Sample records for risk informed safety

  1. RISK-INFORMED SAFETY MARGIN CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh; Ronaldo Szilard

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of safety margins has served as a fundamental principle in the design and operation of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defined as the minimum distance between a system’s “loading” and its “capacity”, plant design and operation is predicated on ensuring an adequate safety margin for safety-significant parameters (e.g., fuel cladding temperature, containment pressure, etc.) is provided over the spectrum of anticipated plant operating, transient and accident conditions. To meet the anticipated challenges associated with extending the operational lifetimes of the current fleet of operating NPPs, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have developed a collaboration to conduct coordinated research to identify and address the technological challenges and opportunities that likely would affect the safe and economic operation of the existing NPP fleet over the postulated long-term time horizons. In this paper we describe a framework for developing and implementing a Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to evaluate and manage changes in plant safety margins over long time horizons.

  2. A risk-informed approach to safety margins analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway is a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The model has been tested on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab.

  3. Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  4. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

  5. Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. As the lead Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for this Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with developing and deploying methods and tools that support the quantification and management of safety margin and uncertainty.

  6. Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board(DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009?1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. Thisrecommendation focused on the...

  7. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  8. RISK-INFORMED BALANCING OF SAFETY, NONPROLIFERATION, AND ECONOMICS FOR THE SFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apostolakis, George; Driscoll, Michael; Golay, Michael; Kadak, Andrew; Todreas, Neil; Aldmir, Tunc; Denning, Richard; Lineberry, Michael

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantial barrier to the implementation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology in the short term is the perception that they would not be economically competitive with advanced light water reactors. With increased acceptance of risk-informed regulation, the opportunity exists to reduce the costs of a nuclear power plant at the design stage without applying excessive conservatism that is not needed in treating low risk events. In the report, NUREG-1860, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes developmental activities associated with a risk-informed, scenario-based technology neutral framework (TNF) for regulation. It provides quantitative yardsticks against which the adequacy of safety risks can be judged. We extend these concepts to treatment of proliferation risks. The objective of our project is to develop a risk-informed design process for minimizing the cost of electricity generation within constraints of adequate safety and proliferation risks. This report describes the design and use of this design optimization process within the context of reducing the capital cost and levelized cost of electricity production for a small (possibly modular) SFR. Our project provides not only an evaluation of the feasibility of a risk-informed design process but also a practical test of the applicability of the TNF to an actual advanced, non-LWR design. The report provides results of five safety related and one proliferation related case studies of innovative design alternatives. Applied to previously proposed SFR nuclear energy system concepts We find that the TNF provides a feasible initial basis for licensing new reactors. However, it is incomplete. We recommend improvements in terms of requiring acceptance standards for total safety risks, and we propose a framework for regulation of proliferation risks. We also demonstrate methods for evaluation of proliferation risks. We also suggest revisions to scenario-specific safety risk acceptance standards, particularly concerning seismic and aircraft impactrelated risks. Most importantly, within the context of the TNF historical SFR safety concerns about energetic core disruptive accidents are seen to be unimportant, but those of rare scenarios mentioned above are seen to be of dominant concern. In terms of proliferation risks the SFR energy system is seen not to be of considerably greater concern than with other nuclear power technologies, providing that highly effective safeguards are employed. We find the economic performance of proposed SFRs likely, due to the problems of using sodium as a coolant, to be inferior to those of LWRs unless they can be credited for services to improve nuclear waste disposal, nuclear fuel utilization and proliferation risk reductions. None of the design innovations investigated offers the promise to reverse this conclusion. The most promising innovation investigated is that of improving the plant's thermodynamic efficiency via use of the supercritical CO{sub 2} (rather than steam Rankine) power conversion system. We were unable to reach conclusions about the economic and proliferation risk implications of competing nuclear fuel processing methods, as available designs are too little developed to justify any such results. Overall, we find the SFR to be a promising alternative to LWRs should the conditions governing the valuation change substantially from current ones.

  9. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC): Integrated Treatment of Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty in Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Youngblood

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of “margin” has a long history in nuclear licensing and in the codification of good engineering practices. However, some traditional applications of “margin” have been carried out for surrogate scenarios (such as design basis scenarios), without regard to the actual frequencies of those scenarios, and have been carried out with in a systematically conservative fashion. This means that the effectiveness of the application of the margin concept is determined in part by the original choice of surrogates, and is limited in any case by the degree of conservatism imposed on the evaluation. In the RISMC project, which is part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), we are developing a risk-informed characterization of safety margin. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system response. For example, the probabilistic load spectrum will reflect the frequency of challenges of a particular severity. Such a characterization is required if decision-making is to be informed optimally. However, in order to enable the quantification of probabilistic load spectra, existing analysis capability needs to be extended. Accordingly, the INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability whose design will allow for much more efficient parameter uncertainty analysis, and will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin.

  10. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk and Safety Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Risk and Safety AssessmentTara...

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  12. Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management 1600 Holloway Avenue, ADM 252 San Francisco, California OF RISK AND AGREEMENT TO PAY CLAIMS Activity: San Francisco State University Campus Recreation Department participating in this Activity. I am aware of the risks associated with traveling to/from and participating

  13. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program focuses on advancing the state of the art in safety analysis and risk assessment to support decision-making on nuclear power plant operation well beyond the originally designed lifetime of the plants (i.e., beyond 60 years). Among the issues being addressed in RISMC is the significance of SSC aging and how confident we are about our understanding of its impact on the margin between the loads SSCs are expected to see during normal operation and accident conditions, and the SSC capacities (their ability to resist those loads) as the SSCs age. In this paper, a summary is provided of a case study that examines SSC aging from an environmental qualification (EQ) perspective. The case study illustrates how the state of knowledge regarding SSC margin can be characterized given the overall integrated plant design, and was developed to demonstrate a method for deciding on which cables to focus, which cables are not so important from an environmental qualification margin standpoint, and what plant design features or operating characteristics determine the role that environmental qualification plays in establishing a safety case on which decisions regarding margin can be made. The selection of cables for which demonstration of margin with respect to aging and environmental challenges uses a technique known as Prevention Analysis. Prevention Analysis is a Boolean method for optimal selection of SSCs (that is, those combinations of SSCs both necessary and sufficient to meet a predetermined selection criterion) in a manner that allows demonstration that plant-level safety can be demonstrated by the collection of selected SSCs alone. Choosing the set of SSCs that is necessary and sufficient to satisfy the safety objectives, and demonstrating that the safety objectives can be met effectively, determines where resources are best allocated to assure SSC performance margin. The paper describes the resulting component types that were selected by Prevention Analysis and identifies the accident sequence characteristics that cause these component types to be important from an EQ and aging perspective (and, hence, worthwhile evaluating the extent of safety margin). In addition, component types not selected as needing significant margin from an EQ and aging perspective are discussed and an engineering rationale is developed justifying the lack of need to apply resources to demonstrating margin for these component types. This rationale is in terms of design features of the plant and operating characteristics that make these component types less important from an EQ and aging perspective. While the case study focuses on EQ and aging of equipment and cables located inside the containment of this PWR, the prevention analysis method is demonstrated to be an effective technique for identification of minimal collections of components that would be effective in managing safety for a variety of issues associated with aging and long-term operation of the fleet of plants.

  14. Incorporating safety risk in early system architecture trade studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dulac, Nicholas

    Ideally, safety should be a part of the early decision making used in conceptual system design. However, effectively evaluating safety risk3 early enough to inform the early trade studies is not possible with current ...

  15. MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 1 of 2 SAFETY & RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 1 of 2 SAFETY & RISK MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY Safety & Risk Management (SRM) of new hires. Completion of a baseline occupational health evaluation Protection Program.) #12;MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 2 of 2 MSU provides additional medical evaluations

  16. Postgraduate Diploma in Safety and Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Postgraduate Diploma in Safety and Risk Management #12;Programme Structure The Postgraduate Diploma in Safety and Risk Management comprises four modules with a total academic rating of 60 credits: Methods of Professional Enquiry 15 credits Entry to the Masters phase of the Safety and Risk Management Programme requires

  17. HANFORD SAFETY ANALYSIS & RISK ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK (SARAH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EVANS, C B

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 2 and 3 (HC-2 and 3) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management''. Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' Consistent with DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'' (STD-3009), and DOE-STD-3011-2002, ''Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents'' (STD-3011), the Hanford SARAH describes methodology for performing a safety analysis leading to development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), and provides the information necessary to ensure a consistently rigorous approach that meets DOE expectations. The DSA and TSR documents, together with the DOE-issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER), are the basic components of facility safety basis documentation. For HC-2 or 3 nuclear facilities in long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M), for decommissioning activities, where source term has been eliminated to the point that only low-level, residual fixed contamination is present, or for environmental remediation activities outside of a facility structure, DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities'' (STD-1120), may serve as the basis for the DSA. HC-2 and 3 environmental remediation sites also are subject to the hazard analysis methodologies of this standard.

  18. Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard The Nuclear Safety Information (NSI) Dashboard provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting...

  19. Postgraduate Certificate in Safety and Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Postgraduate Certificate in Safety and Risk Management #12;Programme Structure The Postgraduate and risk management 15 credits This module takes account of the needs of participants coming from diverse academic and professional backgrounds. It provides a context for safety and risk management practice

  20. TWRS safety and technical integration risk management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fordham, R.A.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety and Technical Integration (STI) programmatic risk management program are to assess, analyze, and handle risks associated with TWRS STI responsibilities and to communicate information about the actions being taken and the results to enable decision making. The objective of this TWRS STI Risk Management Plan is to communicate a consistent approach to risk management that will be used by the organization.

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  2. Reliability Engineering and System Safety 92 (2007) 609618 The nuclear industry's transition to risk-informed regulation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    improvement in safety based on Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) performance indicatorsReliability Engineering and System Safety 92 (2007) 609­618 The nuclear industry's transition a Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139

  3. Safety & Risk Management Montana State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    59717-0510 406-994-2711 406-994-7040 Fax www.montana.edu/wwwsrm Ergonomics Evaluation Form (Please keep 994-7040 or campus mail: Ergonomics Reimbursement c/o Safety & Risk Management The following Safety & Ergonomics Training Courses: www.montana.edu/wwwsrm/training.htm Ergonomics Program Contact

  4. CAMPUS Updated 2/9/2012 OFFICE Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Page 1 CAMPUS Updated 2/9/2012 OFFICE Safety & Risk Management MAILING ADDRESS 9001 Stockdale Hwy Juli A. Smith, CIH Director of Safety & Risk Management (661) 654-2066 jsmith101@csub.edu Risk and Risk Management SAFETY RELATED FUNCTIONS SPECIFIC SAFETY FUNCTIONS RESPONSIBLE PERSON POSITION

  5. CAMPUS Updated 2/9/2012 OFFICE Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Page 1 CAMPUS Updated 2/9/2012 OFFICE Safety & Risk Management MAILING ADDRESS 9001 Stockdale Hwy, CIH Director of Safety & Risk Management (661) 6542066 jsmith101@csub.edu Risk Management) 6546320 sbarela@csub.edu Safety, I.H., and Environmental Programs Director of Safety and Risk Management

  6. Safety Staff Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterials (CRM) | U.S.Safety

  7. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Youngblood; D. Blanchard

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  8. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Blanchard; R. Youngblood

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  9. Risk assessment activities at NIOSH: Information resources and needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stayner, L.T.; Meinhardt, T.; Hardin, B. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health, and Mine Safety and Health Acts, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is charged with development of recommended occupational safety and health standards, and with conducting research to support the development of these standards. Thus, NIOSH has been actively involved in the analysis of risk associated with occupational exposures, and in the development of research information that is critical for the risk assessment process. NIOSH research programs and other information resources relevant to the risk assessment process are described in this paper. Future needs for information resources are also discussed.

  10. U.S. risk management can reduce regulation, enhance safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willke, T.L. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States); Shires, T.M.; Cowgill, R.M. [Radian International LLC, Austin, TX (United States); Selig, B.J. [Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., CT (United States)

    1997-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The only way to slow the spiraling costs of new prescriptive pipeline regulations is to develop an effective risk-management program, one that will focus on the highest priority safety issues not minimum compliance with regulation. If applied systematically and rigorously, risk management can help pipeline operators focus on safety issues specific to their own systems. These operators have a greater understanding of the condition of their systems and what it takes to keep them operating safely. This knowledge, along with the flexibility inherent in the US approach to risk management, can lead to a more effective use of resources devoted to pipeline safety. When an accident occurs, data generated in a risk-management program will provide a mechanism for understanding the causes of an incident. Such information can also direct future efforts toward the most effective actions to ensure that similar incidents are unlikely to occur again. The paper discusses two incidents, an oil products pipeline rupture in Washington, DC and a natural gas pipeline rupture in Edison, NJ. Current regulations for gas pipelines, the US approach to risk management, implementation, performance measurement, accident prevention, and issues to be resolved are discussed.

  11. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  12. Hanford safety analysis and risk assessment handbook (SARAH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GARVIN, L.J.

    2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 1,2, and 3 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. SARAH describes currently acceptable methodology for development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of technical safety requirements (TSR) based on 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management,'' Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' and provides data to ensure consistency in approach.

  13. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocuments Home Stationary PowerResearchRisk and Safety

  14. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  15. pamphlet04.doc SAFETY INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    to emergencies such as fire, chemical spill, electrical outage, communication system failure, etc. 2. RESEARCH Drugs 8 Communication Systems 9 Compliance Issues 10 Compressed Gas Cylinders 11 Electrical Safety 12 Electrical Power Failure 13 Emergency Procedures 14 Fire Safety 15 Hazard Reporting 16 Laser Safety 17

  16. Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

  17. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Safety & Risk Services Environmental Health and Safety Last Revised: 2010/10/20 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety & Risk Services Environmental Health and Safety Last Revised: 2010/10/20 1 EXPOSURE CONTROL the presence or the reasonably anticipated presence of blood or OPIMs on an item or surface. RISK AND RESPONSIBILITIES The purpose of this exposure control plan is to eliminate or minimize the risk of occupational

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    and healthy environment, to develop and facilitate emergency management best practices, to assist and educateENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL Table of Contents Mission Manual Chapter VIII - Radiation Safety Technical Manual Chapter IX - Risk Management Technical Manual

  20. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  1. Reactor operation safety information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  2. Advances in Safety, Reliability and Risk Management -Proceedings of the European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2011 -European Safety and Reliability Conference: Advances in Safety, Reliability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Advances in Safety, Reliability and Risk Management - Proceedings of the European Safety, Reliability and Risk Management, ESREL 2011, Troyes : France (2011) In France, more than 99% of failed is global risk management. This allows analysis of the major risks faced by the busi- ness (loss

  3. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  4. Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services 3-107 Research Transition of Insurance Policy Standards Department of Management Services Protective Services Management & Risk Management & Risk Assessment Office Resource Planning Tel: 780.248.1147 Tel: 780.492.5050 Tel: 780

  5. Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    URMIA Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template 2008 URMIA Journal Reprint Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D. The City University of New York University Risk Management CUNY and other universities to upgrade their risk management efforts? It is easy to suggest

  6. INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK Sanjay S. Chauhan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauhan, Sanjay S.

    on the topic of uncertainty in quantitative risk and policy analysis the reader is referred to Morgan to incorporating input uncertainties into risk analysis model. Input uncertainties are captured by using for uncertainty analysis in dam safety risk assessment, and demonstrates some useful formats for presenting

  7. Risk and Work Configuration Management as a Function of Integrated Safety Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lana Buehrer, Michele Kelly, Fran Lemieux, Fred Williams

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), has established a work management program and corresponding electronic Facilities and Operations Management Information System (e-FOM) to implement Integrated Safety Management (ISM). The management of work scopes, the identification of hazards, and the establishment of implementing controls are reviewed and approved through electronic signatures. Through the execution of the program and the implementation of the electronic system, NSTec staff work within controls and utilize feedback and improvement process. The Integrated Work Control Manual further implements the five functions of ISM at the Activity level. By adding the Risk and Work Configuration Management program, NSTec establishes risk acceptance (business and physical) for liabilities within the performance direction and work management processes. Requirements, roles, and responsibilities are specifically identified in the program while e-FOM provides the interface and establishes the flowdown from the Safety Chain to work and facilities management processes to company work-related directives, and finally to Subject Matter Expert concurrence. The Program establishes, within the defined management structure, management levels for risk identification, risk mitigation (controls), and risk acceptance (business and physical) within the Safety Chain of Responsibility. The Program also implements Integrated Safeguards and Security Management within the NSTec Safety Chain of Responsibility. Once all information has been entered into e-FOM, approved, and captured as data, the information becomes searchable and sortable by hazard, location, organization, mitigating controls, etc.

  8. Model-based Safety Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Peter

    development life-cycle, in order to identify critical system requirements, such as safety requirements their effectiveness, early in the system development life-cycle, on models derived directly from natural language of functional requirements of arbitrary detail ­ whether it is very early in the life-cycle when functions

  9. Information Security Office Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    or Approved) 6/01/2013 CISO Jason Pufahl, CISO Approved 6/01/2013 RMAC Risk Management Advisory Council

  10. Assessing the Changes In Safety Risk Arising From the Use of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessing the Changes In Safety Risk Arising From the Use of Natural Gas Infrastructure For Mixtures of Hydrogen and Natural Gas Assessing the Changes In Safety Risk Arising From...

