Sample records for river basin alabama

  1. Geology of Alabama's Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Holmes, J.W.; Shepard, B.K.

    1983-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama continues to be an exciting area for oil and gas exploration. Several potential pay zones and a variety of petroleum traps in the basin resulted in a large number of successful test wells, helping to make the basin one of the more attractive areas for continued exploration in the US. The Upper Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin are the primary exploration targets, with the Carter and Lewis sandstones being the most prolific producers. These sanstones exhibit considerable lateral and vertical variability and no apparent regional trends for porosity and permeability development. Determining the depositional environments of the Carter and Lewis sandstones should enhance petroleum exploration in the basin by helping to identify reservoir geometry, areal extent, and quality. To date, the Carter sandstones has produced more than 700,000 bbl of oil and 100 billion CR of gas; the Lewis sandstone, over 5000 bbl of oil and 12 billion CF of gas.

  2. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  3. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  4. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  5. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  6. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  7. Hydrologic assessment, Eastern Coal Province, Area 23, Alabama: Black Warrior River; Buttahatchee River; Cahaba River; Sipsey River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, J.R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area 23 is located at the southern end of the Eastern Coal Province, in the Mobile River basin, includes the Warrior, Cahaba, and edges of the Plateau coal fields in Alabama, and covers an area of 4716 square miles. This report is designed to be useful to mine owners and operators and consulting engineers by presenting information about existing hydrologic conditions and identification of sources of hydrologic information. General hydrologic information is presented in a brief text and illustrations on a single water-resources related topic. Area 23 is underlain by the Coker and Pottsville Formations and the pre-Pennsylvanian rocks. Area 23 has a moist temperate climate with an annual average rainfall of 54 inches and the majority of the area is covered by forest. The soils have a high erosion potential when the vegetative cover is removed. Use of water is primarily from surface-water sources as ground-water supplies generally are not sufficient for public supplies. The US Geological Survey operates a network of hydrologic data collection stations to monitor the streamflow and ground-water conditions. This network includes data for 180 surface-water stations and 49 ground-water observation wells. These data include rate of flow, water levels, and water-quality parameters. Hydrologic problems relating to surface mining are (1) erosion and sedimentation, (2) decline in ground-water levels, and (3) degradation of water quality. Decline in ground-water levels can occur in and near surface-mining areas when excavation extends below the static water level in the aquifer. This can cause nearby wells and springs to go dry. Acid mine drainage is a problem only adjacent to the mined area.

  8. Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Ting

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector...

  9. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  10. Annotated bibliography of the Black Warrior basin area, northern Alabama - northern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 1964 records related to the geology of the Black Warrior basin of northern Alabama and northern Mississippi. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; bauxite; iron ores; geologic correlations; earthquakes; fossils; gold deposits; geological surveys; hydrology; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (54) are themselves bibliographies.

  11. North Blowhorn Creek oil field - a stratigraphic trap in Black Warrior basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.; Reeves, P.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama contains shallow oil and gas prospects. To date more than 1000 wells have been drilled in the region and more than 90 petroleum fields and pools have been discovered. Mississippian sandstone reservoirs are the most productive horizons for hydrocarbons in the basin, and the Carter sandstone is the most prolific. Identification of stratigraphic traps will enhance petroleum exploration by delineating sand body geometry. Definition reservoir thickness and extent is critical for identifying successful prospects. The North Blowhorn Creek field in Lamar County, Alabama, which produces from the Carter sandstone, is a prime example of a stratigraphic trap. As of March 1983, this field has produced a total of 657,678 bbl of oil and 972,3 mmcf of gas. The Carter sandstone there was deposited as part of a delta which prograded from northwest to southeast across the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. Primary and secondary porosity in the Carter sandstone ranges from 10 to 16% with an average of 13.5%. Permeability ranges from approximately .01-29 md with an average of 10 md. The Parkwood shales interbedded with the Carter sandstone are probably the primary petroleum source beds of the Mississippian hydrocarbons.

  12. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

  13. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  14. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  15. Petroleum geology of Carter sandstone (upper Mississippian), Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of combination petroleum traps makes the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama an attractive area for continued hydrocarbon exploration. More than 1,500 wells have been drilled, and more than 90 separate petroleum pools have been discovered. The primary hydrocarbon reservoirs are Upper Mississippian sandstones. The Carter sandstone is the most productive petroleum reservoir in the basin. Productivity of the Carter sandstone is directly related to its environment of deposition. The Carter accumulated within a high constructive elongate to lobate delta, which prograded into the basin from the northwest to the southeast. Carter bar-finger and distal-bar lithofacies constitute the primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. Primary porosity in the Carter sandstone has been reduced by quartz overgrowths and calcite cementation. Petroleum traps in the Carter sandstone in central Fayette and Lamar Counties, Alabama, are primarily stratigraphic and combination (structural-stratigraphic) traps. The potential is excellent for future development of hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone. Frontier regions south and east of the known productive limits of the Black Warrior basin are ideal areas for continued exploration.

  16. Analysis of coal and coal bed methane resources of Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, D.E.; McFall, K.S.; Malone, P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior basin in Alabama is the most active area in the US producing natural gas from coal beds. As of 1986, 300 coal-bed methane wells were producing from eight degasification fields, mainly from the Pennsylvanian coal seams along the eastern margin of the basin. Despite difficult market conditions, drilling and expansion are continuing. A detailed geologic analysis of Warrior basin coal-bed methane targets the areas of the basin that show the most promise for future gas production. The geologic analysis is based on extensive well and core data and basin-wide correlations of the Pennsylvanian coal groups. Four detailed cross sections were constructed, correlating the target coal groups in the basin, namely the Cobb, Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek. They estimate that the Warrior basin contains nearly 20 tcf of in-place coal-bed methane, mainly in three of the target coal groups - the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek coals, with 4, 7, and 8 tcf, respectively. The east-central area of the basin contains the greatest volume of natural gas resource due to its concentration of thicker, higher ranked coals with high gas content. The geologic analysis also provided the underlying framework for the subsequent engineering analysis of economically recoverable gas reserves. For example, analysis of structure and tectonics showed the east-central area to be promising for gas recovery due to its proximity to the Appalachian structural front and consequent structural deformation and permeability enhancement.

  17. Ourcrop characterization of sandstone heterogeneity in Carboniferous reservoirs, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Osborne, E.W.; Rindsberg, A.K.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Where production is currently declining, improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling may be used to increase production of liquid hydrocarbons from reservoir sandstone in the Black Warrior basin. Characterizing reservoir heterogeneity provides information regarding how those strategies can best be applied, and exceptional exposures of asphaltic sandstone in north Alabama enable first-hand observation of such heterogeneity. This report identifies heterogeneity in Carboniferous strata of the Black Warrior basin on the basis of vertical variations, lithofacies analysis. Results of lithofacies analysis and depositional modeling were synthesized with existing models of sandstone heterogeneity to propose methods which may improve hydrocarbon recovery in Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin. 238 refs., 89 figs. 2 tabs.

  18. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  19. Paleotopographic control of basal Chesterian sedimentation in the black warrior basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Rindsberg, A.K. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the start of the Chesterian (Upper Mississippian), the Ouachita orogeny began along the southwestern edge of the Alabama promontory. The orogeny ended the upwelling circulation system of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia carbonate ramp that persisted from the Osagian to the Meramecian. These events established the Black Warrior foreland basin, where carbonate and siliciclastic sedimentation were controlled by flexural tectonism and sea level variation. These factors governed deposition of the petroleum source rocks and reservoir rocks that account for most of the conventional hydrocarbon resources in the basin. The Lewis interval is a thin (<100 ft), widespread veneer of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that forms the base of the Chesterian Series in Alabama and contains significant gas, oil, and asphalt resources. Although thin, the Lewis interval is heterogeneous and represents a spectrum of marginal- and open-marine environments, suggesting that depositional topography affected facies distribution. To test the effect of paleotopography on sedimentation, data from wells, outcrops, and cores were analyzed to model the relationship between the Fort Payne Tuscumbia ramp and the Lewis interval. Sandstone bodies in the Lewis interval typically are elongate parallel to strike of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia ramp. Along the lower ramp, siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentation took place exclusively in open-marine environments and sand was deposited in sand waves and patches by storms. Topographic irregularity was especially pronounced on the upper ramp and gave rise to complex facies patterns. Exposure, reworking, and beach formation took place on topographic highs, whereas storm-driven marine sedimentation prevailed in topographic lows. Although inception of the Ouachita orogeny in the Alabama promontory had a marked effect on marine circulation, facies distribution in the basal part of the Chesterian Series was dominated by the ramp topography developed prior to orogenesis.

  20. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  1. Heterogeneity in Mississippi oil reservoirs, Black Warrior basin, Alabama: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Irvin, G.D. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Mississippian sandstone units produce oil in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama: (1) Lewis; (2) Carter; (3) Millerella, and (4) Gilmer. Reservoir geometries differ for each producing interval, reflecting variation in depositional style during the evolution of a foreland basin. Widespread strike-elongate bodies of Lewis sandstone with complex internal geometry were deposited during destruction of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia carbonate ramp and represent inception of the foreland basin and initial forebulge migration. Synorogenic Carter sandstone is part of the first major deltaic foreland basin fill and accounts for more than 80% of oil production in the basin. Millerella sandstone was deposited as transgressive sand patches during the final stages of delta destruction. Gilmer sandstone occurs as imbricate sandstone lenses deposited in a constructive shoal-water delta and is part of the late relaxational basin fill. Interaction of siliciclastic sediment with ancestral and active carbonate ramps was a primary control on facies architecture and reservoir heterogeneity. Patterns of injection and reservoir fluid production, as well as field- to basin-scale depositional, petrological, petrophysical and geostatistical modeling reveal microscopic to megascopic controls on reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon producibility. At a megascopic scale, isolation or continuity of reservoir bodies is a function of depositional topography and the degree of marine reworking of genetically coherent sandstone bodies. These factors result in amalgamated reservoir bodies or in compartments that may remain uncontacted or unconnected during field development. Within producing fields, segmentation of amalgamated sandstone bodies into individual lenses, grain size variations, depositional barriers, and diagenetic baffles further compartmentalize reservoirs, increase tortuosity of fluid flow, and affect sweep efficiency during improved recovery operations.

  2. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  3. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  4. Coal stratigraphy of deeper part of Black Warrior basin in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Womack, S.H.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior coal field of Alabama is stratigraphically in the upper part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation and structurally in the eastern part of the Black Warrior foreland basin. The productive coal beds extend southwestward from the mining area downdip into the deeper part of the Black Warrior structural basin. Because the deep part of the basin is beyond the limits of conventional coal exploration, study of the stratigraphy of coal beds must rely on data from petroleum wells. Relative abundance of coal can be stated in terms of numbers of beds, but because of the limitations of the available data, thicknesses of coals presently are not accurately determined. The lower sandstone-rich coal-poor part of the Pottsville has been interpreted as barrier sediments in the mining area. To the southwest in the deeper Black Warrior basin, coal beds are more numerous within the sandstone-dominated sequence. The coal-productive upper Pottsville is informally divided into coal groups each of which includes several coal beds. The Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Utley coal groups are associated with northeast-trending delta-distributary sandstones. The areas of most numerous coals also trend northeastward and are laterally adjacent to relatively thick distributary sandstones, suggesting coal accumulation in backswamp environments. The most numerous coals in the Pratt coal group are in an area that trends northwestward parallel with and southwest of a northwest-trending linear sandstone, suggesting coal accumulation in a back-barrier environment. Equivalents of the Cobb, Gwin, and Brookwood coal groups contain little coal in the deep part of the Black Warrior basin.

  5. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in the Mississippi interior salt basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea-level change and coastal onlap can be identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin of Alabama. In the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal unconformity and an upper Type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites, Pine Hill anhydrites and shales, and Norphlet eolian sandstones. The middle depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Callovian. This sequence includes Norphlet marine sandstones and lower Smackover packstones and mudstones, middle Smackover mudstones and upper Smackover grainstones and anhydrites. The sequence has an upper Type 2 unconformity indicating relative sea-level fall in the Oxfordian. The upper depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Oxfordian. This sequence includes lower Haynesville evaporites and clastics (transgressive deposits), middle Haynesville carbonate mudstones and shales (condensed section), and upper Haynesville updip continental sandstones and downdip shales, limestones, and anhydrites (progradational highstand regressive deposits). The sequence has an upper Type 1 unconformity indicating abrupt sea-level fall in the late Kimmeridgian. In these depositional sequences, progradational highstand regressive deposits are the principal petroleum reservoirs. Condensed section deposits have the potential to be source rocks if subjected to proper burial conditions; however, only the lower and middle Smackover mudstones were deposited and buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. An understanding of sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to identifying potential hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  6. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  7. Barrier island depositional systems in Black Warrior basin, lower Pennsylvanian (Pottsville) in northwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, C.A.; Gastaldo, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basal Pennsylvanian lower Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama is part of a southwestward-thickening wedge of terrigenous sediments consisting of orthoquartzitic sandstone, siltstone, and shales with discontinuous coals. The present study delineates each lower Pottsville lithofacies, to confirm or refute a barrier-island model. Preliminary interpretation of lithofacies using lithologic criteria, sedimentary structures, and fossil assemblages confirms a barrier deposition system. Exposures along I-65 in southern Cullman County are interpreted to represent lagoonal deposits based on the high percentage of mud-sized material, massive and structureless washover sandstone beds, and highly rippled interbedded sandstones and silty shales that contain microcross-stratification. Exposures in northern Cullman County are interpreted to represent tidal channel-fill deposits, flood tidal sequences, and possible foreshore sandstone deposits. Tidal channel-fill deposits are recognized by coarse sandstone textures with pebble lags, large-scale cross-bedding, and their geometry. Flood tidal sequences are recognized by stacked cross-bedded sets and additional sedimentary structures. Foreshore deposits are interpreted based on the orientation of low-angle planar bedding.

  8. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  9. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  10. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  11. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  12. Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources Gary Stone, Extension Educator, University://www.wrds.uwyo.edu/wrds/nrcs/snowprec/snowprec.html - the University of Wyoming Water Resources Data System - scroll down to the Upper and Lower North Platte River. Seminoe is the first reservoir on the North Platte River in central Wyoming. Glendo is the second

  13. Facies analysis, sea level history, and platform evolution of Jurassic Smackover Formation, Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, R.A. Jr.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation (Jurassic, Oxfordian) in the Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama, is divided into six carbonate sedimentary facies. In approximate stratigraphic order, they are (1) intertidal algal mudstone, (2) basinal carbonate mudstone and calcareous shale, (3) graded slope packstone and wackestone, (4) Tubiphytes-bearing, slope debris-flow grainstone and packstone, (5) distal-ramp wackestone, and (6) shoal-produced oolitic grainstone. Facies correlation and synthesis, using 11 key drill cores, show that the Smackover platform was profoundly affected by two rapid sea level rises during the Oxfordian transgression, as well as the late Oxfordian regression. The first rapid rise drowned in the inherited Norphlet clastic ramp, including the Smackover intertidal algal mudstone (facies 1). Subsequently, a Tubiphytes-rimmed shelf developed and its bypass-margin slope deposits (facies 3 and 4) and coeval basinal facies (facies 2) prograded in the basin. The second rapid sea level rise drowned the rimmed shelf, creating a distally steepened ramp. Facies developed on the ramp were distal-ramp deposits (facies 5) and higher energy updip oolitic shoals (facies 6). The late Oxfordian rapid regression caused widespread progradation of the oolitic shoals and coeval sabkha facies of the overlying Buckner anhydrite.

  14. Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

  15. Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

  16. Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

    been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

  17. african river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 121 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  18. amazon river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 149 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  19. arkansas river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 191 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  20. The distribution of organic carbon in the Brazos River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, James Mark

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN A Thesis by James Nark Brooks Submitted to the Graduate College of. Texas ASYi Hniversity in partial fulfillment. of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August..., 1970 Najor Subject: Oceanography THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN A Thesis by James Mark Brooks Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Commrttee) (Head o Depa tme ) (Member) kJ. ( &. ) i & (Member...

  1. Regional stratigraphy, depositional environments, and tectonic framework of Mississippian clastic rocks between Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones in Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, D.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed correlations in the subsurface and outcrop of northern Alabama document that Mississippian clastic rocks between the Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones are thickest along a band across the northern and eastern parts of the Black Warrior basin. The interval thins markedly southeastward across a northeast-trending line in Monroe County, Mississippi, and Lamar County, Alabama, from more than 350 ft to less than 150 ft. The thickness distribution suggests synsedimentary differential subsidence of crustal blocks. The northeast-trending block boundary in the Black Warrior basin nearly parallels an interpreted northeast-trending late Precambrian rift segment farther southeast. The northwest-striking boundary closely parallels an interpreted northwest-trending transform fault farther southwest. The block boundaries are interpreted as basement faults that originated during late Precambrian rifting. Subsequently, the older faults were reactivated by convergenced during the Mississippian, simultaneously with the initial dispersal of clastic sediment into the Black Warrior foreland basin.

  2. Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

  3. History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Colorado State University 25th South Platte Forum Longmont, CO October 22, 2014 #12;Acknowledgment: Thanks is it -- the History Annual Peak Flows S. Platte River at Julesburg 1902-2013 #12;#12;#12;Now, let's head upstream

  4. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  5. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  6. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  7. Glacier Meltwater Contributions and Glaciometeorological Regime of the Illecillewaet River Basin, British Columbia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dan

    Glacier Meltwater Contributions and Glaciometeorological Regime of the Illecillewaet River Basin This study characterizes the meteorological parameters influencing glacier runoff and quantifies recent glacier contributions to streamflow in the Illecillewaet River basin, British Columbia. The Illecillewaet

  8. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

  9. Controls on deposition of the Pratt seam, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenfluh, G.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of regional, subregional and local variations in the Pratt seam of northern Alabama has generated a geological model which depicts the internal and external geometry of the coal seams and adjoining rocks of the Pratt group and suggests the controlling factors for deposistion of thick and thin coal. In addition to primary structural controls of peat accumulation, differential compaction of peat and other detrital sediments was an important factor governing the topographic setting within the fault blocks. Within a minable coal body, seam thickness is relatively constant (aside from local variations), but when the margins of the body are approached, the number of benches and partings will increase shortly before the seam splits into a number of unminable thin seams. This zone of transition which marks the boundary of the coal body is narrow (on the order of 500 to 1000 feet); consequently efforts in estimating minable tonnages should be directed toward defining this line more precisely.

  10. Diagenetic control on permeability baffles and barriers, Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippian (Chesterian) Carter sandstone is the most productive oil reservoir in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. In North Blowhorn Creek oil unit, very fine- to medium-grained quartzarenite and sublitharenite occur in an elongate, isolated northwest-southeast trending body, surrounded by shale. The sandstone was deposited in a beach-barrier environment. Most production is from ripple-laminated and horizontal- to low-angle-planar laminated shoreface and foreshore deposits in the central part of the reservoir body. Uneven distribution of diagenetic features creates permeability baffles and barriers at several scales within the reservoir, ranging from microscopic to macroscopic, and increases tortuosity of fluid flow. Early authigenic calcite and ferroan calcite occur only in shell lags deposited in channels within the reservoir body. These originally porous and permeable layers are completely cemented by calcite, ferroan calcite, and ferroan dolomite. Carbonate-cemented shell lags form discontinuous permeability barriers that may be laterally continuous between adjacent wells. Ferroan dolomite is the most abundant cement in Carter sandstone and occludes all pores near the margins of the reservoir body. The pore system within the high-quality portion of the reservoir consists of modified primary and secondary intergranular porosity and microporosity within patches of kaolinite. Porosity and permeability relationships are controlled by the distribution of quartz overgrowths, kaolinite, deformed mudstones fragments, intergranular pressure solution, and stylolite seams. The lateral extent of baffles and barriers created by these diagenetic features is related to depositional texture and ranges from micrometers to meters.

  11. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  12. Greater Platte River Basins Symposium PROGRAM Thursday, October 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of the Niobrara River in the National Scenic Reach, Nebraska ­ Jason Alexander, US Geological Survey ­ Nebraska and Computational Investigations of Sandbar Dynamics ­ Paul Kinzel, U.S. Geological Survey ­ Colorado Water Science and Values in the Niobrara Basin: Does Water Flow to Money? ­ Steven Shultz, University of Nebraska-Omaha 2

  13. Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

  14. Chester (Mississippian) ostracodes from Bangor Formation of Black Warrior basin, northern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devery, H.; Dewey, C.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously unreported ostracode fauna is described from the Bangor Limestone in Franklin, Lawrence, and Colbert Counties, Alabama. The Bangor formation is a Chesterian (Mississippian) platformal carbonate sequence. The predominant carbonates are bioclastic and oolitic grainstones to wackestones with less abundant micritic claystones. Intercalated fine clastics are common in the upper and lower parts of the sequence. This study focuses on the bioclastic limestones with interbedded shales of the lower Bangor. The megafaunal associations include crinoid and blastoid pelmatozoans, orthotetid, and spiriferid brachiopids, and both fenestrate and nonfenestrate bryozoans. Solitary rugose corals and trilobites may be locally abundant. Gastropods and bivalves form a consistent but accessory part of the fauna, which indicates a shallow, nearshore shelf environment. A diverse ostracode fauna of variable abundance has been collected from the shaly units and friable limestones. The ostracode fauna indicates shallow, open-marine conditions and is dominated by bairdiaceans, including Bairdia spp. Rectobairdia and Bairdiacypris. Several species of Cavellina, healdia, and Seminolites are also abundant. Palaeocopids present include Coryellina, Kirkbya, and Polytylites. Kloedenellaceans include Beyrichiopsis, Glyptopleura, Glypotpleurina, and .Hypotetragona. Paraparchitaceans are notably more scarce, but specimens of Shishaella have been found. Some sample have a high valve to carapace ratio, suggesting postmortem transport. Although diversity is high, numerical abundances can be low. Initial studies suggest the ostracodes have a Mid-Continent affinity, which may indicate that the Appalachians were acting as a barrier to migration of European forms.

