom in drilling for coalbed natural gas (CBNG), the natural gas contained in coal seams. Large quantities of water are coproduced during the extraction process. The water is currently managed by land application (irrigation), returned to shallow groundwater aquifers via infiltration basins, directly discharged to ephemeral or perennial streams, or injected into the deep subsurface via injection wells. At present, there are over 28,000 CBNG wells permitted or drilled in the PRB and it is estimated that another 50,000 to 100,000 new wells will be drilled in the future. Produced water management is a major challenge to the oil and gas industry as well as federal and state regulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods for the large-scale mapping of vadose zone properties. The base maps derived from the AEM data show the location of conductive anomalies within the vadose zone. These conductive anomalies have been identified as conditions related to soil properties, geologic features, saturated areas, and seepage zones. In the PRB, the data can be used to identify suitable locations for constructing impoundments in areas that avoid highly conductive soils where infiltrating water may leach salts through the vadose zone and into shallow aquifers. Hydrologic changes within the vadose zone were evaluated by completing an AEM survey in 2003 and 2004 over two coincident spatial areas. The data were analyzed to determine statistical relationships between the data sets, in particular data outliers which may represent areas of significant change between each year. Some outliers plot near areas of CBNG development. Ultimately, it is hoped that the information from these surveys will identify cost effective treatment or disposal options for produced water that address both production and environmental issues.

  15. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  16. Lateral Drilling and Completion Technologies for Shallow-Shelf Carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gibbons; Larry A. Carrell; Richard D. George

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil- well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius laterals in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2590 to 2890 m (8500 to 9500 ft) in Richland Co., MT; Bowman Co., ND; and Harding Co., SD.

  17. Determining erodibility, critical shear stress, and allowable discharge estimates for cohesive channels: case study in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoman, R.W.; Niezgoda, S.L. [Lowham Engineering LLC, Lander, WY (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous discharge of coalbed natural gas-produced (CBNG-produced) water within ephemeral, cohesive channels in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming can result in significant erosion. A study was completed to investigate channel stability in an attempt to correlate cohesive soil properties to critical shear stress. An in situ jet device was used to determine critical shear stress (tau{sub c}) and erodibility (k{sub d}); cohesive soil properties were determined following ASTM procedures for 25 reaches. The study sites were comprised of erodible to moderately resistant clays with tau{sub c} ranging from 0.11 to 15.35 Pa and k{sub d} ranging from 0.27 to 2.38 cm{sup 3}/N s. A relationship between five cohesive soil characteristics and tau{sub c} was developed and presented for use in deriving tau{sub c} for similar sites. Allowable discharges for CBNG-produced water were also derived using tau{sub c} and the tractive force method. An increase in the allowable discharge was found for channels in which vegetation was maintained. The information from this case study is critical to the development of a conservative methodology to establish allowable discharges while minimizing flow-induced instability.

  18. Impacts of Climate Change and Vegetation Dynamics on Runoff in the Mountainous Region of the Haihe River Basin in the Past Five Decades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Yang, Dawen; Huang, Maoyi

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration have changed significantly in the mountainous region of the Haihe River basin over the past five decades. In the study, a process-based terrestrial model, version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4), was used to quantify the spatiotemporal changes in runoff over the region, driven by the varying climate factors and CO2 concentration. Overall, our simulations suggest that climate-induced change in runoff in this region show a decreasing trend since 1960. Changes in precipitation, solar radiation, air temperature, and wind speed accounts for 56%, -14%, 13%, -5% of the overall decrease in annual runoff, respectively, but their relative contributions vary across the study area. Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration was found to have limited impacts on runoff. Significant decrease in runoff over the southern and northeastern portion of the region is primarily attributed to decreasing precipitation, while decreasing solar radiation and increasing air temperature are the main causes of slight runoff increase in the northern portion. Our results also suggest that the magnitude of decreasing trend could be greatly underestimated if the dynamical interactions of vegetation phenology with the environmental factors are not considered in the modeling, highlighting the importance of including dynamic vegetation phenology in the prediction of runoff in this region.

  19. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  20. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

  1. EA-1605: Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site; Aiken, Allendale and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  2. The Use of Subsurface Barriers to Support Treatment of Metals and Reduce the Flux of Tritium to Fourmile Branch at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina - 13358

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, Gerald; Thibault, Jeffrey; Wells, Leslie [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Prater, Phillip [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produced tritium, plutonium, and special nuclear materials for national defense, medicine, and the space programs. Acidic groundwater plumes containing metals, metallic radionuclides, non-metallic radionuclides and tritium sourced from the F and H Area Seepage Basins have impacted the surface water of Fourmile Branch on SRS. Tritium releases from Fourmile Branch have impacted the water quality within areas of the Savannah River adjacent to the SRS, and this circumstance has been an ongoing regulatory concern. The F and H Area Seepage Basins operated until 1988 for the disposition of deionized acidic waste water from the F and H Separations Facilities. The waste water contained dilute nitric acid and low concentrations of non-radioactive metals, and radionuclides, with the major isotopes being Cs-137, Sr-90, U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Tc-99, I-129, and tritium. The tritium concentration in the waste water was relatively elevated because there is not a practicable removal method in water. The acid content of the waste water during the operational period of the basins was equal to 12 billion liters of nitric acid. The seepage basins were closed in 1988 and backfilled and capped by 1991. The plumes associated with the F and H basins cover an area of nearly 2.4 square kilometers (600 acres) and discharge along ?2,600 meters of Fourmile Branch. The acidic nature of the plumes and their overall discharge extent along the branch represent a large challenge with respect to reducing contaminant flux to Fourmile Branch. The introduction of nitric acid into the groundwater over a long time effectively reduced the retardation of metal migration from the basins to the groundwater and in the groundwater to Fourmile Branch, because most negatively charged surfaces on the aquifer materials were filled with hydrogen ion. Two large pump and treat systems were constructed in 1997 and operated until 2003 in an attempt to capture and control the releases to Fourmile Branch. The operating cost, including waste disposal, for the two systems was ?$1.3 M/month. Both systems employed reinjection of tritiated water up gradient of the extraction, and produced large quantities of waste from non-tritium isotopes and metals removal prior to reinjection. Both systems were determined to be ineffective and potentially detrimental with respect to limiting the flux of contaminants to Fourmile Branch. After it became apparent that there was very little benefit to continued operation of the systems, and the staggering cost of operations was recognized by the SRS and regulators, a new remedy was developed. The new system uses vertical subsurface barriers to redirect groundwater flow to limit the transport of contaminants to the stream. The barriers were constructed of acid resistant grout using deep soil mixing techniques. The grout mixture used low swelling clay, fly ash, and sodium hydroxide to form a pozzolana material with low permeability and low strength. The SRS and regulators agreed to a series of remedial goals, with the first goal to reduce tritium flux to the stream by 70% and bring constituents other than tritium to groundwater protection standards. (authors)

  3. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the K, L, and P areas of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) as part of the process for continuing operation of three reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the EIS must address the potential environmental consequences to human health and the environment of this major federal action.'' Some of the possible consequences are related to subsurface transport of radionuclides released to seepage basins during normal reactor operation. To assist in the evaluation of the potential subsurface environmental impacts of these releases, Camp Dresser McKee Inc. (CDM) was contracted in June of 1989 to develop a three-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport model which will simulate the movement of radionuclides at each of the reactor areas after they enter the groundwater system through the seepage basins. This report describes the development, calibration, and simulation results of the groundwater flow and contaminant transport model developed for this task. 10 refs., 63 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study timeframe. Future work will involve a final report, which will include data trends, correlations and interpretations of laboratory data.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

  6. EIS-0147: Continued Operation of the K-,L-, and P- Reactors, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental impacts of the proposed action, which is to continue operation of K-, L-, and P-Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to ensure the capability to produce nuclear materials, and to produce nuclear materials as necessary for United States defense and nondefense programs.

  7. Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

  8. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  9. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  10. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful clean-ups. Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at Savannah River Site was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination using innovative approaches and effective bioremediation techniques for clean-up of the contaminant plume have been established.