  11. 05.09 1 Risk Management and Environmental Health & Safety REGENTS' POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    05.09 1 Risk Management and Environmental Health & Safety REGENTS' POLICY PART V ­ FINANCE AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Chapter 05.09 - Risk Management and Environmental Health and Safety P05 effectively and efficiently establish and maintain a risk management and environmental health and safety

  12. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  13. PRA and Risk Informed Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernsen, Sidney A.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Balkey, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has introduced a risk based approach into Section XI that covers Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. The risk based approach requires application of the probabilistic risk assessments (PRA). Because no industry consensus standard existed for PRAs, ASME has developed a standard to evaluate the quality level of an available PRA needed to support a given risk based application. The paper describes the PRA standard, Section XI application of PRAs, and plans for broader applications of PRAs to other ASME nuclear codes and standards. The paper addresses several specific topics of interest to Section XI. Important consideration are special methods (surrogate components) used to overcome the lack of PRA treatments of passive components in PRAs. The approach allows calculations of conditional core damage probabilities both for component failures that cause initiating events and failures in standby systems that decrease the availability of these systems. The paper relates the explicit risk based methods of the new Section XI code cases to the implicit consideration of risk used in the development of Section XI. Other topics include the needed interactions of ISI engineers, plant operating staff, PRA specialists, and members of expert panels that review the risk based programs.

  14. Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environment,...

  15. Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and equipment. The inclusion or exclusion of any given resource is not meant to reflect endorsement by Georgia Tech. Please contact the Laser Safety Officer if you know of any helpful resources

  16. Information needs for risk management/communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The hazardous waste cleanup program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund) is delegated to the ten Regions of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and has, to date, identified more than 33,000 sites for consideration. The size and complexity of the program places great demands on those who would provide information to achieve national consistency in application of risk assessment while meeting site-specific needs for risk management and risk communication.

  17. Contributions to risk-informed decision making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Michael A. (Michael Alfred)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk-informed decision-making (RIDM) is a formal process that assists stakeholders make decisions in the face of uncertainty. At MIT, a tool known as the Analytic Deliberative Decision Making Process (ADP) has been under ...

  18. Analyses to support development of risk-informed separation distances for hydrogen codes and standards.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Houf, William G. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Fluer, Inc., Paso Robels, CA; Fluer, Larry (Fluer, Inc., Paso Robels, CA); Middleton, Bobby

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a set of safety codes and standards for hydrogen facilities is necessary to ensure they are designed and operated safely. To help ensure that a hydrogen facility meets an acceptable level of risk, code and standard development organizations are tilizing risk-informed concepts in developing hydrogen codes and standards.

  19. EHS DSP Authorization Request Form 2012-001 Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , regulations and Driver safety Program requirements. I authorize Safety & Risk Management to enroll me or more persons in one accident; $5,000 property damage). Vehicle Code Section 16020 (effective July 1EHS DSP Authorization Request Form 2012-001 Safety & Risk Management Request for Authorization

  20. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Konzek, G.J.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Fecht, B.A.; Allen, C.H.; Allen, R.D.; Bickford, W.E., Carbaugh, E.H.; Lewis, J.R.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 31 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of summer 1983, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.

  1. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabatabai, A.S.; Fecht, B.A.; Powers, T.B.; Bickford, W.E.; Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Bian, S.H.; Daling, P.M.; Eschbach, E.J.; Allen, C.H.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 23 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of winter 1986, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.''

  2. RISK MANAGEMENT WORKSHEET (CDTCMD Reg 385-10; proponent agency is Cadet Command Safety)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    RISK MANAGEMENT WORKSHEET (CDTCMD Reg 385-10; proponent agency is Cadet Command Safety) 1 385-1-R-E, Apr 01 Risk Assessment and Risk Management Countermeasure Worksheets in CC Reg 145-3 are OBSOLETE #12;Sample Risk Management Worksheet RISK MANAGEMENT WORKSHEET (CDTCMD Reg 385-10; proponent

  3. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  4. Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

  5. Making the business case for process safety using value-at-risk concepts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jayming Sha

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing emphasis on chemical process safety over the last two decades has led to the development and application of powerful risk assessment tools. Hazard analysis and risk evaluation techniques have developed to the ...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  7. RISK MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK: HELPING ORGANIZATIONS IMPLEMENT EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK: HELPING ORGANIZATIONS IMPLEMENT EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAMS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute component of every organization's information security program. An effective risk management process enables

  8. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  9. Human-robot interactions: model-based risk analysis and safety case construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiochet, Jérémie

    Human-robot interactions: model-based risk analysis and safety case construction Quynh Anh DO HOANG potential threats related to physical human-robot interactions and to assess the associated risks that might affect safety and dependability. Because of the complexity of human-robot interactions, rigorous

  10. PhiliP J. Venables Chief Information Risk Officer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    information security and software engineering roles at various finance, defense and energy companies. PhilPhiliP J. Venables Chief Information Risk Officer Goldman sachs Phil is the firm's Chief Information Risk Officer. He leads the Information Security, Technology Risk and Business Continuity Programs

  11. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth in a series of reports to document the development and use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose, and cost impacts of implementing potential resolutions to reactor safety issues (see NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews, et al., 1983). This report contains the results of issue-specific analyses for 34 generic issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information at the time the issues were examined and approximately 2 staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced as one consideration in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues (Emrit, et al., 1983).

  12. Development of a Societal-Risk Goal for Nuclear Power Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicki Bier; Michael Corradini; Robert Youngblood; Caleb Roh; Shuji Liu

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety-goal policy of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has never included a true societal-risk goal. The NRC did acknowledge that the original goal for the risk of latent cancer facilities “was an individual risk goal not related to the number of people involved,” and stated that “a true societal risk goal would place a limit on the aggregate number of people affected.” However, this limitation was never satisfactorily addressed. Moreover, the safety goal has historically focused primarily on fatalities and latent health effects, while experience with actual nuclear accidents has shown that societal disruption can be significant even in accidents that yield only small to modest numbers of fatalities. Therefore, we have evaluated the social disruption effects from severe reactor accidents as a basis to develop a societal-risk goal for nuclear power plants, considering both health effects and non-health concerns such as property damage and land interdiction. Our initial analysis considered six different nuclear power plant sites in the U.S. for Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors. The accident sequences considered for these two reactor types were station blackout sequences (both short-term and long-term SBO) as well as an STSBO with RCIC failure for the BWR and a Steam Generator Tube Rupture for the PWR. The source term release was an input in a RASCAL calculation of the off-site consequences using actual site-based weather data for each of the six plant sites randomly selected over a two-year period. The source term release plumes were then compared to Geographical Information System data for each site to determine the population affected and that would need to be evacuated to meet current emergency preparedness regulations. Our results to date suggest that number of people evacuated to meet current protective action guidelines appears to be a good proxy for disruption -- and, unlike other measures of disruption, has the advantage of being relatively straightforward to calculate for a given accident scenario and a given geographical location and plant site. Revised safety goals taking into account the potential for societal disruption could in principle be applied to the current generation of nuclear plants, but could also be used in evaluating and siting new technologies, such as small modular light water reactors, advanced Gen-IV high-temperature reactors, as well as reactor designs with passive safety features such as filtered vented containments.

  13. Transactions of the nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 19th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 28--30, 1991. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, USNRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from the governments and industry in Europe and Japan are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting, and are given in the order of their presentation in each session. The individual summaries have been cataloged separately.

  14. Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam SafetyICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

  15. Safety Basis Information System | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSARDevelopmental AssignmentAprilAND POWERADVANCEDSafeguardsSafety

  16. Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor Long Beach, CA 90802 in this self-insured program. The Office of Risk Management in the Chancellor's Office administers the general liability, workers' compensation, property, and professional liability programs. The State Office of Risk

  17. Mobius Risk Group LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: Energy ResourcesMitchellElectricInformationRisk

  18. THE NICOLSON MUSEUM Venue and Safety Information for School Excursions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    THE NICOLSON MUSEUM Venue and Safety Information for School Excursions Venue Name: The Nicholson Museum, Sydney University Museums Location: Quadrangle A14, The University of Sydney NSW 2006 Phone Number: (02) 9351 2812 Fax Number: (02) 9351 7305 Web Address: www.usyd.edu.au/museums Sydney University

  19. THE MACLEAY MUSEUM Venue and Safety Information for School Excursions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    THE MACLEAY MUSEUM Venue and Safety Information for School Excursions Venue Name: The Macleay Museum, Sydney University Museums Location: Macleay Building A12, The University of Sydney NSW 2006 Phone Number: (02) 9036 5253 Fax Number: (02) 9351 7305 Web Address: www.usyd.edu.au/museums Sydney University

  20. Public Health and Safety | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This propertyVolumeInformationpeopleOpenPublic

  1. Proceedings of the 1998 USCOLD Annual Lecture, Buffalo, New York. August 1998 PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT David S. Bowles1 , Loren R. Anderson2 , Terry F. Glover3 on to provide the basis for an effective and efficient program for managing and reducing dam safety risksProceedings of the 1998 USCOLD Annual Lecture, Buffalo, New York. August 1998 PORTFOLIO RISK

  2. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  3. Office of the CISO, December 2010 Information Security Risk Advisory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    Office of the CISO, December 2010 Information Security Risk Advisory Web Browsing Software attacks. The Office of the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) encourages you to be aware of the following when

  4. 6 Enterprise information risk management: Dealing with cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pym, David J.

    6 Enterprise information risk management: Dealing with cloud computing Adrian Baldwin HP Labs for the enterprise risk and security management lifecycle. Specifically, the economies of scale that large providers federated assurance for the cloud. 6.1 Introduction Managing IT risks remains a significant challenge

  5. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wei, T.Y.; Wright, A.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites.

  6. Making the business case for process safety using value-at-risk concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jayming Sha

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries. 2 Presently, CPQRA has developed to the point where quantitatively meaningful risks may be calculated for individual processes and entire plants. (Fang et al., 2004)1 Obviously, implementing safety... quantitative and coherent business case for process safety would certainly result in a better-focused investment by the CPI. (Fang et al., 2004) In this thesis, we present a new approach for understanding, organizing, and packaging the results of CPQRA...

  7. ITL BULLETIN FOR MARCH 2011 MANAGING INFORMATION SECURITY RISK: ORGANIZATION, MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ITL BULLETIN FOR MARCH 2011 MANAGING INFORMATION SECURITY RISK: ORGANIZATION, MISSION AND INFORMATION SYSTEM VIEW Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory. Managing information security risk is an essential element of the organization's overall risk management

  8. Risk-Oriented Safety Evaluation of the CAREM-25 Prototype Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, Jorge H.; McLeod, Jorge E. Nunez; Rivera, Selva S

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction of the CAREM-25 full-size prototype, a very low power nuclear power station [25 MW(electric)], is scheduled to begin in Argentina in 2001. The CAREM-25 is designed based on principles of inherent safety, passive safety functions, and ease of operation. This paper analyzes the safety philosophy from the point of view of risk by performing a level-III probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of this prototype. The specific PSA steps are discussed, including a specially developed method to obtain representative initiating events, system analysis by fault trees, event development in event trees, plant and containment response analysis, containment event tree development, consequence calculations, and risk representation. The PSA results are presented and discussed in terms of their own values as well as in comparison to other PSA results performed for larger nuclear power plants (NPPs). The advantages of the CAREM-25 from the risk point of view are studied in terms of the effective reduction of both the probability of severe accident sequences and the potential consequences of such sequences (radiological and emergency preparedness impact). The risk point of view also provides a perspective to analyze the impact of several design modifications in order to further reduce the residual risk of the NPP. These design modifications, several of which have already been included in the prototype, are discussed and evaluated.

  9. 1 INTRODUCTION Probabilistic risk (or safety) assessments (PRA) pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reliability analyses. Finally, a case study in- volving a nuclear reactor is presented in Section 3. Dynamic for managing risks linked to engineering systems, notably in nuclear power plants, aerospace, and chemical of dynamic reliability was established under the name of Con- tinuous Event Tree (CET) theory, (Devooght

  10. Information resource use and need in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turturro, A. [National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The manner in which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses information resources comprises an interesting illustration of federal agency information use. A description of the context in which risk assessment occurs within the FDA is followed by a discussion of information access and use, as well as a practical example.

  11. Nuclear safety information sharing agreement between NRC and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3116 Public Meeting Summaries - July 2007 Fifth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management...

  12. Energy Department Seeks Information on Geothermal Risk and Uncertainty Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) to help quantify and manage risk in geothermal exploration, in an effort...

  13. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  14. Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

  15. Probabilistic risk analysis toward cost-effective 3S (safety, safeguards, security) implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Mochiji, Toshiro [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1193 (Japan)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) has been introduced for several decades in safety and nuclear advanced countries have already used this methodology in their own regulatory systems. However, PRA has not been developed in safeguards and security so far because of inherent difficulties in intentional and malicious acts. In this paper, probabilistic proliferation and risk analysis based on random process is applied to hypothetical reprocessing process and physical protection system in nuclear reactor with the Markov model that was originally developed by the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Working Group (PRPPWG) in Generation IV International Framework (GIF). Through the challenge to quantify the security risk with a frequency in this model, integrated risk notion among 3S to pursue the cost-effective installation of those countermeasures is discussed in a heroic manner.

  16. Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ades, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

  17. Certification process of safety analysis and risk management computer codes at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ades, M.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Toffer, H.; Lewis, C.J.; Crowe, R.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commitment by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to bring safety analysis and risk management codes into compliance with national and sitewide quality assurance requirements necessitated a systematic, structured approach. As a part of this effort, WSRC, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented a certification process for the development and control of computer software. Safety analysis and risk management computer codes pertinent to reactor analyses were selected for inclusion in the certification process. As a first step, documented plans were developed for implementing verification and validation of the codes, and establishing configuration control. User qualification guidelines were determined. The plans were followed with an extensive assessment of the codes with respect to certification status. Detailed schedules and work plans were thus determined for completing certification of the codes considered. Although the software certification process discussed is specific to the application described, it is sufficiently general to provide useful insights and guidance for certification of other software.

  18. Envisory Financial Risk Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:EmminolEntergyEnvisory Financial Risk Management Jump to:

  19. Portfolio Risk Modeling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratiniEdwards, Wisconsin:Porter County,Porter-CologneRisk

  20. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated risk assessment that could assist in the EM prioritization efforts. (authors)

  1. 7th Workshop on Risk Informed Regulation and Safety Culture ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the plant was "built with China's own strength." It has a total of 9 units (1 300MWe PWR; 2 1,000MWe; 4 650MWe; and 2 700MWe Candu-6) in operation. It is stunning to learn how...

  2. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundA l i c e L i p p e r t S e n i

  3. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofittingFundA l i c e L i p p e r t S e n

  4. Manager, Digital Developer Risk & Information Management Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    server · Deep understanding of the Web technology stack (TCP/IP, HTTP, HTML, XHTML, XML, JavaScript, CSS with at least one web programming languages such as Python, PHP, C/C++, C#, Ruby, or Java, especially on web, or other Web 2.0 solutions · Experience in machine learning, information retrieval, large-scale data mining

  5. The Criticality Safety Information Resource Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, B.D.; Meade, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pruvost, N.L. [Galaxy Computer Services, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the preservation of primary documentation supporting criticality safety. In many cases, but not all, this primary documentation consists of experimentalists` logbooks. Experience has shown that the logbooks and other primary information are vulnerable to being discarded. Destruction of these logbooks results in a permanent loss to the criticality safety community.

  6. Preliminary Safety Information Document for the Standard MHTGR. Volume 1, (includes latest Amendments)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With NRC concurrence, the Licensing Plan for the Standard HTGR describes an application program consistent with 10CFR50, Appendix O to support a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review and design certification of an advanced Standard modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design. Consistent with the NRC's Advanced Reactor Policy, the Plan also outlines a series of preapplication activities which have as an objective the early issuance of an NRC Licensability Statement on the Standard MHTGR conceptual design. This Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID) has been prepared as one of the submittals to the NRC by the US Department of Energy in support of preapplication activities on the Standard MHTGR. Other submittals to be provided include a Probabilistic Risk Assessment, a Regulatory Technology Development Plan, and an Emergency Planning Bases Report.

  7. Process safety management (OSHA) and process risk management (CAA) application. Application to a coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graeser, W.C.; Mentzer, W.P.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk Management Programs for Chemical Accidental Release Prevention is the name of the proposed rule for the RMP Risk Management Program. The RMP was written in response to several catastrophic releases of hazardous substances. The rule is applicable to facilities that store, process or use greater than threshold quantities of 62 listed flammable chemicals and another 100 listed toxic substances. Additionally, a Risk Management Plan is registered with the EPA, Chemical Safety and Hazardous Investigation Board, state governments and the local emergency planning commission. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (specifically Section 112r) required the EPA to develop a three phase Risk Management Plan for industry: prevention program; hazard assessment; and emergency response program. The Prevention Program closely follows the OSHA`s Process Safety Management Standard. The Hazard Assessment section requires facilities to develop plans for a worst case scenario. The Emergency Response section defines the steps the facility and each employee will take if a release occurs. This section also needs to be coordinated with the Local Emergency Planning Commission. These regulations are described using Clairton Works as an example of compliance.