  15. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this secondary oil recovery project involving the Carter sandstone in northwest Alabama are: (1) To increase the ultimate economic recovery of oil from the Carter reservoirs, thereby increasing domestic reserves and lessening US dependence on foreign oil; (2) To extensively model, test, and monitor the reservoirs so their management is optimized; and (3) To assimilate and transfer the information and results gathered to other US oil companies to encourage them to attempt similar projects. Start-up water injection began on 0 1/12/93 at the Central Bluff Field, and daily operations began on 01/13/93. These operations include monitoring wellhead pressures at the injector and two producers, and injection water treatment. Water injection was running 200-300 bbl/day at the end of February. Once the unit is pressured-up well testing will be performed. Unitization was approved on 03/01/93.b. For the North Fairview Field correlations and log analyses were used to determine the fluid and rock properties. A summary of these properties is included in Table 1. The results of the log analysis were used to construct the hydrocarbon pore volume map shown on Figure 1. The map was planimetered to determine original oil-in-place (OOIP) values and the hydrocarbon pore volume by tract. The OOIP summed over an tracts by this method is 824.7 Mbbl (Figure 2). Original oil-in-place was also calculated directly: two such independent calculations gave 829.4 Mbbl (Table 1) and 835.6 Mbbl (Table 2). Thus, the three estimates of OOIP are within one percent. The approximately 88% of OOIP remaining provides an attractive target for secondary recovery. Injection start-up is planned for mid-June.

  16. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

  17. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  18. Geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth for each basin, is tabulated. Background heat flow in the Wind River Basin is generally insufficient to produce high conductive gradients. Only where hydrologic systems re-distribute heat through mass movement of water will high temperatures occur at shallow depths. Aquifers which may have the confinement and structural characteristics necessary to create such geothermal systems are the Lance/Fort Union, Mesa Verde, Frontier, Muddy, Cloverly, Sundance, Nugget, Park City, Tensleep, Amsden, Madison, Bighorn, and Flathead Formations. Of these the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison Limestone are the most attractive in terms of both productivity and water quality. Most of the identified geothermal anomalies in the Wind River Basin occur along complex structures in the southwest and south. The most attractive geothermal prospects identified are anomalous Areas 2 and 3 north of Lander, Sweetwater Station Springs west of Jeffrey City, and the thermal springs southwest of Dubois. Even in these areas, it is unlikely temperatures in excess of 130 to 150/sup 0/F can be developed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  19. Fast Facts About the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration, the federal agency that markets the electricity generated at federal dams in the Columbia River Energy Regulatory Commission; electric utilities; and state energy regulatory agencies. State, tribal directs more than $220 million annually in federal electricity revenues to implement more than 400

  20. Atmospheric methane flux from coals - preliminary investigation of coal mines and geologic structures in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L.; Leventhal, J.S.; Rice, D.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mosher, B.; Czepiel, P. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas whose concentration in the atmosphere is increasing. Although this increase in atmospheric methane is correlative with growth in human population and activities, the exact causes for the increase are not fully understood. Because of increasing energy demand, particularly in developing countries where population is increasing, coal production is likely to increase over the next few decades and this could further increase the flux of atmospheric methane. In addition, no data are currently available on methane flux from coalbeds as a result of natural processes such as leakage at outcrops, or along faults and fractures that could provide avenues for methane migration upward from coal at depth. To better understand the global methane cycle and the role of fossil fuels in methane emissions, field measurements of methane emissions are needed from coalbeds, from areas of active mining, from coalbed gas production, and from undisturbed coals. In this paper, we report results of field measurements of CH[sub 4] emissions from surface and underground mines, fault zones, and coreholes in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Ventilation of underground mines in Mary Lee group coals (of economic usage) gave the highest methane emissions rates - about 71,480,000 m[sup 3]/yr (2.5 Bcf or billion cubic feet) from one ventilation shaft. In contrast, very low emissions occurred from active or abandoned coreholes and from Brookwood group coals (of economic usage) exposed by surface mining (about 81 m[sup 3]/yr (2.9 Mcf or thousand cubic feet)). Methane flux of as much as about 500 m[sup 3]/yr occurs from a small section of a normal fault and associated joints exposed at Bankhead Lock and Dam. The carbon isotopic composition of CH[sub 4] collected at the Bankhead Fault ([delta][sup 13]C -49.3 permil) indicates a coalbed origin. 50 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Coalbed methane produced water management guide treatment and discharge to surface waters: Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Final report, April 1991-May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.A.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist coalbed methane in their efforts to manage produced waters in an environmentally acceptable manner, GRI, in cooperation with the member companies of the Coalbed Methane Association of Alabama, developed a guidance manual that presents the state-of-the-art methodology for managing Black Warrior Basin produced water through the use of treatment ponds and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. Six treatment pond systems were studied to develop information for the manual. Topics included in the manual are produced water characteristics, NPDES permit requirements, sample collection and testing, pond based treatment methods, treatment pond management, and process troubleshooting.

  2. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River estuary was a high-energy environment dominated by physical forces, with extensive sand Riddell November 28, 2000 ISAB 2000-5 #12;ISAB 2000-5 Estuary Report i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Northwest to an informed response to the Council. Consequently, this report has been prepared as a preliminary reply

  3. Regional tree growth and inferred summer climate in the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Michael N.

    changes in summer climate within the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783. The basin drains parts the center of their range usually exhibit a more complex relationship with climate (Hughes, 2002Regional tree growth and inferred summer climate in the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783

  4. Subsurface models of coal occurrence, Oak Grove field, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface investigation of coal occurrence in the Black Creek-Cobb interval of Oak Grove field is based on cross sections and isopach maps made from more than 500 density logs. This study was designed to identify styles of coal occurrence in the Black Warrior basin to aid in coalbed-methane exploration and production. Coal occurrence in parts of the Black Warrior basin may be characterized in terms of end-member fluvial and structural control. Fluvial processes apparently were the major controls on coal occurrence in the Black Creek cycle, where sandstone and coal thickness are inversely related. Additionally, occurrence of thick sandstone sequences above the thickest coal beds suggests that peat compaction provided sites for channel avulsion. In the Mary Lee and Cobb cycles, more coal beds occur in a downthrown fault block than in an upthrown block, and in the Pratt and Cobb cycles, the thickest coal beds occur on the downthrown side of a fault. Only in the Mary Lee cycle, where thick peat accumulated in an abandoned tributary system, is coal thickest on the upthrown block. Most coal beds in Oak Grove field are thickest on the downthrown block because differential subsidence apparently promoted peat accumulation. Clastic influx favors beds splits in the downthrown block, but joining of beds in the Pratt cycle may reflect sheltering by the fault. In the Mary Lee cycle, in contrast, channel incision evidently provided local relief sufficient for thick peat to accumulate in lows on the upthrown block. Although fluvial and structural processes result in varied styles of coal occurrence, models of coal occurrence have resulted in a predictive framework that may aid in strategic well siting and completion.

  5. A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    outlook ~Pt t 1 Trinity River Basin EconoInic outlook ~Pt t 1 Neches River Basin 10 10 Economic outlook 10 ~Pt t 1 Sabine River Basin Economic outlook 12 I I I. THE WATER RESOURCES DF THE NECHES AND RED RIVER BASINS 14 Neches River Basin 14..., '' is a general discussion of the economic factors as they are related to demand for water in each basin. In addition to a statewide outlook, a separate discussion for each basin is presented which includes future population projections. In closing...

  6. Criteria to aid in the establishment of genetic boundaries within a carboniferous basin: Mary Lee Coal Zone, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, T.W.; Gastaldo, R.A. (Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper part of the Mary Lee coal zone of the Lower Pennsylvanian (Westphalian A) Pottsville Formation in northwestern Alabama is composed of the Mary Lee and the Newcastle coal seams. The Mary Lee coal seam has been economically significant in terms of both mining and coal-bed methane production. A sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical investigation of the lithologies associated with this coal zone was done to define the changes that occur in facies changing from terrestrial into marine facies. A ravinement bed, ranging in thickness from 13.0 deposits. Fifteen surficially exposed sections were observed and sampled in the study area. Geochemical analyses were done on samples collected from seven sections along the perimeter of the study area. The analyses conducted involved inductively coupled atomic plasma spectrometry (ICAP) for seven elemental oxides that include aluminum, iron, silica, calcium, potassium, magnesium and manganese. Atomic absorption was used to determine sodium content. Carbonate carbon was determined by weight percent difference after hydrochloric acid treatment, whereas organic carbon content was determined by use of a carbon analyzer on a LECO[sup TM] induction furnace. Sulfur content was also determined by a LECO induction furnace equipped with a sulfur analyzer. Loss-on-ignition (LOI) percentage was based upon change in weight of samples after a period of 30 min in a muffle furnace at a temperature of 1000[degrees]C. The combination of sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemical characteristics were used to better understand the depositional setting of the upper Mary Lee coal zone in terms of a transgressive event. These criteria can be used in similar basin systems to better understand the depositional history of those settings.

  7. The use of turbulent jets to destratify the Charles River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, Jeffrey H. (Jeffrey Harrison)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the feasibility of using turbulent jets to destratify the Lower Charles River Basin between the Longfellow and Craigie Bridges between Boston and Cambridge. The basin is currently filled with salt water ...

  8. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

  9. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  10. Energy development and water options in the Yellowstone River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayanan, R.; MacIntyre, D.D.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a mixed-integer programming model, the impacts of institutional constraints on the marginal capacity for energy development in the Yellowstone River Basin and consequent hydrologic changes were examined. Under average annual flow conditions, energy outputs in the Yellowstone Basin can increase roughly nine times by 1985 and 12 to 18 times by 2000. In contrast, water availability is limiting energy development in the Tongue and Powder River Basins in Wyoming. Variability in hydrologic regime causes model solutions to change drastically. If flows decrease to 80 and 60% of average annual levels, the energy production is decreased by 17 and 95%, respectively. If development strategies in the basin are followed on the basis of 80% average annual flows, the Buffalo Bill enlargement (271,300 acre-ft), Tongue River Modification (58,000 acre-ft), and the two reservoirs at Sweetgrass Creek (each 27,000 acre-ft) will be necessary, in addition to several small storage facilities, to best meet the instream flow needs in Montana and to deliver the waters apportioned by compact between Wyoming and Montana. Furthermore, the results indicate that relaxing the instream flow requirements from recommended levels by 10% could increase regional energy output by 19% in 1985 and 35% in 2000. This model illustrates that modifications in institutional restrictions to achieve greater water mobility between users in a given state, as well as flexible practices for transferring water between states, can assist economic growth. Thus, the probability for restricted energy development at this juncture appears to be affected to a greater degree by institutional constraints than by water availability constraints.

  11. Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haglund, Karl T

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

  12. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  13. Sandstone-carbonate cycles in Tensleep Formation, eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittersbacher, D.J.; Wheeler, D.M.; Horne, J.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop and core study of the Tensleep Formation in the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin has revealed cyclic deposits of eolian sandstone and marine carbonate. These cycles, several meters to tens of meters thick, represent the rise and fall of sea level on the Wyoming shelf during Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. Falling sea level was marked by development of a sharp scour surface at the base of each cycle and progradation of eolian dunes over an exposed, shallow carbonate shelf. Subsequent sea level rise resulted in the reworking of eolian sand through wave activity and burrowing organisms. Subtidal carbonates overlies the reworked eolian sands and are sandy at the base, grading upward into fossiliferous dolomite mudstones to wackestones. The sharp scour surface, normally present directly on the subtidal carbonates, indicates that erosion eliminated any regressive marine deposits by deflation to the ground-water table during shoreline progradation or by deflation related to abrupt drop in sea level. Relative sea level changes on the low-relief Wyoming shelf affected large areas during Tensleep deposition. This resulted in widespread sandstone-carbonate cycles that provide the basis for regional correlations of the Tensleep Formation throughout the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin.

  14. Analysis of salt concentrations in the Brazos River Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganze, Charles Keith

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , it is not best suited for evaluating mean monthly salt loads and discharges. WA P3 Modelin S stem The WASP3 system consists of two stand alone computer programs, DYNHYD3 and WASP3, that can be run in conjunction or separately. The hydrodynamics program... data cover water years 1964 through 1986. Annual means prior to 1964 are also cited for those stations for which such data is available. Table 1 lists the 39 USGS streamflow gaging stations in the Brazos River Basin which include mean monthly salt...

  15. CERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Selected Plan provides approximately 170,000 acre-feet of above-ground storage volume in a twoCERP, C&SF, Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Project, Hendry County, Florida 23 August 2007 Abstract: The purpose of the Caloosahatchee River (C-43) West Basin Storage Reservoir project

  16. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  17. Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin Gregory J. Mc (2007), Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin, Geophys. Res; published 27 November 2007. [1] The high demand for water, the recent multiyear drought (1999

  18. A Political Ecology of the Citarum River Basin: Exploring "Integrated Water Resources Management" in West Java, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavelle, Jenna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF THE CITARUM RIVER BASINE. , Afiff, S. A. , The Ecology of Java and Bali, Singapore:

  19. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  20. Incorporating safety into surface haulage in the Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, W.; Jennings, C.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) coal deposit extends from southeast Montana to northeast Wyoming. This paper describes a number of haulage practices and tools in use at several mines of the southern PRB and the way in which safety has been designed into and implemented for surface haulage of coal and overburden. Experiences described herein focus on the northeastern corner of Wyoming. All the mines in this area rely on safe and efficient movement of enormous volumes of material, and the results achieved in safety underscore the planning and attention to detail present in the PRB. There are currently 12 large surface mines (those greater than 10.0MM tons/year) operating in this area. In 1995, these mines produced over 230.0MM tons of coal.

  1. Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Naney, Michael {Mike} T [ORNL; Blencoe, James {Jim} G [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Pashin, Jack C. [Geological Survey of Alabama; Carroll, Richard E. [Geological Survey of Alabama

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

  2. Water quality modelling for recreational use in the Kallang River Basin, Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeles, Justin Victor V. (Justin Victor Velayo)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Singapore's Active, Beautiful, and Clean Waters Programme (ABC) aims to provide functional use of its water bodies to the public. The Kallang River Basin, being part of the ABC Programme, will be used for recreational ...

  3. Precipitation analysis for a flood early warning system in the Manafwa River Basin, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecinati, Francesca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communities living in the Manafwa River Basin experience frequent floods threatening their lives and property. Climate change and anthropogenic perturbations to the natural environment increase flooding frequency. This ...

  4. Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Water conservation is a critical issue in Texas today. This publication explores the relationship between ecosystem health and land stewardship in the Trinity River Basin. It also describes how responsible land stewardship can be applied in urban...

  5. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and utilization. Water in the three main stream reservoirs is unsuitable for municipal use without costly desalinization processes. The quality of the river improves significantly in the lower basin with dilution from good quality tributaries. Population...

  6. The future of the Salton Sea under proposed lower Colorado River basin water management scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelland, Michael Edward

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salton Sea, situated in the Lower Colorado River Basin (LCRB), is under duress due to, among other things, increased water demands of cities like San Diego, California and Mexicali, Mexico. This research developed a tool to investigate...

  7. Characteristics of warm season precipitating storms in the Arkansas–Red River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Li, Xingong

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Analysis of a multisensor precipitation product enables us to extract the precipitation from individual storms in the Arkansas–Red River drainage basin over a period of 11 years. We examine the year-to-year and ...

  8. Response surfaces of vulnerability to climate change: the Colorado River Basin, the High Plains, and California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the vulnerability of water supply to shortage for the Colorado River Basin and basins of the High Plains, it becomes ever more important to assess the vulnerability of current and future water supplies to shortage more likely to experience water shortages (Barnett et al. 2004; Barnett and Pierce 2008, 2009; Cayan et

  9. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Diverting a Portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    TR-1 1967 A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Diverting a Portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins J.H. Cook Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  10. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

  11. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (R[sub o]) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where R[sub o] approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area (state waters of Mobile Bay). Porosity of the cemented, tight zone at the top of the Norphlet in downdip locations is roughly 10% lower than porosities of facies underlying the tight zone, but nevertheless is slightly above the norm for other sandstones at similar R[sub o] levels. Porosity of dune facies is consistently 2-5% higher than that of interdune facies, other factors being equal. Our data show 3-6% higher porosity in chlorite-dominated intervals relative to intervals where illite is the dominant clay mineral. Norphlet porosity has little or no correlation with position relative to the present-day hydrocarbon-water contact. Based on comparisons at similar R[sub o] levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of [open quotes]typical[close quotes] sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. 48 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  13. Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Peter; Pashin, Jack; Carlson, Eric; Goodliffe, Andrew; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Thompson, Mason

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-fired power plants produce large quantities of carbon dioxide. In order to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions from these power plants, it is necessary to separate and store the carbon dioxide. Saline formations provide a potential sink for carbon dioxide and delineating the capacity of the various known saline formations is a key part of building a storage inventory. As part of this effort, a project was undertaken to access the storage capacity of saline reservoirs in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama. This basin has been a productive oil and gas reservoir that is well characterized to the west of the two major coal-fired power plants that are north of Birmingham. The saline zones were thought to extend as far east as the Sequatchie Anticline which is just east of the power plants. There is no oil or gas production in the area surrounding the power plants so little is known about the formations in that area. A geologic characterization well was drilled on the Gorgas Power Plant site, which is the farthest west of two power plants in the area. The well was planned to be drilled to approximately 8,000 feet, but drilling was halted at approximately 5,000 feet when a prolific freshwater zone was penetrated. During drilling, a complete set of cores through all of the potential injection zones and the seals above these zones were acquired. A complete set of openhole logs were run along with a vertical seismic profile (VSP). Before drilling started two approximately perpendicular seismic lines were run and later correlated with the VSP. While the zones that were expected were found at approximately the predicted depths, the zones that are typically saline through the reservoir were found to be saturated with a light crude oil. Unfortunately, both the porosity and permeability of these zones were small enough that no meaningful hydrocarbon production would be expected even with carbon dioxide flooding. iv While this part of the basin was found to be unsuitable for carbon dioxide injection, there is still a large storage capacity in the basin to the west of the power plants. It will, however, require pipeline construction to transport the carbon dioxide to the injection sites.

  14. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.D. (J.R. Holland and Associates, Northport, AL (US)); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  15. A Comparison of AMSR-E/Aqua Snow Products with in situ Observations and MODIS Snow Cover Products in the Mackenzie River Basin, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Jinjun; Velicogna, Isabella

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alpine watershed of western Canada inferred from spatially-Basin, British Columbia, Canada. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci.Mackenzie River Basin, Canada. Adv. Water Resour. Derksen,

  16. Forestry Policies (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alabama's Forests are managed by the Alabama Forestry Commission. The Commission has organized biomass market resources including a number of publications with regard to biomass energy...

  17. Evidence for an allocyclic origin of marine strata bounding the Upper Carboniferous Mary Lee coal zone, Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastaldo, R.A. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Geology); Demko, T.M. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior Basin, a triangular foreland basin of Carboniferous age, is located at the southern end of the Appalachian orogen. A southwestward wedge of Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks occurs in the basin. The generally accepted model for basin-fill involves the progradation of a single delta, or multiple deltas (the Pottsville Formation), over an offshore carbonate bank (the Bangor Limestone). The Pottsville Formation is typical of Euramerican Carboniferous strata and is composed of the cyclical alternation of marine and terrestrial facies. The deposition of marine facies overlying terrestrial facies has been interpreted to have been the result of delta lobe switching and the compaction of underlying sediments, hence, autocyclic processes. Sedimentological features associated with the marine strata bounding the Mary Lee coal zone, the informal Jagger bedrock sandstone below and the Morris Shale above, are not indicative of circumstances generated by autocyclic processes. Rather, the marine strata highlight features resulting from allocyclic processes. The Jagger bedrock sandstone is a thick (> 15 m) sublitharenite interpreted as representing subtidal, shore-parallel bars. It is a sandstone body that was stranded on the shoreline during regional regression. The terrestrial coal-bearing strata are truncated by an erosional surface, marking the base of the Morris Shale. This ravinement surface is overlain by a ravinement bed representing a substrate developed by regional transgressive erosion that was subsequently colonized by open-marine macroinvertebrates. The ravinement bed is interpreted as a condensed section that accumulated under maximum water depth. Both of these features are indicative of development in response to extrinsic causes rather than intrinsic ones.

  18. Geologic assessment of natural gas from coal seams in the Warrior Basin, Alabama. Topical report, September 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFall, K.S.; Wicks, D.E.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a detailed geologic assessment of the coal deposits in the Warrior Basin area that have high potential for natural gas from coal seams. The estimate of the natural gas in place in the four major coal groups is 19.8 trillion cubic feet. Although the bulk of the gas in place is in the deeper areally extensive Black Creek and Mary Lee coal groups, the more shallow Pratt coal group also shows good potential for coal seam gas. The most concentrated areas of methane in place are in the eastern portion of the Warrior Basin. These areas coincide with thick accumulations of high rank coals and their associated higher gas contents. These areas also appear to have been structurally altered, leading to enhanced permeability to gas and water. Thus, the eastern portions of the basin appear more favorable for coalbed methane production due to high gas contents, attractive coal thicknesses, closely-spaced coal cleats and joints, and moderate depths to the coal horizons.