  11. Paleoenvironment of Fort Union Formation, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrum, C.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocks of Paleocene age are represented in the Cave Hills of northwestern South Dakota by the Ludlow, Cannonball, and Tongue River members of the Fort Union Formation. The Cave Hills are situated within the southern margin of the Williston basin, 80 mi (130 km) north of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Numerous fine-grained, fining-upward sedimentary sequences comprise the Ludlow Member and are attributed to meandering streams occupying a low-gradient lower alluvial to upper deltaic plain. The Cannonball Member is 130 ft (40 m) thick in the North Cave Hills and is represented by two fine-grained, coarsening-upward sandstone mudstone sequences. A distinct vertical succession of sedimentary facies occur within each sequence representing offshore/lower shoreface through upper shoreface/foreshore depositional environment. A north to northeast depositional strike for the Cannonball shoreline is inferred from ripple crest and cross-bed orientations. The basal part of the Tongue River consists of approximately 40 to 50 ft (12 to 15 m) of lenticular sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, thin-bedded lignite, and kaolinite beds representing thin broad channels, point-bar, levee, overbank, and nearshore swamp depositional environments. Massive fluvial channel sandstones measuring several tens of ft in thickness overlie the fine-grained basal Tongue River lithologies. These channel sandstones represent the continued progradation of continental/fluvial/coastal plain depositional environments eastward over the marine sandstones of the Cannonball Member.

  12. Stressors to Imperiled Fishes in the Etowah Basin Mechanisms, Sources and Management under the Etowah HCP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    Geological Survey Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Athens, GA 30602 Abstract The Etowah River basin, 2006 Edited February 1, 2007 1. University of Georgia River Basin Center, Athens, GA 30602 2. US and its Aquatic Fauna The Etowah River is a major headwater tributary of the Coosa River system

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

  14. atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

  15. Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

  16. CHEMOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC DUITSCHLAND FORMATION, SOUTH AFRICA: IMPLICATIONS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Alan Jay

    CHEMOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC DUITSCHLAND FORMATION, SOUTH AFRICA: IMPLICATIONS the only unequivocal glacial unit of this era in the Transvaal Basin, South Africa. Lithologic evidence Park 2006, Johannesburg, South Africa. [American Journal of Science, Vol. 301, March, 2001, P. 261

  17. Saving a Dwindling River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

  18. 18 Rare Freshwater Fish of British Columbia Salvelinus confluentus Suckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern Chilcotin Ranges Southern Thompson Upland Thompson Basin Halfway Plateau Kiskatinaw Plateau Peace Fraser River Harrison River Thompson River South Thompson River North Thompson River Chilcotin River

  19. Trinity River Initiative Building partnerships for cooperative conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinity River Initiative Building partnerships for cooperative conservation More people in Texas use the water, wildlife and recreational resources from the Trinity River Basin than from any other in the Trinity River Basin--the ecological resources along much of the Trinity are in poor condition. Despite

  20. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  1. Late Cenozoic structure and stratigraphy of south-central Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)]|[Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology; Campbell, N.P. [Yakima Valley Coll., WA (United States); Fecht, K.R.; Lindsey, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural framework of the Columbia Basin began developing before Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) volcanism. Prior to 17.5 Ma, the eastern part of the basin was a relatively stable area, with a basement of Paleozoic and older crystalline rock. The western part was an area of subsidence in which large volumes of sediment and volcanic rocks accumulated. Concurrent with eruption of the CRBG, anticlinal ridges of the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) were growing under north-south compression. Topographic expression of these features was later masked by the large volume of CRBG basalt flowing west from fissures in the eastern Columbia Basin. The folds continued to develop after cessation of volcanism, leading to as much as 1,000 m of structural relief in the past 10 million years. Post-CRBG evolution of the Columbia Basin is recorded principally in folding and faulting in the YFB and sediments deposited in the basins. The accompanying tectonism resulted in lateral migration of major depositional systems into subsiding structural lows. Although known late Cenozoic faults are on anticlinal ridges, earthquake focal mechanisms and contemporary strain measurements indicate most stress release is occurring in the synclinal areas under north-south compression. There is no obvious correlation between focal mechanisms for earthquakes whose foci are in the CRBG and the location of known faults. High in situ stress values help to explain the occurrence of microseismicity in the Columbia Basin but not the pattern. Microseismicity appears to occur in unaltered fresh basalt. Faulted basalt associated with the YFB is highly brecciated and commonly altered to clay. The high stress, abundance of ground water in confined aquifers of the CRBG, and altered basalt in fault zones suggest that the frontal faults on the anticlinal ridges probably have some aseismic deformation. 85 refs.

  2. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina, March 1990--July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Runs Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F/H area effluent on the creek, the study included qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites (see map), chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. In a March 1990 study of the potential impact of F/H Area effluent on the macroinvertebrate communities of Upper Three Runs Creek was extended, with reductions in the number of sites to be sampled and in the frequency of water chemistry sampling. This report presents the results of macroinvertebrate stream surveys at three sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent and water chemistry analysis of the three stream sites and the effluent from March 1990 to July 1991.

  3. Powder River 0 20 40 KILOMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. coal basins. The Powder River Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana (fig. 1 tons (MST), some 42 percent of the total coal pro- duction in the United States, making the PRB the single most important coal-producing basin in the Nation. About 426 MST (92 percent of total PRB coal

  4. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  5. Radium-226 and low pH in groundwater due to oxidation of authigenic pyrite; Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KUBILIUS, WALTER

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of elevated radium-226 in groundwater beneath a sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was investigated. Nearly one hundred monitoring wells are developed in the Steed Pond Aquifer (SPA), which consists of 100-150 ft of Coastal Plain sand, iron oxides, and minor clay. Wells screened in the upper and middle portions of the aquifer have average Ra-226 between 0.5 and 2.5 pCi/L, and average pHs above 4.7. However, wells screened near the base of the aquifer exhibit higher average Ra-226 concentrations of 2.5 to 4.6 pCi/L, with some measurements exceeding the MCL of 5 pCi/L, and show average pHs of 4.1 to 4.7. These wells are not downgradient of the landfill, and are not impacted by landfill leachate. The Crouch Branch Confining Unit (CBCU) underlies the aquifer, and is composed partly of reduced gray/brown clay with lignite and authigenic pyrite. Gamma ray logs show that the SPA has low gamma counts, but the CBCU is consistently elevated. Groundwater with high radium/low pH also contains elevated sulfate concentrations. pH calculations indicate that sulfate is in the form of sulfuric acid. A model for the origin of elevated Ra-226 levels in deeper SPA wells envisions infiltration of oxygenated SPA groundwater into reduced pyritic CBCU sediments, with consequent oxidative pyrite dissolution, and acidification of groundwater. Then, naturally occurring CBCU radium dissolves, and mixes into the Steed Pond Aquifer.

  6. Uranium potential of precambrian rocks in the Raft River area of northwestern Utah and south-central Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, B.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 1214 geochemical samples were collected and analyzed. The sampling media included 334 waters, 616 stream sediments, and 264 rocks. In addition, some stratigraphic sections of Elba and Yost Quartzites and Archean metasedimentary rock were measured and sampled and numerous radiation determinations made of the various target units. Statistical evaluation of the geochemical data permitted recognition of 156 uranium anomalies, 52 in water, 79 in stream sediment, and 25 in rock. Geographically, 68 are located in the Grouse Creek Mountains, 43 in the Raft River Mountains, and 41 in the Albion Range. Interpretation of the various data leads to the conclusion that uranium anomalies relate to sparingly and moderately soluble uraniferous heavy minerals, which occur as sparse but widely distributed magmatic, detrital, and/or metamorphically segregated components in the target lithostratigraphic units. The uraniferous minerals known to occur and believed to account for the geochemical anomalies include allanite, monazite, zircon, and apatite. In some instances samarskite may be important. These heavy minerals contain uranium and geochemically related elements, such as Th, Ce, Y, and Zr, in sufficient quantities to account for both the conspicuous lithologic preference and the generally observed low amplitude of the anomalies. The various data generated in connection with this study, as well as those available in the published literature, collectively support the conclusion that the various Precambrian W and X lithostratigraphic units pre-selected for evaluation probably lack potential to host important Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerate uranium deposits. Moreover it is also doubted that they possess any potential to host Proterozoic unconformity-type uranium deposits.

  7. The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, C.

    planting saltcedar for stream bank erosion control along such rivers as the Pecos River in New Mexico. The plant has spread down the Pecos River into Texas and is now known to occur along the river south of Interstate 10. More recently the plant has become...