  8. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  9. Light Water Reactor Safety Technology Program. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on LWR safety is presented concerning the Technology Management Center support programs; risk methods utilization; improved safety systems;man-machine interaction; safety data; and progress reports for each of the research project areas.

  10. Risk-Informed Assessment Methodology Development and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung Goo Chi; Seok Jeong Park; Chul Jin Choi [Korea Power Engineering Company Inc, 360 9 Mabuk Dong, Giheung-gu Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 449-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ritterbusch, S.E.; Jacob, M.C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Electric Company (WEC) has been working with Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) on a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project through a collaborative agreement established for the domestic NERI program. The project deals with Risk-Informed Assessment (RIA) of regulatory and design requirements of future nuclear power plants. An objective of the RIA project is to develop a risk-informed design process, which focuses on identifying and incorporating advanced features into future nuclear power plants (NPPs) that would meet risk goals in a cost-effective manner. The RIA design methodology is proposed to accomplish this objective. This paper discusses the development of this methodology and demonstrates its application in the design of plant systems for future NPPs. Advanced conceptual plant systems consisting of an advanced Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and Emergency Feedwater System (EFWS) for a NPP were developed and the risk-informed design process was exercised to demonstrate the viability and feasibility of the RIA design methodology. Best estimate Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analyses were performed to validate the PSA success criteria for the NPP. The results of the analyses show that the PSA success criteria can be met using the advanced conceptual systems and that the RIA design methodology is a viable and appropriate means of designing key features of risk-significant NPP systems. (authors)

  11. Risk-informed design changes for a passive cooling system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patalano, Giovanbattista

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The failure probability of a passive decay heat removal system after a LOCA is evaluated as part of a risk-informed design process for a helium-cooled fast reactor. The system was modeled using RELAP5-3D. The epistemic ...

  12. \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments DEPARTMENT: Andrew Wiles March 2015 Brief description of area and location Roof tops, walkways, and Fire Route. Sedum' Roof Area

  13. Use of probabilistic risk assessment in expert system usage for nuclear power plant safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of probability risk assessments (PRA's) to nuclear power plants in the Rasmussen Report (WASH-1400) gave us a means of evaluating the risk to the public associated with the operation of nuclear power plants, at least on a relative basis. While the choice of the ''source term'' and methodology in a PRA significantly influence the absolute probability and the consequences of core melt, comparison of two PRA calculations for two configurations of the same plant, carried out on a consistent basis, can be readily identify the increase in risk associated with going from one configuration of a plant to another by removing components or systems from service. This ratio of core melt probabilities (assuming no recovery of failed systems) obtained from two PRA calculations for different configurations was the criterion (called ''risk factor'') chosen as a basis for making a decision in an expert system as to what mitigating action, if any, would be taken to avoid a trip situation from developing. PRISIM was developed by JBF Associates of Knoxville under the sponsorship of the NRC as a system for Resident Inspectors at nuclear power plants to provide them with a relative safety status of the plant under all configurations. PRISIM calculated the risk factor---the ration of core melt probabilities of the plant under the current configuration relative to the normal configuration with all systems functioning---using an algorithm that emulates the results of the original PRA. It also presents time and core melt (assuming no recovery of systems or components).

  14. TITLE: RELEASING PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO PREVENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO HEALTH OR SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    TITLE: RELEASING PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO PREVENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO HEALTH OR SAFETY the patient's authorization in order to prevent a serious threat to health or safety. PURPOSE The purpose will release a patient's PHI without the patient's authorization to prevent a serious threat to health

  15. Laser safety information for the Atomic, Molecular and Optical (AMO) Physics Labs at Lehigh University modified from the laser safety program developed by the office of Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    1 Laser safety information for the Atomic, Molecular and Optical (AMO) Physics Labs at Lehigh University modified from the laser safety program developed by the office of Environmental Health and Safety using the following reference materials: I. American National Standards for Safe Use of Lasers - ANSI Z

  16. Thermal reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  17. SOS8520 Organizational perspectives on safety conference of The Society for Risk Analysis Europe (SRAE) will be held June 17th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malinnikova, Eugenia

    SOS8520 Organizational perspectives on safety The 22nd conference of The Society for Risk Analysis (June 20th ­ 21st ) focusing on Organizational perspectives on safety The primary target group

  18. Evolution of Risk Management at NASA in the Context of Achieving Adequate Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Homayoon Dezfuli, Ph.D. NASA Technical Fellow for System Safety Office of Safety and Mission Assurance NASA Headquarters

  19. Quantifying and managing the risk of information security breaches participants in a supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellefeuille, Cynthia Lynn

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical integration between companies can result in an increased risk of information security breaches. This thesis proposes a methodology for quantifying information security risk to a supply chain participant. Given a ...

  20. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  1. Office of the CISO, February 2011 Information Security and Privacy Risk Advisory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    Office of the CISO, February 2011 Information Security and Privacy Risk Advisory Phishing Phishing's trust in traditional landline communication. The Office of the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO

  2. Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard- September 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A working group with nuclear safety expertise used paired pairing computer software to develop first, a severity-weighted factor for the 17 Groups of ORPS Reporting Criteria and then, a severity-weighted factor for the sixty-five ORPS reporting criteria.

  3. Safety and Health Regulatory and Policy Response Line- General Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Worker Safety and Health Standards Response Line, established in 1992, is a service that responds to questions DOE, DOE contractor, and DOE subcontractor personnel regarding DOE-adopted and -prescribed standards and directives. These responses may not represent official OSHA policies.

  4. University Fire Marshal's Office Holiday Fire Safety Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    festive space heaters... As you un-box those lights, wires and bearers of holiday warmth, it is also heaters. Now is the time--as you set them up--to ensure that you do so providing for the safety of your must be kept in water at all times to slow the natural drying process. Approved Tree Lots ­ Licensed

  5. Informal Risk Sharing in an Infinite-horizon Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charness, Gary B; Genicot, Garance

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genicot, G. (forthcoming). “Risk Pooling, Commitment, and1981). “Attitudes Towards Risk: Theoretical Implications ofJ. (2004). “A Simple Risk-Sharing Experiment,” Journal of

  6. Transactions of the twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 25th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 20--22, 1997. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion of information exchanged during the course of the meeting, and are given in order of their presentation in each session.

  7. Transactions of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 21st Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 25--27, 1993. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session.

  8. Climate Risk and Financial Institutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNewClayClearSpotYork: EnergyWitham,KnowledgeRisk and

  9. Pesticide safety risk, food chain organization, and the adoption of sustainable farming practices. The case of Moroccan early tomatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    standards and more recently process standards (Good agricultural practices and integrated pest management in safeguarding specific investments, which results in greater diffusion of biocontrol and good agricultural1 Pesticide safety risk, food chain organization, and the adoption of sustainable farming practices

  10. FTCP Site Specific Information - Chief of Nuclear Safety | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAMDepartment ofEnergy Chief of Nuclear Safety

  11. Guidelines for nuclear-power-plant safety-issue-prioritization information development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Bickford, W.E.; Konzek, G.J.; Strenge, D.L.; Smith, R.I.; Weakley, S.A.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a methodology, with examples, to calculate - to an approximation serviceable for prioritization purposes - the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues. This report is an applications guide to issue-specific calculations. A description of the approach, mathematical models, worksheets and step-by-step examples are provided. Analysis using this method is intended to provide comparable results for many issues at a cost of two staff-weeks per issue. Results will be used by the NRC to support decisions related to issue priorities in allocation of resources to complete safety issue resolutions.

  12. CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF INFORMATION SECURITY: AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF INFORMATION SECURITY: AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF RISK MANAGEMENT Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute) security, and the assurance of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information

  13. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and environmental risks from energy production: A year-longaddition to the risks of the existing energy infrastructureto minimize HSE risk related to the world's existing energy

  14. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) offers the benefit of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions and thereby mitigating climate change risk, but it will also bring its own health, safety, and environmental risks. Curtis M. Oldenburg, Editor-in-Chief, considers these risks in the context of the broader picture of energy production. Over the last year, there have been major acute health, safety, and environmental (HSE) consequences related to accidents involving energy production from every major primary energy source. These are, in chronological order: (i) the Upper Big Branch (coal) Mine disaster, (ii) the Gulf of Mexico Macondo (oil) well blowout, (iii) the San Bruno (natural gas) pipeline leak and explosion, and (iv) the Fukushima (nuclear) reactor radioactivity releases. Briefly, the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster occurred in West Virginia on April 5, 2010, when natural methane in the mine ignited, causing the deaths of 29 miners, the worst coal mine disaster in the USA since 1970. Fifteen days later, the Macondo oil well in the Gulf of Mexico suffered a blowout, with a gas explosion and fire on the floating drilling platform that killed 11 people. The oil and gas continued to flow out of the well at the seafloor until July 15, 2010, spilling a total of approximately 5 million barrels of oil into the sea. On September 9, 2010, a 30-inch (76-cm) buried, steel, natural gas pipeline in San Bruno, California, leaked gas and exploded in a residential neighborhood, killing 8 people in their homes and burning a total of 38 homes. Flames were up to 1000 ft (300 m) high, and the initial explosion itself reportedly measured 1.1 on the Richter scale. Finally, on March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan's main island, Honshu, caused a tsunami that crippled the backup power and associated cooling systems for six reactor cores and their spent fuel storage tanks at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. At time of writing, workers trying to bring the crisis under control have been exposed to dangerous levels of radiation, and radioactive water and particulates have been released to the sea and atmosphere. These four disasters, all of which occurred within the past 12 months, were not unprecedented; similar events differing only in detail have happened around the world before, and such events will occur again. Today, developed nations primarily use fossil fuels to create affordable energy for comforts such as lighting, heating and air-conditioning, refrigeration, transportation, education, and entertainment, as well as for powering manufacturing, which creates jobs and a wealth of material goods. In addition to the risks of the existing energy infrastructure that have become obvious through these recent disasters, there is also the ongoing risk of climate change that comes from the vast emissions of greenhouse gases, primarily CO{sub 2}, from the burning of fossil fuels. The implementation of CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) will help mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel energy, but it also carries with it HSE risks. In my personal interactions with the public and with students, the main concern voiced is whether CO{sub 2} could leak out of the deep reservoirs into which it is injected and rise up out of the ground, smothering people and animals at the ground surface. Another concern expressed is that CO{sub 2} pipelines could fail and cause similar gaseous plumes of CO{sub 2}. The widespread concerns about CO{sub 2} leaking out over the ground surface may be inspired by events that have happened within natural systems in equatorial Africa, in Indonesia, and in Italy. Researchers have been investigating a wide variety of HSE risks of geologic CO{sub 2} storage for some time and have determined that wells are the main potential pathways for significant leakage from the deep subsurface. I discuss the acute HSE risks of CO{sub 2} leakage through wells and from pipelines, and compare the behavior of failures in CO{sub 2} wells and pipelines with oil and gas analogues from which most of our experien

  15. September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix C Templates for Lab-Specific Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    your lab's Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP). These templates are also available as documents which can's CHP consists of the generic UW Laboratory Safety Manual plus your lab's laboratory- specific knows is the location of the laboratory-specific information for your CHP. If you keep electronic copies

  16. Communication Information Structures and Contents for Enhanced Safety of Highway Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongwei

    in developing intelligent transporta- tion systems. By autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle con- trol and inter-vehicle, autonomous vehicles. I. INTRODUCTION Highway platooning of vehicles has been identified as a promising1 Communication Information Structures and Contents for Enhanced Safety of Highway Vehicle Platoons

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  18. Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

  19. Embrittlement Database from the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) is a comprehensive collection of data from surveillance capsules of U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors and from experiments in material test reactors. The collected data are contained in either the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) or the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB). The EDB work includes verification of the quality of the EDB, provision for user-friendly software to access and process the data, exploration and/or confirmation of embrittlement prediction models, provision for rapid investigation of regulatory issues, and provision for the technical bases for voluntary consensus standards or regulatory guides. The EDB is designed for use with a personal computer. The data are collected into "raw data files." Traceability of all data is maintained by including complete references along with the page numbers. External data verification of the PR-EDB is the responsibility of the vendors, who were responsible for the insertion and testing of the materials in the surveillance capsules. Internal verification is accomplished by checking against references and checking for inconsistencies. Examples of information contained in the EDBs are: Charpy data, tensile data, reactor type, irradiation environments, fracture toughness data, instrumented Charpy data, pressure-temperature (P-T) data, chemistry data, and material history. The TR-EDB additionally has annealing Charpy data. The current version of the PR-EDB contains the test results from 269 Charpy capsules irradiated in 101 reactors. These results include 320 plate data points, 123 forging data points, 113 standard reference materials (SRMS) or correlation monitor (CM) points, 244 weld material data points, and 220 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) material data points. Similarly, the TR-EDB contains information for 290 SRM or CM points, 342 plate data points, 165 forging data points, 378 welds, and 55 HAZ materials. [copied from http://rsicc.ornl.gov/RelatedLinks.aspx?t=edb

  20. Author: Duncan Woodhouse, Assistant Registrar for Information Security, Risk Management and Business Continuity Date Version Author Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    Author: Duncan Woodhouse, Assistant Registrar for Information Security, Risk Management Information Security Policy 2004 09/2008 D01 Duncan Woodhouse Adaption and consolidation of best practices Registrar for Information Security, Risk Management and Business Continuity 2 University of Warwick

  1. Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

  2. Laser Safety Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    use Integrated Safety Management here at the lab to reduce risk and work to improve the quality and safety of the work? #12;Integrated Safety Management Use (greater in size than wavelength) #12;Integrated Safety Management Remember, we

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Testing Phenomenological Modeling Risk and Safety Assessment Cyber-Based Vulnerability Assessments Uncertainty Analysis Transportation Safety Fire Science Human...

  4. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

  5. Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

  6. Printed copies of the WSU Spokane Annual Security/Fire Safety Report can be obtained at the Office of Security and Public Safety. Information prepared by the Office of Security and Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    of Security and Public Safety. Information prepared by the Office of Security and Public Safety at WSU Spokane and Security Department Information 3 Reporting, Access and Programs 3-5 Policies and Procedures 6Printed copies of the WSU Spokane Annual Security/Fire Safety Report can be obtained at the Office

  7. Liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors: Preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning LMFBR design characteristics; uranium-plutonium/uranium recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; thorium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle homogeneous core; safety consideration for the LMFBR; and environmental considerations.

  8. A framework for dynamic safety and risk management modeling in complex engineering systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dulac, Nicolas, 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost all traditional hazard analysis or risk assessment techniques, such as failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis (FTA), and probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) rely on a chain-of-event paradigm of ...

  9. Hot Works Procedures and Protocols Last Updated: 2/14/2014 Owner: Safety and Risk Management Director Page 1 of 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Hot Works Procedures and Protocols Last Updated: 2/14/2014 Owner: Safety and Risk Management Management Director Page 2 of 6 start and stop times, and location of work. The Office of Work Control and Risk Management reserves the right to inspect all Hot Works areas, and revoke authorizations

  10. Sensitivity of risk parameters to component unavailability in reactor safety study (PSAP/PSAB computer codes). [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azarm, M.; Farahzad, P.; Tingle, A.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Probabilistic Sensitivity Analysis for Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors (PSAP/PSAB) codes have been developed to update the WASH-1400 conclusions. The initial effort, reported in NUREG/CR-1879 Sensitivity of Risk Parameters to Human Errors in Reactor Safety Study for a PWR, concentrated on developing a code for system sensitivity to human errors based on an expanded version of the PWR fault trees from the Reactor Safety Study (RSS). The success of that effort and the insights gained from the code's use initiated the development of the PSAP/PSAB codes. The two codes allow the user to evaluate the impact of new data and system models on the conclusions drawn in WASH-1400. They are designed to be fast running and modular so that detailed sensitivity studies can be run efficiently.

  11. Qualitative Risk Assessment For An LNG Refueling Station And Review Of Relevant Safety Issues, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, Nathan; Herring, J Stephen; Cadwallader, Lee; Reece, Wendy; Byers, James

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of liquefied natural gas vehicle refueling facility.

  12. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and environmental risks from energy production: A year-longbroader picture of energy production. Over the last year,to accidents involving energy production from every major

  13. air risk information: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies to protect the bank from the increased risk of technology. This cycle will lead to bank examiners and regulators to focus on human behavior, not on the ever changing...

  14. Including model uncertainty in risk-informed decision-making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinert, Joshua M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model uncertainties can have a significant impact on decisions regarding licensing basis changes. We present a methodology to identify basic events in the risk assessment that have the potential to change the decision and ...

  15. A Framework for Dynamic Safety and Risk Management Modeling in Complex Engineering Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    analysis (FTA), and probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) rely on a chain-of-event paradigm of accident analysis or risk assessment techniques, such as failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA), fault tree and organizational boundaries. STAMP (System-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes) is a comprehensive accident

  16. Risk-informed applications and online maintenance in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdier, Edouard (Edouard Pierre Emmanuel)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past twenty-five years, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been progressing toward a more risk-informed, performance-based regulation. This regulatory framework has effectively supported the development ...