  19. Floodplain River Foodwebs in the Lower Mekong Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Chouly

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics in tropical rivers undergo significant seasonal shifts and emphasizes that river food webs are altered by dams and flow regulation. Seston and benthic algae were the most important production sources supporting fish biomass during the dry season...

  20. Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    150 miles of shoreline and hundreds of acres of marsh, mudflat, and shallow water habitats. The river

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  2. Causes of variable production rates of Pottsville Formation Coalbed Gas Wells, Virginia Mine Field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, W.B. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)); Ferguson, P.A. (Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, 27 coalbed gas wells were drilled, creating Virginia Mines field. In early 1993, average production rate was 55 Mcf/d per well, less than the geometric mean of 63 Mcf/d for wells in this region of the Warrior Basin. To clarify controls on gas production rates, we evaluated the production trends and the geologic setting. Strata on the southeast side of the project dip steeply northwestward off the Birmingham Anticlinorium toward the synclinal axis of the basin, which plunges approximately 2[degrees] southwestward. Northeast-trending normal faults having throws as great as 115 ft divide the project area into horsts and graben. Virginia Mines coalbed gas wells are completed in 13 to 16 ft of coal in 2 coal groups. Closure pressure (minimum stress) varies with structural setting and is 1,500 to 2,300 psi in the Black Creek group and 950 to 1,900 psi in overlying the Mary Lee group. Fracture gradient is greatest (commonly > 1.0 psi/ft) on the southeast of the project, along basin margin, suggesting that induced fractures have complex (T-shaped) geometries. Peak gas production at Virginia Mines occurred within the first 2 months and ranged from 40 to 180 Mcf/d; production rates fell sharply to 30 to 80 Mcf/d in the 18th month. Gas production rates are highest in the northern part of the project and lowest on the southeast side of the project and in one major fault block. Water production rates were 95 to 330 b/d initially but decreased an average of less than 40 b/d by the 18th month. Rapid gas and water decline rates are attributed to ineffective stimulations due to high fracture gradients and to low permeability caused by high in-situ stress. In-situ stress differences, in turn, reflect a highly variable structural setting. To improve production from low-rate wells will require new completion and stimulation techniques. Such techniques could have far-reaching implications, because coal beds in many other areas have high in-situ stresses.

  3. Causes of variable production rates of Pottsville Formation Coalbed Gas Wells, Virginia Mine Field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, W.B. Jr. [S.A. Holditch & Associates, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Ferguson, P.A. [Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, 27 coalbed gas wells were drilled, creating Virginia Mines field. In early 1993, average production rate was 55 Mcf/d per well, less than the geometric mean of 63 Mcf/d for wells in this region of the Warrior Basin. To clarify controls on gas production rates, we evaluated the production trends and the geologic setting. Strata on the southeast side of the project dip steeply northwestward off the Birmingham Anticlinorium toward the synclinal axis of the basin, which plunges approximately 2{degrees} southwestward. Northeast-trending normal faults having throws as great as 115 ft divide the project area into horsts and graben. Virginia Mines coalbed gas wells are completed in 13 to 16 ft of coal in 2 coal groups. Closure pressure (minimum stress) varies with structural setting and is 1,500 to 2,300 psi in the Black Creek group and 950 to 1,900 psi in overlying the Mary Lee group. Fracture gradient is greatest (commonly > 1.0 psi/ft) on the southeast of the project, along basin margin, suggesting that induced fractures have complex (T-shaped) geometries. Peak gas production at Virginia Mines occurred within the first 2 months and ranged from 40 to 180 Mcf/d; production rates fell sharply to 30 to 80 Mcf/d in the 18th month. Gas production rates are highest in the northern part of the project and lowest on the southeast side of the project and in one major fault block. Water production rates were 95 to 330 b/d initially but decreased an average of less than 40 b/d by the 18th month. Rapid gas and water decline rates are attributed to ineffective stimulations due to high fracture gradients and to low permeability caused by high in-situ stress. In-situ stress differences, in turn, reflect a highly variable structural setting. To improve production from low-rate wells will require new completion and stimulation techniques. Such techniques could have far-reaching implications, because coal beds in many other areas have high in-situ stresses.

  4. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

  5. Alabama Profile

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S. StateAlabama

  6. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    TR-47 1973 Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor G.L. Curry J.C. Helm Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  7. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Office of River Protection, K Basin Sludge Waste System.

  8. CRAD, Management- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Management at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

  9. DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PD DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  10. FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  11. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  12. SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  13. COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  14. ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PA ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  15. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  16. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT Prepared for the Northwest Power Planning Council October 1997 97-15 #12;Published October 1997 by the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 503-222-5161 Toll Free

  17. Helminth Parasites of Freshwater Fishes of the Pnuco River Basin, East Central Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercado-Silva, Norman

    Helminth Parasites of Freshwater Fishes of the Pµnuco River Basin, East Central Mexico GUILLERMO Biologi´a, Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Apartado Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Me´xico D. F., Mexico (e-mail: gsalgado@mail.ibiologia.unam.mx), 2 Laboratorio de Ictiologi´a y Limnologi´a, Escuela

  18. Without proper controls, consolidation could influence performance in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, S.; Nelson, P.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American coal industry is in a period of consolidation. Fewer firms with larger production are replacing a more dispersed industry. Because of the southern Powder River Basin's great importance as source of coal, there is a need to monitor the performance of southern PRB coal producers.

  19. RECONCILING HYDROPOWER AND ENVIRONMENTAL WATER USES IN THE LEISHUI RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    RECONCILING HYDROPOWER AND ENVIRONMENTAL WATER USES IN THE LEISHUI RIVER BASIN X. S. AIa,b , S of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA b State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower alternative policies to improve the water supply for two conflicting uses, hydropower and environmental, using

  20. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

  1. Groundwater Resources Use and Management in the Amu Darya River Basin (Central Asia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Groundwater Resources Use and Management in the Amu Darya River Basin (Central Asia) Shavkat) 1183-1193" DOI : 10.1007/s12665-009-0107-4 #12;2 Abstract This paper analyses groundwater resources use nations for sustaining their vital agricultural productions started to use groundwater during the recent

  2. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  3. An entropy-based morphological analysis of river basin networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorentino, Mauro; Claps, Pierluigi; Singh, Vijay P.

    related to the logarithm of the magnitude of the basin network. This relation leads to a nonlinear relation between the network diameter and magnitude, where the exponent is found to be related to the fractal dimension of the drainage network. Also...

  4. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Project Number 200845800 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposes to take advantage of iteroparity in natural-origin (NOR) steelhead populations to increase,000 fish) between 1941-1954 (Mullan et al. 1992). Subsequent to this dramatic increase, wild stock escapements to the Columbia Basin have fluctuated widely. Wild stock productivity and abundance declined again

  5. Petroleum geology of the Zhu-1 depression, Pearl River Mouth Basin, People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilera, C.L.; Huizinga, B.J.; Lomando, A.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pearl River Mouth basin, located in the South China Sea between Hainan Island and Taiwan has been the focus of an intense exploration effort during the l980s. In 1979 the international oil industry, acquired over 60,000 km of seismic, gravity, and magnetic data covering an area of approximately 240,000 km{sup 2}. Three major subbasins, Zhu-1, Zhu-2, and Zhu-3 were defined. Chevron in partnership with Texaco and AGIP (ACT group), concentrated their effort on the Zhu-1 depression which was interpreted to contain as much as 7,800 m of sedimentary section. This subbasin, bounded by the Wansha and Donsha massifs to the north and south, is the most inboard of the three depressions, thereby possibly prolonging anoxic lacustrine conditions prior to the Neogene marine incursion. Additionally, the Zhu- 1 depression should have directly received Miocene sediment potentially supplying the subbasin with high-quality reservoirs. Within the Zhu-1 depression, the ACT group focused in on Block 16/08, which covered the deepest part of the Zhu-1 depression. The block was awarded to the consortium in January 1983. Structuring within the block ranges from Paleogene tensional block faulting created during the early formation of the overall Pearl River Mouth basin to draping over basement highs and carbonate buildups during the Neogene. The Pearl River Mouth basin exhibits classic rift basin geometry with early nonmarine continental fluvial/lacustrine deposition (Zhuhai Formation) during the Oligocene and capped by a lower Miocene marine incursion (Zhu Jiang Formation). Integrated interpretations, exploration drilling, and constant refinement of the geological model led to the discovery of two oil fields, Huizhou/21-1 and Huizhou/26-1, both of which are currently under development and will represent the first commercial oil production from the entire Pearl River Mouth basin.

  6. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  7. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  8. Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

  9. Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coming soon. Native Grassland Restoration in the Middle Trinity River Basin was published early in August #30;#29;#28;#30; for landowners in the Blackland Prairie and Post Oak Savannah ecoregions. Publications currently available in the Texas A...20 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Blake Alldredge and Danielle Kalisek Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin Fall 2012 tx H2O 21 ] The shores of Lake...

  10. Stresses and fractures in the Frontier Formation, Green River Basin, predicted from basin-margin tectonic element interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural fractures and in situ stresses commonly dictate subsurface reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, as well as the effectiveness of stimulation techniques in low-permeability, natural gas reservoirs. This paper offers an initial prediction for the orientations of the fracture and stress systems in the tight gas reservoirs of the Frontier Formation, in the Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming. It builds on a previous report that addressed fractures and stresses in the western part of the basin and on ideas developed for the rest of the basin, using the principle that thrust faults are capable of affecting the stress magnitudes and orientations in little-deformed strata several hundreds of kilometers in front of a thrust. The prediction of subsurface stresses and natural fracture orientations is an undertaking that requires the willingness to revise models as definitive data are acquired during drilling. The predictions made in this paper are offered with the caveat that geology in the subsurface is always full of surprises.

  11. Climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, S.A.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the method used to generate a climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. The scenario considers climate patterns that may change if the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2), or its greenhouse gas equivalent, were to double over pre-Industrial Revolution values. A composite approach was taken to generate a climate scenario that considers knowledge of current regional climate controls, available output from general circulation and regional climate models, and observed changes in climate.

  12. Plant biomass in the Tanana River Basin, Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, B.R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation biomass tables are presented for the Tanana River Basin. Average biomass for each species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in the 13 forest and 30 nonforest vegetation types is shown. These data combined with area estimates for each vegetation type provide a tool for estimating habitat carrying capacity for many wildlife species. Tree biomass is reported for the entire aboveground tree, thereby allowing estimates of total fiber content.

  13. Land Use in Relation to Sedimentation in Reservoirs : Trinity River Basin, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Garin, Alexis N.

    1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cash in advance foY docks, fishing camps, et cetera. Few permanent. imprdvements, how- ever, and the period of time since the construction of the reservoir has been so short that not much road construction has been possible. *That is, annual...LIBRARY. ' A & M COLLEGE. 1 - k TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas 'ULLETIN NO. 597 JANUARY 1941 LAND USE IN RELATION TO SEDIMENTA- TION IN RESERVOIRS, TRINITY RIVER BASIN, TEXAS I I 1...

  14. 8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited. Moreover, water pollution is serious, with significant wastewater reuse for irrigation within the basin. Lastly, water is being transferred from agriculture to the urban and industrial sectors, without due

  15. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

  16. Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unminable coal beds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this report is to provide a final topical report on enhanced coal bed methane recovery and CO2 sequestration to the U.S. Department of Energy in fulfillment of a Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership milestone. This report summarizes work done at Idaho National Laboratory in support of Phase II of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. Research that elucidates the interaction of CO2 and coal is discussed with work centering on the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Sorption-induced strain, also referred to as coal swelling/shrinkage, was investigated. A new method of obtaining sorption-induced strain was developed that greatly decreases the time necessary for data collection and increases the reliability of the strain data. As coal permeability is a strong function of sorption-induced strain, common permeability models were used to fit measured permeability data, but were found inadequate. A new permeability model was developed that can be directly applied to coal permeability data obtained under laboratory stress conditions, which are different than field stress conditions. The coal permeability model can be used to obtain critical coal parameters that can be applied in field models. An economic feasibility study of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming was done. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 Mg) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin, they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

  17. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  18. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  19. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

  20. Design of a sediment quality assessment for the tidal Christina River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, K.; Allen, R.; Williams, S. [Delaware State Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Dover, DE (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed baseline sediment study was designed and conducted within the tidal portion of the Christina River Basin, Delaware. A complementary battery of field-screening and laboratory analyses was established in order to obtain substantial coverage of the basin at reasonable cost. The approach provided for 180 sediment sample locations from a 15 mile stretch of the Christina River, the proximal reaches of its tributaries, and associated wetlands. Analytical parameters consisted of physiochemical measurements (TOC, grain size distribution, and redox potential), total metals, major anions, carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pH, and metals partitioning analysis. Toxicity indicators included in the study were: SEM/AVS analysis, IQ{reg_sign} toxicity tests, Microtox{reg_sign}, and Hyalella azteca 10-day acute toxicity tests. This basin-wide approach successfully established a database of sediment information that allowed for the determination of: contaminants of concern; contaminant spatial distribution; potential ecological impacts; contaminant/indicator relationships; and potential upland contaminant source areas. The incorporation of low cost field and analytical methods permitted the use of short-spaced systematic sampling thus eliminating stratified random sampling methods and the need to focus on localized reaches. The database was sufficiently large to allow for statistically valid analyses of the results. Additionally, it will aid in the delineation of relevant strata for subsequent monitoring, provide a comparative baseline for future investigations, and guide state decision-making.

  1. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  2. Alabama - SEP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Huntsville program fact sheet Sample Energy Performance Score report Facebook: Nexus Energy Center Alabama Program Takes a Dual Approach to Energy Efficiency Upgrades Alabama...

  3. Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

    The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River...

  4. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  5. Provenance study and environments of deposition of the Pennslyvanian-Permian Wood River Formation, south-central Idaho, and the paleotectonic character of the Wood River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Christopher William

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and provenance of the conglomerates in the Big Wood River and Fish Creek Reservoir regions of south-central Idaho is needed. Distinguishing between marine and non-marine strata and determining source terranes will aid in reconstructing Wood River basin... paleogeography and paleo- tectonics. Three source areas have been postulated in recent years: 1, The Antler highland to the west, containing volcanics and low grade metamorphic rocks (Bissell, 1960; Churkin, 1962; Roberts and Thomasson, 1964). 2. The stable...

  6. Lead exposure of waterfowl ingesting Coeur d`Alene River Basin sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyer, W.N.; Morton, A. [Geological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States). Patuxent Wildlife Research Center; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States). Coeur d`Alene Basin NRDA and Restoration Office; LeCaptain, L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Klamath Basin Ecosystem Restoration Office

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feces from tundra swans [Bygnus columbianus (Ord)], Canada geese [Branta canadensis (L.)], and mallards [Anas platrhynchos (L.)] were collected from the Coeur d`Alene River Basin and two reference areas in Idaho to estimate exposure to lead from mining activities and relate that exposure to the ingestion of contaminated sediments. The average acid-insoluble ash content of the feces, a measure of sediment ingestion, was 18% for Canada geese and tundra swans, and 12% for ducks. The 18% value corresponded to an estimated 9% sediment ingestion rate (dry weight). The 90th percentile for acid-insoluble ash in feces of tundra swans-corresponded to an estimated 22% sediment in the diet. The average lead concentration (dry weight) of tundra swan feces from all Coeur d`Alene River Basin wetlands sampled was 880 mg/kg, compared to 2.1 mg kg{sup {minus}1} from reference areas. the 90th percentile of lead in tundra swan feces from the Coeur d`Alene River Basin sites was 2700 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. Fecal lead concentrations of tundra swans were correlated with the acid-insoluble ash content of the feces. The very low lead concentrations in feces having low acid-insoluble ash contents established that the sediment was the primary source of the lead ingested by waterfowl. Sediment lead concentrations at 11 wetland sites were closely correlated with average fecal lead concentrations for all waterfowl, corrected for the average percent acid-insoluble ash in the feces.

  7. Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Resources International

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

  8. Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

  9. What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

  10. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department of Renewable Resources

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Mercury Methylation at Mercury Mines In The Humboldt River Basin, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, John E. (U.S. Geological Survey); Crock, James G. (U.S. Geological Survey); Lasorsa, Brenda K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Hg and methylmercury concentrations were measured in mine-waste calcines (retorted ore), sediment, and water samples collected in and around abandoned mercury mines in western Nevada to evaluate Hg methylation at the mines and in the Humboldt River basin. Mine-waste calcines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 14 000?g/g. Stream-sediment samples collected within 1 km of the mercury mines contain total Hg concentrations as high as 170?g/g, whereas stream sediments collected>5 km from the mines, and those collected from the Humboldt River and regional baseline sites, contain total Hg concentrations<0.5?g/g. Similarly, methylmercury concentrations in mine-waste calcines are locally as high as 96 ng/g, but methylmercury contents in stream-sediments collected downstream from the mines and from the Humboldt River are lower, ranging from<0.05 to 0.95 ng/g. Stream-water samples collected below two mines studied contain total Hg concentrations ranging from 6 to 2000 ng/L, whereas total Hg in Humboldt River water was generally lower ranging from 2.1 to 9.0 ng/L. Methylmercury concentrations in the Humboldt River water were the lowest in this study (<0.02-0.27 ng/L). Although total Hg and methylmercury concentrations are locally high in mine-waste calcines, there is significant dilution of Hg and lower Hg methylation down gradient from the mines, especially in the sediments and water collected from the Humboldt River, which is> 8 km from any mercury mines. Our data indicate little transference of Hg and methylmercury from the sediment to the water column due to the lack of mine runoff in this desert climate.

  12. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  13. Exploration pace fast in Mississippi, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration in northern and southern Mississippi and adjacent northwestern Alabama is off to a fast start in 1991. A sample of activity in the area includes a potentially significant Cambro-Ordovician Knox dolomite play building in northern Mississippi and west of the Black Warrior basin. In northeastern Mississippi, two companies are kicking off a Knox exploratory program on a spread of more than 200,000 net acres.

  14. Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

  15. Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

  16. Status Report: USGS coal assessment of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Luppens; Timothy J. Rohrbacher; Jon E. Haacke; David C. Scott; Lee M. Osmonson [USGS, Reston, VA (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication reports on the status of the current coal assessment of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This slide program was presented at the Energy Information Agency's 2006 EIA Energy Outlook and Modeling Conference in Washington, DC, on March 27, 2006. The PRB coal assessment will be the first USGS coal assessment to include estimates of both regional coal resources and reserves for an entire coal basin. Extensive CBM and additional oil and gas development, especially in the Gillette coal field, have provided an unprecedented amount of down-hole geological data. Approximately 10,000 new data points have been added to the PRB database since the last assessment (2002) which will provide a more robust evaluation of the single most productive U.S. coal basin. The Gillette coal field assessment, including the mining economic evaluation, is planned for completion by the end of 2006. The geologic portion of the coal assessment work will shift to the northern and northwestern portions of the PRB before the end of 2006 while the Gillette engineering studies are finalized. 7 refs.

  17. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  18. Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco the Cariaco Basin continental shelf and Orinoco delta was investigated in order to constrain the clay was studied using a geo-statistical approach that allows drawing representative clay-mineral distribution maps

  19. Towards application of a climate-index for Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Indonesia Ramon van Bruggen De Bilt, 2013 | Internal report; IR-2013-06 #12;#12;Towards application of a climate-index for dengue incidence Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia Master Thesis during this work and for their warm welcome during my stay in Indonesia. At last my thanks go

  20. Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison of different global data sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the spatio-temporal variations of total terrestrial water storage (the sum of ground water, soil water1 Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison mass variations monitored by GRACE, simulated surface and total water storage from WGHM, water levels

  1. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

  2. Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin Regional Power Plan Touts Efficiency to Meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin Regional Power equivalent of the power use of a city the size of Seattle. Over time, the energy- efficiency target, to meet future demand. The plan's target for the first five years, 1,200 average megawatts, is the energy

  3. Prioritizing Areas of the Conasauga River Sub-basin in Georgia and Tennessee for Preservation and Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    controversial (Simon et al., 2007). Here we define restoration to mean direct modification of stream channels. Because both land preservation and stream restoration are expensive tools, there is a general public and Restoration SETH J. WENGER1,*, MEGAN M. HAGLER2, AND BYRON J. FREEMAN3 1University of Georgia River Basin

  4. Quantification of Water Quality Improvement in Sandy Creek, A Tributary Watershed of Jordan Lake in the Cape Fear River Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Cape Fear River Basin, After Stream and Riparian Restoration and Wetland Treatment Cell Creation: Final to restoration. The Duke Forest Stream and Wetlands Restoration was established to rectify these problems delivery following watershed development, a three-phase stream and floodplain restoration was planned

  5. Bridging river basin scales and processes to assess human-climate impacts and the terrestrial hydrologic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagener, Thorsten

    scales impacts of storm water from urban/suburban development on water quantity and quality have been and implementation of integrated instrumentation, a new generation of models, and a management framework that clearly of our water resources at the river basin scale. This paper concludes with a discussion of how a network

  6. Groundwater availability and flow processes in the Williston and Powder River basins in the Northern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Groundwater availability and flow processes in the Williston and Powder River basins Center, Cheyenne, WY 4 Office of Groundwater, Denver, CO 5 Oklahoma Water Science Center, Oklahoma City in Montana and Wyoming, provides an opportunity to study the water-energy nexus within a groundwater context

  7. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in sediments of the Upper Scheldt River Basin: contamination levels and source apportionment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Author manuscript, published in "Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11, 5 (2009) 1086-1093" DOI : 10 and Antwerp. Anthropogenic activities including textile and chemical industries, transport, coal mining, paper) has been developing an integrated and coordinated water management plan for the whole river basin

  8. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 FY 2008-2009 F&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    among life histories. Specific project objectives include identification of spatiotemporal patterns: technical and/or scientific background At least two genetically distinct subspecies of rainbow trout in the San Poil River Basin exhibit the fluvial or fluvial-adfluvial life history strategy, for the purposes

  9. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-2001 Report : Populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan and Methow River Drainages.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project was to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-2001 was year three (and final year) of a project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-2001 we worked in collaboration with the Wenatchee National Forest to catalog populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan, and Methow River drainages of Washington State.