  8. Evaluating DNAPL Source and Migration Zones: M-Area Settling Basin and the Western Sector of A/M Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G.

    2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to critically evaluate previous characterization and remediation data to determine the current extent and distribution of DNAPL associated with releases at the M-Area Basin within A/M Area. The primary objective of the effort is to develop an approximate recommendation for the target treatment location and volume near the M Area Settling Basin. Through this analysis the final objective is to identify those subsurface regions having specific geometry and character necessary to cost-effectively deploy DNAPL specific remediation alternatives.

  9. Impact of Water Resource Development on Coastal Erosion, Brazos River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathewson, C. C.; Minter, L. L.

    Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis of the river...

  10. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  11. 23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER. In this paper we. Santa Oruz Rivel'. San Pedro River; Babacomari River. Salt Rive,'. . White Mountain Creek, Aqua Frio. Trapper Lctke. Eagle Riv~.". Roaring Fork. Oanon Creek. Green River. White River. Yampa River. Little

  12. Diagenesis and petrophysics of the Upper Cretaceous, Pictured Cliffs Formation of the San Juan Basin, North West New Mexico and South West Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goberdhan, Helene C

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the zone of maximum hydrocarbon production. This is the best reservoir in the Pictured Cliffs sandstones. Petrophysical rock type 3 forms a "diagenetic seal" to the north of the basin. Production "hot spots" may exists in zone 3, in sandstones with higher...

  13. Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

  14. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  15. Behaviour of lithium and its isotopes during weathering in1 the Mackenzie Basin, Canada2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Behaviour of lithium and its isotopes during weathering in1 the Mackenzie Basin, Canada2 3 Romain and lithium concentrations found in the dissolved load of the Mackenzie rivers suggests31 that precipitation fluxes in the Mackenzie River Basin.40 41 Keywords: lithium isotopes, river waters, silicate weathering

  16. Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

  17. Geodatabase of the South Texas Uranium District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Beaman; William Wade Mcgee

    Uranium and its associated trace elements and radionuclides are ubiquitous in the South Texas Tertiary environment. Surface mining of this resource from the 1960s through the early 1980s at over sixty locations has left an extensive anthropological footprint (Fig. 1) in the lower Nueces and San Antonio river basins. Reclamation of mining initiated after 1975 has been under the regulatory authority of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RCT). However, mines that were active before the Texas Surface Mining Act of 1975 was enacted, and never reclaimed, are now considered abandoned. The Abandoned Mine Land Section of the RCT is currently reclaiming these pre-regulation uranium mines with funding from the federal government. The RCT monitors the overall effectiveness of this process through post-reclamation radiation and vegetative cover surveys, water quality testing, slope stability and erosion control monitoring. Presently a number of graduate and postgraduate students are completing research on the watershed and reservoir distribution of trace elements and radionuclides downstream of the South Texas Uranium District. The question remains as to whether the elevated levels of uranium, its associated trace elements and radiation levels in the South Texas environment are due to mining

  18. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

  19. Case Studies in River Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

  20. Reduction of Risk in Exploration and Prospect Generation through a Multidisciplinary Basin-Analysis Program in the South-Central Mid-Continent Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, S.; Barker, C.; Fite, J.; George, S.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.; Jordan, J., Szpakiewicz, M.; Person, M.; Reeves, T.K.; Safley, E.; Swenson, J.B.; Volk, L.; and Erickson, R.

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report will discuss a series of regional studies that were undertaken within the South-Central Mid-Continent region of the U.S. Coverage is also provided about a series of innovative techniques that were used for this assessment.

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

  2. South Asia transboundary water quality monitoring workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betsill, Jeffrey David; Littlefield, Adriane C.; Luetters, Frederick O.; Rajen, Gaurav

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in several regions as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group made up of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States convened in Kathmandu, Nepal, from February 17-23,2002. The workshop was held to further develop the South Asia Transboundary Water Quality Monitoring (SATWQM) project. The project is sponsored in part by the CMC located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico through funding provided by the US. Department of State, Regional Environmental Affairs Office, American Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal, and the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This report summarizes the SATWQM project, the workshop objectives, process and results. The long-term interests of the participants are to develop systems for sharing regional environmental information as a means of building confidence and improving relations among South Asian countries. The more immediate interests of the group are focused on activities that foster regional sharing of water quality data in the Ganges and Indus River basins. Issues of concern to the SATWQM network participants include studying the impacts from untreated sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, salinity increases in fresh waters, the siltation and shifting of river channels, and the environmental degradation of critical habitats such as wetlands, protected forests, and endangered aquatic species conservation areas. The workshop focused on five objectives: (1) a deepened understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of additional regional and national government and non-government organizations in South Asia involved in river water quality monitoring; (3) identification of sites within the region at which water quality data are to be collected; (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process; and, (5) training of partners in the use of water quality monitoring equipment.

  3. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  4. Multiple oil families in the west Siberian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Lee, C.Y. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Kontorovich, A.Eh. [Siberian Scientific Research Institute for Geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Moldowan, J.M. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, Richmond, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two major oil families are identified in the West Siberian basin. Twenty-six of 32 analyzed oils occur in Jurassic and cretaceous reservoirs and are derived from anoxic marine Upper Jurassic Bazhenov source rock. These oils are widely distributed both north and immediately south of the Ob River, and their biomarker ratios indicate a wide range of source rock thermal maturity from early to middle oil window (Van-Egan, Russkoye, Samotlor, Sovninsko-Sovyet, Olyenye, Ozynornoye, and Kogolym), to peak oil window (Srednekhulym, Yem-Yegov, Vostochno-Surgut, Khokhryakov, Fedorov, and Urengoi), to late oil window (Salym). Some of these oils have been mildly (e.g., Fedorov 75) to heavily (e.g., Russkoye) biodegraded in the reservoir. The Bazhenov-sourced oils show different compositions that support regional variations of organic facies in the source rock. Six nonbiodegraded, highly mature oils show geochemical characteristics that suggest they were derived from clastic-rich lacustrine or nearshore marine source rocks dominated by terrigenous higher plant input like those in the Lower to Middle Jurassic Tyumen Formation, although no correlation was observed between the oils and single rock sample (Yem-Yegov 15) from the formation. The six oils occur in the Tyumen (Taitym, Geologiche, and Cheremshan) and fractured basement/Paleozoic (Gerasimov, Yagyl Yakh, and Verchnekombar) reservoirs in positions readily accessible to any oil migrating from the Tyumen source rock. For example, at the Gerasimov locations, the Tyumen Formation lies unconformably on weathered basement-Paleozoic reservoir rocks. Most of the probable Tyumen-sourced oils are from south of the Ob River, but the occurrence of Geologiche oil to the north suggests that related oils may be widespread in the basin.

  5. Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

  6. Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989 : with Listings of Historical Streamflow, Summation of Storage Change and Adjusted Streamflow : Columbia River and Coastal Basins.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of irrigation projects since the 1830's and the construction of major dams and reservoirs since the early 1900's have altered substantially the natural streamflow regimen of the Columbia River and its tributaries. As development expanded a multipurpose approach to streamflow regulation evolved to provide flood control, irrigation, hydropower generation, navigation, recreation, water quality enhancement, fish and wildlife, and instream flow maintenance. The responsible agencies use computer programs to determine the effects of various alternative system regulations. This report describes the development of the streamflow data that these computer programs use.

  7. Sedimentology of freshwater lacustrine shoreless in the Eocene Scheggs Bed of the Tipton Tongue of the Green River Formation, Sand Wash Basin, Northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper two freshwater shorelines, 40-274 ft thick, were investigated in the Scheggs Bed along Hardgrove Rim, 8 mi north of Maybell, Colorado. The rocks comprising the shorelines consist of interbedded quartzose sandstone, conglomerate, siltstone, shale, oil shale, carbonaceous shale, and coal. The shorelines are divisible into fluvial channel, mudflat, swamp, strandline, nearshore, and offshore lithofacies, which are identified by their stratigraphic positions, characteristic lithologies, and sedimentary structures. A columnar section is presented as a model for similar deposition in other members of the Green River Formation.

  8. SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

  9. Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, James Frank

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Williston Basin is located in the northern Great Plains of the United States. This area includes eastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota, and western North Dakota. The stratigraphy and geologic history of this basin are well understood...