  17. Development of an Updated Societal-Risk Goal for Nuclear Power Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicki Bier; Michael Corradini; Robert Youngblood; Caleb Roh; Shuji Liu

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly summarizes work done in FY 2013 on the subject LDRD. The working hypothesis is that societal disruption should be addressed in a safety goal. This is motivated by the point that the Fukushima disaster resulted in very little public dose, but enormous societal disruption; a goal that addressed societal disruption would fill a perceived gap in the US NRC safety goal structure. This year's work entailed analyzing the consequences of postulated accidents at various reactor sites in the US, specifically with a view to quantifying the number of people relocated and the duration of their relocation, to see whether this makes sense as a measure of societal disruption.

  18. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritterbusch, Stanley; Golay, Michael; Duran, Felicia; Galyean, William; Gupta, Abhinav; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Malsch, Marty

    2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 Summary of methods proposed for risk informing the design and regulation of future nuclear power plants. All elements of the historical design and regulation process are preserved, but the methods proposed for new plants use probabilistic risk assessment methods as the primary decision making tool.

  19. Cyber safety : a systems thinking and systems theory approach to managing cyber security risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salim, Hamid M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If we are to manage cyber security risks more effectively in today's complex and dynamic Web 2.0 environment, then a new way of thinking is needed to complement traditional approaches. According to Symantec's 2014 Internet ...

  20. Risk and Performance Based Fire Safety Design of Steel and Composite Structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the development of performance based design on a proper scientific basis the use of the concept of risk is inevitable. However, the application of this concept to actual structural design is not simple because of the ...

  1. Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Aidong

    data and use these integrated features to effectively predict osteoporosis and bone fractures. We; disease memory; osteoporosis; bone fracture. ! 1 INTRODUCTION Risk factor (RF) analysis based on patients on the study of osteoporosis and bone fracture prediction. Over the past few decades, osteoporosis has been

  2. Waste isolation safety assessment program. Task 4. Third contractor information meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contractor Information Meeting (October 14 to 17, 1979) was part of the FY-1979 effort of Task 4 of the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP): Sorption/Desorption Analysis. The objectives of this task are to: evaluate sorption/desorption measurement methods and develop a standardized measurement procedure; produce a generic data bank of nuclide-geologic interactions using a wide variety of geologic media and groundwaters; perform statistical analysis and synthesis of these data; perform validation studies to compare short-term laboratory studies to long-term in situ behavior; develop a fundamental understanding of sorption/desorption processes; produce x-ray and gamma-emitting isotopes suitable for the study of actinides at tracer concentrations; disseminate resulting information to the international technical community; and provide input data support for repository safety assessment. Conference participants included those subcontracted to WISAP Task 4, representatives and independent subcontractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, representatives from other waste disposal programs, and experts in the area of waste/geologic media interaction. Since the meeting, WISAP has been divided into two programs: Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) (modeling efforts) and Waste/Rock Interactions Technology (WRIT) (experimental work). The WRIT program encompasses the work conducted under Task 4. This report contains the information presented at the Task 4, Third Contractor Information Meeting. Technical Reports from the subcontractors, as well as Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), are provided along with transcripts of the question-and-answer sessions. The agenda and abstracts of the presentations are also included. Appendix A is a list of the participants. Appendix B gives an overview of the WRIT program and details the WRIT work breakdown structure for 1980.

  3. Legal Issues and Risks Associated with Building Information Modeling Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Leon Lewis

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a tool that has already changed the ways projects are conceived, designed, communicated and constructed by integrating the fragmented Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) industry. BIM has proven...

  4. RISK PREDICTION OF A BEHAVIOR-BASED ADHESION CONTROL NETWORK FOR ONLINE SAFETY ANALYSIS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    by default. But for wheeled driving on concrete walls via negative pressure adhesion a prediction of risks- ited payload. Also the impact of features like surface roughness, sheathing defects, porous areas is de- signed to be used for inspections of large concrete buildings as depicted in figure 1

  5. First Capitol Risk Management LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County, Minnesota:Island, NewFirmGreenRisk

  6. Use of information resources by the state of Tennessee in risk assessment applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashor, B.S. [Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Nashville (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The major resources used by the Bureau of Environment, and Environmental Epidemiology (EEP) for risk assessment are: the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), Health and Environmental Effects Summary Table (HEAST), Agency for Toxic Substances and disease Registry (ATSDR) Toxicological Profiles, databases at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), World Health Organization (WHO) ENvironmental Criteria, and documents that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published on Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) risk assessment activities. The Risk Assessment Review has been helpful in providing information about availability of new documents or information. No systematic method has been made available to us to locate information resources. IRIS User`s Support has been helpful in making appropriate and timely referrals. Most other EPA resources were located by serendipity and persistence. The CERCLA methodology for risk assessments is being used in environmental programs, and at present, one person is responsible for all risk assessment activities in the department, but plans are underway to train one or two people from each program area. 2 figs.

  7. REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE FORM Issued By: Risk & Safety 20 Oct 2009 REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE FORM Issued By: Risk & Safety 20 Oct 2009 REQUEST TO USE A UNIVERSITY MOTORIZED VEHICLE INSTRUCTIONS: Complete form, attach a photocopy of your drivers University Vehicle License Plate# ____________currently under the control of the Department

  8. Coal Mine Safety Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act is the primary legislation pertaining to coal mine safety in Virginia. It contains information on safety rules, safety standards and required certifications for mine workers, prohibited...

  9. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  10. Experts are partnering in Tampa, the Lightning Capital of the U.S., to provide safety information about the dangers of lightning and promote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this free event to learn more about the national Lightning Safety Awareness Campaign to protect your family about the dangers of lightning and promote risk reduction and lightning protection education. Attend safety & protection resources FEATURED GUESTS INCLUDE: · Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn · Tampa Fire Chief

  11. RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. OVERVIEW OF REGULATIONS, PROTECTION STANDARDS, AND RADIATION SAFETY ORGANIZATION.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 V. BASIC RADIATION PROTECTION PRINCIPLES

  12. Report on the handling of safety information concerning flammable gases and ferrocyanide at the Hanford waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses concerns safety issues, and management at Hanford Tank Farm. Concerns center on the issue of flammable gas generation which could ignite, and on possible exothermic reactions of ferrocyanide compounds which were added to single shell tanks in the 1950's. It is believed that information concerning these issues has been mis-handled and the problems poorly managed. (CBS)

  13. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk (most common ­ personal hygiene very important); d) storage ­ leaks; and e) waste ­ storage and disposal

  14. 29.01.03.M1.26 Information Resources Security Risks Assessment Reviews Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29.01.03.M1.26 Information Resources ­ Security Risks Assessment Reviews Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 29.01.03.M1.26 Information Resources ­ Information Security Risk Assessment Reviews system and the value and accuracy of their information security risk assessments. Reason Information

  15. Using Causal Mapping Methods to Identify and Analyse Risk in Information System Projects as a Post-Evaluation Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winstanley, Graham

    the different generic stages of the system development life cycle. The method builds on the reflection, Information System Risk and System Development Life Cycle. 1. Introduction Despite advances in information

  16. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. From {open_quotes}command and control{close_quotes} to risk management: The evolution of the federal natural gas pipeline safety program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biancardi, P.; Bogardus, L.M.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The pipeline industry essentially accepted the passage of the NGPSA in 1968 because it would provide one set of uniform regulations under the shield of federal preemption, thus relieving industry from the impossible burden of complying with inconsistent state and local requirements. The program developed, however, in response to the public`s misperception of infrequent but highly publicized accidents, rather than as a result of rational evaluation of actual pipeline safety risks. Like other federal agencies, the DOT has begun to reassess this method of regulation and today has a new vision of pipeline safety regulation. The DOT has embarked on a regulatory experiment which requires government-industry partnerships, greater public participation, and risk-based regulations. Whether or not this experiment succeeds, the DOT deserves credit for seeking new and innovative approaches to regulating the pipeline industry.

  18. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

  19. 7th Workshop on Risk Informed Regulation and Safety Culture | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|IdahotheWhatProposed - FINAL 30atProposed

  20. Normalization of Process Safety Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Mengtian

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    and organizational risks, there is an emerging need to evaluate the process safety implementation across an organization through measurements. Thus, the process safety metric is applied as a powerful tool that measures safety activities, status, and performance...

  1. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  2. Risk information in support of cost estimates for the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Section 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelston, G.M.; Jarvis, M.F.; Warren, B.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Von Berg, R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(1) effort on the overall Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) project consists of four installation-specific work components performed in succession. These components include (1) development of source terms, 92) collection of data and preparation of environmental settings reports, (3) calculation of unit risk factors, and (4) utilization of the unit risk factors in Automated Remedial Action Methodology (ARAM) for computation of target concentrations and cost estimates. This report documents work completed for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for components 2 and 3. The product of this phase of the BEMR project is the development of unit factors (i.e., unit transport factors, unit exposure factors, and unit risk factors). Thousands of these unit factors are gene rated and fill approximately one megabyte of computer information per installation. The final unit risk factors (URF) are transmitted electronically to BEMR-Cost task personnel as input to a computer program (ARAM). Abstracted files and exhibits of the URF information are included in this report. These visual formats are intended to provide a sample of the final task deliverable (the URF files) which can be easily read without a computer.

  3. How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

  4. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  5. Safety Issues for High Temperature Gas Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Informed Safety Profile #12;LEVELS OF DEFENCE IN DEPTH (From INSAG-10) Control, limiting (reactivity insertion) ­ Loss of Load ­ Rod Ejection (more significant in block reactors) ­ Failure of reactor effects and chemical attack on graphite · Blow down loads and timing of accident event sequences

  6. Development of a pilot safety information document (PSID) for the replacement of radioactive liquid waste treatment facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selvage, Ronald Derek

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on recent decisions made by Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning the development of site-wide National Environmental Policy Act documents, an effort was undertaken to develop a Pilot Safety Information Document (PSID) for the replacement...

  7. How information resources are used by state agencies in risk assessment applications - Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, C.S.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency of the State of Illinois (Illinois EPA) has programs in water, air, and land pollution and water supplies paralleling those of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The organization is part of a tripartite arrangement in which the Pollution Control Board is the judicial arm, the Department of Energy and Natural Resources is the research arm, and the Illinois EPA is the enforcement arm. Other state agencies are also concerned with various aspects of the environment and may do risk assessments for chemicals. Although there are various risk assessment activities, both formal and informal, in our agency and in others, this paper will discuss only recent initiatives in water quality criteria.

  8. Form Name Form description Form URL Laboratory Safety General Information on Laboratory Safety at Penn State http://www.ehs.psu.edu/occhealth/labsafety.cfm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Safety Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Example/Template SOP that must be approved by Laser Safety's safe for maintenance to work on http://www.ehs.psu.edu/occhealth/SafetyClearance.pdf Bloodborne from all lab personnel. http://www.ehs.psu.edu/occhealth/unit_specific_plan_form.pdf Procedures

  9. Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

  10. Savannah River Site K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandyberry, M.D.; Bailey, R.T.; Baker, W.H.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; O`Kula, K.R.; Wittman, R.S.; Woody, N.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N.; Weingardt, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the results of a Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Measures of adverse consequences to health and safety resulting from representations of severe accidents in SRS reactors are presented. In addition, the report gives a summary of the methods employed to represent these accidents and to assess the resultant consequences. The report is issued to provide useful information to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the risk of operation of SRS reactors, for insights into severe accident phenomena that contribute to this risk, and in support of improved bases for other DOE programs in Heavy Water Reactor safety.

  11. Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the 580th meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), February10-12, 2011, we reviewed the staff’s white paper, “A Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysisand...

  12. Current Regulations and Guidance - New Approaches for Risk-Informed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, M.T. Ph.D.; CHP [Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste and Materials, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the historical foundations and future challenges for commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management in the United States. LLRW has been managed at government facilities since the beginning of the nuclear age and in the commercial sector since the early 1960's. Over the intervening years many technical, management and regulatory changes have occurred. Significant progress has been made in waste form, waste packaging and in recognizing radionuclides important to performance of disposal technologies and disposal facilities. This presentation will examine approaches using existing regulations and risk-informed approaches to improve guidance, licensing and management of LLRW. (authors)

  13. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes risk management training, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  14. Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, May 6, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Risk Assessment Information Notice (IN): HSS provided the draft IN to safety basis experts fromSNL, Y-12 and PNNL for their review and comment. Their comments were addressed and the IN isback into...

  15. Approved Module Information for CE1007, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Health, Safety & the Environment Module Code: CE1007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Module Code: CE1007 School: Engineering and Applied Science Module Type: Standard Module New ModuleApproved Module Information for CE1007, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Health, Safety & the Environment? No Module Credits: 10 Module Management Information Module Leader Name George Drahun Email Address j

  16. Transactions of the twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting to be held at Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 23rd Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory, Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session.

  17. UVM chemical use planning form.docx; 2012 Version 4 Page 1 of 6 Risk Management & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    :________________________________ Chemical labels with hazard warnings REMINDER : All lab personnel must be aware of locations of safety. Hazard Identification: a) Identify the Hazardous Chemical or Hazard Group: 1. List chemical name and CAS number if a single chemical is covered by this form: Chemical name: CAS number 2. Or, identify the hazard

  18. Sensemaking in a High-Risk Lifestyle: The Relationship Between Work and Family for Public Safety Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bochantin, Jaime Elizabeth

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    , there is no doubt that employees' in non-traditional settings, particularly those employed in public safety professions (i.e. police and fire) experience the relationship between work and family differently than those in white-collar settings, especially since...

  19. Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Preliminary Safety Information Document, Amendment 10. GCFR residual heat removal system criteria, design, and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a comprehensive set of safety design bases to support the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) residual heat removal (RHR) systems. The report is structured to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to review and comment in the licensability of these design bases. This report also presents information concerning a specific plant design and its performance as an auxiliary part to assist the NRC in evaluating the safety design bases.

  20. Gas-cooled fast reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning a homogeneous plutonium/uranium oxide core with thorium oxide axial and radial blankets and spiked recycle.

  1. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  2. aviation risk-management information: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & keep your attention Transportation Sanitation acilities (the environment we work in) UREC RISK MANAGEMENT 12;Potential Risks: User Carter, John 18 Improving...

  3. Pipeline safety. Information on gas distribution system operators reporting unaccounted for gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to Department of Transportation records, 92 of the 1491 gas distribution system operators reported high levels of unaccounted for gas (unaccounted for gas is the difference between the amount of gas purchased and sold) for 1984, the latest year for which data were available. Of the 92 gas system operators, 64 were municipals (gas systems owned by a governmental entity, such as a city or county) and 28 were nonmunicipals. Based on the data we reviewed, these 92 gas systems did not report any accidents during calendar year 1984. Part I provides more details on the unaccounted for gas of municipal gas systems. Federal and industry officials consider that unaccounted for gas in excess of 15% of gas purchases high and worthy of investigation. High levels of unaccounted for gas can occur for a number of reasons, including errors in metering and billing, not accounting for gas used by city or company facilities, and leaking gas pipelines. While it may, a leak does not always indicate a safety problem. For example, a slow leak in an open area may not be a safety hazard. The Secretary has the authority to regulate any liquid deemed hazardous when transported by pipeline, and therefore could regulate hazardous liquids not currently regulated including methanol and carbon dioxide. However, the Department of Transportation has no plans to regulate any additional liquids. Part II provides more details. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Heavy-water reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning the modifications relative to the CANDU reactor; and a once-through fuel cycle with 1.2% enriched uranium-235 and a burnup of 20,000 MWd/MT.

  5. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

  6. Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. [Safety Bulletin 2011-01

  7. Reference computations of public dose and cancer risk from airborne releases of plutonium. Nuclear safety technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, V.L.

    1993-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of computations of doses and the associated health risks of postulated accidental atmospheric releases from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) of one gram of weapons-grade plutonium in a form that is respirable. These computations are intended to be reference computations that can be used to evaluate a variety of accident scenarios by scaling the dose and health risk results presented here according to the amount of plutonium postulated to be released, instead of repeating the computations for each scenario. The MACCS2 code has been used as the basis of these computations. The basis and capabilities of MACCS2 are summarized, the parameters used in the evaluations are discussed, and results are presented for the doses and health risks to the public, both the Maximum Offsite Individual (a maximally exposed individual at or beyond the plant boundaries) and the population within 50 miles of RFP. A number of different weather scenarios are evaluated, including constant weather conditions and observed weather for 1990, 1991, and 1992. The isotopic mix of weapons-grade plutonium will change as it ages, the {sup 241}Pu decaying into {sup 241}Am. The {sup 241}Am reaches a peak concentration after about 72 years. The doses to the bone surface, liver, and whole body will increase slightly but the dose to the lungs will decrease slightly. The overall cancer risk will show almost no change over this period. This change in cancer risk is much smaller than the year-to-year variations in cancer risk due to weather. Finally, x/Q values are also presented for other applications, such as for hazardous chemical releases. These include the x/Q values for the MOI, for a collocated worker at 100 meters downwind of an accident site, and the x/Q value integrated over the population out to 50 miles.