  10. Water Rules (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure...

  11. Observation of induced fractures intercepted by mining in the Warrior Basin, Alabama. Topical report. Rock Creek methane from multiple coal seams completion project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steidl, P.F.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research and inspection of induced fractures that have been intercepted by mining. Induced fractures from 13 wells intercepted by mining were inspected at the Jim Walter Resources' (JWR) No. 4 and 5 Mines in Tuscaloosa County, and the Oak Grove Mine in Jefferson County, Alabama. In this area the Mary Lee and Blue Creek coalbeds average 1.3 ft and 4 to 5.5 ft, respectively at depths of about 2,000 ft at the JWR mines and 1,000 ft in the Oak Grove Mine. These seams are usually separated by 2 to 10 ft of rock parting. The wells were completed open hole from 1982 to 1986. Hydraulic fracture treatments were used to stimulate production. Some expected results include: in general, the fractures followed the coal face cleat direction; they were vertical, and were sandpacked close to the wall. Other observations include the following: (1) most of the fractures and proppant were present in the parting and roof rock, (2) results were similar in the JWR and Oak Grove Mines even though there is 1,000 ft less overburden at the Oake Grove Mine, and (3) no horizontal fractures were observed in the study; though other stimulations have propagated horizontal fractures at Oak Grove.

  12. Subtask 7.4 - Power River Basin Subbituminous Coal-Biomass Cogasification Testing in a Transport Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the Kellogg Brown and Root transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 3600 hours of operation on 17 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air- and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 90% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and oxygen/fuel ratios. During this series of tests, a previously tested baseline Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming was mixed with 20 wt% biomass. Two types of biomass were used - wood waste and switchgrass. Gas and particulate sampling at several locations in the riser provided information on coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry as a function of residence time, transport gas, and mode of operation. The goal of these tests was to compare the operating data and sample chemistry of the coal-biomass mixture to the PRB coal, with a focus on Fischer-Tropsch coal-to-liquid production in oxygen-blown mode. Data are to be provided to DOE to determine kinetic rates of devolatilization and tar cracking.

  13. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields, Black Warrior basin, Alabama. [Annual] yearly report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Class I PON, Anderman/Smith Operating Company is targeting three Carter sandstone oilfields (Black Warrior basin) for secondary recovery. Waterfloods are underway in two of the areas -- Central Bluff and North Fairview units. For the third area, South Bluff, negotiations are underway to unitize the field. Once South Bluff is unitized, waterflooding will commence.

  14. Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

  15. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  16. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

  17. Viability of underground coal gasification in the 'deep coals' of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the PRB coal geology, hydrology, infrastructure, environmental and permitting requirements and to analyze the possible UCG projects which could be developed in the PRB. Project economics on the possible UCG configurations are presented to evaluate the viability of UCG. There are an estimated 510 billion tons of sub-bituminous coal in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. These coals are found in extremely thick seams that are up to 200 feet thick. The total deep coal resource in the PRB has a contained energy content in excess of twenty times the total world energy consumption in 2002. However, only approximately five percent of the coal resource is at depths less than 500 feet and of adequate thickness to be extracted by open pit mining. The balance is at depths between 500 and 2,000 feet below the surface. These are the PRB 'deep coals' evaluated for UCG in this report. The coal deposits in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming are thick, laterally continuous, and nearly flat lying. These deposits are ideal for development by Underground Coal Gasification. The thick deep coal seams of the PRB can be harvested using UCG and be protective of groundwater, air resources, and with minimum subsidence. Protection of these environmental values requires correct site selection, site characterization, impact definition, and impact mitigation. The operating 'lessons learned' of previous UCG operations, especially the 'Clean Cavity' concepts developed at Rocky Mountain 1, should be incorporated into the future UCG operations. UCG can be conducted in the PRB with acceptable environmental consequences. The report gives the recommended development components for UCG commercialization. 97 refs., 31 figs., 57 tabs., 1 app.

  18. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  19. Characterization and fluid flow simulation of naturally fractured Frontier sandstone, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harstad, H. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM (United States); Teufel, L.W.; Lorenz, J.C.; Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant gas reserves are present in low-permeability sandstones of the Frontier Formation in the greater Green River Basin, Wyoming. Successful exploitation of these reservoirs requires an understanding of the characteristics and fluid-flow response of the regional natural fracture system that controls reservoir productivity. Fracture characteristics were obtained from outcrop studies of Frontier sandstones at locations in the basin. The fracture data were combined with matrix permeability data to compute an anisotropic horizontal permeability tensor (magnitude and direction) corresponding to an equivalent reservoir system in the subsurface using a computational model developed by Oda (1985). This analysis shows that the maximum and minimum horizontal permeability and flow capacity are controlled by fracture intensity and decrease with increasing bed thickness. However, storage capacity is controlled by matrix porosity and increases linearly with increasing bed thickness. The relationship between bed thickness and the calculated fluid-flow properties was used in a reservoir simulation study of vertical, hydraulically-fractured and horizontal wells and horizontal wells of different lengths in analogous naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The simulation results show that flow capacity dominates early time production, while storage capacity dominates pressure support over time for vertical wells. For horizontal wells drilled perpendicular to the maximum permeability direction a high target production rate can be maintained over a longer time and have higher cumulative production than vertical wells. Longer horizontal wells are required for the same cumulative production with decreasing bed thickness.

  20. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields -- Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Anderman/Smith Operating Co. is operating a secondary oil recovery project involving the Carter sandstone in northwest Alabama. The project objectives are: (1) to increase the ultimate economic recovery of oil from the Carter reservoirs, thereby increasing domestic reserves and lessening US dependence on foreign oil; (2) to extensively model, test, and monitor the reservoirs so their management is optimized; and (3) to assimilate and transfer the information and results gathered to other US oil companies to encourage them to attempt similar projects. As a result of waterflood operations at the Central Buff unit, oil production from the Fowler Brasher 7--9 well increased to 40--50 stb/d in late October, and averaged about 45 stb/d in November with no measurable water production. Production at the Fowler Dodson 8--12 was more erratic during the same period. In October, the oil rate for this well increased to nearly 17 stb/d with no reported water production. However, in November the oil production rate declined to about 9 stb/d with an associated average water rate of nearly 17 bpd. Water analysis showed that this produced water was significantly fresher than the connate water produced prior to waterflood operations. This provides evidence for early breakthrough of water injected at the Jones 7--16 well and will be an important consideration in the reservoir modeling study being performed for the unit. There has been essentially no change in the waterflood response at the North Fairview Unit during the last quarter. Oil production rates from the three producing wells have remained unchanged; that is, 3 stb/d for Smith 33-6, 2 stb/d for Perkins 33--11, and 1 stb/d for the Perkins Young 33--10 well.

  1. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

  2. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  3. Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelghani, A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

  5. Genetic and Phenotype [Phenotypic] Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-99 Report : Populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State.

  6. Depositional environment of lower Green River Formation sandstones (Eocene), Red Wash field (Uinta Basin), Uintah County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Anthony Scott

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) occurred. The resulting increase in water supply to Lake Uinta while sediment remained trapped in the northern basin caused a period of exceptionally high biologic activity. This allowed the deposition of the rich oil shales for which the Green River... brown, brittle shales make up the majority of this unit. Minor amounts of limestone, dolomite, and siltstone are also present. Some of the shales are "oil shales". This 440 ft ( 134 m) thick Member is responsible for most of the production from...

  7. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  8. Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

  9. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  10. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  11. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  12. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  13. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  14. The authors of the ISAB Report Columbia River Basin Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for Fish and Wildlife Restoration (ISAB 2011-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The authors of the ISAB Report Columbia River Basin Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific restoration: Columbia River food webs Abstract. Well-functioning food webs are fundamental for sustaining on restoring habitat structure--without explicitly considering food webs--has been less successful than hoped

  15. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  16. The key to minimizing minesite versus utility laboratory analyses on Powder River Basin coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rexin, M.G.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powder River Basin (PRB) coals are continuing to expand their areas of use into regions previously reserved for higher ranked coals. PRB coals are subbituminous by rank. Inherent moisture values of 25 to 30 percent are the norm. PRB coals, being lower rank in nature, also tend to oxidize very easily. These factors combined produce a coal which can cause analysis problems for laboratories unaccustomed to PRB coals. In fact, even laboratories that deal with this type of coal on a daily basis can experience analytical difficulties. Special care needs to be taken by both minesite laboratory and the utility laboratory to ensure accurate analyses. Cooperation between both parties is the key to reproducible analyses. Only by working together can parties fully analyze the situation and develop analytical methods acceptable to both. This paper will describe the methods employed by the Caballo Rojo Mine (CRM) and the Georgia Power Company (GPC) to resolve laboratory analysis differences found during shipments by CRM to GPC beginning in 1994. The following topics are discussed: initial comparative results, analytical investigations, the cooperative process, recent comparative results, and conclusions.

  17. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Chris Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; James Drahovzal; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; John Bocan; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' has reached the mid-point in a two-year research effort to produce a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 exploration and production companies and 6 research team members, including four state geological surveys, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks and one administrative and technology transfer task are being conducted basin-wide by research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined at least once. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 10 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York and Pennsylvania. In addition, three surfaces in that area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. In the Kentucky-Ohio-West Virginia portion of the study area, a velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Fifteen formation tops have been identified on seismic in that area. Preliminary conclusions based on the available seismic data do not support the extension of the Rome Trough into New York state. Members of the stratigraphy task team measured, described and photographed numerous cores from throughout the basin, and tied these data back to their network of geophysical log cross sections. Geophysical logs were scanned in raster files for use in detailed well examination and construction of cross sections. Logs on these cross sections that are only in raster format are being converted to vector format for final cross section displays. The petrology team measured and sampled one classic outcrop in Pennsylvania and ten cores in four states. More than 600 thin sections were prepared from samples in those four states. A seven-step procedure is being used to analyze all thin sections, leading to an interpretation of the sequence of diagenetic events and development of porosity in the reservoir. Nearly 1000 stable isotope geochemistry samples have been collected from cores in four of the five states in the study area. More than 400 of these samples will be analyzed for fluid inclusion and/or strontium isotope analyses, as well. Gas samples have been collected from 21 wells in four states and analyzed for chemical content and isotope analyses of carbon and hydrogen. Because natural gases vary in chemical and isotope composition as a function of their formation and migration history, crossplots of these values can be very revealing. Gas from the Homer field in Kentucky indicates compartmentalization and at least two different sources. Gas from the York field in Ohio also came from at least two discrete compartments. Gas from the Cottontree field in West Virginia is very dry, probably generated from post-mature source rocks. Isotope reversals may be indicative of cracking of residual oil. Gas from Glodes Corners Road field in New York also is post-mature, dry gas, and again isotope reversals may indicate cracking of residual oil in the reservoir. Noble gases are predominantly of crustal origin, but a minor helium component was derived from the mantle. The project web server continues to evolve as the project progresses. The user/password authenticated website has 18 industry partner users and 20 research team users. Software has been installed to track website use. Two meetings of the research team were held to review the status of the project and prepare reports to be given to the full consortium. A meeting of the full consortium--industry partners and researchers--was very successful. However, the ultimate product of the research could be improved if industry members were more forthcoming with proprietary data.

  18. Alabama Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article establishes a program, to be implemented, maintained, and administered by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, to encourage the voluntary cleanup and the reuse and...

  19. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  20. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  1. A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John Henry

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General descri tion 14 Rainfall and eva oration Ground water Surface water Runoff Floods ~ua I i t Surface water reservoirs 15 15 15 15 16 17 18 ~ti t td 20 Com uter ro rams 22 Partial duration - inde endent low flow events ro ram 22 Data... cards Card I Card 11 Card 111 and 111. 1 Flow data cards Bod of the ro ram 23 24 24 25 25 25 25 30 Reservoir ield ro ram 34 t d t 4O VI Bod of the ro ram 41 ~ft t 46 Red River Basin 47 General descri tion 47 Rainfall and eva oration...

  2. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200880000 ISRP FAN1B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Accords) are ten-year agreements between the federal action agencies and states and tribes. The Accords supplement the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and are intended substantial biological benefits for Columbia Basin fish. The Accords also acknowledge the tribes' and states

  3. Recovery Act State Memos Alabama

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    two graduate students throughout its duration. MontgoMery Hurricanes, tornadoes, jobs and energy efficiency in Montgomery, Alabama Warm, humid climate and proximity to the Gulf of...

  4. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Tara

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

  5. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  6. NOx EMISSIONS PRODUCED WITH COMBUSTION OF POWDER RIVER BASIN COAL IN A UTILITY BOILER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Nordin; Norman W. Merriam

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to estimate the NOx emissions produced when Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is combusted in a utility boiler. The Clean Air Act regulations specify NOx limits of 0.45 lb/mm Btu (Phase I) and 0.40 lb/mm Btu (Phase II) for tangentially fired boilers, and 0.50 lb/mm 13tu (Phase II) and 0.46 lb/mm Btu (Phase II) for dry-bottom wall-fired boilers. The Clean Air Act regulations also specify other limits for other boiler types. Compliance for Phase I has been in effect since January 1, 1996. Compliance for Phase II goes into effect on January 1, 2000. Emission limits are expressed as equivalent NO{sub 2} even though NO (and sometimes N{sub 2}O) is the NOx species emitted during combustion. Regulatory agencies usually set even lower NOx emission limits in ozone nonattainment areas. In preparing this report, Western Research Institute (WRI) used published test results from utilities burning various coals, including PRB coal, using state-of-the art control technology for minimizing NOx emissions. Many utilities can meet Clean Air Act NOx emission limits using a combination of tight combustion control and low-NOx burners and by keeping furnaces clean (i.e., no slag buildup). In meeting these limits, some utilities also report problems such as increased carbon in their fly ash and excessive furnace tube corrosion. This report discusses utility experience. The theory of NOx emission formation during coal combustion as related to coal structure and how the coal is combusted is also discussed. From this understanding, projections are made for NOx emissions when processed PRB coal is combusted in a test similar to that done with other coals. As will be shown, there are a lot of conditions for achieving low NOx emissions, such as tight combustion control and frequent waterlancing of the furnace to avoid buildup of deposits.

  7. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Robert Bereskin

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Anastamosing, low gradient distributary channels produce {approx}30 gravity, paraffinic oils from the Middle Member of the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation in the south-central portion of the Uinta Basin. This localized depocenter was situated along the fluctuating southern shoreline of Lake Uinta, where complex deposits of marginal-lacustrine to lower delta plain accumulations are especially characteristic. The Middle Member contains several fining-upward parasequences that can be recognized in outcrop, core, and downhole logs. Each parasequence is about 60 to 120 feet thick and consists of strata deposited during multiple lake level fluctuations that approach 30 to 35 feet in individual thickness. Such parasequences represent 300,000-year cycles based on limited absolute age dating. The subaerial to subaqueous channels commonly possess an erosional base and exhibit a fining upward character. Accordingly, bedding features commonly range from large-scale trough and planar cross bedding or lamination at the base, to a nonreservoir, climbing ripple assemblage near the uppermost reservoir boundary. The best reservoir quality occurs within the laminated to cross-stratified portions, and the climbing ripple phase usually possesses more deleterious micas and/or detrital clays. Diagenesis also exerts a major control on reservoir quality. Certain sandstones were cemented by an early, iron-poor calcite cement, which can be subsequently leached. Secondary intergranular porosity (up to 20%) is largely responsible for the 10 -100 millidarcy rock, which represents petrophysical objectives for both primary and secondary production. Otherwise, intense compaction, silicic and iron-rich carbonate cements, and authigenic clays serve to reduce reservoir quality to marginal economic levels.

  8. Alabama DOT: Alabama Report Questions on NDT Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama DOT: Alabama Report Questions on NDT Testing 1. What NDT testing methods for concrete materials, concrete pavements, and overlays are you trying? · We perform pavement smoothness testing, pavement friction testing and FWD testing · We are currently using GPR on the I-59 project to locate voids

  9. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  10. Hazardous materials in aquatic environment of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into four aspects relating to water pollution problems in the Mississippi River Basin. They are: collaborative cluster research projects, in which investigators employ a synergistic approach to the solution of problems; initiation research projects, in which a single investigator is involved ; technical support activities, which involve anything that is required to support the research; and the research training and education core, which is designed to develop courses with emphasis on environmental studies. This report presents the objectives and accomplishments of the various research projects for July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996.

  11. Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Alabama Applies to States or Provinces Alabama Name Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type...

  12. South Alabama Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Alabama Electric Cooperative (SAEC) is a part owner of Alabama Electric Cooperative which has a generation facility in Andalusia, Alabama. The Energy Resources Conservation Loan (ERC) helps...

  13. Hardgrove grindability study of Powder River Basin and Appalachian coal components in the blend to a midwestern power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, P.L.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Five coals representing four distinct coal sources blended at a midwestern power station were subjected to detailed analysis of their Hardgrove grindability. The coals are: a low-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal (Pike County, KY); a medium-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Pittsburgh coal (southwestern PA); a low-sulfur, subbituminous Wyodak coal from two mines in the eastern Powder River Basin (Campbell County, WY). The feed and all samples processed in the Hardgrove grindability test procedure were analyzed for their maceral and microlithotype content. The high-vitrinite Pittsburgh coal and the relatively more petrographically complex Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal exhibit differing behavior in grindability. The Pittsburgh raw feed, 16x30 mesh fraction (HGI test fraction), and the {minus}30 mesh fraction (HGI reject) are relatively similar petrographically, suggesting that the HGI test fraction is reasonably representative of the whole feed. The eastern Kentucky coal is not as representative of the whole feed, the HGI test fraction having lower vitrinite than the rejected {minus}30 mesh fraction. The Powder River Basin coals are high vitrinite and show behavior similar to the Pittsburgh coal.

  14. WATER-QUALITY CONDITIONS DURING LOW FLOW IN THE LOWER YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER BASIN, PENNSYLVANIA, OCTOBER 5-7, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James I. Sams, III, Karl T. Schroeder; Terry E. Ackman; J. Kent Crawford; Kim L. Otto

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1998, a chemical synoptic survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, in the Lower Youghiogheny River Basin in Pennsylvania to give a snap-shot of present (1998) water quality during low-flow conditions. Water samples from 38 sites--12 mainstem sites, 22 tributaries, and 4 mine discharges that discharge directly to the Youghiogheny River--were used to identify sources of contaminants from mining operations. Specific conductance, water temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the field at each site and concentrations of major ions and trace elements were measured in the laboratory. Unaccounted for gains and losses in streamflow were measured during the study. Unaccounted for losses in streamflow might be attributed to water loss through streambed fractures. Extensive mine tunnels are present in the basin and loss of water to these tunnels seems likely. Unaccounted for gains in streamflow may be from unmeasured tributaries or surface seeps, but most of the gains are suspected to come from artesian flow through fractures in the streambed from underground mine pools. Influent flows of rust-colored water were noted in some river sections. The pH values for all the samples collected during this survey were above 5.8, and most (33 of 38 samples) were above 7.0. Samples from the four mine-discharge sites also had pH values between 6.3 and 6.7. The lowest pH (5.8) was in a tributary, Galley Run. All 38 sampling sites had net alkalinity. The alkalinity load in the Youghiogheny River increased between Connellsville and McKeesport from 35 to 79 tons per day. Above Smithton, the measured alkalinity load in the Lower Youghiogheny River agreed well with the estimated alkalinity load. Below Smithton, measured alkalinity loads in the Lower Youghiogheny River are greater than calculated loads, resulting in unaccounted for gains in alkalinity. These gains are believed to be from seeps in the streambed. Approximately one-third of the load of total alkalinity in the Youghiogheny River at McKeesport is attributed to Sewickley Creek, which contributes 14 tons per day. Sulfate concentrations in the Youghiogheny River steadily increase from 33 milligrams per liter at Connellsville to 77 milligrams per liter near McKeesport. The measured concentrations of sulfate exceeded Pennsylvania water-quality standards at four tributary sites (Galley Run, Hickman Run, Sewickley Creek, and Gillespie Run) and all four mine-discharge sites but not at any main-stem sites. A large increase in sulfate load between West Newton and Sutersville can be attributed almost entirely to the contribution from Sewickley Creek (49 tons per day). Approximately 25 percent of the load measured between Connellsville and McKeesport is unaccounted for. These gains are believed to be from seeps in the streambed from underground mine pools. Similar patterns also were observed for loads of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. Unmeasured inputs from mine rainage are believed to be the source of these loads. Elevated concentrations (above background levels) of chemicals associated with drainage from coal-mining operations were measured in samples from tributaries, especially from Galley Run, Gillespie Run, and Sewickley Creek, and from the mine-discharge sites. The synoptic survey conducted for this study was successful in identifying generalized reaches of the Youghiogheny River where unaccounted for loads of constituents associated with mining activities are entering the river. However, the survey was not able to pinpoint the location of these loads. Remote-sensing techniques, such as thermal infrared imaging by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, could be useful for determining the precise locations of these inputs.