  10. South Dakota North Platte R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Dakota Nebraska Index map North Platte R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in cooperation with the NORTH PLATTE NATURAL RESOURCES DISTRICT SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS

  11. Silurian of Illinois basin - a carbonate ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, G.W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Silurian of the Illinois basin has classically been defined as a shelf-basin sequence. According to the shelf-basin model, the Illinois basin is a deep-water basin in the extreme southern part (southern Illinois-Tennessee), with a slope in the south (Illinois-Indiana) and a shelf extending from central Illinois and Indiana northeast to the Michigan basin. Reef buildups are in a continuous trend along the shelf break. However, the author proposes that the silurian of the Illinois basin represents a carbonate ramp. The down-ramp position is located in southern Illinois and grades into deeper water environments south of Illinois. In this environment, reef buildups would form in the late Alexandrian of early St. Clair, and would begin in the down-ramp position. Therefore, using the new model, reef buildups are expected throughout the basin, rather than being confined to an imaginary shelf break. This model would facilitate exploration in southern Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky for reefal hydrocarbon deposits. A ramp model is indicated for the Illinois basin because: (1) the basin lacks a shelf-slope break; (2) the facies sequence is compatible with a ramp environment and incompatible with a shelf-slope environment; (3) discontinuous reef trends are typical of a ramp environment; and (4) facies changes and slope are gradual, extending over hundreds of miles as expected in a ramp environment. Modern carbonate models border on ocean basins. However, the Illinois basin is a cratonic basin, which may have affected the depositional environments. How much that environment differed from present-day models is unknown.

  12. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

  14. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  15. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  16. Lateral drilling and completion technologies for shallow-shelf carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin. Topical report, July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; George, R.D.; Gibbons, D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil-well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius lateral in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2,590 to 2,890 m in Richland County, MT; Bowman County, ND; and Harding County, SD. In theory, all of the horizontal drilling techniques explored in this project have merit for application fitting specific criteria. From a realistic point of view, the only relatively trouble-free, adequately-proven technology employed was the medium-radius steered motor/MWD technology. The slim-tool steered motor/MWD re-entry technology has been used extensively but appears to still be significantly in developmental stages. This technology will probably always be more troublesome than the technology used to drill new wells because the smaller diameter required for the tools contributes to both design and operational complexities. Although limited mechanical success has been achieved with some of the lateral jetting technologies and the Amoco tools, their predictability and reliability is unproven. Additionally, they appear to be limited to shallow depths and certain rock types. The Amoco technology probably has the most potential to be successfully developed for routinely reliable, field applications. A comparison of the various horizontal drilling technologies investigated is presented.

  17. Characterization of Miocene-Pliocene carbonate platforms, southern Southwest Palawan Basin, Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sta. Ana, Ma. Corazon Victor

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    in northern parts of western offshore Palawan (i.e. Northwest Palawan Basin and central South Palawan), carbonate deposition began later in the south during late middle Miocene time. Carbonate platforms of the Likas Formation developed in the Paragua sub...

  18. Geologic map of the Gulkana B-1 quadrangle, south-central Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, D.H.; Ratte, J.C.; Schmoll, H.R.; Leeman, W.P.; Smith, J.G.; Yehle, L.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quadrangle includes the Capital Mountain Volcano and the northern part of Mount Sanford Volcano in the Wrangell Mountains of south-central Alaska. The Capital Mountain volcano is a relatively small, andesitic shield volcano of Pleistocene age, which contains a 4-km-diameter summit caldera and a spectacular post-caldera radial dike swam. Lava flows from the younger Pleistocene Mount Sanford Volcano overlap the south side of the Capital Mountain Volcano. Copper-stained fractures in basaltic andesite related to a dike-filled rift of the North Sanford eruptive center are the only sign of mineralization in the quadrangle. Rock glaciers, deposits of Holocene and Pleistocene valley glaciers and Pleistocene Copper River basin glaciers mantle much of the volcanic bedrock below elevations of 5,500 ft.

  19. Interpretation of Geological Correlation Borings 1, 2, 3 in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Cumbest, R.J.; Aadland, R.K.; Syms, F.H.; Stephenson, D.E.; Sherrill, J.C.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geophysical Correlation Boring (GCB) Program was organized to provide a comprehensive correlation capability between geological core and advanced borehole geophysical data, surface high resolution reflection seismic information and, when available, borehole geochemical and cone penetrometer data. This report provides results and initial geological interpretations of borings one, two, and three (GCB-1, GCB-2, GCB-3) located within the Upper Three Runs Watershed (A/M Area) of the Savannah River Site.

  20. Baseline mapping study of the Steed Pond aquifer and vadose zone beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G. Jr.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the second phase of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this second phase is to map the structure and distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized sediment) within the vadose zone beneath A/M Area. The results presented in this report will assist future characterization and remediation activities in the vadose zone and upper aquifer zones in A/M Area.

  1. EA-1999: Proposal to Permit 750 Acres at the Savannah River Site for Use by the State of South Carolina Military Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts from a proposal by South Carolina Military Department (SCMD) to permit the use of 750 acres at SRS for military training exercises and permanent facilities to support training. This proposal, if implemented, would further the purposes of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of the Army and DOE concerning the Use of SRS Lands for Military Training Activities, signed in 2007. SCMD has requested permitting two tracts of land, one near B-Area and one west of L-Lake and north of South Carolina Route 125, to establish facilities for military training purposes. SCMD does not propose to conduct live-fire training or to use tracked vehicles at SRS.

  2. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects tributaries. Collector-gatherers (invertebrates feeding on fine particulate organic material) are the most

  3. Math 360 Sample Project: River Crossing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linner, Anders

    corresponding to the east-west difference between the entry and the exit points at the river. Assume the crossing is from north to south, so g is positive if the exit point is east of the entry point

  4. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumber ofTexas-Louisiana-

  5. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  6. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1995--June 9, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; Sippel, M.A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  7. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1994--June 9, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.; Zinke, S.; Magruder, G.; Eby, D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  8. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; Nautiyal, C.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Cores from five Red River wells in the Bowman-Harding study area have been examined and described in detail; contracts have been awarded for a 3-D survey in Bowman Co., ND and a 2D, multi-component survey in Richland Co.; extended-time pressure buildup data have been analyzed from two wells which are candidates for jetting-lance completion workovers; a 20-day injectivity test has been completed in the Red River (upper member); a jetting-lance completion program has commenced with one job completed and three more scheduled during April; and reservoir data from three key Red River fields in the Bowman-Harding study area has been researched and accumulated for inclusion in the TORIS database and technology transfer activities.

  9. EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

  10. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and will assure that the Northwest power supply remains efficient, clean, reliable, and a model of regional Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency of the Pacific Northwest October 1, 2009 ­ September 30, 2010 Northwest Power Conservation Council and #12

  11. Key Performance Indicators of River Basin Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    frequently has faculty from universities spending time in residence at the Institute. Both IWR and the Corps benefit from such faculty engaging in ongoing water resources studies and research on a reimbursable basis such as analyzing the linkages between water resources development and water resources problems (e.g. drought

  12. 2011 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity from 31 federal hydropower dams and one non-federal nuclear power plant in the Pacific Northwest (debt-funded) in facilities and some land purchases 2. Reimbursements to other federal agencies tO thE NORthWESt GOvERNORS > FIsh & WIlDlIFE ExPEnDItuREs Background The Pacific Northwest Electric Power

  13. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will depend on demonstrated effectiveness. Sincerely, Bruce Measure, Chair Northwest Power Conservation Council and Bruce A. Measure Chair Montana Rhonda Whiting Montana W. Bill Booth Idaho James A. Yost Idaho Forum Develops Guidelines for Efficiency Savings and Verification 14 First-Ever Regional Standards

  14. Fall Chinook Salmon Survival and Supplementation Studies in the Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Connor, William P.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nez Perce Tribe completed the third year of research to investigate migrational characteristics of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin.

  15. Evolution of extensional basins and basin and range topography west of Death Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, K. V.; McKenna, L. W.; Stock, J.; Knapp, J.; Page, L.; Sternlof, K.; Silverberg, D.; Wust, G.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECTONICS, VOL. 8, NO. 3, PAGES 453-467, JUNE 1989 EVOLUTION OF EXTENSIONAL BASINS AND BASIN AND RANGE TOPOGRAPHY WEST OF DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA K.V. Hodges, L.W. McKenna, J. Stock , J. Knapp, L. Page, K. Sternlof, D. Silverberg, G. Wrist 2... of the extensional riders in this area indicates that the sole fault dips less than 15øNW beneath the Nova Formation [Hodges et al., 1989]. Detailed mapping of the structurally lowest portions of the Nova Basin south of Panamint Butte (Figure 2; K.V. Hodges...