  8. Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Hicks

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

  9. Reliability, Risk and Safety Ale, Papazoglou & Zio (eds) 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, London, ISBN 978-0-415-60427-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Střlen, Ketil

    . Here the com- mon goal is to provide electrical power. It is also an example of a CI embedded within Infrastructures (CIs), such as the electrical grid, telecommunication, transpor- tation, and banking and financial, London, ISBN 978-0-415-60427-7 Analyzing security risks in critical infrastructures embedded in systems

  10. MORT User's Manual for use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram. [Contains a list of System Safety Development Center publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1,500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  11. New Applications of Gamma Spectroscopy: Characterization Tools for D&D Process Development, Inventory Reduction Planning & Shipping, Safety Analysis & Facility Management During the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Gray, L; Vellinger, R; West, M; Gaylord, R; Larson, J; Jones, G; Shingleton, J; Harris, L; Harward, N

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel applications of gamma ray spectroscopy for D&D process development, inventory reduction, safety analysis and facility management are discussed in this paper. These applications of gamma spectroscopy were developed and implemented during the Risk Reduction Program (RPP) to successfully downgrade the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. Non-destructive assay in general, gamma spectroscopy in particular, were found to be important tools in project management, work planning, and work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected''), minimizing worker dose, and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. Inventory reduction activities utilized gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy inventory, ingrowth of daughter products and the presence of process impurities; quantify inventory; prioritize work activities for project management; and to supply information to satisfy shipper/receiver documentation requirements. D&D activities utilize in-situ gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy contamination; quantify contamination levels and monitor the progress of decontamination efforts; and determine the point of diminishing returns in decontaminating enclosures and glove boxes containing high specific activity isotopes such as {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu. In-situ gamma spectroscopy provided quantitative comparisons of several decontamination techniques (e.g. TLC-free Stripcoat{trademark}, Radiac{trademark} wash, acid wash, scrubbing) and was used as a part of an iterative process to determine the appropriate level of decontamination and optimal cost to benefit ratio. Facility management followed a formal, rigorous process utilizing an independent, state certified, peer-reviewed gamma spectroscopy program, in conjunction with other characterization techniques, process knowledge, and historical records, to provide information for work planning, work prioritization, work control, and safety analyses (e.g. development of hold points, stop work points); and resulted in B251 successfully achieving Radiological status on schedule. Gamma spectroscopy helped to define operational approaches to achieve radiation exposure ALARA, e.g. hold points, appropriate engineering controls, PPE, workstations, and time/distance/shielding in the development of ALARA plans. These applications of gamma spectroscopy can be used to improve similar activities at other facilities.

  12. Post this advisory as necessary to keep our community informed. Campus Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    materials from a conex storage box on the MTLSS construction site. An additional vehicle of interest was also observed in the area during the incident. VEHICLE INFORMATION Suspect Vehicle #1 ­ Possible FL Tag OCT### Suspect Vehicle #2 ­ FL Tag 660HMP SUSPECT DESCRIPTION Vehicle #1 ­ Driver ­ Black Male, 5

  13. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning medium-enriched uranium/thorium once-through fuel cycle; medium-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle fuel; high-enrichment uranium-235/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; high-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; and gas-turbine high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  14. Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter.

  15. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  16. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  17. Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

  18. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemicals in food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, W.A. [Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is responsible for the wholesomeness, safety, and adulteration-free status of meat and poultry. The agency developed the National Residue Program (NRP) to monitor these products for residue of drugs, pesticides, and environmental contaminants. Today, few chemical residues are detected in meat and poultry because of the success of the NRP. 3 figs.

  19. Materials Reliability Program: Risk-Informed Revision of ASME Section XI Appendix G - Proof of Concept (MRP-143)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Bishop; et al

    2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study indicates that risk-informed methods can be used to significantly relax the current ASME and NRC Appendix G requirements while still maintaining satisfactory levels of reactor vessel structural integrity. This relaxation in Appendix G requirements directly translates into significant improvements in operational flexibility.

  20. This paper describes the use of Bayesian networks (BNs) to model the operational risk to information technology (IT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil, Martin

    to information technology (IT) infrastructure in financial and other institutions. We describe a methodology risk in other industries, especially the Aviation and Nuclear sectors, readily translate to operational infrastructure in financial institutions Martin neil1 Professor of Computer Science and Statistics, Queen Mary

  1. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  2. Light-water reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning the reference PWR reactor system; once-through, low-enrichment uranium-235 fuel, 30 MWD per kilogram (PWR LEU(5)-OT); once-through, low-enrichment, high-burnup uranium fuel (PWR LEU(5)-Mod OT); self-generated plutonium spiked recycle (PWR LEU(5)-Pu-Spiked Recycle); denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle (PWR DU(3)-Th Recycle DU(3)); and plutonium/thorium cycle (Pu/ThO/sub 2/ Burner).

  3. Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. The information below is taken from the American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. The information below is taken from the American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist. What should I do? Check your disaster, lawn furniture). Close windows, doors and hurricane shutters. If you do not have hurricane shutters

  4. Risk Assessment Risk communication 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    · 1 1997 2003 WHO #12;6060 NTU Alumni Bimonthly No.87 Fault tree Event tree [2] Nuclear reactor of nuclear power plants. Reliability Engineering and Safety System, 52:297-314. [4] Jonas Hagmann. 2012. Fukushima: probing the analytical and epistemological limits of risk analysis. Journal of Risk Research. 15

  5. Information on DOE O 420.1C, Facility Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment ofEnergy Information for Department

  6. Feasibility of risk-informed regulation for Generation-IV reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matos, Craig H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of new and innovative Generation-IV reactor designs, new regulations must be developed to assure the safety of these plants. In the past a purely deterministic way of developing design basis accidents was ...

  7. Investing in International Information Exchange Activities to Improve the Safety, Cost Effectiveness and Schedule of Cleanup - 13281

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seed, Ian; James, Paula [Cogentus Consulting (United States)] [Cogentus Consulting (United States); Mathieson, John [NDA United Kingdom (United Kingdom)] [NDA United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Judd, Laurie [NuVision Engineering, Inc. (United States)] [NuVision Engineering, Inc. (United States); Elmetti-Ramirez, Rosa; Han, Ana [US DOE (United States)] [US DOE (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With decreasing budgets and increasing pressure on completing cleanup missions as quickly, safely and cost-effectively as possible, there is significant benefit to be gained from collaboration and joint efforts between organizations facing similar issues. With this in mind, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) have formally agreed to share information on lessons learned on the development and application of new technologies and approaches to improve the safety, cost effectiveness and schedule of the cleanup legacy wastes. To facilitate information exchange a range of tools and methodologies were established. These included tacit knowledge exchange through facilitated meetings, conference calls and Site visits as well as explicit knowledge exchange through document sharing and newsletters. A DOE web-based portal has been established to capture these exchanges and add to them via discussion boards. The information exchange is operating at the Government-to-Government strategic level as well as at the Site Contractor level to address both technical and managerial topic areas. This effort has resulted in opening a dialogue and building working relationships. In some areas joint programs of work have been initiated thus saving resource and enabling the parties to leverage off one another activities. The potential benefits of high quality information exchange are significant, ranging from cost avoidance through identification of an approach to a problem that has been proven elsewhere to cost sharing and joint development of a new technology to address a common problem. The benefits in outcomes significantly outweigh the costs of the process. The applicability of the tools and methods along with the lessons learned regarding some key issues is of use to any organization that wants to improve value for money. In the waste management marketplace, there are a multitude of challenges being addressed by multiple organizations and the effective pooling and exchange of knowledge and experience can only be of benefit to all participants to help complete the cleanup mission more quickly and more cost effectively. This paper examines in detail the tools and processes used to promote information exchange and the progress made to date. It also discusses the challenges and issues involved and proposes recommendations to others who are involved in similar activities. (authors)

  8. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

  9. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A. J. [comp.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

  10. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  11. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  12. Bayesian Networks and Geographical Information Systems for Environmental Risk Assessment for Oil and Gas Site Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela Gonzalez, Patricia Ysolda

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Environmental Sensibility of Oil and Gas (O&G) developments for a given study area. A Risk index associated with the development of O&G operation activities based on the spatial environmental sensibility was also mapped. To facilitate the Risk assessment...

  13. Safety and Security Enfrocment Process Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    are to enhance and protect worker safety and health, nuclear safety, and classified information security by fostering a culture that seeks to attain and sustain compliance...

  14. Interdisciplinary: Industrial Hygienist/Safety Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments that conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on occupational safety and health...

  15. WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL NUCLEAR SAFETY RELATED R AND D REPORT FOR CY2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engineering and Technology Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks associated with key waste processing project decisions. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment (TDD). The Office of Waste Processing TDD program prioritizes and approves research and development scopes of work that address nuclear safety related to processing of highly radioactive nuclear wastes. Thirteen of the thirty-five R&D approved work scopes in FY2009 relate directly to nuclear safety, and are presented in this report.

  16. Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 21711 Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and...

  17. Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

  18. Safety Staff Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguardsUpdates >- DOESafety

  19. Safety Staff Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton nSafeguardsUpdates >-

  20. Safety Staff Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterials (CRM) |

  1. RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Communications Manager (951) 827-6303 janette.ducut@ucr.edu Beiwei Tu, MS, CIH, CSP Safety and Industrial Hygiene

  2. Request for Investigation or Inspection of Safety or Classified...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Request for Investigation or Inspection of Safety or Classified Information Security Violations Request for Investigation or Inspection of Safety or Classified Information Security...

  3. Total safety: A new safety culture to integrate nuclear safety and operational safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saji, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Murphy, G.A. [ed.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of a complete and thorough safety culture is proposed for the purpose of providing additional assurance about nuclear safety and improving the performance of nuclear power plants. The safety philosophy developed a combination of the former hardware-oriented nuclear safety approach and recent operational safety concepts. The improvement of the latter, after TMI-2 and Chernobyl, has been proven very effective in reducing the total risk associated with nuclear power plants. The first part of this article introduces a {open_quotes}total safety{close_quotes} concept. This extends the concept of {open_quotes}nuclear safety{close_quotes} and makes it closer to the public perception of safety. This concept is defined by means of a taxonomy of total safety. The second part of the article shows that total safety can be achieved by integrating it into a modern quality assurance (QA) system since it is tailored to make implementation into a framework of QA easier. The author believes that the outstanding success experienced by various industries as a result of introducing the modern QA system should lead to its application for ensuring the safety and performance of nuclear facilities. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Assessing Risk and Driving Risk Mitigation for First-of-a-Kind Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning and decision making amidst programmatic and technological risks represent significant challenges for projects. This presentation addresses the four step risk-assessment process needed to determine clear path forward to mature needed technology and design, license, and construct advanced nuclear power plants, which have never been built before, including Small Modular Reactors. This four step process has been carefully applied to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. STEP 1 - Risk Identification Risks are identified, collected, and categorized as technical risks, programmatic risks, and project risks, each of which result in cost and schedule impacts if realized. These include risks arising from the use of technologies not previously demonstrated in a relevant application. These risks include normal and accident scenarios which the SMR could experience including events that cause the disablement of engineered safety features (typically documented in Phenomena Identification Ranking Tables (PIRT) as produced with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and design needs which must be addressed to further detail the design. Product - Project Risk Register contained in a database with sorting, presentation, rollup, risk work off functionality similar to the NGNP Risk Management System . STEP 2 - Risk Quantification The risks contained in the risk register are then scored for probability of occurrence and severity of consequence, if realized. Here the scoring methodology is established and the basis for the scoring is well documented. Product - Quantified project risk register with documented basis for scoring. STEP 3 - Risk Handling Strategy Risks are mitigated by applying a systematic approach to maturing the technology through Research and Development, modeling, test, and design. A Technology Readiness Assessment is performed to determine baseline Technology Readiness Levels (TRL). Tasks needed to mature the technology are developed and documented in a roadmap. Product - Risk Handling Strategy. STEP 4 - Residual Risk Work off The risk handling strategy is entered into the Project Risk Allocation Tool (PRAT) to analyze each task for its ability to reduce risk. The result is risk-informed task prioritization. The risk handling strategy is captured in the Risk Management System, a relational database that provides conventional database utility, including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. The tool's Hierarchy Tree allows visualization and analyses of complex relationships between risks, risk mitigation tasks, design needs, and PIRTs. Product - Project Risk Allocation Tool and Risk Management System which depict project plan to reduce risk and current progress in doing so.

  5. Risk-informed public safety policy for seismic events in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afolayan Jejeloye, Olubukola

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are potentially vulnerable to accidents, which can either be internally or externally initiated. External events include natural events like tornadoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes. The purpose ...

  6. OIT Risk Management Strategy Page 1 of 5 Office of Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management best practices in the IT industry and higher education. This document formalizes OIT's risk on service perceptions; requires possibly heavy staff activity (limited to service team) to resolve Major reduction in work efficiency for customers; requires possibly heavy staff activity (across multiple teams

  7. Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  9. Author: Duncan Woodhouse, Assistant Registrar for Information Security, Risk Management and Business Continuity University of Warwick Statement on the Regulation of Investigatory Powers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    Author: Duncan Woodhouse, Assistant Registrar for Information Security, Risk Management and Business Continuity 1 University of Warwick Statement on the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000: E Powers (RIP) Act as outlined below. The RIP Act statement is part of the strategic Information Security

  10. Northwestern University Information Technology Your data. Your privacy. Your role.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    the risk presented by identity theft, and avoid possible criminal and civil action and penalties Network of those actions: Your information -- Protecting your personally identifiable information helps keep it private and out of the hands of identity thieves Safety of our constituents -- Proper handling

  11. DOE's Safety Bulletin No. 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, March 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PURPOSE This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis.

  12. Alerting device and method for reminding a person of a risk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runyon, Larry (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Gunter, Wayne M. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An alerting device and method to remind personnel of a risk is disclosed. The device has at least two sensors, a logic controller, a power source, and an annunciator that delivers a visual message, with or without an audible alarm, about a risk to a person when the sensors detect the person exiting a predetermined space. In particular, the present invention reminds a person of a security, safety, or health risk upon exiting a predetermined space. More particularly, the present invention reminds a person of an information security risk relating to sensitive, proprietary, confidential, trade secret, classified, or intellectual property information.

  13. Highlights from a Workshop Series: Best Practices for Risk-Informed Remedy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approved on 24 July 2008 1 OfficeHighest Risk

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  15. New Methods and Tools to Perform Safety Analysis within RISMC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Robert Kinoshita; Joshua Cogliati

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway uses a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. What differentiates the RISMC approach from traditional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is the concept of safety margin. In PRA, a safety metric such as core damage frequency (CDF) is generally estimated using static fault-tree and event-tree models. However, it is not possible to estimate how close we are to physical safety limits (say peak clad temperature) for most accident sequences described in the PRA. In the RISMC approach, what we want to understand is not just the frequency of an event like core damage, but how close we are (or not) to this event and how we might increase our safety margin through margin management strategies in a Dynamic PRA (DPRA) fashion. This paper gives an overview of methods that are currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the scope of advance the current state of the art of dynamic PRA.

  16. RISMC ADVANCED SAFETY ANALYSIS WORKING PLAN – FY 2015 – FY 2019

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUMMARY In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: 1. A value proposition (“why is this important?”) that will make the case for stakeholder’s use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products. 2. An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users. 3. A proposed set of practical and achievable “use case” demonstrations. 4. A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs. 5. A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  17. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  18. DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.

  19. Estimating Overall Risk of Dam Failure: Practical Considerations in Combining Failure Probabilities ANCOLD 2003 Risk Workshop Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    combination of probabilities in quantitative risk analysis. Keywords: dam safety, risk analysis, risk for estimating probabilities in dam safety risk analysis both for assessing the risks associated with an existing in the risk analysis model can have a significant influence on the magnitudes of key inputs to decisions about

  20. Station Blackout: A case study in the interaction of mechanistic and probabilistic safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli; Cristian Rabiti

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margins is important to improved decision making about nuclear power plant design, operation, and plant life extension. As research and development (R&D) in the light-water reactor (LWR) Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario.

  1. When the Details Matter – Sensitivities in PRA Calculations That Could Affect Risk-Informed Decision-Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana L. Kelly; Nathan O. Siu

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) continues its efforts to increase its use of risk information in decision making, the detailed, quantitative results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculations are coming under increased scrutiny. Where once analysts and users were not overly concerned with figure of merit variations that were less than an order of magnitude, now factors of two or even less can spark heated debate regarding modeling approaches and assumptions. The philosophical and policy-related aspects of this situation are well-recognized by the PRA community. On the other hand, the technical implications for PRA methods and modeling have not been as widely discussed. This paper illustrates the potential numerical effects of choices as to the details of models and methods for parameter estimation with three examples: 1) the selection of the time period data for parameter estimation, and issues related to component boundary and failure mode definitions; 2) the selection of alternative diffuse prior distributions, including the constrained noninformative prior distribution, in Bayesian parameter estimation; and 3) the impact of uncertainty in calculations for recovery of offsite power.

  2. Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

  3. Safety study application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Included are analyses of existing facilities done under the aegis of the Safety Analysis Report Upgrade Program, and analyses of new and modified facilities. A graded approach is used wherein the level of analysis and documentation for each facility is commensurate with the magnitude of the hazard(s), the complexity of the facility and the stage of the facility life cycle. Safety analysis reports (SARs) for hazard Category 1 and 2 facilities are usually detailed and extensive because these categories are associated with public health and safety risk. SARs for Category 3 are normally much less extensive because the risk to public health and safety is slight. At Energy Systems, safety studies are the name given to SARs for Category 3 (formerly {open_quotes}low{close_quotes}) facilities. Safety studies are the appropriate instrument when on-site risks are limited to irreversible consequences to a few people, and off-site consequences are limited to reversible consequences to a few people. This application guide provides detailed instructions for performing safety studies that meet the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.22, {open_quotes}Technical Safety Requirements,{close_quotes} and 5480.23, {open_quotes}Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.{close_quotes} A seven-chapter format has been adopted for safety studies. This format allows for discussion of all the items required by DOE Order 5480.23 and for the discussions to be readily traceable to the listing in the order. The chapter titles are: (1) Introduction and Summary, (2) Site, (3) Facility Description, (4) Safety Basis, (5) Hazardous Material Management, (6) Management, Organization, and Institutional Safety Provisions, and (7) Accident Analysis.