  15. Two Years in the Life of the Indus River Basin [book chapter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Reviews the major challenges and current water and agriculture context, plans, and policies following difficult years of drought and catastrophic monsoon flooding in Pakistan's Indus Basin. The years from 2009 through 2011 ...

  16. LAND RESOURCES AND HOUSEHOLD STRATEGIES IN A CHANGED SOCIO-ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT -SOKOLUK RIVER BASIN (TIEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    BASIN (TIEN SHAN, KYRGYZSTAN) Jyldyz Shigaeva (International University of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek), Almaz Shanazarov (International University of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek), Michael Kollmair (Department of GeographyD study at the International University of Kyrgyzstan in Bishkek funded by the National Centre

  17. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

  18. Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

  19. Effect of Urbanization and Climate Change on Hydrological Processes over the San Antonio River Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gang

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    . Another study by Cuo et al. (2011) investigated the change of flows over Puget Sound in the Pacific Northwest under urbaninzation and climate change, respectively. Despite the perspectives gained through the previous studies, knowledge about three... of the Puget Sound basin in Washington State (Cuo et al., 2008, 2009, 2011; Vano et al., 2010). The DHSVM input data includes a digital elevation map (DEM), a basin boundary mask, soil texture information, and land cover types. In this study, the DEM data...

  20. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

  1. Environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system technology demonstration plan for use at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R.D. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drillbit data during drilling operations. This demonstration plan presents information on the EMWD-GRS technology, demonstration design, Cs-137 contamination at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin, responsibilities of demonstration participants, and the policies and procedures for the demonstration to be conducted at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration will consist of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes will pass near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels are known. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling will be compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  2. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  3. Soil Conservation in the Yangtze River Basin By Nicholas Gervais 3169537

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    area) · Developed formula to evaluate the value ecological service of forests for hydroelectric power agricultural · Traditional farming · Hydroelectric conservation · Sediment flux · Conclusion Yangtze River decades (Xiubin et al 2007) Study site profile (Xiubin et al 2007) Hydroelectric conservation · Zhongwei

  4. Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffel, Markus

    valve to the entire Syr Darya river system, the Toktogul reservoir in Kyrgyzstan could take over more than four million square kilometres, the post-Soviet states of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan

  5. Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems...

  6. Abundance of the Louisiana Black Bear in the Upper Atchafalaya River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    125 PSB Arkansas Background/Justification the `Delta' · Mississippi River Alluvial Valley of being captured not realistic! M d l t l thi ti Behavior Model -trap happy/shy Heterogeneity Model -age

  7. area sichuan basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 59 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  8. area tarim basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 65 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  9. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

  10. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy (EG& G Services) [EG& G Services; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy (Advanced Resources International) [Advanced Resources International

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  11. Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    , Rapid City, SD 57702, email: jbednar@usgs.gov Groundwater availability in the Lower Tertiary and Upper in parts of Montana and Wyoming. Both structural basins are in the forefront of energy development associated with measuring streamflow, only fall estimates of base flow were used in the study. A net balance

  12. Climate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along a Mediterranean Basin river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    Populus nigra (Salicaceae) In-channel gravel mining Climate change Dynamic fluvial processes strongly controls on soil depth. Climate in the Drôme basin and in the Mediterranean region is trendingClimate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along

  13. AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) is now offering an energy efficiency and renewable energy revolving loan fund called AlabamaSAVES. The funds are available to...

  14. Upper Carboniferous Insects from the Pottsville Formation of Northern Alabama (Insecta: Ephemeropterida, Palaeodictyopterida, Odonatoptera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckemeyer, Roy J.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    coal zone, in northern Alabama from localities associated with strip mines. All the sites are in the Black Warrior coal basin (Murrie et al., 1976); two are in Walker County and one in Tuscaloosa County (Fig. 1). Most of the fossils...

  15. Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River mussel infestation. We estimated hydropower maintenance costs associated with zebra mussels by examining, and a survey of zebra mussel mitigation costs at other hydropower generation facilities in North America. We

  16. Climate change projection of snowfall in the Colorado River Basin using dynamical downscaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    . Dominguez, M. Durcik, J. Valdes, H. F. Diaz, and C. L. Castro (2012), Climate change projection of snowfall Sungwook Wi,1 Francina Dominguez,2,3 Matej Durcik,3 Juan Valdes,1,3 Henry F. Diaz,4 and Christopher L approximately 85% of the river's 17.2 Ã? 109 m3 annual flow [Christensen and Lettenmaier, 2007; Serreze et al

  17. Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

  18. Hydrodynamic effect on oil accumulation in a stratigraphic trap, Kitty Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larberg, Gregory Martin

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stratigraphic traps in the Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstones on the east flank of the basin (Figure 1). The nine ? township area immediately surrounding Kitty in- cludes Kingsbury and Mill ? Gillette fields and is well ? suited for hydrodynamic study because... understanding of the relationships between pressures, flow, and the rocks themselves. 14 Nethods Subsurface data from the nine township area surround- ing Kitty field is abundant and readily available from in- dustry sources. Over 530 class "A" (analyzable...

  19. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  20. Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippert, Peter Gregory

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

  1. Urban land-use effects on groundwater phosphate distribution in a shallow aquifer, Nanfei River basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    basin, China Jiazhong Qian & Lulu Wang & Hongbin Zhan & Zhou Chen Abstract Groundwater, surface water

  2. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

  3. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  4. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  5. Status Report of the Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra Trzdentata) in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David A.; Parker, Blaine; James, gary

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread decline of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Pacific Northwest, especially in the Columbia River system has led to concerns and questions from a number of regional agencies, Native American tribes, and the public. To address these concerns, new research efforts must focus on specific problems associated with this understudied species. The preservation and restoration of this species is critical for a number of reasons, including its importance to the tribes and its importance as an indicator of ecosystem health. Historically lamprey have been labeled a pest species due to the problems associated with the exotic sea lamprey, (Petromyzon marinus), invading the Great Lakes.

  6. Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

  7. Population Structure of Columbia River Basin Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Technical Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, E.L.; National Science Foundation (U.S.)

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead trout is presented as an assimilation of the life history forms that have evolved in synchrony with diverse and complex environments over their Pacific range. As poikilotherms, temperature is described as the overwhelming environmental influence that determines what life history options occur and where they are distributed. The different populations represent ecological types referred to as spring-, summer-, fall, and winter-run segments, as well as stream- and ocean-type, or stream- and ocean-maturing life history forms. However, they are more correctly described as a continuum of forms that fall along a temporal cline related to incubation and rearing temperatures that determine spawn timing and juvenile residence patterns. Once new habitats are colonized, members of the founding populations spread through adaptive evolution to assume complementary life history strategies. The related population units are collectively referred to as a metapopulation, and members most closely associated within common temporal and geographic boundaries are designated as first-order metapopulations. Population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin, therefore, is the reflection of the genetic composition of the founding source or sources within the respective region, shaped by the environment, principally temperature, that defines life history evolutionary strategy to maximize fitness under the conditions delineated. The complexity of structure rests with the diversity of opportunities over the elevations that exist within the Basin. Consistent with natural selection, rather than simply attempting to preserve populations, the challenge is to provide opportunities to expand their range to new or restored habitat that can accommodate genetic adaptation as directional environmental changes are elaborated. Artificial propagation can have a critical role in this process, and the emphasis must be placed on promoting the ability for anadromous salmonids to respond to change by assuring that the genetic diversity to facilitate such responses is present. The key in developing an effective recovery program for chinook salmon and steelhead is to recognize that multiple life history forms associated with temperature characterize the species in the Columbia Basin, and recovery measures taken must address the biological requirements of the population unit within the environmental template identified. Unless such measures are given first and highest priority, establishment of biologically self-sustaining populations will be restrained.

  8. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations.

  9. Dual mechanisms of Laramide structural growth: the Bighorn uplift-Powder River basin transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.D. Jr.; Lisenbee, A.L.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bighorn uplift margin from Buffalo to Dayton, Wyoming, consists of a northern monoclinal domain and a southern fault-segmented domain. The Precambrian basement and overlying Paleozoic-Mesozoic strata have been rotated and folded in the monocline, producing a structural relief of 17,000 ft. Range-directed thrusts, formed by compression in the synclinal hinge of the monocline, are responsible for several second-order structures. The monocline may be transported eastward above a Rich-model thrust in the basement. The southern domain displays up to 20,000 ft of structural relief and consists of contiguous fault-bounded blocks with eastern margins 2 to 9 mi long. The largest and northernmost fault-bounded block, the Precambrian-cored Piney block, was transported eastward along a west-dipping reverse fault. Drilling indicates the fault overlies a vertical Cretaceous-Tertiary section underlain by nearly flat strata below the top of the Cretaceous Parkman Sandstone. Wells drilled through the Precambrian-cored Clear Creek thrust block west of Buffalo suggest a similar structural development. Reverse faulting in the southern domain occurred at a late stage, cutting through the synclinal flexure of the monocline, or occurred contemporaneously with the formation of the monocline to the north. Paleocene and Eocene syntectonic conglomerates underlie and front the range-bounding faults and exhibit basal angular unconformities. An arcuate band of conglomerates on the east side of Mowry basin implies the existence of other thrusts beneath Tertiary strata in the topographic basin, a conclusion reinforced by seismic data.

  10. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  11. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  12. Assessments of Environmental Impacts and Beneficial Use of Coalbed Methane Produced Water in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Morris

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact on water quality and the beneficial use of the coal bed methane (CBM) produced water are imminent questions to be answered due to the rapidly growing CBM exploration in the Powder River Basin (PRB). The practice of discharging large volumes of water into drainage channels or using it to irrigate rangeland areas has the potential of causing serious problems. The elevated salinity and sodicity in the CBM water may be detrimental to soils, plants and the associated microbial communities. There are limited studies on CBM water characterization; however, a comprehensive understanding of CBM water influence on the local ecosystem is lacking. It is very important that the water applied to soils meets the favorable combination of salinity and sodicity that will allow the plants to grow at good production levels and that will maintain the structure of the soils. The purpose of this study was to access various CBM water treatment technologies and the influence of the treated water on local biogeochemical settings in order to evaluate and identify the proper technologies to treat the CBM produced water from CBM operations, and use it in an environmentally safe manner. Unfortunately, a suitable field site was not identified and the funds for this effort were moved to a different project.

  13. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  14. Lance water injection tests adjacent to the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Myer, L.; Moridis, G.; Cook, P.; James, A.; Pellerin, L.; Pruess, K.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale field demonstration of waste isolation using viscous- liquid containment barriers has been planned for the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. The 281-3H basin is a shallow retention/seepage basin contaminated mainly by radionuclides. The viscous-liquid containment barrier utilizes the permeation of liquid grout to either entomb the contaminants within a monolithic grout structure or to isolate the waste by drastically reducing the permeability, of the soils around the plume. A clear understanding of the hydrogeologic setting of the retention basin is necessary for proper design of the viscous liquid barrier. To aid in the understanding of the hydrogeology of the 281-3H retention basin, and to obtain critical parameters necessary for grout injection design, a series of tests were undertaken in a region immediately adjacent to the basin. The objectives of the LWIT were: 1. To evaluate the general performance of the Lance Injection Technique for grout emplacement at the site, including the range and upper limits of injection pressures, the flow rates applicable for site conditions, as well as the mechanical forces needed for lance penetration. 2. To obtain detailed information on the injectability of the soils immediately adjacent to the H-area retention basin. 3. To identify any high permeability zones suitable for injection and evaluate their spatial distribution. 4. To perform ground penetrating radar (GPR) to gain information on the structure of the soil column and to compare the results with LWIT data. This report will focus on results pertinent to these objectives.

  15. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alabama has substantial natural resources, including gas, coal, biomass, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery &...

  16. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Alabama as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  17. Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable...

  18. Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to environmental covenants arising from environmental response projects conducted under any of the following Alabama Department of Environmental Management programs: Scrap...

  19. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Fox, J.E. [South Dakota School of Mines, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  20. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

  1. Competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on some native and reclamation species in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.B.; Knight, D.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four experiments were conducted to examine the competitive effects of introduced annual weeds on certain native and reclamation species. The first experiment was initiated by discing three sites in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, at three distances from introduced weed seed sources. Introduced weed colonization was greatest when a seed source was located nearby. Higher weed cover resulted in reductions of percent cover, density, and richness of the native species. The second experiment was conducted in the greenhouse and was designed to determine if there are changes in response of S. kali and the native grasses Agropyron smithii and Bouteloua gracilis to competition and water regime. Both grass species had lower biomass and higher stomatal resistance when growing in mixed culture with S. kali than in pure culture in the dry regime, but there were no significant differences in the wet regime. In general, the difference in plant response between mixed and pure cultures was more pronounced in the dry than in the wet regime. The third study was a greenhouse experiment on germination and competition of S. kali (a C/sub 4/ species) with native species Lepidium densiflorum (C/sub 3/), Chenopodium pratericola (C/sub 3/), A. smithii (C/sub 3/), and B. gracilis (C/sub 4/) under May, June, and July temperature regimes. Salsola kali germinated equally well in all three regimes, but the other C/sub 4/ species had highest germination in the July regime and the C/sub 3/ species in the May and June regimes. The fourth study was designed to examine the effect of weed colonization on the success of mine reclamation. Little effect was observed, but colonization by introduced annuals was very low. (ERB)

  2. Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun W. Lee; Shannon D. Serre; Yongxin Zhao; Sung Jun Lee; Thomas W. Hastings [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg{sup 0}. Concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg0 oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg{sup 0} oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg{sup 0} oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg{sup 0} oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH{sub 3} injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Subsidence history of the Alabama promontory in response to Late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita thrusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitting, B.M.; Thomas, W.A. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alabama promontory of North American continental crust was framed during late Precambrian-Cambrian rifting by the northeast-striking Blue Ridge rift and the northwest-striking alabama-Oklahoma transform fault. A passive margin persisted along the western side of the promontory from Cambrian to Mississippian time, but the eastern side was affected by the Taconic and Acadian orogenies. Prior to initiation of Ouachita and Appalachian (Alleghanian) thrusting, the outline of the rifted margin of continental crust on the Alabama promontory remained intact; and the late paleozoic thrust belt conformed to the shape of the promontory, defining northwest-striking Ouachita thrust faults along the southwest side of the promontory, north-striking Appalachian (Georgia-Tennessee) thrust faults on the east, and northeast-striking Appalachian (Alabama) thrust faults across the corner of the promontory. Subsidence profiles perpendicular to each of the strike domains of the thrust belt have been constructed by calculating total subsidence from decompacted thickness of the synorogenic sedimentary deposits. The profile perpendicular to the Ouachita thrust belt shows increasing subsidence rates through time and toward the thrust front, indicating the classic signature of an orogenic foreland basin. The profile perpendicular to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust belt similarly shows increasing subsidence rates through time and toward the orogenic hinterland. These quantitative results support the conclusion that Black Warrior basin subsidence is tectonically rather than sedimentologically driven, and the timing of subsidence events reported here has implications for regional tectonic models.

  4. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  5. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an audit and home energy rating tool; emphasis on community based coordination and partnerships; marketing and outreach to increase homeowner participation; training for market actors; access to financing options including rebates, incentives, and loan products; and an in depth process evaluation to support continual program improvement and analysis. In Alabama, Nexus Energy Center operated energy efficiency retrofit programs in Huntsville and Birmingham. In the Huntsville community the AlabamaWISE program was available in five Alabama counties: Cullman, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan. In Birmingham, the program was available to residents in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. In both communities, the program was similar in terms of program design but tailored marketing and partnerships to address the unique local conditions and population of each community. ADECA and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) provided overall project management services and common resources to the local program administrator Nexus Energy Center, including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection and reporting, and compliance. The fundamental components of the AlabamaWISE program included a vertical contractor-based business model; comprehensive energy assessments; third-party quality assurance; rebates for installation of energy saving measures; accessible, low-interest financing; targeted and inbound marketing; Energy Performance Score (EPS) tool to engage and educate homeowners; training for auditors, contractors, and real estate professionals; and online resources for education and program enrollment. Program participants were eligible to receive rebates or financing toward the assessments and upgrades to their home provided they reached at least 20 percent deemed or modeled energy savings. The design of each program focused on addressing several known barriers including: limited homeowner knowledge on the benefits of energy efficiency, lack of financing options, lack of community support for energy efficiency programs, and

  6. StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Resource Information Network - Status of Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Duane A.; Beamesderfer, Raymond C. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Enterprise, OR (United States); Woodard, Bob [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on fish populations, fisheries, and fish habitat is crucial to the success of ongoing program to protect, recover, enhance, and manage fish resources in the Columbia River Basin. However, pertinent data are often difficult to locate because it is scattered among many agencies and is often unpublished. The goal of this annual report is to bring many diverse data types and sources into a single comprehensive report on the status of anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin and the environmental conditions that may affect that status. Brief summaries are provided to identify the type and scope of available information. This synopsis is intended to complement other more detailed reports to which readers are referred for comprehensive treatment of specific subjects. This first report focuses mainly on anadromous salmon and steelhead (primarily through 1994) but the authors intend to expand the scope of future issues to include resident species. This is the first of what the authors intend to be an annual report. They welcome constructive suggestions for improvements. This report is a product of the StreamNet (formerly Coordinated Information System and Northwest Environmental Data Base) project which is a part of the Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The project is called for in the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The project`s objective is to promote exchange and dissemination of information in a standardized electronic format throughout the basin. This project is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission with active participation by tribal, state, and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

  7. Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    @BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

  8. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

  9. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the U.S. Department of Agriculture?s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the RGBI project, formally titled Efficient Irrigation for Water Conservation in the Rio Grande Basin, involves about 150 researchers, specialists, and county... the project. This team works with local irrigation districts, agricultural producers, homeowners, and other state and federal agencies to address the various water issues in the basin. ?The Rio Grande Basin Initiative is a model outcome- based program...

  10. Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet)

  11. Biodiversity and the Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Salmon Species in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report of 8 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, C. R. (Cleveland R.)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, and protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.

  12. Overview of GRI research at the Rock Creek Site, Black Warrior Basin. Overview of GRI research at Rock Creek: Eight years of cooperative research, coalbed methane shortcourse. Held in Birmingham, Alabama on October 21, 1992. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schraufnagel, R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation slides from the October 21, 1992 workshop on coalbed methane exploration and production are assembled in this volume. They illustrate the following discussions Overview of GRI Research at Rock Creek: Eight Years of Cooperative Research, Drilling and Completing Coalbed to the Formation: Perforations vs. Slotting, Coalbed Methane Well Testing in the Warrior Basin, Reservoir Engineering: A Case Study at Rock Creek, Fraccing of Multiple Thin Seams: Considerations and Constraints, Implementing Coal Seam Stimulations: Requirements for Successful Treatments, Coal-Fluid Interactions, Mine-Through Observations of Coal Seam Stimulations: Reality vs. Theory, and Improving Gas Production: Techniques of Operations.

  13. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim [Geology Programme, School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1–5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

  14. Structure, sedimentology, coal quality, and hydrology of the Black Warrior Basin in Alabama: Controls on the occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane. Topical report, August 1, 1987-December 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic evaluation of critical production parameters in the Black Warrior basin employed an interdisciplinary approach that utilized structural, sedimentologic, coal-quality, hydrologic, completion, and production data. Results indicate that geologic structure affected sedimentation, coalification, hydrogeology, and the ultimate occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane. Geologic trend analysis was used to characterize regional coalbed-methane potential, and results indicate that many parts of the basin have untapped resources. Some highly productive trends coincide with northeast-trending structures that apparently are zones of enhanced fracture permeability. Water-production data indicate that many high-permeability trends exist that are not associated with exceptional coalbed-methane production and that the coal beds are structurally compartmentalized reservoirs. Water-level data indicate that all highly productive coalbed-methane wells occur where reservoir pressure has been lowered significantly. Therefore, highly productive areas apparently represent structural compartments where formation pressure has been lowered enough to facilitate desorption of a large quantity of methane. Results of the research suggest that completion technology and field design can be tailored to specific geologic settings to produce from reservoir compartments that are readily depressurized, thereby optimizing reservoir drainage.

  15. Climate Change and the Episodicity of Sediment Flux of Small California Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Douglas L.; Jenkins, Scott A.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dip slip. The Salinas River basin lies in a synclinali 4.1 j River basin 1. Pajaro 2. Salinas Estrella (Combined)

  16. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

  17. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Powder River Basin for the potential application of a production process patented by Jack W. McIntyre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvasnicka, D.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of a patented (US Patent Office No. 4,766,957) process developed by Jack W. McIntyre for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Powder River Basin. General research, based on a review of published literature from both private and public sources, indicates that the shallow, thick subbituminous coal seams found in the Powder River Basin exhibit significant potential for the application of this patented process. These coal deposits can be characterized, on the basis of established coalbed methane production, as being highly water productive. The desorption and economic recovery of coalbed methane, widely believed to be biogenic in origin, from these low-grade deposits will require the subsequent dewatering of these geologic formations. The patented process, developed by Mr. McIntyre and described in the compendium of this study, may offer a cost-effective means of methane recovery and downhole disposal of produced groundwaters.