  16. Regional tectonics, differential subsidence, and sediment dispersal patterns: implications for sediment flux to the southern South China Sea and regional filling of sedimentary Basins during Pliocene to the Recent time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Mychal Roland

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sediments that bypass the Malay and West Natuna basins. Local basement highs such as the Natuna Arch, Khorat Platform, and Con Son High were sediment sources while they were emergent during eustatic lowstands, especially during Paleogene time, when...

  17. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Return to Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts from development of the river's hydroelectric potential. The most recent fishery recovery program from the Columbia River hydroelectric system, contained important provisions regarding mitigation for the impacts of hydroelectric development on fish and wildlife in the basin. The act authorized the states of M

  18. New South Wales New South Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    ; ¡ ¦ ¥ ¥© £ ¡ £ §£ ¡ ¢¢ © £ § ¦ £© ¤§ ¢ ¥ ¢ ¥ ¥ ¢ Western Australia Northern Territory South Australia Queensland New South Wales Victoria Tasmania; ¡ ¦ ¥ ¥© £ ¡ £ §£ ¡ ¢¢ © £ § ¦ £© ¤§ ¢ ¥ ¢ ¥ ¥ ¢ Western Australia Northern Territory South Australia Queensland New South Wales Victoria Tasmania 7

  19. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 55085521 Air quality impacts of distributed power generation in the South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the South Coast Air Basin of California 1: Scenario development and modeling analysis M.A. Rodriguez, M scenarios of DG implementation in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) of California. Realistic scenarios reflect an anticipated level of DG deployment in the SoCAB by the year 2010. Spanning scenarios

  20. Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

  1. History of Artificial Propagation of Coho Salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in the Mid-Columbia River System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History of Artificial Propagation of Coho Salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in the Mid-Columbia River System ROY J. WAHLE and ROGER E. PEARSON Figure I. - Middle and upper portion of the Columbia River Basin, artificial propagation was attempted. The first hatcheries in the mid- Columbia section (Fig. 1) of the river

  2. Preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Silurian and Devonian carbonate aquifer system in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer and confining units have been identified; data on the thickness, extent, and structural configuration of these units have been collected; and thickness and structure-contour maps have been generated. Hydrologic information for the confining units and the aquifer also has been compiled. Where present, the confining unit that caps the carbonate aquifer consists of shales of Middle and Upper Devonian age and Lower Mississippian age, however, these units have been eroded from a large part of the study area. The regional carbonate aquifer consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones and dolomites. The rocks that comprise the aquifer in Indiana and northwestern Illinois are grouped into four major stratigraphic units: Brassfield and Sexton Creek Limestones or the Cataract Formation, the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, and the Detroit River and Traverse Formations or the Muscatatuck Group. In Ohio and southern Michigan the aquifer is grouped into ten stratigraphic units: Brassfield Limestone and Cataract Formation, the Dayton Limestone, the Rochester Shale equivalent, the Lockport Dolomite, the Salina Formation, the Hillsboro Sandstone, the Detroit River Group, the Columbus Limestone, the Delaware Limestone, and the Traverse Formation. The thickness of the carbonate aquifer increases from the contact with the outcropping Ordovician shales in the south-central part of the study area from the contact into the Appalachian Foreland Structural Basin from 0 ft at the contact to more than 700 ft at the eastern boundary of the study area, to more than 1,000 ft beneath Lake Erie and greater than 1,200 ft in southeastern Michigan. At the edge of the Michigan Intercontinental Structural Basin in western Ohio and eastern Indiana, the thickness ranges from 700 to 900 ft. and from 200 ft to 300 ft in south-central Indiana along the northeastern edge of the Illinois Intercontinental Structural Basin.

  3. Organochlorine pollutants in water, soils, and earthworms in the Guadalquivir River, Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, L.M.; Fernandez, M.A.; Gonzalez, M.J. (Institute of Organic Chemistry, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organochlorine compounds (insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls) are known to maintain their stability in the aquatic environment for long periods. DDT and cyclodiene insecticides were used widely in Spain until their use was banned in 1976; DDT and its degradation products are still found in environmental samples. Since DDT has been legally restricted for use, lindane has become important as a substitute for DDT. This study has been carried out along Guadalquivir River, Spain. This river runs across an agricultural area where pesticides are used extensively. The Guadalquivir basin is the most economically important area of the South of the Iberian Peninsula; its economic importance stems from its proximity to a major metropolitan areas (Cordova, Seville), which indicates the presence of numerous urban, commercial, and industrial locations in the vicinity of the sampling stations. The purposes of this investigation are: (1) to determine the levels of organochlorine compounds in water, soils, and earthworms sampled in ten stations of the Guadalquivir River; (2) to evaluate biological accumulation of pollutants studied within the food webs; (3) to evaluate regional patterns and time trends of residues. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  5. Impact assessment of hydroclimatic change on water stress in the Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasheed, Bilhuda

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety percent of Pakistan's agricultural output is produced in fields irrigated by the Indus basin irrigation system, the world's largest network of canals, dams, barrages and tubewells. River flows, primarily fed by snow ...

  6. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, and methods for improved completion efficiency. The investigations and demonstrations were focussed on Red River and Ratcliffe reservoirs in the Williston Basin within portions of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Both of these formations have been successfully explored with conventional 2-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) seismic was investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterizations were integrated with geological and engineering studies. The project tested lateral completion techniques, including high-pressure jetting lance technology and short-radius lateral drilling to enhance completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary oil where low permeability is a problem and higher-density drilling of vertical infill wells is limited by drilling cost. New vertical wells were drilled to test bypassed oil in ares that were identified by 3D seismic. These new wells are expected to recover as much or greater oil than was produced by nearby old wells. The project tested water injection through vertical and horizontal wells in reservoirs where application of waterflooding has been limited. A horizontal well was drilled for testing water injection. Injection rates were tested at three times that of a vertical well. This demonstration well shows that water injection with horizontal completions can improve injection rates for economic waterflooding. This report is divided into two sections, part 1 covers the Red River and part 2 covers the Ratcliffe. Each part summarizes integrated reservoir characterizations and outlines methods for targeting by-passed oil reserves in the respective formation and locality.

  7. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  8. Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

  9. Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadler, W.R.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

  10. Intrashelf basins: A geologic model for source-bed and reservoir facies deposition within carbonate shelves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G. Jr. (Sauid Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrashelf basins (moats, inshore basins, shelf basins, differentiated shelf, and deep-water lagoons of others) are depressions of varying sizes and shapes that occur within tectonically passive and regionally extensive carbonate shelves. Intrashelf basins grade laterally and downdip (seaward) into shallow-water carbonates of the regional shelf, are separated from the open marine basin by the shelf margin, and are largely filled by fine-grained subtidal sediments having attributes of shallow- and deeper water sedimentation. These basins are commonly fringed or overlain by carbonate sands, reefs, or buildups. These facies may mimic those that occur along the regional shelf margin, and they can have trends that are at a high angle to that of the regional shelf. Intrashelf basins are not intracratonic basins. The history of most intrashelf basins is a few million to a few tens of million of years. Examples of intrashelf basins are known throughout the Phanerozoic; the southern portion of the Holocene Belize shelf is a modern example of an intrashelf basin. Two types of intrashelf basins are recognized. Coastal basins pass updip into coastal clastics of the craton with the basin primarily filled by fine clastics. Shelf basins occur on the outer part of the shelf, are surrounded by shallow-water carbonate facies, and are filled by peloidal lime mud, pelagics, and argillaceous carbonates. Intrashelf basins are commonly the site of organic-rich, source-bed deposition, resulting in the close proximity of source beds and reservoir facies that may fringe or overlie the basin. Examples of hydrocarbon-charged reservoirs that were sourced by an intrashelf basin include the Miocene Bombay High field, offshore India; the giant Jurassic (Arab-D) and Cretaceous (Shuaiba) reservoirs of the Arabian Shelf; the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland trend, South Florida basin; and the Permian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs surrounding the Tatum basin in southeastern New Mexico.