  4. Tank farm health and safety plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickle, G.D.

    1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Tank Farm Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the conduct of all operations and work activities at the Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms is provided in order to minimize health and safety risks to workers and other onsite personnel. The HASP accomplishes this objective by establishing requirements, providing general guidelines, and conveying farm and facility-specific hazard communication information. The HASP, in conjunction with the job-specific information required by the HASP, is provided also as a reference for use during the planning of work activities at the tank farms. This HASP applies to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), other prime contractors to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and subcontractors to WHC who may be involved in tank farm work activities. This plan is intended to be both a requirements document and a useful reference to aid tank farm workers in understanding the safety and health issues that are encountered in routine and nonroutine work activities. The HASP defines the health and safety responsibilities of personnel working at the tank farms. It has been prepared in recognition of and is consistent with National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)/Unlimited State Coast Guard (USCG)/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site Activities (NIOSH 1985); WHC-CM-4-3, Industrial Safety Manual, Volume 4, {open_quotes}Health and Safety Programs for Hazardous Waste Operations;{close_quotes} 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; WHC-CM-1-1, Management Policies; and WHC-CM-1-3, Management Requirements and Procedures. When differences in governing regulations or policies exist, the more stringent requirements shall apply until the discrepancy can be resolved.

  5. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902, Am. M004) Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley E. Ritterbusch, et. al.

    2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 Research under this project addresses the barriers to long term use of nuclear-generated electricity in the United States. It was agreed that a very basic and significant change to the current method of design and regulation was needed. That is, it was believed that the cost reduction goal could not be met by fixing the current system (i.e., an evolutionary approach) and a new, more advanced approach for this project would be needed. It is believed that a completely new design and regulatory process would have to be developed--a ''clean sheet of paper'' approach. This new approach would start with risk-based methods, would establish probabilistic design criteria, and would implement defense-in-depth only when necessary (1) to meet public policy issues (e.g., use of a containment building no matter how low the probability of a large release is) and (2) to address uncertainties in probabilistic methods and equipment performance. This new approach is significantly different from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current risk-informed program for operating plants. For our new approach, risk-based methods are the primary means for assuring plant safety, whereas in the NRC's current approach, defense-in-depth remains the primary means of assuring safety. The primary accomplishments in the first year--Phase 1 were (1) the establishment of a new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework, (2) the establishment of the preliminary version of the new, highly risk-informed design process, (3) core damage frequency predictions showing that, based on new, lower pipe rupture probabilities, the design of the emergency core cooling system equipment can be simplified without reducing plant safety, and (4) the initial development of methods for including uncertainties in a new integrated structures-systems design model. Under the new regulatory framework, options for the use of ''design basis accidents'' were evaluated. It is expected that design basis accidents would be an inherent part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment for the plant and their evaluation would be probabilistic. Other first year accomplishments include (1) the conversion of an NRC database for cross-referencing NRC criteria and industry codes and standards to Microsoft 2000 software, (2) an assessment of the NRC's hearing process which concluded that the normal cross-examination during public hearings is not actually required by the U.S. Administrative Procedures Act, (3) the identification and listing of reliability data sources, and (4) interfacing with other industry groups (e.g., NEI and IAEA) and NRC at workshops for risk-informing regulations. The major accomplishments during the second year consisted of (1) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.1, ''Identify Current Applicable Regulatory Requirements [and Industry Standards],'' (2) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.2,'' Identify Structures, Systems, and Components and Their Associate d Costs for a Typical Plant,'' (3) extension of the new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework to non-light-water-reactor technology, (4) completion of more detailed thermal-hydraulic and probabilistic analyses of advanced conceptual reactor system/component designs, (6) initial evaluation and recommendations for improvement of the NRC design review process, and (7) initial development of the software format, procedures and statistical routines needed to store, analyze and retrieve the available reliability data. Final reports for Subtasks 1.1 (regulatory and design criteria) and 1.2 (costs for structures, systems, and components) were prepared and issued. A final report for Subtask 1.3 (Regulatory Framework) was drafted with the aim to issue it in Phase 3 (Year 3). One technical report was produced for Subtask 1.4 (methods development) and two technical reports were produced for Subtask 1.6 (sample problem analysis). An interim report on the NRC design review process (Subtask 1.7) was prepared and issued. Finally, a report on Subtask 2.2 (database weaknesses) addressed the i

  6. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  7. Risk-informed design guidance for a Generation-IV gas-cooled fast reactor emergency core cooling system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaney, Michael J. (Michael James), 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental objectives of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and proliferation resistance, physical protection and stakeholder relations must be considered during the design of an advanced reactor. However, ...

  8. Informational Purposes Only - DOE Directives, Delegations, and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Weapon Surety Program (Informational Purposes Only) Acquisition Career Management Program (Informational Purposes Only) Facility Safety (For Informational Purposes Only)...

  9. Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Worker Safety and Health Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on occupational safety and health programs and performance....

  10. Software Reliability Cases: The Bridge Between Hardware, Software and System Safety and Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, D.S.; Peercy, D.E.

    1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    High integrity/high consequence systems must be safe and reliable; hence it is only logical that both software safety and software reliability cases should be developed. Risk assessments in safety cases evaluate the severity of the consequences of a hazard and the likelihood of it occurring. The likelihood is directly related to system and software reliability predictions. Software reliability cases, as promoted by SAE JA 1002 and 1003, provide a practical approach to bridge the gap between hardware reliability, software reliability, and system safety and reliability by using a common methodology and information structure. They also facilitate early insight into whether or not a project is on track for meeting stated safety and reliability goals, while facilitating an informed assessment by regulatory and/or contractual authorities.

  11. Analysis of Wet Weather Related Collision Concentration Locations: Empirical Assessment of Continuous Risk Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Soonmi; Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David R; Chan, Ching-Yao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Continuous Risk Profile Submission Date: November 15,The Continuous Risk Profile Approach for the Identificationby the Continuous Risk Profile (CRP) approach and the safety

  12. SAFETY ANALYSIS QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yinhai

    1 TOPIC C2 SAFETY ANALYSIS AND POLICY QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS ON ANGLE-ACCIDENT RISK AT SIGNALIZED-2700 Tel: (206) 543-9639 Fax: (206) 543-5965 Email: nihan@u.washington.edu #12;2 Quantitative Analysis on Angle-Accident Risk at Signalized Intersections Abstract: This paper demonstrates how a new modeling

  13. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

  14. Biological Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE's Biological Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of biological safety. This content is supported by the Biosurety Executive Team. The Biosurety Executive Team is a DOE-chartered group. The DOE Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy provides administrative support for this group. The group identifies biological safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursues solutions to issues identified.

  15. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

  16. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

  17. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

  18. Seismic Safety Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eagling, D.G. (ed.)

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides managers with practical guidelines for administering a comprehensive earthquake safety program. The Guide is comprehensive with respect to earthquakes in that it covers the most important aspects of natural hazards, site planning, evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings, design of new facilities, operational safety, emergency planning, special considerations related to shielding blocks, non-structural elements, lifelines, fire protection and emergency facilities. Management of risk and liabilities is also covered. Nuclear facilities per se are not dealt with specifically. The principles covered also apply generally to nuclear facilities but the design and construction of such structures are subject to special regulations and legal controls.

  19. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH REPORTING, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. Chg 1, 11-7-96.

  20. Environment Safety and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. Does not cancel other directives.

  1. Slideshow, National Safety Month- June 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Safety Month is recognized by employers, employees, and safety and health professionals throughout the country. During the month of June, HSS provided information, activities, and events pertaining to weekly themes.

  2. The Safety Data Sheet, or SDS, is written or printed material used to convey the hazards of a hazardous chemical product. It contains 16 sections of important chemical information, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Safety Data Sheet, or SDS, is written or printed material used to convey the hazards of a hazardous chemical product. It contains 16 sections of important chemical information, including: Chemical characteristics; Physical and health hazards, including relevant exposure limits; Precautions for safe handling

  3. RISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK The UNIVERSITY of VERMONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    RISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK UVM PEOPLE WORKING 2004 The UNIVERSITY of VERMONT #12;2 © 2004 University · Fire and Life Safety · Property Protection · Vehicle Safety · Liability Risk Management · Insurance & Claims Management RISK MANAGEMENT HANDBOOKThe UNIVERSITY of VERMONT #12;4 © 2004 University of Vermont

  4. Thermal Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  5. Paper presented at the 4th International Conference Working on Safety, Crete, Greece, 2008 Functional modeling for risk assessment of automation in a changing air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Functional modeling for risk assessment of automation in a changing air traffic management environment R or to let automation act autonomously. The Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM) provides a framework from ERASMUS automation. Various instantiations of a partial model resulting from the application

  6. Impact of Passive Safety on FHR Instrumentation Systems Design and Classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs) will rely more extensively on passive safety than earlier reactor classes. 10CFR50 Appendix A, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, establishes minimum design requirements to provide reasonable assurance of adequate safety. 10CFR50.69, Risk-Informed Categorization and Treatment of Structures, Systems and Components for Nuclear Power Reactors, provides guidance on how the safety significance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) should be reflected in their regulatory treatment. The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) has provided 10 CFR 50.69 SSC Categorization Guideline (NEI-00-04) that factors in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) model insights, as well as deterministic insights, through an integrated decision-making panel. Employing the PRA to inform deterministic requirements enables an appropriately balanced, technically sound categorization to be established. No FHR currently has an adequate PRA or set of design basis accidents to enable establishing the safety classification of its SSCs. While all SSCs used to comply with the general design criteria (GDCs) will be safety related, the intent is to limit the instrumentation risk significance through effective design and reliance on inherent passive safety characteristics. For example, FHRs have no safety-significant temperature threshold phenomena, thus, enabling the primary and reserve reactivity control systems required by GDC 26 to be passively, thermally triggered at temperatures well below those for which core or primary coolant boundary damage would occur. Moreover, the passive thermal triggering of the primary and reserve shutdown systems may relegate the control rod drive motors to the control system, substantially decreasing the amount of safety-significant wiring needed. Similarly, FHR decay heat removal systems are intended to be running continuously to minimize the amount of safety-significant instrumentation needed to initiate operation of systems and components important to safety as required in GDC 20. This paper provides an overview of the design process employed to develop a pre-conceptual FHR instrumentation architecture intended to lower plant capital and operational costs by minimizing reliance on expensive, safety related, safety-significant instrumentation through the use of inherent passive features of FHRs.

  7. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & INSTRUCTIONAL SAFETY 2009 ANNUAL REPORTS #12;2009 Annual Report Page 2 RISK MANAGEMENT I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management program is to compare the annual cost

  8. Identification and Resolution of Safety Issues for the Advanced Integral Type PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Woong Sik; Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusung-dong, Yusung-ku, Taejon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the interim results of a study on the identification and resolution of safety issues for the AIPWR licensing. The safety issues discussed in this paper include (1) policy issues for which decision-makings are needed for the procedural requirements of licensing system in the regulatory policy point of view, (2) technical issues for which either development of new requirements or amendment of some existing requirements is needed, or (3) other technical issues for which safety verifications are required. The study covers (a) the assessment of applicability of the issues identified from the previous studies to the case of the AIPWR, (b) identification of safety issues through analysis of the international experiences in the design and licensing of advanced reactors, and technical review of the AIPWR design, and (c) development of the resolutions of safety issues, and application of the resolutions to the amendment of regulatory requirements and the licensing review of the AIPWR. As the results of this study, a total of twenty eight safety issues was identified: fourteen issues from the previous studies, including the establishment of design safety goals; four issues from the foreign practices and experiences, including the risk-informed licensing; and ten issues by the AIPWR design review, including reliability of passive safety systems. Ten issues of them have been already resolved and the succeeding study is under way to resolve the remaining ones. (authors)

  9. Forrestal Security and Safety Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1983-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish uniform procedures for the security and safety of the Forrestal Building and to inform all personnel of precautionary measures. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE N 251.11.

  10. DOE explosives safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) policy requires that all DOE activities be conducted in a manner that protects the safety of the public and provides a safe and healthful workplace for employees. DOE has also prescribed that all personnel be protected in any explosives operation undertaken. The level of safety provided shall be at least equivalent to that of the best industrial practice. The risk of death or serious injury shall be limited to the lowest practicable minimum. DOE and contractors shall continually review their explosives operations with the aim of achieving further refinements and improvements in safety practices and protective features. This manual describes the Department's explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. It is intended to reflect the state-of-the-art in explosives safety. In addition, it is essential that applicable criteria and requirements for implementing this policy be readily available and known to those responsible for conducting DOE programs.

  11. Comparison of Intergrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DC 20555-0001 SUBJECT: COMPARISON OF INTEGRATED SAFETY ANALYSIS (ISA) AND PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT (PRA) FOR FUEL CYCLE FACILITIES Dear Chairman Jaczko: During the 580 th...

  12. Conduct and results of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel's evaluation of the Ulysses space mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sholtis, J.A. Jr. (Directorate of Nuclear Surety, Air Force Inspection Safety Center, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117-5000 (USA)); Gray, L.B. (Office of Safety Mission Quality, National Aeronautics Space Administration, Washington, DC 20546 (USA)); Huff, D.A. (Office of Environment, Safety, Health, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20545 (USA)); Klug, N.P. (Office of Light Water Reactor Safety Technology, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20545 (USA)); Winchester, R.O. (Directorate of Nuclear Surety, Air Force Inspection Safety Center, Kirtland, AFB, New Mexico 87111-5000 (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent 6 October 1990 launch and deployment of the nuclear-powered Ulysses spacecraft from the Space Shuttle {ital Discovery} culminated an extensive safety review and evaluation effort by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP). After more than a year of detailed independent review, study, and analysis, the INSRP prepared a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) on the Ulysses mission, in accordance with Presidential Directive-National Security Council memorandum 25. The SER, which included a review of the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and an independent characterization of the mission risks, was used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in its decision to request launch approval as well as by the Executive Office of the President in arriving at a launch decision based on risk-benefit considerations. This paper provides an overview of the Ulysses mission and the conduct as well as the results of the INSRP evaluation. While the mission risk determined by the INSRP in the SER was higher than that characterized by the Ulysses project in the FSAR, both reports indicated that the radiological risks were relatively small. In the final analysis, the SER proved to be supportive of a positive launch decision. The INSRP evaluation process has demonstrated its effectiveness numerous times since the 1960s. In every case, it has provided the essential ingredients and perspective to permit an informed launch decision at the highest level of our Government.

  13. Analytic tools for information warfare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandewart, R.L.; Craft, R.L.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information warfare and system surety (tradeoffs between system functionality, security, safety, reliability, cost, usability) have many mechanisms in common. Sandia`s experience has shown that an information system must be assessed from a {ital system} perspective in order to adequately identify and mitigate the risks present in the system. While some tools are available to help in this work, the process is largely manual. An integrated, extensible set of assessment tools would help the surety analyst. This paper describes one approach to surety assessment used at Sandia, identifies the difficulties in this process, and proposes a set of features desirable in an automated environment to support this process.

  14. pamphlet2014.docx Office of Research Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    Control Center (24 hrs) 3456 Epidemiology 4376 Employee Health Service 2893 Emergency Department 2588 4 Biological Safety/Bloodborne Pathogen/TB 5 TB Exposure Control 6 Chemical Safety 7 Radiation 31 Confined Space 32 Asbestos Awareness 33 UCHC Safety Information/Policies 34 Chemical Inventory #12

  15. Northwestern University Office for Research Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Northwestern University Office for Research Safety ISIS User Manual ISIS (pronounced -ss) is Northwestern University's Integrated Safety Information System. ISIS is the on-line web application by which PIs submit applications and registrations for review. ISIS also builds a laboratory's Safety Profile

  16. Toolbox Safety Talk Articulating Boom Work Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Toolbox Safety Talk Articulating Boom Work Platforms Environmental Health & Safety Facilities sign-in sheet to Environmental Health & Safety for recordkeeping. Articulating boom work platforms platforms and provides tips to prevent injuries, death, and equipment damage. More information can be found

  17. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  18. Satellite System Safety Analysis Using STPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Nicholas Connor

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional hazard analysis techniques based on failure models of accident causality, such as the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) method currently used at NASA, are inadequate for analyzing safety at the system level. ...

  19. LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ISSUED BY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE OF RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY and GEORGIA TECH LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE July 1, 2010 Revised July 31, 2012 #12;Laser Safety Program 1-1 #12;Laser Safety Policy Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. POLICY AND SCOPE

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL May 10, 2002 #12;i Acknowledgements Environmental Health and Safety gratefully acknowledges the assistance provided by the University Safety Council extremely helpful. #12;ii Environmental Health and Safety General Safety Manual Table of Contents Section

  1. Health and Safety Policy Statement4 Health and Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    To achieve this, the University will ensure effective management of risk by setting and reviewing a quality-based health and safety management system and workplace health framework, and by allocating the resources necessary to attain these. It will also define clear management systems and ensure the involvement of all

  2. Safety Bulletin

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the...