  18. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  19. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  20. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  1. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  2. Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339350 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 339­350 (2002) © EGS Hydrological ), this paper focuses on calibration of the hydrological part of the model and nitrogen (N) dynamics

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    production facilities in Alabama, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  4. Alabama successes spur interest in eastern Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redden, J.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow waters of the eastern fringe of the Gulf of Mexico are becoming a world-class offshore gas play. Spurred by the success ratio offshore Alabama, the water off Mississippi and Florida are drawing intense interest as oil companies attempt to extend the prolific Norphlet formation. Sitting at the heart of the recent interest in the eastern Gulf are the state and federal waters off Alabama. Exploration and drilling activity in the area are discussed.

  5. Depositional history of Smackover Formation in southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation in southwestern Alabama is the product of an overall Middle Jurassic transgression. However, significant lateral variation in lithologic sequence reflects the effects of Smackover paleotopography. Paleozoic ridges and Mesozoic horst blocks defined a number of paleohighs, which separated southwestern Alabama into a series of subbasins or embayments. The Smackover lithologic sequence differs significantly from basin to paleohigh. Initial transgression of Smackover seas reworked the upper surface of the underlying Norphlet clastics and resulted in deposition of intertidal to shallow subtidal algally laminated mudstones and peloidal and oncoidal wackestones and packstones. These lower Smackover rocks are common dolomitized and locally anhydritic. Initial lower Smackover deposition was restricted to paleolows, and subaerial clastic deposition continued over the still emergent paleohighs. As sea level continued to rise, these lower Smackover deposits graded upward into skeletal and peloidal wackestones that contain a sparse, somewhat restricted, faunal assemblage. These wackestones are interbedded with argillaceous organic-rich mudstones that reflect deeper, more restricted depositional conditions. By the early Oxfordian, the sea level rise had inundated most of the paleohighs. Ooid and oncoidal grainstone shoals developed across paleohighs and along the updip margin. In the basin centers, skeletal and peloidal wackestone/packstones were being deposited. As the rate of sea level rise decreased, the shoals began to prograde basinward and lagoonal environments developed behind the shoals in some areas. Sea level fluctuations led to the formation of stacked shallowing-upward sequences. Evaporitic sabkhas developed along the updip margin and prograded basinward behind the shoals, eventually terminating carbonate deposition.

  6. Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil

  7. Recommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to operate the FCRPS to maximize energy revenue so Bonneville can pay its nuclear power plant gambling debtsRecommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power to the Northwest Power Planning Council's March 14, 2001 request for recommended amendments to the mainstem

  8. Characterization of the chemical variation of feed coal and coal combustion products from a power plant utilizing low sulfur Powder River Basin coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, in collaboration with an Indiana utility, are studying a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin coal. This investigation involves a systematic study of the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a 1,300-megawatt (MW) power unit. The main goal of this study is to characterize the temporal chemical variability of the feed coal, fly ash, and bottom ash by looking at the major-, minor-, and trace-element compositions and their associations with the feed coal mineralogy. Emphasis is also placed on the abundance and modes of occurrence of elements of potential environmental concern that may affect the utilization of these CCPs and coals.

  9. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

  10. Mobile District River System Status for June 19, 2014 Weather Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) Projected One-Week Elevation (ft) Okatibbee 343.03 343.0 Black Warrior Tombigbee & Tenn-Tom Basins Below (% of normal) ­ 1st period #12;Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa Basin Table 1 ACT Projects Current elevation (ft-5744. Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Basin Table 4 ACF Projects Current Elevation (ft) Projected One-Week Elevation

  11. Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

  13. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  14. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

  15. Survey of Artificial Production of Anadromous Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1981-1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, Percy M.

    1985-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to collect, organize, and summarize data concerning anadromous fish culture stations of the Columbia River system for 1981, 1982, and 1983 and to create a data archive system with a means of making this information available to the public.

  16. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and quality of water for this region. For further information, materials, and articles about RGBI, visit riogrande.tamu.edu. Don?t let the river run dry, continued ... conservation; (6) environment, ecology, and water quality protection; (7) saline and wastewater management and reuse; (8) basinwide hydrology, salinity modeling, and technology; and (9) communica- tions and accountability. ?A major strength of the Rio...

  17. Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ................................................................................................... 37 Appendix C. Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Focused on North Florida1 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River: Mark Long) #12;2 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee

  18. Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation, northeast Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation small-scale fining-upward cycles (average 4.5 m thick). Facies architectural elements include channel. Understanding of facies architecture and sand body geometry of this Formation is crucial in examining the issue

  19. Alabama's Hatter's Pond called a classic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCaslin, J.C.

    1981-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Delineation of the combination (structural-stratigraphic) hydrocarbon traps in southern Alabama's Hatter's Pond field demands a thorough understanding of the facies distribution, diagenesis, and structural relations of the area. The field's trapping mechanism is highly complex. In addition to the salt movement associated with normal faulting, the porosity distribution - and hence reservoir development - is facies-selective and is significantly altered by the field's diagenetic changes. Hatter's Pond is one of the most important fields in the Smackover and Norphlet producing areas. The Jurassic section of southwest Alabama probably holds most of that state's oil and gas.

  20. amazon river system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Use in indigenous and Colonist Communities of the Palcazu Basin, Peruvian Amazon McClain, Michael 159 Charlotte, Manatee River, Sarasota, Hardee, and Peace River Soil Biology...

  1. assessment columbia river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and disturbances may be ineffective are being spent in the United States on river and stream restoration projects. In the Columbia River basin Montgomery, David R. 311 A...

  2. Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

  3. A design study for the isolation of the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site using the viscous liquid barrier technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Persoff, P.; Apps, J.; James, A.; Oldenburg, C.; McGrath, A.; Myer, L.; Pellerin, L.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a description of the design study for a pilot-scale field demonstration of the Viscous Liquid Barrier (VLB) technology, a new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The demonstration site was Retention Basin 281-3H, a shallow catchment basin at the Savannah River Site, which is contaminated mainly by radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 238}Pu). The goals of the field demonstration were (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier in order to isolate the contaminants, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier. The site was characterized, and preliminary hydraulic conductivity data were obtained from core samples. Based on the site characteristics and the functional requirements, a conceptual model was developed, the barrier specifications were defined, and lance injection was selected as the emplacement method. The injection strategy for the subsurface conditions at the site was determined using numerical simulations. An appropriate variant of Colloidal Silica (CS) was selected as the barrier liquid based on its relative insensitivity to interactions with the site soils, and the formulation for optimum site performance was determined. A barrier verification strategy, including hydraulic, pneumatic, tracer, and geophysical methods, was developed. A lance water injection test was conducted in order to obtain representative estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and its distribution for the design of the barrier emplacement. The water injection test demonstrated the lack of permeable zones for CS injection, and a decision not to proceed with the barrier emplacement was reached.

  4. Using Airborne Geophysics to Improve the Management of Produced Water from Coal Bed Natural Gas Extraction in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana has seen a boom in drilling for coalbed natural gas (CBNG), the natural gas contained in coal seams. Large quantities of water are coproduced during the extraction process. The water is currently managed by land application (irrigation), returned to shallow groundwater aquifers via infiltration basins, directly discharged to ephemeral or perennial streams, or injected into the deep subsurface via injection wells. At present, there are over 28,000 CBNG wells permitted or drilled in the PRB and it is estimated that another 50,000 to 100,000 new wells will be drilled in the future. Produced water management is a major challenge to the oil and gas industry as well as federal and state regulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods for the large-scale mapping of vadose zone properties. The base maps derived from the AEM data show the location of conductive anomalies within the vadose zone. These conductive anomalies have been identified as conditions related to soil properties, geologic features, saturated areas, and seepage zones. In the PRB, the data can be used to identify suitable locations for constructing impoundments in areas that avoid highly conductive soils where infiltrating water may leach salts through the vadose zone and into shallow aquifers. Hydrologic changes within the vadose zone were evaluated by completing an AEM survey in 2003 and 2004 over two coincident spatial areas. The data were analyzed to determine statistical relationships between the data sets, in particular data outliers which may represent areas of significant change between each year. Some outliers plot near areas of CBNG development. Ultimately, it is hoped that the information from these surveys will identify cost effective treatment or disposal options for produced water that address both production and environmental issues.

  5. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  6. Lateral Drilling and Completion Technologies for Shallow-Shelf Carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gibbons; Larry A. Carrell; Richard D. George

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil- well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius laterals in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2590 to 2890 m (8500 to 9500 ft) in Richland Co., MT; Bowman Co., ND; and Harding Co., SD.

  7. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  8. Determining erodibility, critical shear stress, and allowable discharge estimates for cohesive channels: case study in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoman, R.W.; Niezgoda, S.L. [Lowham Engineering LLC, Lander, WY (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous discharge of coalbed natural gas-produced (CBNG-produced) water within ephemeral, cohesive channels in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming can result in significant erosion. A study was completed to investigate channel stability in an attempt to correlate cohesive soil properties to critical shear stress. An in situ jet device was used to determine critical shear stress (tau{sub c}) and erodibility (k{sub d}); cohesive soil properties were determined following ASTM procedures for 25 reaches. The study sites were comprised of erodible to moderately resistant clays with tau{sub c} ranging from 0.11 to 15.35 Pa and k{sub d} ranging from 0.27 to 2.38 cm{sup 3}/N s. A relationship between five cohesive soil characteristics and tau{sub c} was developed and presented for use in deriving tau{sub c} for similar sites. Allowable discharges for CBNG-produced water were also derived using tau{sub c} and the tractive force method. An increase in the allowable discharge was found for channels in which vegetation was maintained. The information from this case study is critical to the development of a conservative methodology to establish allowable discharges while minimizing flow-induced instability.

  9. Impacts of Climate Change and Vegetation Dynamics on Runoff in the Mountainous Region of the Haihe River Basin in the Past Five Decades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Yang, Dawen; Huang, Maoyi

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration have changed significantly in the mountainous region of the Haihe River basin over the past five decades. In the study, a process-based terrestrial model, version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4), was used to quantify the spatiotemporal changes in runoff over the region, driven by the varying climate factors and CO2 concentration. Overall, our simulations suggest that climate-induced change in runoff in this region show a decreasing trend since 1960. Changes in precipitation, solar radiation, air temperature, and wind speed accounts for 56%, -14%, 13%, -5% of the overall decrease in annual runoff, respectively, but their relative contributions vary across the study area. Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration was found to have limited impacts on runoff. Significant decrease in runoff over the southern and northeastern portion of the region is primarily attributed to decreasing precipitation, while decreasing solar radiation and increasing air temperature are the main causes of slight runoff increase in the northern portion. Our results also suggest that the magnitude of decreasing trend could be greatly underestimated if the dynamical interactions of vegetation phenology with the environmental factors are not considered in the modeling, highlighting the importance of including dynamic vegetation phenology in the prediction of runoff in this region.

  10. Geologic framework of the Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation the Alabama coastal waters area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mink R.M.; Mann, S.D. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)); Mancini, E.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a prolific hydrocarbon-producing geologic unit in the onshore Gulf of Mexico area, including southwest Alabama. However, no Smackover strata containing commercial accumulations of oil or gas have thus far been discovered in the Alabama state coastal waters area (ACW). This study of the regional geologic framework of the Smackover Formation was done to characterize the unit in the ACW and to compare strata in the ACW with productive Smackover intervals in the onshore area. In the study area, the Smackover Formation was deposited on a highly modified carbonate associated with pre-Smackover topographic features. In the onshore Alabama, north of the Wiggins arch complex, an inner ramp developed in the area of the Mississippi interior salt basin and the Manila and Conecuh embayments. South of the Wiggins arch complex in extreme southern onshore Alabama and in the ACW, an outer ramp formed that was characterized by a much thicker Smackover section. In the outer ramp setting, four lithofacies associations are recognized: lower, middle, and upper outer ramp lithofacies (ORL) and the coastal dolostone lithofacies. The coastal dolostone lithofacies accounts for most of the reservoir-grade porosity in the outer ramp setting. The lower, middle, and upper ORL, for the most part, are nonporous. Volumetrically, intercrystalline porosity is the most important pore type in the coastal dolostone lithofacies. Numerous data in the ACW area indicate that halokinesis has created structural conditions favorable for accumulation and entrapment of oil and gas in the outer ramp lithofacies of the Smackover. Prolific hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the ACW, as evidenced by the significant natural gas accumulations in the Norphlet Formation. To date, however, reservoir quality rocks of the coastal dolostone lithofacies coincident with favorable structural conditions have not been encountered in the ACW.

  11. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  12. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

  13. Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alabama Regions Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches...

  14. Alabama High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Alabama Regions Alabama High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High...

  15. Central Alabama Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central Alabama Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Electric Cooperative, offers the Touchstone Energy Home Program. Touchstone Energy Homes with a dual-fuel or geothermal heat pump qualify for...

  16. Alabama -- SEP Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alabama Summary of Reported Data More Documents & Publications Virginia -- SEP Summary of Reported Data NYSERDA Summary of Reported Data Michigan -- SEP Summary of Reported Data...

  17. Two Alabama Elementary Schools Get Cool with New HVAC Units ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    campaign. Winston's HVAC replacement project received a boost from the Alabama State Energy Program, which granted the school district a little more than 82,000 in Recovery...

  18. ALABAMA GETS WISE ABOUT SELLING UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    financing products, and stakeholder education and training. Managed by Nexus Energy Center, AlabamaWISE achieved success through high involvement from contractors to...

  19. Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act money to weatherize homes has resulted in much lower energy bills for Alabama families, including Mary, whose bill is about $300 cheaper now.

  20. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Savannah River Site (USDOE), Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A), Aiken, SC, June 26, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A) (MSSB) is listed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3004(u) solid waste management unit/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) unit in Appendix C of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (FFA 1993) for the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. The selected alternative was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy for MSSB is No Action. Investigation of this operable unit was performed to determine if hazardous substances had been released to the environment. The Baseline Risk Assessment indicated that there were no significant releases to the environment. Therefore, it appears that either there were no significant discharges of hazardous materials to the seepage basin or natural remediation processes (i.e., bioremediation) have reduced the levels of hazardous materials to the extent that they no longer pose risk to human health or the environment. The Baseline Risk Assessment considered both the future residential and future industrial land use scenarios. Benzo(a)pyrene was the only preliminary constituent of concern (human health) detected in the soil at MSSB. Benzo(a)pyrene was detected only in the top foot of soil at levels which give risk values greater than 1 {times} 16{sup {minus}6} (but less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}) for the future adult/child resident. Further uncertainty analysis indicated that benzo(a)pyrene should not be considered a constituent of concern for the MSSB due to: (1) low frequency of detection; (2) unit history that strongly suggests it came from an adjacent source; and (3) conservative methodology was utilized in the risk assessment. No ecological or contaminant migration constituents of concern were identified at this unit. Therefore, No Action is the appropriate remedy and a five year ROD review will not be required. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control has modified the SRS RCRA permit to incorporate the No Action remedy.

  1. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  2. PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study timeframe. Future work will involve a final report, which will include data trends, correlations and interpretations of laboratory data.

  3. Upper Jurassic carbonate/evaporite shelf, south Alabama and west Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of Upper Jurassic carbonates and evaporites in south Alabama and west Florida defines a brining upward and inward sequence that is indicative of deposition on an increasingly evaporitic marine shelf. Structural features that bound this evaporitic shelf were the Pensacola arch, the South Mississippi platform, and the State Line flexure. Paleo-drainage of the surrounding highlands also affected shelf salinities as fresh waters were funneled into the Covington and Manila Embayments. During the Late Jurassic, marine carbonates and evaporites of the Smackover and Lower Haynesville (Buckner) Formations were deposited over Middle Jurassic Norphlet clastics that accumulated in arid continental and marginal-marine environments. Initially, Smackover carbonate deposition was pervasive across the shallow shelf. Later, as a result of increasing water salinities, contemporaneous precipitation of central-shelf evaporites and basin-edge carbonates occurred. Maximum restriction of the basin and the culmination of subaqueous deposition resulted in the formation of a basin-wide lower Haynesville salt unit. The overlying upper Haynesville strata represents a shift to subaerial environments. Application of a shelf-basin evaporite model explains the spatial and temporal lithologic relationships observed within the study area. Onlap of evaporites over porous carbonates, due to brining-upward processes, suggest that large-scale stratigraphic traps exist within the Smackover Formation in a sparsely explored part of the basin.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

  5. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  6. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  7. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  8. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  9. Energy Incentive Programs, Alabama | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogenDistributionFact Sheet EnergyEnergy ExportsAlabama

  10. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Alabama | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom:EnergyJoshuaThisAgency-Energy |Alabama.

  11. Trapping styles in Mississippi, Alabama Haynesville reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sticker, E.E. (Office of Geology, Jackson, MI (United States))

    1994-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jurassic Haynesville formation of Mississippi and Alabama has historically been just another stratigraphic unit to be penetrated before the underlying Smackover-Norphlet potential could be evaluated. But with recent production tests at rates in excess of 3,000 b/d of oil and individual wells that have produced more than 3 million bbl of oil equivalent, assuming a 6 Mcf/bbl ratio, many operators have reclassified the objectives status of the Haynesville from secondary to primary. The paper describes the structure and stratigraphy, the simple anticline, a complexly faulted anticline, a salt-breached anticline, depositional termination, and production projections.

  12. The Corporate Headquarters for Alabama Power Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reardon, J. G.; Penuel, K. M.

    of the "product", and also helps to delay require ments for future generating capacity. Therefore, cooling for the complex will be provided by a state of-the-art refrigeration plant and ice storage system which is capable of producing and storing one and a... 16-18, 1987 I Typical Peak Demand Breakdown Commercial Building LIGHTING (39.4%) AIR HANDLING (10.8%) / COOLING AUX (5.2%) Figure 1 DESIGN APPROACH Specific objectives established by Alabama Power for the project include: - Reduce peak...

  13. Addison, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington, Oklahoma: Energy ResourcesAlabama:

  14. Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airwaysource History View New PagesAlabama:

  15. Alabama Municipal Elec Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:Akuo EnergyFuelAlabama

  16. Alabama/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008EnergyAlabama/Wind Resources <

  17. Headland, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas BeenLegal Document-Headland, Alabama: Energy

  18. Ozark, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York:Ozark, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to:

  19. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry

  20. Save Energy Now Alabama | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department ofDepartment ofEnergy SummarySarahSeniorofAlabama

  1. Central Alabama Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd: China Datang CorporationCenterCentraisCentral Alabama

  2. Gordon, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo,GEFLakes,GoliadGordon, Alabama: Energy

  3. Enterprise, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolis JumpESLEnergyEnphase EnergyEnterprise, Alabama:

  4. Newville, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchNewton,Newville, Alabama:

  5. Madrid, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECOFlorida:Madison GasMadisonburg,Alabama:

  6. Cottonwood, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis AtSystems |CostaCottonAlabama: Energy

  7. Dothan, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:EmerlingDoorDothan, Alabama: Energy Resources

  8. Ariton, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County,DelhiArdmore,Ariton, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump

  9. Ashford, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansasAshford, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to:

  10. Rehobeth, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRayreviewAl., 2005) |RGGIRehobeth, Alabama:

  11. Alabama Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgoura Hills,OesteAkrong Machine ServicesAlabama

  12. Stressors to Imperiled Fishes in the Etowah Basin Mechanisms, Sources and Management under the Etowah HCP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    Geological Survey Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Athens, GA 30602 Abstract The Etowah River basin, 2006 Edited February 1, 2007 1. University of Georgia River Basin Center, Athens, GA 30602 2. US and its Aquatic Fauna The Etowah River is a major headwater tributary of the Coosa River system

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

  14. atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

  15. Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

  16. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  17. Saving a Dwindling River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

  18. Mineralogy of Alabama coals. Annual report for the 1983-84 Project Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.H.; Donahoe, J.L.; Grow, A.G.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forty-one coal samples collected from the Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama were (low-temperature) plasma ashed to yield minerals. These lta ashes were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by x-ray diffraction techniques. The major minerals are kaolinite, illite, mixed-layer clays, pyrite, quartz, and gypsum. Trace amounts of feldspars, siderite, marcasite, calcite, and dolomite were also found. Chlorite, in variable amounts, is found in most samples. Quantitative analysis was carried out by the internal standard method for nonclay minerals. For clay minerals, a modified Schultz's method was employed. The relative abundances of the major minerals are variable - total clays range from 63 to 91%; quartz, from 1 to 21%; pyrite, from trace amount to as much as 64%, due to pyrite nodules. Among clay minerals, kaolinite ranges from 29 to 70% (of the total clay); illite from 14 to 57%; mixed-layer clays from 10 to 34%. Smectite is found only in three samples, and chlorite is quite common, ranging from trace amount to 11%. Coal minerals are genetically classified into: syngenetic (detrital) and epigenetic (diagenetic). Syngenetic minerals, especially pyrite and clays, are not only important geologically, but also technologically in terms of coal preparation. Mineral analysis of coal ash helps identify some of the problems associated with sulphur and ash removal from coal. Some further studies are suggested in order to better understand the Alabama coal from the geological and technological points of view. 14 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, G.; Millings, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of these basins. There are also several cement and ammonia plants near the basins. Sixteen coal fired power plants are present on or adjacent to the basins which could support a low pipeline transportation cost. The current geological information is not sufficient to quantify specific storage reservoirs, seals, or traps. There is insufficient hydrogeologic information to quantify the saline nature of the water present within all of the basins. Water data in the Dunbarton Basin of the Savannah River Site indicates dissolved solids concentrations of greater than 10,000 parts per million (not potential drinking water). Additional reservoir characterization is needed to take advantage of the SGFAR trend for anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage. The authors of this report believe it would be appropriate to study the reservoir potential in the deeper basins that are in close proximity to the current larger coal fired power plants (Albany-Arabi, Camilla-Ocilla, Alamo-Ehrhardt, and Jedburg basin).