  11. Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yamin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for basinward extension of Travis Peak gas production along the west margin of the East Texas Basin. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, southeast-trending Travis Peak sandstones belts were deposited by the Ancestral Red River fluvial-deltaic system...

  12. Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

  13. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  14. Submarine geomorphology and sedimentation patterns of the Gyre Intraslope Basin, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lester Badder

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    portions of the basin. The presence of high percentages of sand size quartz grains, rock fragments, displaced benthonic foraminifers and shallow water mollusc shells indicate that Pleistocene sediments from the basin margins have been carried... into the basin via slumping and possibly sediment gravity flow mechanism. Heavy mineral identification indicate" that the source of sand size sediment during Late Pleistocene was from the Rio Grande and Mississippi Rivers and there was very little, if any...

  15. anapodaris gorge south: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  16. area south eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  17. area south china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. South Platte R. Dismal R. Platte R. Study area 0 0 1 KILOMETER 1 MILE Scotts Bluff County Tri-St ate Canal Mitchell Canal North Platte River Enterprise 2002 Prepared in...

  18. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  19. Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

  20. SOUTH FORK CLEARWATER RIVER HABITAT ENHANCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Everson, Project Manager U. S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish

  1. Where is the North ChinaSouth China block boundary in eastern China?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Where is the North China­South China block boundary in eastern China? Michel Faure, Wei Lin of the North China and South China blocks. The eastern extension of the belt (the Sulu area) consists and the lack of ocean-basin rock shows that the boundary between the North China block and South China block

  2. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    in the South Fork American River, California Sarah A. Cocherell & Gardner J. Jones & Javier B. Miranda & Dennis to frequent pulsed releases of water in the South Fork American River (California) from July to October 2005 and migration, and that telemetry is a tool that allows integration across disciplines and between

  3. Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

  4. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

  5. The ending of an era: After more than 10 years, the Rio Grande Basin Initiative concludes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    available for the people of the basin, Lacewell said. In addition, desalination use in South Texas has grown and become competitive with municipal water production. Project sponsor NIFA o#17;en uses data produced through RGBI because it is broad..., the Rio Grande Basin Initiative concludes Summer 2013 tx H2O 9 Scientists with the Rio Grande Basin Initiative used aquatic weed control methods and herbicides to control invasive water plants such as water hyacinth, pictured. Photo by Danielle...

  6. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  7. Fates of Eroded Soil Organic Carbon: Mississippi Basin Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. V.; Sleezer, R. O.; Renwick, W. H.; Buddemeier, Robert W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a mass balance analysis of organic carbon (OC) across the five major river subsystems of the Mississippi (MS) Basin (an area of 3.2 3 106 km2). This largely agricultural landscape undergoes a bulk soil erosion rate of ;480 t·km22...

  8. Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

  9. Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication details the results of a survey of elected city officials and water managers in the Rio Grande River Basin of Texas and New Mexico. The participants ranked water conservation strategies for their communities....

  10. Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

    Effective management of the highly variable water resources of a river basin requires an understanding of the amount of suitable quality water that can be provided under various conditions within institutional constraints. Although much research has...

  11. A Publication of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory National Environmental Research Park Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    A Publication of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory National Environmental Research Park Program of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program SRO-NERP-28 2005 Prepared under the auspices of The University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P.O. Drawer E Aiken, South Carolina

  12. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  13. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstrand, P.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  14. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  15. Livingston Campus North and South Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston Campus North and South Tower General Instructions: · Print directions and name.7 miles). Continue on Route 18 North. · Follow the signs for Towers move in. From Garden State Parkway the Raritan River (approximately 3.7 miles). Continue on Route 18 North. · Follow the signs for Towers move in

  16. Evolutionary sequences and hydrocarbon potential of Kenya sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cregg, A.K. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Carrollton, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kenya basins have evolved primarily through extension related to episodic continental rifting. In eastern Kenya, thick accumulations of sediments formed within grabens during the prerift phase (Precambrian to Carboniferous) of the Gondwana breakup. Synrift sedimentation (Late Carboniferous to Middle Jurassic) occurred within a north-south rift system, which included the Mandera basin, South Anza basin, and Lamu embayment. During the Early Jurassic, a marine transgression invaded the margins of the eastern Kenya rift basins, resulting in the deposition of platform carbonates and shales. A Callovian-aged salt basin formed in the offshore regions of the Lamu embayment. Intermittent tectonic activity and eustatic sea-level changes controlled sedimentation, which produced marine shales, carbonates or evaporites, and fluvio-deltaic to lacustrine sandstones. From the Early Cretaceous to recent, continental sediments were deposited within the North Anza and Turkana basins. These fluvial-lacustrine sediments are similar to the Lower Cretaceous sequences that have produced oil in the Mesozoic Sudanese Abu Gabra rift. Although exploration activities began in the early 1950s, significant occurrences of potential reservoir, source, and seal lithologies as well as trapping configurations remain in many areas. Favorable structures and sequences of reservoir sandstones and carbonates overlain by potentially sealing lacustrine or marine shales, evaporites, or volcanics have been noted. Potential source beds are believed to be present within shales of the lacustrine or marine depositional environments.

  17. Climatic implications of correlated upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits on the Cinca and Gallego rivers, NE Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Claudia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcdonald, Eric [NON LANL; Sancho, Carlos [NON LANL; Pena, Jose- Luis [NON LANL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We correlate Upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits of the Cinca and Gallego River valleys (south central Pyrenees and Ebro basin, Spain) using geomorphic position, luminescence dates, and time-related trends in soil development. The ages obtained from glacial deposits indicate glacial periods at 85 {+-} 5 ka, 64 {+-} 11 ka, and 36 {+-} 3 ka (from glacial till) and 20 {+-} 3 ka (from loess). The fluvial drainage system, fed by glaciers in the headwaters, developed extensive terrace systems in the Cinca River valley at 178 {+-} 21 ka, 97 {+-} 16 ka, 61 {+-} 4 ka, 47 {+-} 4 ka, and 11 {+-} 1 ka, and in the Gallego River valley at 151 {+-} 11 ka, 68 {+-} 7 ka, and 45 {+-} 3 ka. The times of maximum geomorphic activity related to cold phases coincide with Late Pleistocene marine isotope stages and heinrich events. The maximum extent of glaciers during the last glacial occurred at 64 {+-} 11 ka, and the terraces correlated with this glacial phase are the most extensive in both the Cinca (61 {+-} 4 ka) and Gallego (68 {+-} 7 ka) valleys, indicating a strong increase in fluvial discharge and availability of sediments related to the transition to deglaciation. The global Last Glacial Maximum is scarcely represented in the south central Pyrenees owing to dominantly dry conditions at that time. Precipitation must be controlled by the position of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation system. The glacial systems and the associated fluvial dynamic seem sensitive to (1) global climate changes controlled by insolation, (2) North Atlantic thermohaline circulation influenced by freshwater pulses into the North Atlantic, and (3) anomalies in atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic controlling precipitation on the Iberian peninsula. The model of glacial and fluvial evolution during the Late Pleistocene in northern Spain could be extrapolated to other glaciated mountainous areas in southern Europe.

  18. Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual ?ow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak ?ood waters, that ?ow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, of?cials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the ?ooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

  19. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  20. Structure and stratigraphy of Dungeness Arch, and western Malvinas basin, offshore Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalkan, Fercan Engin

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To the south-east, the basin connects with the Malvinas Basin (Natland, 1974) (figure 4). Basement rocks crop out along the present edge of the Magallanes Basin in small areas on the western Deseado massif, and along a discontinuous belt in the Patagonian... Andes and coastal Chile. Basement also hss encountered in a few wells in the basin (Lesta and Ferello, 1972; Natland, 1974). Most known basement rocks are lower to middle greenschist-grade slates. phyllites, mica schists, and metacherts derived from...

  1. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

  2. On-line river flow forecasting with `Hydromax' : successes and challenges after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    frequent on-line field measurements of rainfall depths in raingauges, weather radar data, wa- ter levels in 88 automatic telemetered rain- gauges and two weather radars. Preprints of the 15th IFAC Symposium BOCQ EAU D'HEURE Rain Gauges River flow meas. stations MEUSE M EUSE Fig. 1. The Meuse river basin

  3. ARCHAEOLOGY, LATE-QUATERNARY LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE UPPER DRIFTWOOD CREEK BASIN, BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Nicholas Victor

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on valley fills in the upper Driftwood Creek basin, a 3rd order drainage network in south-central Kansas to determine the geologic potential for stratified cultural material and to reconstruct a record of Late...