  3. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

  4. Winter Safety Information & Tips

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of EnergyThe U.S.Department of EnergyToday,January 2007 1

  5. Occupational Safety and Health Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Calderon

    1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Valley Nuclear Services Co. LLC (WVNS) is committed to provide a safe, clean, working environment for employees, and to implement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements affecting worker safety. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Occupational Safety and Health Program is designed to protect the safety, health, and well-being of WVDP employees by identifying, evaluating, and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the work place. Hazards are controlled within the requirements set forth in the reference section at the end of this report. It is the intent of the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program to assure that each employee is provided with a safe and healthy work environment. This report shows the logical path toward ensuring employee safety in planning work at the WVDP. In general, planning work to be performed safely includes: combining requirements from specific programs such as occupational safety, industrial hygiene, radiological control, nuclear safety, fire safety, environmental protection, etc.; including WVDP employees in the safety decision-making processes; pre-planning using safety support re-sources; and integrating the safety processes into the work instructions. Safety management principles help to define the path forward for the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program. Roles, responsibilities, and authority of personnel stem from these ideals. WVNS and its subcontractors are guided by the following fundamental safety management principles: ''Protection of the environment, workers, and the public is the highest priority. The safety and well-being of our employees, the public, and the environment must never be compromised in the aggressive pursuit of results and accomplishment of work product. A graded approach to environment, safety, and health in design, construction, operation, maintenance, and deactivation is incorporated to ensure the protection of the workers, the public, and the environment.'' These principles are demonstrated through: Conducting all activities in an atmosphere of trust and confidence based on open, honest, and responsive communication. Using innovative and effective approaches to risk identification and management. Applying a systematic approach to planning and execution of all activities that affect the environment, safety, and health through use of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System. Holding line management fully accountable to effectively plan and integrate environment, safety, and health activities into field activities. Providing clear policy and direction on environment, safety, and health issues to guide field work. Encouraging and promoting the sharing of environment, safety, and health information and resources. Empowering employees through training, information, tools, and program involvement to effectively protect themselves and the environment. Ensuring it is every employees' responsibility to identify and report potential safety and health hazards and environmental noncompliance. Together, as a team, we accomplish our mission while protecting the environment and preserving the safety and health of each employee and the public.

  6. Department of Energy Cites Bechtel Jacobs for Classified Information...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Jacobs for Classified Information Security and Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Bechtel Jacobs for Classified Information Security and Worker Safety...

  7. Toolbox Safety Talk Ladder Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Health & Safety for recordkeeping. Slips, trips, and falls constitute the majority of general industry and construction worker injuries. Falls cause 15% of all accidental deaths, and are second only to motor vehicle

  8. Lessons Learned from Safety Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

  9. Chemical and Hazardous Materials Department of Environmental Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Chemical and Hazardous Materials Safety Department of Environmental Health and Safety 800 West information useful in the recognition, evaluation, and control of workplace hazards and environmental factors safety, fire safety, and hazardous waste disposal. Many chemicals have properties that make them

  10. Risk D&D Rapid Prototype: Scenario Documentation and Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Report describes process and methodology associated with a rapid prototype tool for integrating project risk analysis and health & safety risk analysis for decontamination and decommissioning projects.

  11. Empirical Analysis of Value at Risk and Expected Shortfall in Portfolio Selection Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Liyuan 1988-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety first criterion and mean-shortfall criterion both explore cases of assets allocation with downside risk. In this paper, I compare safety first portfolio selection problem and mean-shortfall portfolio optimization problem, considering risk...

  12. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRAHN, D.E.

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological and toxicological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines are included.

  13. Nuclear fuel cycle risk assessment: survey and computer compilation of risk-related literature. [Once-through Cycle and Plutonium Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, K.R.; Schreiber, A.M.; Rudolph, A.W.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated the Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. Both the once-through cycle and plutonium recycle are being considered. A previous report generated by this program defines and describes fuel cycle facilities, or elements, considered in the program. This report, the second from the program, describes the survey and computer compilation of fuel cycle risk-related literature. Sources of available information on the design, safety, and risk associated with the defined set of fuel cycle elements were searched and documents obtained were catalogued and characterized with respect to fuel cycle elements and specific risk/safety information. Both US and foreign surveys were conducted. Battelle's computer-based BASIS information management system was used to facilitate the establishment of the literature compilation. A complete listing of the literature compilation and several useful indexes are included. Future updates of the literature compilation will be published periodically. 760 annotated citations are included.

  14. Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety or harmful emission giving metals. Welding Safety When welding outside of a designated welding booth, ensure injury. Avoid welding on materials such as galvanized or stainless steel in order to minimize toxic fume

  15. Gallium Safety in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A university laboratory experiment for the US Department of Energy magnetic fusion research program required a simulant for liquid lithium. The simulant choices were narrowed to liquid gallium and galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) alloy. Safety information on liquid gallium and galinstan were compiled, and the choice was made to use galinstan. A laboratory safety walkthrough was performed in the fall of 2002 to support the galinstan experiment. The experiment has been operating successfully since early 2002.

  16. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    overall Nuclear Safety Policy & ESH Goals Safety Basis Review and Approval In the DOE governance model, contractors responsible for the facility develop the safety basis and...

  17. Gas Pipeline Safety (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes the Pipeline Safety Division within the Utility Regulatory Commission to administer federal pipeline safety standards and establish minimum state safety standards for...

  18. CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOFFER, H.

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

  19. The Safety Wire The Newsletter from Environmental Health and Safety Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    -andrews.ac.uk #12;Gas Safety Introduction Gas is a versatile supply of energy, from heating University Buildings; indeed some staff members with health & safety roles at the University have requested more regular was presented to the Audit & Risk Committee on 17 May 2012. This is now available on the web site (http

  20. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B. DOE O 231.1B cancels all portions pertaining to environment, safety, and health reporting. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information provisions remain in effect until January 1, 2012.

  1. System Design and the Safety Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingson, Darrel

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) Lessons Learned for system design as it relates to safety basis documentation. BJC has had to reconcile incomplete or outdated system description information with current facility safety basis for a number of situations in recent months. This paper has relevance in multiple topical areas including documented safety analysis, decontamination & decommissioning (D&D), safety basis (SB) implementation, safety and design integration, potential inadequacy of the safety analysis (PISA), technical safety requirements (TSR), and unreviewed safety questions. BJC learned that nuclear safety compliance relies on adequate and well documented system design information. A number of PIS As and TSR violations occurred due to inadequate or erroneous system design information. As a corrective action, BJC assessed the occurrences caused by systems design-safety basis interface problems. Safety systems reviewed included the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Fluorination System, K-1065 fire alarm system, and the K-25 Radiation Criticality Accident Alarm System. The conclusion was that an inadequate knowledge of system design could result in continuous non-compliance issues relating to nuclear safety. This was especially true with older facilities that lacked current as-built drawings coupled with the loss of 'historical knowledge' as personnel retired or moved on in their careers. Walkdown of systems and the updating of drawings are imperative for nuclear safety compliance. System design integration with safety basis has relevance in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the BJC Lessons Learned in this area. It will be of benefit to DOE contractors that manage and operate an aging population of nuclear facilities.

  2. Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, April-June 1982. Volume 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overall objective of this work is to provide NRC a comprehensive data base essential to (1) defining key safety issues, (2) understanding risk-significant accident sequences, (3) developing and verifying models used in safety assessments, and (4) assuring the public that power reactor systems will not be licensed and placed in commercial service in the United States without appropriate consideration being given to their effects on health and safety. This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents, and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  3. Reducing Food Safety Risks in Community Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    as good agricultural practices (GAPs) -- has been pointed to by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of the final products. Good agricultural practices are the basic environmental and operational conditions outlines the recommended agricultural practices

  4. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

  5. Safety valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Ulf C. (Malmoe, SE)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety valve contains a resilient gland to be held between a valve seat and a valve member and is secured to the valve member by a sleeve surrounding the end of the valve member adjacent to the valve seat. The sleeve is movable relative to the valve member through a limited axial distance and a gap exists between said valve member and said sleeve.

  6. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, and DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 232.2.

  7. Medical Surveillance n Based on risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Surveillance Risk Assessment 2.12 #12;n Top management n overall safety policy n resource allocation n2.12 #12;Medical Surveillance Criteria n Based on risk assessment n Pre-placement n evaluate of numbers exists n Predict an outcome given similar events Medical Surveillance Risk Assessment 2.12 #12;n

  8. Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Risk Management Department of Human Resource Services Workers' Compensation Update INJURY to identify and address potential safety hazards. It also assists Risk Management staff determine in a timely manager or supervisor will contact Risk Management to arrange transportation. An employee who needs

  9. DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic...

  10. DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments in Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Applications, 1210 DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of...

  11. Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and safety, public perceptions, environmental benefits and proliferation and terrorism risk reduction) for different fuel cycle options to understand the tradeoffs and potential...

  12. Safety Share from National Safety Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Joe Yanek, Fluor Government Group. National Safety Council Safety Share. The Campbell Institute is the “Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Center of Excellence” at the National Safety Council and provides a Forum for Leaders in EHS to exchange ideas and collaborate across industry sectors and organizational types.

  13. Introduction to LNG vehicle safety. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratvold, D.; Friedman, D.; Chernoff, H.; Farkhondehpay, D.; Comay, C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic information on the characteristics of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is assembled in this report to provide an overview of safety issues and practices for the use of LNG vehicles. This document is intended for those planning or considering the use of LNG vehicles, including vehicle fleet owners and operators, public transit officials and boards, local fire and safety officials, manufacturers and distributors, and gas industry officials. Safety issues and mitigation measures that should be considered for candidate LNG vehicle projects are addressed.

  14. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  15. Setting clear expectations for safety basis development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORENO, M.R.

    2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-RL has set clear expectations for a cost-effective approach for achieving compliance with the Nuclear Safety Management requirements (10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Rule) which will ensure long-term benefit to Hanford. To facilitate implementation of these expectations, tools were developed to streamline and standardize safety analysis and safety document development resulting in a shorter and more predictable DOE approval cycle. A Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) was issued to standardized methodologies for development of safety analyses. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (RADIDOSE) was issued for the evaluation of radiological consequences for accident scenarios often postulated for Hanford. A standard Site Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) detailing the safety management programs was issued for use as a means of compliance with a majority of 3009 Standard chapters. An in-process review was developed between DOE and the Contractor to facilitate DOE approval and provide early course correction. As a result of setting expectations and providing safety analysis tools, the four Hanford Site waste management nuclear facilities were able to integrate into one Master Waste Management Documented Safety Analysis (WM-DSA).

  16. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT EAST-WEST DRIFT SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the design of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) East-West Cross Drift. This analysis builds upon prior ESF System Safety Analyses and incorporates TS Main Drift scenarios, where applicable, into the East-West Drift scenarios. This System Safety Analysis (SSA) focuses on the personnel safety and health hazards associated with the engineered design of the East-West Drift. The analysis also evaluates other aspects of the East-West Drift, including purchased equipment (e.g., scientific mapping platform) or Systems/Structures/Components (SSCs) and out-of-tolerance conditions. In addition to recommending design mitigation features, the analysis identifies the potential need for procedures, training, or Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). The inclusion of this information in the SSA is intended to assist the organization(s) (e.g., constructor, Safety and Health, design) responsible for these aspects of the East-West Drift in evaluating personnel hazards and augment the information developed by these organizations. The SSA is an integral part of the systems engineering process, whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach is used which incorporates operating experiences and recommendations from vendors, the constructor and the operating contractor. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the scenarios associated with East-West Drift SSCs in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified hazards. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into SSC designs. (2) Add safety features and capabilities to existing designs. (3) Develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, reduce exposure to hazards, and inform personnel of the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. This analysis does not consider temporary construction items and, therefore, does not consider hazards associated with temporary construction items. This analysis will be reviewed and updated to reflect new East-West Drift design changes, construction modifications, and ''as built'' documentation of the East-West Drift when completed. A major difference between this analysis and previous ESF SSAs is the inclusion of hazards that arise as a result of non-accident events, (e.g., ''off-normal'' operations, adverse environmental conditions, or ''out-of-tolerance'' conditions). Non-accident events, that were not included in previous ESF SSAs, include environmental and/or toxic hazards such as leaking gases/fluids, off-gassing reactions, and excessive dust, particulates, exhaust fumes, noise, temperature, etc. which could have an adverse health effect on personnel.

  17. Structural risk management of buildings during erection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikorsky, Charles Steven

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Boe (8, 9) and Knoll (28). One given definition of safety is: something is safe if its risks are judged to be acceptable (32). Establishment of an acceptable level of risk implies judg- ment of safety. Once the level of risk is determined...). Statistics such as the above can only support a need not only for safety improvements in the construction process, but also in quality control of the process. In 1968 the Research Committee of the Construction Division of the American Society of Civil...

  18. Enhancing vehicle safety management in training deployments : an application of system dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Kelvin F. H. (Kelvin Fang Hui)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organization Sierra-Tango is employing a systematic and methodical safety framework to manage risks in all their operational and training activities. While this safety system has shown itself to be reasonably effective in ...

  19. A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis Nancy of plant layout with safety considerations. The model considers a quantitative risk analysis to take safety aims at providing a more elaborate analysis of risk sources by considering a complete quantitative risk

  20. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

  1. Delivering safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.D.; Spooner, K.G.; Walkden, P. [British Nuclear Group Ltd, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United Kingdom there have been significant recent changes to the management of civil nuclear liabilities. With the formation in April 2005 of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), ownership of the civil nuclear licensed sites in the UK, including the Magnox Reactor Stations, passed to this new organisation. The NDAs mission is to seek acceleration of the nuclear clean up programme and deliver increased value for money and, consequently, are driving their contractors to seek more innovative ways of performing work. British Nuclear Group manages the UK Magnox stations under contract to the NDA. This paper summarises the approach being taken within its Reactor Sites business to work with suppliers to enhance working arrangements at sites, improve the delivery of decommissioning programmes and deliver improvements in safety and environmental performance. The UK Magnox stations are 1. generation gas-graphite reactors, constructed in the 1950's and 1960's. Two stations are currently still operating, three are shut-down undergoing defueling and the other five are being decommissioned. Despite the distractions of industry restructuring, an uncompromising policy of demanding improved performance in conjunction with improved safety and environmental standards has been adopted. Over the past 5 years, this policy has resulted in step-changes in performance at Reactor Sites, with increased electrical output and accelerated defueling and decommissioning. The improvements in performance have been mirrored by improvements in safety (DACR of 0 at 5 sites); environmental standards (reductions in energy and water consumption, increased waste recycling) and the overall health of the workforce (20% reduction in sickness absence). These achievements have, in turn, been recognised by external bodies, resulting in several awards, including: the world's first ISRS and IERS level 10 awards (Sizewell, 2006), the NUMEX plant maintenance award (Bradwell, 2006), numerous RoSPA awards at site and sector level and nomination, at Company level, for the RoSPA George Earle trophy for outstanding performance in Health and Safety (Reactor Sites, 2006). After 'setting the scene' and describing the challenges that the company has had to respond to, the paper explains how these improvements have been delivered. Specifically it explains the process that has been followed and the parts played by sites and suppliers to deliver improved performance. With the experience of already having transitioned several Magnox stations from operations to defueling and then to decommissioning, the paper describes the valuable experience that has been gained in achieving an optimum change process and maintaining momentum. (authors)

  2. Safety, Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterialsSafety, Security

  3. Your Safety and at Syracuse University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    programs to disclose campus crime statistics and security information. A 1998 amendment renamed the lawYour Safety and Security at Syracuse University A comprehensive report on campus security and fire and security measures on and around our campus. The need for security encompasses more than personal safety

  4. Your Safety and Security at Syracuse University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    programs to disclose campus crime statistics and security information. A 1998 amendment renamed the lawYour Safety and Security at Syracuse University A comprehensive report on campus security and fire and security measures on and around our campus. The need for security encompasses more than personal safety

  5. Savannah River Reactor Operation: Indices of risk for emergency planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Kula, K.R.; East, J.M.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodically it is necessary to re-examine the implications of new source terms for neighboring offsite populations as Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Severe Accident studies mature, and lead to a better understanding of the progression of hypothetical core melt accidents in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. In this application multiple-system failure, low-frequency events, and consequently higher radiological source terms than from normal operation or design basis accidents (DBAs) are considered. Measures of consequence such as constant dose vs distance, boundary doses, and health effects to close-in populations are usually examined in this context. A set of source terms developed for the Safety Information Document (SID) for support of the Reactor Operation Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) forms the basis for the revised risk evaluation discussed herein. The intent of this review is not to completely substantiate the sufficiency of the current Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). However, the two principal measures (200-rem red-bone marrow dose vs distance and 300-rem thyroid dose vs distance) for setting an EPZ are considered. Additional dose-at-distance calculations and consideration of DBA doses would be needed to complete a re-evaluation of the current EPZ. These subject areas are not addressed in the current document. Also, this report evaluates the sensitivity of individual risk estimates to the extent of offsite evacuation assumed from a K reactor severe accident and compares these risks to the Draft DOE Safety Guidelines. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Overview of pipeline safety legislation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, J. [Caldwell and Associates, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipeline regulation in the US as it has been known since 1968 is being changed. Several major actions are occurring in Government that will redirect the focus of pipeline safety regulation and how it is carried out by government and industry. The Congress is proposing to accept risk management as away of regulation and requiring risk assessment and cost analysis on all regulatory requirements. The DOT/OPS is developing a risk-prioritization program for regulatory activities to be used in evaluating existing regulations to identify those that are obsolete and need modifying or eliminating. The pipeline industry is taking on a proactive role in working with Congress and DOT/OPS to develop this agenda. For the first time in the regulatory history of pipeline safety, Congress, DOT/OPS, and the industry are talking to each other and working toward a common goal of less regulation, more flexible regulation, and placing the responsibility for safety in the hands of the industry.