  20. Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 8, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis ZF North America used Alabama E3 funding to create a recycling program that saves more than 100,000 a year in trash pickup and landfill fees....

  1. Trinity River Initiative Building partnerships for cooperative conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinity River Initiative Building partnerships for cooperative conservation More people in Texas use the water, wildlife and recreational resources from the Trinity River Basin than from any other in the Trinity River Basin--the ecological resources along much of the Trinity are in poor condition. Despite

  2. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  3. Powder River 0 20 40 KILOMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. coal basins. The Powder River Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana (fig. 1 tons (MST), some 42 percent of the total coal pro- duction in the United States, making the PRB the single most important coal-producing basin in the Nation. About 426 MST (92 percent of total PRB coal

  4. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  5. Seasonal cycle of Precipitation over Major River Basins in South and Southeast Asia: A Review of the CMIP5 climate models data for present climate and future climate projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio; Böhner, Jürgen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the skill of thirty coupled climate models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 in terms of reproducing properties of the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the major river basins of South and Southeast Asia (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for historical period (1961-2000). We also present projected changes by these models by end of century (2061-2100) under extreme scenario RCP8.5. First, we assess their ability to reproduce observed timings of the monsoon onset and the rate of rapid fractional accumulation (RFA slope) - a measure of seasonality within active monsoon period. Secondly, we apply a threshold-independent seasonality index (SI) - a multiplicative measure of precipitation and extent of its concentration relative to the uniform distribution (relative entropy - RE). We apply SI distinctly for monsoonal precipitation regime (MPR), westerly precipitation regime (WPR) and annual precipitation regime. For present climate, neither any single model nor the multi-mod...

  6. Flexural interpretation of Mississippian stratigraphy in the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Science); Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of Mississippian rocks in the Black Warrior basin and adjacent parts of the Appalachian basin using basic viscoelastic flexural models suggests that this sequence of rocks is largely a response to deformational loading and relaxation accompany early phases of Ouachita orogeny. A Kinderhook-Valmeyer unconformity atop the Maury Shale apparently represents an initial tectophase of Ouachita orogeny too distant to affect the basin otherwise. However, a Valmeyer-Chesterian unconformity atop the Tuscumbia, along which the Genevievian Stage is absent or condensed, indicates that a second Ouachita tectophase had become localized along the southwest part of alabama promontory, close enough to generate the Black Warrior foreland basin, fill it with a flexural sequence of sediments, and alter sedimentation patterns in nearby parts of the Appalachian basin.

  7. Evaluating DNAPL Source and Migration Zones: M-Area Settling Basin and the Western Sector of A/M Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G.

    2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to critically evaluate previous characterization and remediation data to determine the current extent and distribution of DNAPL associated with releases at the M-Area Basin within A/M Area. The primary objective of the effort is to develop an approximate recommendation for the target treatment location and volume near the M Area Settling Basin. Through this analysis the final objective is to identify those subsurface regions having specific geometry and character necessary to cost-effectively deploy DNAPL specific remediation alternatives.

  8. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  9. Reservoir heterogeneity in carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  10. Impact of Water Resource Development on Coastal Erosion, Brazos River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathewson, C. C.; Minter, L. L.

    Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis of the river...

  11. SEP Success Story: Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - 9:44am Addthis The Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind is replacing almost 2,900 lights in 19 buildings across its campuses.| Photo courtesy of Alabama Institute for Deaf and...

  12. Tectonic setting and origin of the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Whiting, B.M. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin has a triangular outline that is framed by the Ouachita thrust belt on the southwest, the Appalachian thrust belt on the southeast, and the North American craton on the north. The stratigraphy of the Black Warrior basin includes two distinct parts: a Cambrian-Mississippian passive-margin carbonate-shelf succession, and a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic succession, the lower (Mississippian) part of which grades northeastward into a carbonate-shelf facies. The provenance and dispersal system of the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic deposits have been interpreted in four different ways, each of which has significantly different implications for origin of the basin: (1) Ouachita orogenic source and northeastward prograding; (2) Alabama Appalachian orogenic source and northwestward prograding; (3) Georgia-tennessee Appalachian orogenic source and westward prograding; and (4) cratonic source and southward prograding. Subsidence history determined from calculations of decompacted thickness indicates that (1) the Black Warrior basin is an orogenic foreland basin related primarily to the Ouachita thrust load on the southwest; (2) later emplacement of the Alabama Appalachian thrust belt modified the southeastern side of the Ouachita-related Black Warrior foreland basin; and (3) a separate foreland basin, representing the southern end of the Appalachian foreland basin, formed in response to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust load. The previously used criteria do not necessarily support a unique interpretation, but synthesizing these data with subsidence history leads to the conclusion that the Black Warrior basin is a tectonically driven, orogenic foreland basin dominated by Ouachita thrusting and modified by Appalachian thrusting.

  13. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  14. 23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER. In this paper we. Santa Oruz Rivel'. San Pedro River; Babacomari River. Salt Rive,'. . White Mountain Creek, Aqua Frio. Trapper Lctke. Eagle Riv~.". Roaring Fork. Oanon Creek. Green River. White River. Yampa River. Little

  15. Impacts of House Bill 56 on the Construction Economy in Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbo, David; Escamilla, Edelmiro; Bigelow, Ben F.; Garcia, Jose

    to enact legislation intended to deter unauthorized immigration. South Carolina, Utah, and Alabama have all followed Arizona, which was the first state to enact such a law. This study evaluates House Bill (HB) 56, Alabama’s anti-unauthorized immigration...

  16. Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

  17. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  18. Natural gas plays in Jurassic reservoirs of southwestern Alabama and the Florida panhandle area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Jurassic natural gas trends can be delineated in Alabama and the Florida panhandle area. They include a deep natural gas trend, a natural gas and condensate trend, and an oil and associated natural gas trend. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. Within these natural gas trends, at least eight distinct natural gas plays can be identified. These plays are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps and reservoirs. The deep natural gas trend includes the Mobile Bay area play, which is characterized by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Lower Mobile Bay fault system and Norphlet eolian sandstone reservoirs exhibiting primary and secondary porosity at depths exceeding 20,000 ft. The natural gas and condensate trend includes the Mississippi Interior Salt basin play, Mobile graben play, Wiggins arch flank play, and the Pollard fault system play. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin play is typified by salt anticlines associated with salt tectonism in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin and Smackover dolomitized peloidal and pelmoldic grainstone and packstone reservoirs at depths of approximately 16,000 ft. The Mobile graben play is exemplified by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Mobile graben and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Wiggins arch flank play is characterized by structural traps consisting of salt anticlines associated with stratigraphic thinning and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Pollard fault system play is typified by combination petroleum traps. The structural component is associated with the Pollard fault system and reservoirs at depths of approximately 15,000 ft. These reservoirs are dominantly Smackover dolomitized oomoldic and pelmoldic grainstones and packstones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones exhibiting primary and secondary porosity.

  19. Behaviour of lithium and its isotopes during weathering in1 the Mackenzie Basin, Canada2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Behaviour of lithium and its isotopes during weathering in1 the Mackenzie Basin, Canada2 3 Romain and lithium concentrations found in the dissolved load of the Mackenzie rivers suggests31 that precipitation fluxes in the Mackenzie River Basin.40 41 Keywords: lithium isotopes, river waters, silicate weathering

  20. Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

  1. An investigation of the water balance of the basin of the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Clyde Stanley

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the atmospheric branch. Sources ot Data River discharge data for the United States were obtained from thn following district offices of the United States Geological Survey, Department of the interior: Deals, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Montgomery, Alabama... Department of lntezior-Geological S rvcy. Mouth coefficients for rivers -of Mexico vere determined after th= method described b low, Fig. l. Approximate location of strecmflow gaging stations used in this study. 10 To account for water contributed by rhe...

  2. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from “Proof of Concept” to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project – Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama – advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  3. Petroleum source rock potential of Mesozoic condensed section deposits in southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A; Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because condensed section deposits in carbonates and siliclastics are generally fine-grained lithologies often containing relatively high concentrations of organic matter, these sediments have the potential to be petroleum source rocks if buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. In the Mesozoic deposits of southwestern Alabama, only the Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.1 cycle have realized their potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. These carbonate mudstones contain organic carbon concentrations of algal and amorphous kerogen of up to 1.7% and have thermal alteration indices of 2- to 3+. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa marine claystones of the condensed section of the UZAGC-2.5 cycle are rich (up to 2.9%) in herbaceous and amorphous organic matter but have not been subjected to burial conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation. The Jurassic Pine Hill/Norphlet black shales of the condensed section of the LZAGC-3.1 cycle and the Upper Jurassic Haynesville carbonate mudstones of the condensed section of the LZAGC-4.2 cycle are low (0.1%) in organic carbon. Although condensed sections within depositional sequences should have the highest source rock potential, specific environmental, preservational, and/or burial history conditions within a particular basin will dictate whether or not the potential is realized as evidenced by the condensed sections of the Mesozoic depositional sequences in southwestern Alabama. Therefore, petroleum geologists can use sequence stratigraphy to identify potential source rocks; however, only through geochemical analyses can the quality of these potential source rocks be determined.

  4. Sedimentary facies and history of Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation in Conecuh embayment of south Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, R.A.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is an important petroleum-bearing unit in the deep subsurface of the gulf rim. The authors studied the sedimentary facies and sedimentary history of the Smackover in Escambia County, Alabama. The wells studied form an east-west strike section across the Conecuh embayment in south Alabama. In the central part of the embayment, the Smackover is 350 ft (107 m) thick and consists of a vertical sequence of the following correlative sedimentary facies. In stratigraphic order, they are: (1) basal, shallow-water facies that rests conformably on the underlying Norphlet and forms a discontinuous interval a few feet thick, consisting of algal-laminated mudstones, sandy packstones and grainstones, and clast horizons; (2) basinal, deep-water facies, 175 ft (53 m) thick, consisting of resedimented debris beds (oolitic-pisolitic-graded beds, 8 in or 24 cm thick) intercalated with laminated, very argillaceous mudstone and wackestone; (3) parallel and wavy-laminated, sparsely fossiliferous packstone and wackestone, 80 ft (24 m) thick, interpreted as a carbonate slope deposit that accumulated below storm wave base; (4) bioturbated oolitic, pelletal, and fossiliferous packstone with faint relict laminations, 45 ft (14 m) thick, containing abundant Thalassinoides and Zoophycus traces and interpreted as below normal wave base deposits; and (5) oolitic and fossiliferous grainstone, 50 ft (15 m) thick, interpreted as deposits formed above wave base (shelf-platform deposits). The above sequence suggests progradation of a carbonate shelf. This progradation probably followed the rapid eustatic sea-level rise of the Oxfordian.

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

  6. Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT may be substituted for part of the required Portland cement. Substitution of mineral admixtures shall Cement shall not exceed the percentages shown in the following table: MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTION

  7. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE FINANCIAL DATA SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE FINANCIAL DATA SHEET 1. Price Summary The cost estimate raises. These increases are MERIT, not cost-of-living, raises. Percentage of time is estimated. Salaries on Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC). Equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care and tuition

  8. The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science Computer science is a multifaceted discipline that encompasses a broad range of topics. At one end of the spectrum, computer science focuses. At the other applications-oriented end of the spectrum, computer science deals with techniques for the design

  9. A University of Alabama Fuel Cell Electronic Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    CAVT A University of Alabama Fuel Cell Electronic Integration y Research Center OBJECTIVE ­ Study the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to H2 tank Loads ­ Study the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to respond to rapid load changes MOTIVATION Fuel cell ­ Automotive cycles include rapid load changes (passing

  10. Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

  11. Molecular Ecology Notes (2007) 7, 811813 doi: 10.1111/j.1471-8286.2007.01712.x 2007 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Phillip

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endangered vermilion darter (Etheostoma chermocki) is endemic to the Black Warrior River system in the Mobile Warrior River system in the Mobile Basin in Alabama (Boschung & Mayden 2004). The distribution Basin in Alabama. Restoration and conservation of this species require an understanding of its

  12. Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989 : with Listings of Historical Streamflow, Summation of Storage Change and Adjusted Streamflow : Columbia River and Coastal Basins.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of irrigation projects since the 1830's and the construction of major dams and reservoirs since the early 1900's have altered substantially the natural streamflow regimen of the Columbia River and its tributaries. As development expanded a multipurpose approach to streamflow regulation evolved to provide flood control, irrigation, hydropower generation, navigation, recreation, water quality enhancement, fish and wildlife, and instream flow maintenance. The responsible agencies use computer programs to determine the effects of various alternative system regulations. This report describes the development of the streamflow data that these computer programs use.

  13. Sedimentology of freshwater lacustrine shoreless in the Eocene Scheggs Bed of the Tipton Tongue of the Green River Formation, Sand Wash Basin, Northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper two freshwater shorelines, 40-274 ft thick, were investigated in the Scheggs Bed along Hardgrove Rim, 8 mi north of Maybell, Colorado. The rocks comprising the shorelines consist of interbedded quartzose sandstone, conglomerate, siltstone, shale, oil shale, carbonaceous shale, and coal. The shorelines are divisible into fluvial channel, mudflat, swamp, strandline, nearshore, and offshore lithofacies, which are identified by their stratigraphic positions, characteristic lithologies, and sedimentary structures. A columnar section is presented as a model for similar deposition in other members of the Green River Formation.

  14. Record of Decision/Remedial Alternative Selection for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  15. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of subsurface Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, R.H.; Maylan, M.A.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of Mississippi and Alabama is a Paleozoic foreland basin developed between the North American craton and the Appalachian and Ouachita orogenic belts. The basin fill consists of a middle Mississippian to Lower Pennsylvanian clastic wedge, transitional in character, between Appalachian molasse and Ouachita flysch. Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, shales, coals, and thin conglomerates make up the greater part of the wedge, thickening to 11,000 ft in northeast Mississippi. Although the outcropping and near-surface Pottsville is economically importance as a source of coal in Alabama, only minor amounts of gas have been derived from the subsurface Pottsville of Mississippi (Clay and Monroe Counties). Production from the Black Warrior basin, mostly gas, is chiefly from Chesterian (Mississippian) sands and limestones in the shallower part of the basin, principally in Monroe County. Cores of Pottsville sandstones from four wells in the deeper part of the Black Warrior basin (Calhoun and Choctaw Counties) have been examined to determine their petrography, diagenetic history, and reservoir quality. This part of the basin is relatively unexplored, and the primary objective of the study was to determine if suitable hydrocarbon reservoirs are present.

  16. Columbia, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:Governor s EnergyColquittWashington:River

  17. Lateral drilling and completion technologies for shallow-shelf carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin. Topical report, July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; George, R.D.; Gibbons, D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil-well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius lateral in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2,590 to 2,890 m in Richland County, MT; Bowman County, ND; and Harding County, SD. In theory, all of the horizontal drilling techniques explored in this project have merit for application fitting specific criteria. From a realistic point of view, the only relatively trouble-free, adequately-proven technology employed was the medium-radius steered motor/MWD technology. The slim-tool steered motor/MWD re-entry technology has been used extensively but appears to still be significantly in developmental stages. This technology will probably always be more troublesome than the technology used to drill new wells because the smaller diameter required for the tools contributes to both design and operational complexities. Although limited mechanical success has been achieved with some of the lateral jetting technologies and the Amoco tools, their predictability and reliability is unproven. Additionally, they appear to be limited to shallow depths and certain rock types. The Amoco technology probably has the most potential to be successfully developed for routinely reliable, field applications. A comparison of the various horizontal drilling technologies investigated is presented.

  18. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

  19. Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama Angela Marie Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama by Angela Marie Jackson for the Degree of Master of Science Auburn, Alabama August 6, 2011 Keywords: White-tailed deer, fawn survival, coyote, predator-prey theory Copyright 2011 by Angela Marie Jackson Approved by Stephen S. Ditchkoff

  20. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Alabama portion of the Black Warrior Basin (Pashin,Total Petroleum System, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama andgas resources of the Black Warrior Basin Province, Alabama

  1. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  2. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects tributaries. Collector-gatherers (invertebrates feeding on fine particulate organic material) are the most

  3. Lake View, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Lamar County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  5. Lowndes County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Alabama's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Alabama, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004)Airway Heights,Akins,AkunInformationAlabama,

  9. Chambers County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEI Jump to:CerionChagrin Falls,Alabama:

  10. Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (Million Cubic

  11. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in Alabama (MillionGrossFeet)

  12. Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in AlabamaGross Withdrawals

  13. Alabama--onshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessed in AlabamaGross

  14. Fayette County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway,FarmersFastcapAlabama: Energy Resources

  15. ALABAMA GETS WISE ABOUT SELLING UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf1.pdfALABAMA

  16. Henry County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategyHayesHeliofiles JumpNevada:Alabama:

  17. Houston County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to: navigation,Alabama: Energy

  18. Pickens County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. City of Dothan, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton, IowaDothan, Alabama

  20. City of Elba, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton,City of EastElba, Alabama

  1. City of Luverne, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCityCityLongmont, ColoradoLuverne, Alabama

  2. Greene County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. South Alabama Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Alabama Ordnance Works - AL 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  5. Crenshaw County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Alabama Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

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  7. Autauga County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Montgomery County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  9. Alabama -- SEP Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. Baldwin County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  11. Barbour County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  12. Randolph County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  13. Russell County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  14. Franklin County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbsSalonga,FrancisAlabama: Energy Resources Jump

  15. Geneva County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGeneva County, Alabama: Energy

  16. City of Lafayette, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville, Louisiana (UtilityEnergyAlabama (Utility

  17. Colbert County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: EnergyCoeur d Alene FiberColbert County, Alabama:

  18. Comparison of geology of Jurassic Norphlet Mary Ann field, Mobile Bay, Alabama, to onshore regional Norphlet trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marzono, M.; Pense, G.; Andronaco, P.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geology of the Mary Ann field is better understood in light of regional studies, which help to establish a depositional model in terms of both facies and thickness variations. These studies also illustrate major differences between onshore and offshore Norphlet deposits concerning topics such as diagenesis, hydrocarbon trapping, and migration. The Jurassic Norphlet sandstone was deposited in an arid basin extending from east Texas to Florida by a fluvial-eolian depositional system, prior to the transgression of the Smackover Formation. Until discovery of the Mary Ann field in 1979, Norphlet production was restricted to onshore areas, mostly along the Pickens-Pollard fault system in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. The Mary Ann field is a Norphlet dry-gas accumulation, and was the first offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico to establish economic reserves in the Jurassic. The field is located in Mobile Bay, approximately 25 mi (40 km) south of Mobile, Alabama. Formed by a deep-seated (more than 20,000 ft or 6096 m) faulted salt pillow, Mary Ann field produces from a series of stacked eolian dune sands situated near the Norphlet paleocoastline. Five lithofacies have been recognized in cores from the Mobil 76 No. 2 well. Each lithofacies has a distinct reservoir quality. Optimum reservoir faces are the dune and sheet sands. Nonreservoir facies are interdune (wet and dry), marine reworked, and evaporitic sands. Following deposition, these sediments have undergone varying amounts of diagenesis. Early cementation of well-sorted sands supported the pore system during compaction. However, late cementation by chlorite, silica, and alteration of liquid hydrocarbons to an asphaltic residue have completely occluded the pore system in parts of the reservoir.

  19. Geohydrological feasibility study of the Black Warrior Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. Mclntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Black Warrior Basin of Mississippi and Alabama through literature surveys. Methane gas from coalbeds in the Black Warrior Basin is confined to the coal fields of northern Alabama. Produced water from degasification of coalbeds is currently disposed by surface discharge. Treatment prior to discharge consists of short-term storage and in-stream dilution. Mr. Mclntyre`s process appears to be applicable to the Black Warrior Basin and could provide an environmentally sound alternative for produced water production.

  20. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumber ofTexas-Louisiana-

  1. Onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin: Evidence from echinoderm biostratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, J.A. (West Georgia Coll., Carrollton, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Maples, C.G. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many echinoderm taxa have limited temporal ranges and are potentially significant regional index fossils. Echinoderm endemism and size have limited the utility of echinoderms in biostratigraphy, but in particular situations, echinoderm biostratigraphy has provided the key to timing of geological events. One example is the timing of the onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin (BWB), a major Carboniferous foreland basin in Alabama and Mississippi. Physical stratigraphy indicates that basinal development in the BWB began some time during or after deposition of the Tuscumbia Limestone (TL). The TL was deposited on a broad carbonate platform on the southern passive margin of North America. In the BWB, the TL is overlain by the Pride Mountain Formation (PMF), which is a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate unit that prograded into the basin from the west. Northeast of the BWB, on the Warrior platform, the TL is Monteagle Limestone and the PMF have been difficult owing to the lack of biostratigraphic acuity in rocks of this age, which has resulted in mistaken time stratigraphic relationships between the units. The authors have collected echinoderms in the basal limestones in the PMF, which indicates a Gasperian age for all but the lowest 30 cm of the PMF. The Genevievian apparently was a time of nondeposition in the BWB because this lowermost 30 cm of PMF is temporally equivalent to tens of meters of carbonates rocks in the Monteagle Limestone on the Warrior platform. Therefore, the onset of foreland basin development in the BWB can be constrained to early during the Genevievian Stage.