  4. Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite altimeter data and modeled discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite for 21 ``virtual gauge stations'' located at the upper Negro River (Amazon Basin, Brazil). A virtual station can be defined as any crossing of water body surface (i.e., large rivers) by radar altimeter

  5. A Serenitatis origin for the Imbrian grooves and South Pole-Aitken thorium anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    1 A Serenitatis origin for the Imbrian grooves and South Pole-Aitken thorium anomaly Mark A) basin contains a high abundance of thorium and a unique Imbrian aged geomorphologic unit that consists are almost antipodal to the Imbrium basin, where high-thorium ejecta and seismic energy are expected to have

  6. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  7. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River, Annual Report 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Connor, William P.; Burge, Howard L.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted primarily in 1997 and 1998. This report communicates significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

  8. Development of a HEC-HMS model to inform river gauge placement for a flood early warning system in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaatz, Joel Alan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Communities in the downstream region of the Manafwa River Basin in eastern Uganda experience floods caused by heavy precipitation upstream. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has partnered with the Red Cross ...

  9. Spatial and temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the Fraser River, Canada : a coupled organic-inorganic perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voss, Britta Marie

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The great geologic and climatic diversity of the Fraser River basin in southwestern Canada render it an excellent location for understanding biogeochemical cycling of sediments and terrigenous organic carbon in a relatively ...

  10. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  11. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  12. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  13. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  14. Coastal and Lower Elwha River, Washington, Prior to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Puget Sound, a large fjord-estuary in northwestern Washington State. The more than 3,000 km of Puget, and deltas. Puget Sound and the Georgia Basin are part of the Salish Sea (fig. 1.1), which is fed by rivers impacts, Puget Sound is home to a diverse array of biological communities and charismatic species

  15. Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

  16. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Clay

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  17. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  18. Red River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

  19. Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1998-2002 Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and shows how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. This chapter also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Umatilla River Basin. (Figure 1-1, Tables 1-1 and 1-2). Data and reports from this and previous efforts are available on the CTUIR website http://www.umatilla.nsn.us. This project was one of several subprojects of the Umatilla River Basin Fisheries Restoration Master Plan (CTUIR 1984, ODFW 1986) orchestrated to rehabilitate salmon and steelhead runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Subprojects in additions to this project include: Watershed Enhancement and Rehabilitation; Hatchery Construction and Operation; Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation; Satellite Facility Construction and Operations for Juvenile Acclimation and Adult Holding and Spawning; Fish Passage Construction and Operation; Juvenile and Adult Passage Facility Evaluations; Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, and Flow Augmentation to Increase Stream Flows below Irrigation Diversions.

  20. A comparison of single-suture and double-suture incision closures in seaward-migrating juvenile Chinook salmon implanted with acoustic transmitters: implications for research in river basins containing hydropower structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Cook, Katrina V.; Eppard, M. B.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the ability to make shorter incisions that may warrant using only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known if one suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed, particularly when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site such as when migrating fish experience pressure changes associated with passage at hydroelectric dams. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Juvenile Chinook salmon were surgically implanted with a 2012 Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitter (0.30 g) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g) and incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. Mortality and tag retention were monitored and fish were examined after 7 and 14 days to evaluate tissue responses. In a separate experiment, surgically implanted fish were exposed to simulated turbine passage and then examined for expulsion of transmitters, expulsion of viscera through the incision, and mortal injury. With incisions closed using a single suture, there was no mortality or tag loss and similar or reduced tissue reaction compared to incisions closed with two sutures. Further, surgery time was significantly reduced when one suture was used, which leads to less handling and reduced stress. No tags were expelled during pressure scenarios and expulsion of viscera only occurred in two non-mortally injured fish (5%) with single sutures that were also exposed to very high pressure changes. No viscera expulsion was present in fish exposed to pressure scenarios likely representative of hydroturbine passage at many Columbia River dams (e.g. <2.7 ratio of pressure change; an acclimation pressure of 146.2 absolute kpa and a lowest exposure pressure of ~ 53.3 absolute kpa). Based on these results, we recommend the use of a single suture for surgical implantation of transmitters with incisions that are approximately 5 1/2 mm long after tag insertion.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Groundwater Arsenic in South and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    in rural areas throughout the major river basins draining the Himalayas have become the main source. Arsenic enters groundwater naturally from rocks and sediment by coupled biogeochemical and hydrologic population exposed to unsafe As levels by drinking untreated groundwater in India, China, Myanmar, Pakistan

  2. Petroleum geology of Benue trough and southeastern Chad basin, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petters, S.W.; Ekweozor, C.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cretaceous cyclic sedimentation in the southern Benue trough, together with unconformities, provide a tripartite subdivision of the sedimentary succession into (1) the Albian Asu River Group, (2) the late Cenomanian to early Santonian Cross River Group (new name) and interfingering marginal marine sandstones, and (3) the post-Santonian coal measures sequence. Most of the Albian to Eocene marine shales in the Benue trough and the Turonian shales in the southern Chad basin contain well over 0.5% total organic carbon, with values of up to 7.4% in Turonian anaerobic shales. Based on the high content of soluble organic matter, thermal maturity, and the predominantly terrigenous character of the Late Cretaceous shales, mostly natural gas was probably generated in both basins. The late Santonian folding and uplift would have disrupted petroleum reservoirs. Also, crude oil accumulations which were not dissipated by tectonism would be relocated at relatively shallow depths and hence become accessible to invading meteoric waters.

  3. Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

  4. Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

  5. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume I, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Sockeye Salmon Summaries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to identify and characterize the wild and hatchery stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River Basin on the basis of currently available information. This report provides a comprehensive compilation of data on the status and life histories of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

  6. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiman, W.D.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration activity in South America, Central America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986 was considerably reduced compared to 1985. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Venezuela had increased oil production, with Colombia showing a dramatic 71% increase attributed mainly to bringing on-stream the pipeline connecting Occidental-Shell-Ecopetrol's Cano Limon complex to the port of Covenas. Significant discoveries were reported from Argentina in the Olmedo, Oran, and San Jorge basins; Brazil in the offshore Campos and Amazon basins; Colombia in the Llanos basin; Ecuador in the Oriente basin; Mexico in the Bay of Campeche; Peru in the Ucayali basin; and Venezuela in the Eastern Venezuela basin. Eastern Venezuela's Furrial discovery is reported to have recoverable reserves of more than 1 million bbl of oil, and Shell's Ucayali basin discovery is reported to hold more than 7 tcf of gas. 7 figures, 10 tables.

  7. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

  8. Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1992-1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project from September 30, 1992 to September 29, 1993. Examinations of historical flow and water temperature records and current physical habitat, indicate that the streams in the Umatilla River Basin vary in condition from extremely poor to good. Reduced flows and high water temperatures prevented salmonid production in the lower Umatilla River below river mile 75 during the summer and early fall. This was also true in the lower reaches of many tributaries. Isolated springs provided limited refuges in the mid Umatilla River and lower Meacham Creek. Suitable habitat for salmonids was found in the upper reaches of the mainstem and tributaries.

  9. South Vienna Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiverToms River,South

  10. Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – For more than two decades, Shelly Wilson has been working with the Savannah River Site (SRS) as an employee of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)....

  11. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  12. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  13. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  14. Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, R. A.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

  15. Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  16. Reservoir description of low resistivity sandstones in the Mugrosa Formation (Oligocene) of Gala-Llanito Fields, Colombia, South America 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal Guerrero, Maria Cristina

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gala-Llanito oil fields are located in the Middle Magdalena Valley Basin in northern Colombia, South America. These fields are operated by Empresa Colombiana de Petroleos (ECOPETROL) which is the oil national company. ...

  17. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho: Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult Pacific lamprey counted passing Ice Harbor Dam fishway averaged 18,158 during 1962-69 and 361 during 1993-2000. Human resource manipulations in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 120 years, likely impacting the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Timber harvest, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile and larval lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass/collection systems, and over spillway structures at the four lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities have impacted Pacific lamprey populations to an unknown degree. The Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, restricted chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha passage in the 1927-1940 period, altering the migration route of outmigrating Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae and upstream adult migrants (1927-1972). Dworshak Dam, completed in 1972, eliminated Pacific lamprey spawning and rearing in the North Fork Clearwater River drainage. Construction of the Harpster hydroelectric dam on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed fish passage 1949-1963. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2001. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork Clearwater River drainage. Forty-three sites in Red River, South Fork Clearwater River, and their tributaries were electrofished in 2001. Sampling yielded a total of 442 juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey. Findings indicate Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae are not numerous or widely distributed. Pacific lamprey distribution in the South Fork of the Clearwater River drainage was confined to lower reaches of Red River and the South Fork Clearwater River.

  18. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  19. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  20. Inland out: Midwestern river coal transloaders deal with increased pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As greater amounts of US western coal is burned by many eastern and south-eastern power plants located along the Ohio River and its tributaries, Midwestern coal transload facilities are playing an ever growing role in the nation's coal transportation system by moving traffic off clogged rail lines onto barges on inland rivers. The article describes operations by three mid-western ports - American Electric Power's (AEP) Cook Terminal in Metropolis, IL; Kinder-Morgan's Cora Terminal in Cora, IL; and Kinder-Morgan's Grand Rivers Terminal near Paducah, KY. Together these terminals transferred more than 30 m tons onto barges in 2006. 5 figs.

  1. Santa Barbara and Ventura basins: Tectonics, structure, sedimentation, oilfields along an east-west transect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, A.G.; Brown, G.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Santa Barbara and Ventura basins are tectonically active and are economically important because millions of barrels of oil were produced there since the 1800s. This guidebook focuses on structural and sedimentological aspects of two main structural tends in the basin: the Rincon-Ventura anticlinorium, and the Oakridge-South Mountain uplift. Section One of the publication is a roadlog which summarizes geologic features. Section Two focuses on the sedimentation of the principal reservoirs and source rocks in the main oil fields in the two basins. Section Three presents four original papers on the oil fields and tectonic evolution of the area.

  2. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTENSIVELY MANAGED FORESTS TO THE SUSTAINABILITY OF WILDLIFE COMMUNITIES IN THE SOUTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Mike

    Sciences, 11 West Jones Street, Raleigh, NC 27601-1029 (JAG); Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken University, Box 8002, Raleigh, NC, 27695-8002 (RAL); Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken, SC, 29802 to sustaining wildlife communities in the South. National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, Inc., PO Box

  3. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, M.A. (Conoco, Cairo (Egypt))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recent well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.

  4. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  5. Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a 23 February 2012 Keywords: XRD Clay mineralogy Monsoon Himalaya Indus Delta Floodplain Fluvial processes Large rivers We employed X-ray diffraction methods to quantify clay mineral assemblages

  6. Glacial geology of the West Tensleep Drainage Basin, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burggraf, G.B.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The glacial deposits of the West Tensleep Basin in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming are mapped and a relative chromology established. The deposits are correlated with the regional model as defined in the Wind River Mountains. A statistical analysis is performed on the density and weathering characteristics of the surficial boulders to determine their validity as indicators of relative age. (ACR)

  7. Geochemical anomalies in the surface media over the Phoenix Deposit, Athabasca Basin Ressources naturelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    naturelles Canada Natural Resources Canada Targeted Geoscience Initiative 4: Increasing Deep Exploration River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium deposit, is situated near the southeastern rim of the Eastern Athabasca Basin: Implications for Uranium Drift Prospecting. Written communication. Gamelin, C

  8. Macroscale water fluxes 1. Quantifying errors in the estimation of basin mean precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October 2002. [1] Developments in analysis and modeling of continental water and energy balances of gauges therein. Neither index requires restrictive statistical assumptions (such as spatial homogeneity (median area of 51,000 km2 ) river basins of the world for which contemporaneous, continuous (missing

  9. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  10. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  11. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  12. Utilizing Divers in Support of Spent Fuel Basin Closure Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen Nellesen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of nuclear facilities in the world are aging and with this comes the fact that we have to either keep repairing them or decommission them. At the Department of Energy Idaho Site (DOEID) there are a number of facilities that are being decommissioned, but the facilities that pose the highest risk to the large aquifer that flows under the site are given highest priorities. Aging spent nuclear fuel pools at DOE-ID are among the facilities that pose the highest risk, therefore four pools were targeted for decommissioning in Fiscal Year 2004. To accomplish this task the Idaho Completion Project (ICP) of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, put together an integrated Basin Closure Subproject team. The team was assigned a goal to look beyond traditional practices at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to find ways to get the basin closure work done safer and more efficiently. The Idaho Completion Project (ICP) was faced with a major challenge – cleaning and preparing aging spent nuclear fuel basins for closure by removing sludge and debris, as necessary, and removing water to eliminate a potential risk to the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The project included cleaning and removing water from four basins. Two of the main challenges to a project like this is the risk of contamination from the basin walls and floors becoming airborne as the water is removed and keeping personnel exposures ALARA. ICP’s baseline plan had workers standing at the edges of the basins and on rafts or bridge cranes and then using long-handled tools to manually scrub the walls of basin surfaces. This plan had significant risk of skin contamination events, workers falling into the water, or workers sustaining injuries from the awkward working position. Analysis of the safety and radiation dose risks presented by this approach drove the team to look for smarter ways to get the work done.

  13. Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South sluice gate operations affect the 45-km reach of the Hwang River between the Hapcheon Reregulation Dam

  14. Big Stick/Four Eyes fields: structural, stratigraphic, and hydrodynamic trapping within Mission Canyon Formation, Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breig, J.J.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Mission Canyon formation of the Williston basin is the region's most prolific oil producing horizon. Big Stick/Four Eyes is among the most prolific of the Mission Canyon fields. Primary production from 87 wells is projected to reach 47 million bbl of oil. An additional 10-20 million bbl may be recovered through waterflooding. The complex was discovered in 1977 by the Tenneco 1-29 BN, a wildcat with primary objectives in the Devonian Duperow and Ordovician Red River Formations. A series of Mission Canyon discoveries followed in the Big Stick, Treetop, T-R, and Mystery Creek fields. Early pressure studies showed that these fields were part of an extensive common reservoir covering 44.75 mi/sup 2/ (115.91 km/sup 2/). The reservoir matrix is formed from restricted marine dolostones deposited on a low-relief ramp. Landward are algal-laminated peritidal limestones and saline and supratidal evaporites of a sabkhalike shoreline system. Open-marine limestones, rich in crinoids, brachiopods, and corals, mark the seaward limit of reservoir facies. Regressive deposition placed a blanket of anhydrite over the carbonate sequence providing a seal for the reservoir. Lateral trapping is accomplished through a combination of processes. Upper reservoir zones form belts of porosity that parallel the northeasterly trending shoreline. The trend is cut by the northward plunging Billings anticline, which provides structural closure to the north. Facies changes pinch out porosity to the south and east. Trapping along depositional strike to the southwest is only partially controlled by stratigraphic or structural factors. A gentle tilt of 25 ft per mi (5 m per km) occurs in the oil-water contact to the east-northeast, due to freshwater influx from Mississippian outcrop on the southern and southwestern basin margins.

  15. Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. ameca river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Conservation Council was established pursuant to the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (Public Law First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6...

  17. Chlorinated Compounds in Wildlife from the Fraser River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1993, on a dosé les hydrocarbures chlorés (dichlorodiphényltrichloroéthane, DDT; biphényles polychlorés Fraser. Les hydrocarbures chlorés les plus communs décelés dans les échantillons fauniques de ce bassin hydrocarbures chlorés. Depuis la mise en oeuvre de cett

  18. Cape Fear River Basin Action Plan for Migratory Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    those built to produce hydroelectric power and store drinking water, which block fish from returning

  19. Lower Cape Fear River Basin Cape Fear DO Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    Water Quality Goal Neuse Estuary Eutrophication Model #12;Neuse and Cape Fear Models are "Mass Balance Anoxic Bottom Waters #12;Model Developed for Nutrient TMDL NEEM = Neuse Estuary Eutrophication Model #12

  20. Enhancing Sustainability in River Basin Management through Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Scozzafava3 and Joon-Hee Lee4 1 Center for Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Delaware 2 in China, to the often small and forgotten relics from times gone by that are broken dams blocking fish that provides for livelihoods and food, for recreation, and for distribution amongst people of varying political