  2. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  3. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields--Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Producibility problems, such as low reservoir pressure and reservoir heterogeneity, have severely limited oil production from the Central Bluff and North Fairview fields. Specific objectives for this project were: To successfully apply detailed geologic and engineering studies with conventional waterflood technologies to these fields in an effort to increase the ultimate economic recovery of oil from Carter sandstone fields; To extensively model, test and evaluate these technologies; thereby, developing a sound methodology for their use and optimization; and To team with Advanced Resources International and the US DOE to assimilate and transfer the information and results gathered from this study to other oil companies to encourage the widespread use of these technologies. At Central Bluff, water injection facilities were constructed and water injection into one well began in January 1993. Oil response from the waterflood has been observed at both producing wells. One of the producing wells has experienced early water breakthrough and a concomitant drop in secondary oil rate. A reservoir modeling study was initiated to help develop an appropriate operating strategy for Central Bluff. For the North Fairview unit waterflood, a previously abandoned well was converted for water injection which began in late June 1993. The reservoir is being re-pressurized, and unit water production has remained nil since flood start indicating the possible formation of an oil bank. A reservoir simulation to characterize the Carter sand at North Fairview was undertaken and the modeling results were used to forecast field performance. The project was terminated due to unfavorable economics. The factors contributing to this decision were premature water breakthrough at Central Bluff, delayed flood response at North Fairview and stalled negotiations at the South Bluff site.

  4. EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

  5. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and will assure that the Northwest power supply remains efficient, clean, reliable, and a model of regional Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency of the Pacific Northwest October 1, 2009 ­ September 30, 2010 Northwest Power Conservation Council and #12

  6. Key Performance Indicators of River Basin Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    frequently has faculty from universities spending time in residence at the Institute. Both IWR and the Corps benefit from such faculty engaging in ongoing water resources studies and research on a reimbursable basis such as analyzing the linkages between water resources development and water resources problems (e.g. drought

  7. 2011 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity from 31 federal hydropower dams and one non-federal nuclear power plant in the Pacific Northwest (debt-funded) in facilities and some land purchases 2. Reimbursements to other federal agencies tO thE NORthWESt GOvERNORS > FIsh & WIlDlIFE ExPEnDItuREs Background The Pacific Northwest Electric Power

  8. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will depend on demonstrated effectiveness. Sincerely, Bruce Measure, Chair Northwest Power Conservation Council and Bruce A. Measure Chair Montana Rhonda Whiting Montana W. Bill Booth Idaho James A. Yost Idaho Forum Develops Guidelines for Efficiency Savings and Verification 14 First-Ever Regional Standards

  9. Fall Chinook Salmon Survival and Supplementation Studies in the Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Connor, William P.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nez Perce Tribe completed the third year of research to investigate migrational characteristics of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Alabama.

  11. History of coastal Alabama natural gas exploration and development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.W.; Plater, J.R.; Kelley, J.Q.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study documents the development and growth of the natural gas industry offshore Alabama. This report provides a full account of natural gas discover, Mobile Bay leasing, industry exploration, industry development projects and production history. A gas production forecast is developed for the Mobile Bay region with and without proposed development of the Destin Dome OCS in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Coastal Alabama Norphlet and Miocene production will rise to 1.4 BCFD by 2000. Destin Dome`s production came online after Mobile Bay production from discovered reserves reaches peak, thereby sustaining supplies to interstate markets in the 1.4--1.6 BCFD through 2005. Combining both the Alabama state and federal OCS offshore production, the Alabama-Destin Dome production forecast reaches and sustains 1.6 BCFD between 2002--2004.

  12. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Alabama.

  13. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Return to Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts from development of the river's hydroelectric potential. The most recent fishery recovery program from the Columbia River hydroelectric system, contained important provisions regarding mitigation for the impacts of hydroelectric development on fish and wildlife in the basin. The act authorized the states of M

  14. Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

  15. Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

  16. History of Artificial Propagation of Coho Salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in the Mid-Columbia River System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History of Artificial Propagation of Coho Salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in the Mid-Columbia River System ROY J. WAHLE and ROGER E. PEARSON Figure I. - Middle and upper portion of the Columbia River Basin, artificial propagation was attempted. The first hatcheries in the mid- Columbia section (Fig. 1) of the river

  17. Diagenesis of Eolian and fluvial feldspathic sandstones, Norphlet formation (upper Jurassic), Rankin County, Mississippi, and Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, E.F.; Land, L.S.; Mack, L.E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Norphlet sandstones in seven cores from Mississippi and Alabama are arkoses and subarkoses deposited in eolian-dune, interdune, and fluvial environments. Similar to the deeply buried (> 5 km) Tertiary feldspathic sandstones of the Gulf basin, all detrital plagioclase that survived dissolution has been albitized. Fluvial red sandstone lost all initial porosity by the introduction of preburial pedogenic calcite and compaction. Initial porosity of eolian sands was reduced by compaction to an average of 29%; and later by cementation by quartz, carbonates, anhydrite, halite, K-feldspar, and illite. Quartz and anhydrite cements precipitated between 90/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/C (approximately 2.3 km deep), carbonates and halite cements formed below 120/sup 0/C (< 3 km), and late-stage illite cement formed between 130/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C (4-5 km deep). Cements are patchy, and some, especially quartz and anhydrite, are texture-selective, being more abundant in coarser laminae. Secondary porosity, which makes up approximately half the porosity in thin sections, formed by dissolution of detrital grains (feldspar, rock fragments) and cements (anhydrite, carbonate, halite). Reservoir bitumen records an early phase of oil entrapment. Reservoir quality is influenced by the abundance of reservoir bitumen and thread-like illite, both of which bridge pores. Isotopic data suggest that during the first 30 to 40 m.y. of burial, subsurface diagenesis of the Norphlet Formation was dominated by deep-circulating, hot, meteoric water. This phenomenon may be characteristic of the early diagenetic history of rifted basins. 10 figures, 5 tables.

  18. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  19. Impact assessment of hydroclimatic change on water stress in the Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasheed, Bilhuda

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety percent of Pakistan's agricultural output is produced in fields irrigated by the Indus basin irrigation system, the world's largest network of canals, dams, barrages and tubewells. River flows, primarily fed by snow ...

  20. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  1. Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

  2. Measurement of induced fractures by downhole TV camera in Black Warrior Basin coalbeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, I.D. (Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Sparks, P. (Taurus Exploration Inc., Birmingham, AL (US))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture stimulation is commonly used for coal degasification at the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. To understand coalbed fracturing better, Well AM-1 in the Oak Grove field was completed openhole in the section bracketing the Black Creek coals. Special diagnostics used on this project included various injection tests, static-line pressure measurements, and a downhole television camera. The television camera observed fractures during injection tests and after the propped fracture treatment. The authors believe these are the first successful downhole television pictures of propped fractures in coalbeds. Results are compared with predictions of hydraulic fracture simulators. This is a way of calibrating hydraulic fracture models for improved design/optimization.

  3. Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yamin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for basinward extension of Travis Peak gas production along the west margin of the East Texas Basin. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, southeast-trending Travis Peak sandstones belts were deposited by the Ancestral Red River fluvial-deltaic system...

  4. Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

  5. Submarine geomorphology and sedimentation patterns of the Gyre Intraslope Basin, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lester Badder

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    portions of the basin. The presence of high percentages of sand size quartz grains, rock fragments, displaced benthonic foraminifers and shallow water mollusc shells indicate that Pleistocene sediments from the basin margins have been carried... into the basin via slumping and possibly sediment gravity flow mechanism. Heavy mineral identification indicate" that the source of sand size sediment during Late Pleistocene was from the Rio Grande and Mississippi Rivers and there was very little, if any...

  6. Recognition of two distinctive diagenetic facies trends as aid to hydrocarbon exploration in deeply buried Jurassic Smackover carbonates of southern Alabama and southern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petrological investigations from wells drilled in the southern Mississippi Interior Salt basin and in the northern Gulf Coast Salt basin have revealed regionally predictable diagenetic-facies trends within the deeply buried (19,000-22,500 ft) Smackover Formation. Within deeply buried Smackover trends, calcitic facies and dolomitic facies are recognized. The calcitic facies is areally widespread and exhibits diagenetic intensities ranging from well-preserved grainstones to pervasive neomorphism. Petrographic evidence of multistage cementation, solution compaction, replacement fabrics, and cement-occluded secondary porosity is common. The calcitic facies is characterized by low porosity and low permeability. The dolomitic facies is less abundant, and its distribution can be related to the Jurassic paleotopography. The Wiggins uplift, a prominent basement element extending across southern Alabama and southern Mississippi, exerted significant control on the areal distribution of this facies. Porous and permeable intervals in the deeply buried Smackover are restricted to this facies. The most significant textural parameter of the dolomitic facies is crystal size. Finely crystalline dolostone is normally of low porosity and low permeability, whereas coarsely crystalline dolostone exhibits more-favorable reservoir properties. The distribution of these diagenetic facies has important implications on future hydrocarbon exploration in the deeply buried Smackover Formation.

  7. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Tupelo quadrangle, Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tupelo quadrangle covers a region immediately east of the Mississippi River flood plain in the northernmost Gulf Coastal Physiographic Province. Sediments of Teritary and Paleozoic basins shoal eastward. Tertiary exposures dominate the western half of the quadrangle. Cretaceous strata are exposed over most of the eastern half. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of eighty-six uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Few were considered significant, and most appear to relate to some cultural feature. Magnetic data appears, for the most part, to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  8. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Blytheville quadrangle, Tennessee, Arkansas, Alabama, and Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blytheville quadrangle covers a region east of the Mississippi River in the northernmost Gulf Coastal Province. The Tertiary Mississippi Embayment and the older Black Warrior - Arkoma Basins all shoal to the northeast in this area. Surficial exposures are dominantly Cretaceous or younger. Older strata are exposed in the northeast. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Ninety uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Few were considered significant,and almost all appear to relate to some cultural feature. Magnetic data appears, for the most part, to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region.

  9. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  10. More wells will expand knowledge of Knox group, Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, D.E. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (US))

    1991-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arbuckle group of the Arkoma, Ardmore, and Anadarko basins was essentially untested in 1986. This paper reports that in these basins, shallower Pennsylvanian reservoirs were easy to reach and more economical to develop. The general consensus was that if a karstic reservoir was not present at the top of the Arbuckle group then there was no potential for oil and gas. Today the story is different; production zones are being found throughout the Arbuckle group, and drilling has been as deep as 28,000 ft. The Black Warrior basin is in a similar setting to the Arkoma, it is a foreland basin that has produced from multiple Mississippian and Pennsylvanian horizons at shallow depths. The Knox carbonate is present in a similar structural setting to that of the Arbuckle group at depths generally above 15,000 ft. In addition, Alabama is even more fortunate in that the buried Appalachian fold and thrust belt along the southern boundary of the basin also provides additional Knox targets with great promise. In this area Knox dolomites are fractured and folded and are juxtaposed by thrust faulting against Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks that are excellent sources of oil and gas. Therefore, the Knox is essentially untested in the Black Warrior basin.

  11. Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

  12. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

  13. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  14. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  15. Fates of Eroded Soil Organic Carbon: Mississippi Basin Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. V.; Sleezer, R. O.; Renwick, W. H.; Buddemeier, Robert W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a mass balance analysis of organic carbon (OC) across the five major river subsystems of the Mississippi (MS) Basin (an area of 3.2 3 106 km2). This largely agricultural landscape undergoes a bulk soil erosion rate of ;480 t·km22...

  16. Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

  17. Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81 JOHN M. WARD and JOHN R. POFFENBERGER Introduction Reports of ice shortages during the shrimp fishing season prompted a Na- tional closure regulation on ice plant production and sales. Like Texas, Louisiana controls the opening

  18. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering) that are administratively supported by the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. In the last ten degrees in environmental engineering and architectural engineering. At the graduate level, the department

  19. Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic) of southwestern and offshore Alabama: environments of deposition and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.; Wilkerson, R.P.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern and offshore Alabama accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama to provide a barrier for air and water circulation during the deposition of the Norphlet Formation. These mountains produced topographic conditions that contributed to the arid climate, and they affected sedimentation. Norphlet paleogeography in southwestern Alabama was dominated by a broad desert plain, rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. The desert plain extended westward into eastern and central Mississippi. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent; six oil and gas fields already have been established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist primarily of quartz-rich sandstones that are eolian, wadi, and marine in origin. Porosity is principally secondary (dissolution) with some intergranular porosity. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. Jurassic oil generation and migration probably were initiated in the Early Cretaceous.

  20. Recoverable natural gas reserves from Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Alabama coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Hamilton, R.P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, 11 Norphlet gas fields have been established in offshore Alabama. These fields are part of a deep Jurassic gas trend that extends across southern Mississippi and Alabama into the Gulf of Mexico. Recoverable gas reserves of 4.9-8.1 tcf are estimated for the Norphlet Formation in Alabama's coastal waters. Proven gas reserves are estimated to be 3.7-4.6 tcf and potential reserves are estimated to be 1.2-3.5 tcf. The natural gas is trapped in a series of generally east-west-trending salt anticlines. The mechanism of structure formation appears to be salt flowage that has formed broad, low-relief anticlines, most of which are faulted, and many of which are related to small-scale growth faults. Salt movement is the critical factor in the formation of these petroleum traps. The primary Norphlet reservoir lithofacies are eolian dune and interdune sandstones that range in thickness from 140 to over 600 ft in Alabama's coastal waters. Gas pay can exceed 280 ft in thickness. Porosity is principally secondary, developed as a result of decementation and grain dissolution. Jurassic Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were the main source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. The seal for the gas is the nonpermeable upper portion of the Norphlet Formation. The overlying lower Smackover carbonates are also nonpermeable and may serve as part of the seal.

  1. Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication details the results of a survey of elected city officials and water managers in the Rio Grande River Basin of Texas and New Mexico. The participants ranked water conservation strategies for their communities....

  2. Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

    Effective management of the highly variable water resources of a river basin requires an understanding of the amount of suitable quality water that can be provided under various conditions within institutional constraints. Although much research has...

  3. Computer modeling and simulation of Black Warrior Basin formation: Annual report for the 1987--1988 SOMED (School of Mines and Energy Development) project year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visscher, P.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations have been performed, aimed at achieving a better understanding of the geological and physical processes involved in the formation of sedimentary basins in general and the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi in particular. Microscopic-level computer modeling of sandstone porosity reduction has been done, elucidating the detailed small-scale dynamics which lead to the geological phenomenon of pressure solution. A new technique has been developed for 1D burial and thermal modeling of sedimentary basins based on stratigraphic data from test wells. It is significantly faster than previous methods, and can be used in interactive menu-oriented program requiring relatively little learning time or prior computer experience. This allows a geologist to rapidly determine the results of various different hypotheses about basin formation, providing insight which may help determine which is correct. A program has also been written to simulate tectonic-plate collisions and rifting processes using viscoelastic hydrodynamics.

  4. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  5. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  6. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of Mississippian (Chesterian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.B.; Meylan, M.A.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The character and reservoir quality of six different Mississippian (Chesterian) sandstone units in frontier areas of the Black Warrior basin of Mississippi have been determined by core inspection, thin-section examination, and x-ray diffractometry. A total of 113 samples from ten wells was taken from cores of the following sandstones: the Lewis, a calcareous sandstone at the top of or just above the Lewis that the authors refer to as the Lewis limestone, the Evans, the Rea, the Sanders, and the Carter. Hydrocarbon production from the basin, which is located in northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama, is mostly shallow gas (with minor gas condensate and oil) from the units. Sample depths range from about 2500 ft (762 m) in northern Chickasaw County to about 5500 ft (1676 m) in Monroe and Lowndes Counties, with the deepest samples coming from almost 11,000 ft (3353 m) in northern Clay County.

  7. Quarterly review of Methane from Coal Seams Technology. Volume 9, Number 2, January 1992. Rept. for Apr-Jun 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBane, R.A.; Schwochow, S.D.; Stevens, S.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following reports summarize the results of recent exploration, testing, and production in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming; Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana; Greater Green River Coal Region, Wyoming and Colorado; Piceance Basin, Colorado; San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Black Warrior Basin, Alabama and the Northern and Central Appalachian Basins. Contents also include: Advances in Laboratory Measurement Techniques of Relative Permeability and Capillary Pressure for Coal Seams; Methane from Coal Seams Research; and Technical Events.

  8. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  9. EECBG Success Story: Alabama Justice Center Expands its Solar Capabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River Site for UseConservationEvansville,| Department

  10. EECBG Success Story: Managing Storm Aftermath in Alabama | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River SiteDepartment of EnergyDepartmentEnergy

  11. Modeling the resolution of inexpensive, novel non-seismic geophysical monitoring tools to monitor CO2 injection into coal beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoirs of the Black Warrior Basin: Tuscaloosa, Alabama,test planned in the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. In theof coal in the Black Warrior basin decreases exponentially

  12. Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual ?ow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak ?ood waters, that ?ow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, of?cials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the ?ooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

  13. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  14. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

  15. On-line river flow forecasting with `Hydromax' : successes and challenges after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    frequent on-line field measurements of rainfall depths in raingauges, weather radar data, wa- ter levels in 88 automatic telemetered rain- gauges and two weather radars. Preprints of the 15th IFAC Symposium BOCQ EAU D'HEURE Rain Gauges River flow meas. stations MEUSE M EUSE Fig. 1. The Meuse river basin

  16. Petroleum geology of the Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic), S. W. and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successful gas test in the Norphlet formation (up to 26 million CF/day) at depths exceeding 20,500 ft in the Mobile Bay area demonstrate a high potential for hydrocarbon production in the Alabama offshore area. In addition, wells drilled in the upper Mobile Bay area could encounter gas condensate in the Norphlet formation; gas condensate is being produced from wells in Hatter's Pond field about 14 miles north of Mobile Bay and 45 miles north of the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann field. With continued petroleum exploration, additional Norphlet petroleum fields should be discovered in southwestern and offshore Alabama in the years ahead. In light of the recent discoveries in Escambia County and in the lower Mobile Bay area, Mobile, Baldwin, and Escambia counties and Mobile Bay appear to be the most prospective hydrocarbon areas.

  17. Increased activity expected in Permian basin, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagar, R.

    1988-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration and development activities in two of the most important petroleum provinces in the U.S. are mixed, but the outlook is bright. There has been a steady increase in drilling in oil plays of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico and in the Permian basin of West Texas and New Mexico. But natural gas drilling has not seen much of an increase, although activity involving Miocne sands in the shallow water portion of the gulf is starting to pick up. Deep gas drilling, stalled by the 1986 spot price collapse, has not yet shown signs of new life, even though production is scheduled to begin this year from the Jurassic Norphlet deep gas play off Alabama. There should be continued increases this year in deepwater and Permian basin drilling if oil prices remain in the $18-20/bbl range. And gas drilling is expected to pick up considerably if spot prices strengthen. An important factor in the drilling outlook is an expectation that major interstate transmission companies this year will resume buying long term gas supplies for resale. Long term contracts reduce producer uncertainty in project economics.

  18. Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite altimeter data and modeled discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite for 21 ``virtual gauge stations'' located at the upper Negro River (Amazon Basin, Brazil). A virtual station can be defined as any crossing of water body surface (i.e., large rivers) by radar altimeter

  19. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Groshong, R.H.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and produces oil from chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group and from sandstone of the Eutaw Formation along the southern margin of the Gilbertown fault system. Most of the field has been in primary recovery since establishment, but production has declined to marginally economic levels. This investigation applies advanced geologic concepts designed to aid implementation of improved recovery programs. The Gilbertown fault system is detached at the base of Jurassic salt. The fault system began forming as a half graben and evolved in to a full graben by the Late Cretaceous. Conventional trapping mechanisms are effective in Eutaw sandstone, whereas oil in Selma chalk is trapped in faults and fault-related fractures. Burial modeling establishes that the subsidence history of the Gilbertown area is typical of extensional basins and includes a major component of sediment loading and compaction. Surface mapping and fracture analysis indicate that faults offset strata as young as Miocene and that joints may be related to regional uplift postdating fault movement. Preliminary balanced structural models of the Gilbertown fault system indicate that synsedimentary growth factors need to be incorporated into the basic equations of area balance to model strain and predict fractures in Selma and Eutaw reservoirs.

  20. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Baisn and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain: Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1997-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.

    1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Part I (Inventory of Existing Data and Information Sources) objectives are to provide improved access to information available in the public domain by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format. The producers in the region maintain that the accessibility of oil and gas information is the single-most important factor to assist them in finding new hydrocarbon discoveries and in improving production from established fields. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with geologists for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. A subcontract has been executed between the University of Alabama and the Geological Survey of Alabama. A subcontract agreement is under review by the Mississippi Office of Geology. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with a number of faculty members from departments of geology in the region. A listing of theses and dissertations from the University of Alabama, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Louisiana State University related to the petroleum geology of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been compiled. This list is accessible electronically through the Home Page of the Eastern Gulf Region of the Pertroleum Technology Transfer Council (EGRPTTC) (http://egrpttc.geo.ua.edu).