  7. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Management Plan. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to effectively plan for environment, safety and health activities that protect the environment, workers and the public from harm. This document, which covers fiscal year 1996, reflects planning by operating contractors and Program Offices in early 1994, updated to be consistent with the President`s FY 1996 budget submittal to Congress, and subsequent Department of Energy Program refinements. Prior to 1992, only a small number of facilities had a structured process for identifying environment, safety and health (ES and H) needs, reporting the costs (in both direct and indirect budgets) of ES and H requirements, prioritizing and allocating available resources, and efficiently communicating this information to DOE. Planned costs for ES and H activities were usually developed as an afterthought to program budgets. There was no visible, consistently applied mechanism for determining the appropriate amount of resources that should be allocated to ES and H, or for assuring that significant ES and H vulnerabilities were planned to be funded. To address this issue, the Secretary (in November 1991) directed DOE to develop a Safety and Health Five-Year Plan to serve as a line management tool to delineate DOE-wide programs to reduce and manage safety and health risks, and to establish a consistent framework for risk-based resource planning and allocation.

  8. Hydrogen quantitative risk assessment workshop proceedings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groth, Katrina M.; Harris, Aaron P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) Toolkit Introduction Workshop was held at Energetics on June 11-12. The workshop was co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and HySafe, the International Association for Hydrogen Safety. The objective of the workshop was twofold: (1) Present a hydrogen-specific methodology and toolkit (currently under development) for conducting QRA to support the development of codes and standards and safety assessments of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and fueling stations, and (2) Obtain feedback on the needs of early-stage users (hydrogen as well as potential leveraging for Compressed Natural Gas [CNG], and Liquefied Natural Gas [LNG]) and set priorities for %E2%80%9CVersion 1%E2%80%9D of the toolkit in the context of the commercial evolution of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). The workshop consisted of an introduction and three technical sessions: Risk Informed Development and Approach; CNG/LNG Applications; and Introduction of a Hydrogen Specific QRA Toolkit.

  9. 2011 WSU SPOKANE ANNUAL Security/Fire Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Security/Fire Safety Report can be obtained at the Office of Security and Public Safety. Information Information and Preparation of Statistics 1 Director's Letter 2 Mission Statement and Security Department INFORMATION The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (also

  10. 2012 WSU SPOKANE ANNUAL Security/Fire Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Security/Fire Safety Report can be obtained at the Office of Security and Public Safety. Information Information and Preparation of Statistics 1 Director's Letter 2 Mission Statement and Security Department INFORMATION The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (also

  11. CRAD, Nuclear Safety Delegations for Documented Safety Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Delegations for Documented Safety Analysis Approval - January 8, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-09, Rev. 0) CRAD, Nuclear Safety Delegations for Documented Safety Analysis Approval -...

  12. Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

  13. University of Pittsburgh Safety Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    : ELECTRICAL SAFETY Effective Date 5/6/13 Page 2 of 4 1.10 Lockout/Tagout procedures must be followed when equipment is de-energized. Call EH&S for more information on the University's Lockout/Tagout Program. 1

  14. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  15. Risk Assessment and Management for Interconnected and Interactive Critical Flood Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamedifar, Hamed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G.E. (2004) How useful is quantitative risk assessment?Risk Analysis Vol. 24 No. 3, pp. 515-520 Atwater, BF (Quantitative and qualitative risk analyses – the safety of

  16. Clinical practice of risk assessment of sexual violence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judge, Joseph Gerard

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Risk assessment of sexual violence involves evidence based evaluation of the risks posed by sexual offenders. It informs risk management; the provision of treatment that reduces the risk of future sexual ...

  17. Proceedings of the international meeting on thermal nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current issues in nuclear power plant safety; national programs in nuclear power plant safety; radiological source terms; probabilistic risk assessment methods and techniques; non LOCA and small-break-LOCA transients; safety goals; pressurized thermal shocks; applications of reliability and risk methods to probabilistic risk assessment; human factors and man-machine interface; and data bases and special applications.

  18. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabala, Dana [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information: Brad Merrill 208-526-0395 Email Contact Fusion Safety Program Thermonuclear fusion powers the Sun and the stars and is the most powerful energy source known....

  20. The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented by Domingo (2000) for human health and by Wolfenbarger and Phifer (2000) for the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented) is a technology which has been released prematurely into the marketplace. As a result, GM crops are vulnerable and longevity of ag biotech have been fatally compromised by a) misrepresenting GM crops as solutions to real

  1. Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review Overview and Management Oversight...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This SRP, Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review, consists of five volumes. It provides information to help strengthen the technical rigor of line management oversight and federal...

  2. Monthly Analysis of Electrical Safety Occurrences – July 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An analysis of the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports that was requested by the Electrical Safety Community for information exchange and continual learning.

  3. Safety Planning Guidance for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This guidance document provides information on safety requirements for hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

  4. Natural Gas Vehicle Cylinder Safety, Training and Inspection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    any proprietary or confidential information 22808 Purpose of Work Assure the safety of natural gas vehicle fuel systems in order to... Help encourage the use of natural gas...

  5. Monthly Analysis of Electrical Safety Occurrences – June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An analysis of the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports that was requested by the Electrical Safety Community for information exchange and continual learning.

  6. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  7. WHY CHANGING THE WAY TO MEASURE THE RISK ? Olivier SALVI, Didier GASTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the risk analysis and to build a safety management System. Such tools have to be recognised by the Public the risk prevention, · Risk decision-makers have no clear opüüon of the real risk level, · The risk expert Authorities and the decision-makers in charge of risk control. After reading the Directive, the objectives

  8. www.leeds.ac.uk/safety safety@leeds.ac.uk T:0113 34 34201 How can Health and Safety Services help you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    and development Managing hazardous waste disposal contracts Fire safety GM and Biological Safety W: www, inspection and spot-checks Advice to identify and control hazards Investigating complaints, accidents and strategic planning Risk management advice Developing and consulting upon protocols Monitoring the impact

  9. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  10. Office of Information Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Information Management provides a broad range of information technology services in support of the Associate Under Secretary for the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU).

  11. Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

  12. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  13. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

  14. Proceedings of the international ANS/ENS topical meeting on thermal reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on reactor safety. Topics considered at the conference included containment, fission product release, safety injection, reactor instrumentation, thermal-hydraulic analyses, reactor safety experiments, meltdowns, gas production rates, computerized simulation, occupational safety, human factors engineering, emergency plans, emergency core cooling systems, reactor licensing, after-heat removal, RHR systems, risk assessment, probability, fuel-cladding interactions, safety standards, and molten metal-water interactions.

  15. Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

  16. Pipeline Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania legislature has empowered the Public Utility Commission to direct and enforce safety standards for pipeline facilities and to regulate safety practices of certificated utilities...

  17. Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, O.C.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events; various accident scenarios; single- and two-phase flow; single- and two-phase heat transfer; nuclear systems safety modeling; startup and shutdown; transient response during normal and upset conditions; vapor explosions, natural convection cooling; blockages in LMFBR subassemblies; sodium boiling; and Three Mile Island.

  18. Risks of Untrustworthiness Peter G. Neumann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Peter G.

    - erties such as security, reliability, human safety, and sur- vivability in the presence of a wide range to what had been ex- pected of them. The risks relate to security, reliability, survivability, human safety, and other attributes, and span a variety of applications and critical infrastructures

  19. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    With the implementation of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, and DOE-STD-3007-2007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities', a new requirement was imposed that all criticality safety controls be evaluated for inclusion in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and that the evaluation process be documented in the site Criticality Safety Program Description Document (CSPDD). At the Hanford site in Washington State the CSPDD, HNF-31695, 'General Description of the FH Criticality Safety Program', requires each facility develop a linking document called a Criticality Control Review (CCR) to document performance of these evaluations. Chapter 5, Appendix 5B of HNF-7098, Criticality Safety Program, provided an example of a format for a CCR that could be used in lieu of each facility developing its own CCR. Since the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is presently undergoing Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), new procedures are being developed for cleanout of equipment and systems that have not been operated in years. Existing Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) are revised, or new ones written, to develop the controls required to support D&D activities. Other Hanford facilities, including PFP, had difficulty using the basic CCR out of HNF-7098 when first implemented. Interpretation of the new guidelines indicated that many of the controls needed to be elevated to TSR level controls. Criterion 2 of the standard, requiring that the consequence of a criticality be examined for establishing the classification of a control, was not addressed. Upon in-depth review by PFP Criticality Safety staff, it was not clear that the programmatic interpretation of criterion 8C could be applied at PFP. Therefore, the PFP Criticality Safety staff decided to write their own CCR. The PFP CCR provides additional guidance for the evaluation team to use by clarifying the evaluation criteria in DOE-STD-3007-2007. In reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since February of 2008 and has proven to be simple and effective. Each control identified i

  20. SHSD Manager Safety Engineering Group Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safety, Machine Shop Safety, Tier I Program, Traffic Safety S. Moss: Nuclear Criticality Safety G. Shepherd: Explosives Safety, Facility Authorization Basis, Nuclear Safety R. Travis: Readiness Evaluations

  1. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  2. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  3. EA-0915: Waste Tank Safety Program Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to resolve waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and to reduce the risks associated with...

  4. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  5. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  6. Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment PI or environmental concerns were identified. B. Items of safety or environmental concerns were identified. C. Uncorrected repeated safety or environmental items were identified. Safety Equipment # Compliance Items

  7. Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengston, S.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

  8. Safety Alerts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Documents downloaded from the password-protected areas of this web site may be made available to the DOE Federal and contractor community and to the military. These documents are not permitted to be made available to the general public via an Internet web site. All parties with access to the password-protected areas of the EHSS web site are to exercise due diligence to maintain control of information.

  9. (BSET) -FIRE SAFETY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM Effective Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    (BSET) - FIRE SAFETY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM Effective Fall 2003 Updated - Fall 2009csd: In addition to University and College of Engineering requirements, an AAS transfer student who is admitted Advisor: Notes Engineering Economics Building Fire Safety Risk Mgmt. for Emerg. Services Professional

  10. Tank farms criticality safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORT, L.A.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the Tank Farms Contractor (TFC) criticality safety program, as required by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Subpart 830.204(b)(6), ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (10 CFR 830.204 (b)(6)), and US Department of Energy (DOE) 0 420.1A, Facility Safety, Section 4.3, ''Criticality Safety.'' In addition, this document contains certain best management practices, adopted by TFC management based on successful Hanford Site facility practices. Requirements in this manual are based on the contractor requirements document (CRD) found in Attachment 2 of DOE 0 420.1A, Section 4.3, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety,'' and the cited revisions of applicable standards published jointly by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) as listed in Appendix A. As an informational device, requirements directly imposed by the CRD or ANSI/ANS Standards are shown in boldface. Requirements developed as best management practices through experience and maintained consistent with Hanford Site practice are shown in italics. Recommendations and explanatory material are provided in plain type.

  11. Pressure safety program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borzileri, C.; Traini, M.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a Research and Development facility. Programs include research in: nuclear weapons, energy, environmental, biomedical, and other DOE funded programs. LLNL is managed by the University of California for the Department of Energy. Many research and development programs require the use of pressurized fluid systems. In the early 1960`s, courses were developed to train personnel to safely work with pressurized systems. These courses served as a foundation for the Pressure Safety Program. The Pressure Safety Program is administered by the Pressure Safety Manager through the Hazards Control Department, and responsibilities include: (1) Pressure Safety course development and training, (2) Equipment documentation, tracking and inspections/retests, (3) Formal and informal review of pressure systems. The program uses accepted codes and standards and closely follows the DOE Pressure Safety Guidelines Manual. This manual was developed for DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DOE Pressure Safety Guidelines Manual defines five (5) basic elements which constitute this Pressure Safety Program. These elements are: (1) A Pressure Safety Manual, (2) A Safety Committee, (3) Personnel who are trained and qualified, (4) Documentation and accountability for each pressure vessel or system, (5) Control of the selection and the use of high pressure hardware.

  12. MSU Safety & Risk Management Page 1 of 7 SAFETY & RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    ) atmospheres: · A full facepiece pressure demand self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) certified by NIOSH

  13. Risk Measures Constituting Risk Metrics for Decision Making in the Chemical Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prem, Katherine

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    monetization. Predicting incidents as leading metrics is pivotal to improving plant processes and, for individual and societal safety in the vicinity of the plant (portfolio). From this study it can be concluded that the comprehensive judgments of all the risks...

  14. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  15. RISK ASSESSMENT FORM FIELD / LOCATION WORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    the work. Detail such risks in the final section. ENVIRONMENT The environment always represents a safety weather, illness, hypothermia, assault, getting lost. Is the risk high/medium/low? CONTROL MEASURES environment trained leaders accompany the trip refuge is available work in outside organisations is subject

  16. TWRS safety program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calderon, L.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of Nuclear Safety, Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and Fire Protection programs, functions, and field support resources for Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) has, until recently, been centralized in TWRS Safety, under the Emergency, Safety, and Quality organization. Industrial hygiene technician services were also provided to support operational needs related to safety basis compliance. Due to WHC decentralization of safety and reengineering efforts in West Tank Farms, staffing and safety responsibilities have been transferred to the facilities. Under the new structure, safety personnel for TWRS are assigned directly to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and a core Safety Group in TWRS Engineering. The Characterization Project Operations (CPO) safety organization will remain in tact as it currently exists. Personnel assigned to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and CPO will perform facility-specific or project-specific duties and provide field implementation of programs. Those assigned to the core group will focus on activities having a TWRS-wide or programmatic focus. Hanford-wide activities will be the responsibility of the Safety Center of Expertise. In order to ensure an effective and consistent safety program for TWRS under the new organization program functions, goals, organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and path forward must be clearly established. The purpose of the TWRS Safety Program Plan is to define the overall safety program, responsibilities, relationships, and communication linkages for safety personnel under the new structure. In addition, issues associated with reorganization transition are addressed, including training, project ownership, records management, and dissemination of equipment. For the purpose of this document ``TWRS Safety`` refers to all safety professionals and technicians (Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Fire Protection, and Nuclear Safety) within the TWRS organization, regardless of their location in the organization.

  17. Who can help me? The Safety Office offers ergonomic assessments for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Who can help me? The Safety Office offers ergonomic assessments for all University of Winnipeg employees. Call 786.9894 to arrange an appointment. For more information on ergonomics, visit the Safety Office website at www. uwinnipeg.ca/index/safety-safety. ERGONOMICS OFFICE What is ergonomics? Ergonomics

  18. Fifty years of progress in reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okrent, D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper chronicles the major watershed occurrences in the evaluation of current reactor safety principles and concepts. The author covers such issues as the development of siting criteria in the early 1960s, development and design of engineered safety features and emergency cooling systems (ECCS), core meltdown scenarios, anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) issues, WASH-1400 Reactor Safety study employing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) approaches, early PRAs conducted, development of safety goals in the 1980s, and reliability of AC power. Perhaps three of the most significant events related to operating reactors that occurred near the end of the 50-yr period were recognition of the problems of aging, completion of the NUREG-1150 study, and the development of a program on severe accident management.

  19. CYBER SECURITY THREATS TO SAFETY-CRITICAL, SPACE-BASED INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    into advanced air-traffic management applications, rail signalling systems, energy distribution software etc of a combined safety and security risk assessment methodology. The aim is to identify attack scenarios, the inclusion of a combined safety-security risk based methodology for the identification of attack scenarios

  20. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 231.1A Chg 1, DOE M 231.1-1A Chg 2 and DOE N 234.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12, cancels DOE O 231.1B.

  1. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 231.1A Chg 1, DOE M 231.1-1A Chg 2 and DOE N 234.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12.

  2. PERSONAL TRAINING RECORD Guidance on using the Personal Safety Training Record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    PERSONAL TRAINING RECORD Guidance on using the Personal Safety Training Record What safety training adequate health and safety training on induction, when there is exposure to new or increased risks and to repeat the training periodically where appropriate. Members of the University are required to attend any

  3. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the SST modified sluicing system with DST supernatant for retrieval of the 100-series SSTs in the tank farms is adequately addressed and bounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  4. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the single-shell tank modified sluicing system for retrieval of the 100-series Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) in the tank farms is adequately addressed and bounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  5. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the single-shell tank modified sluicing system for retrieval of the 100-series SSTs in the tank farms is adequately addressed and bounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  6. SAFETY EVALUATION OF THE SINGLE SHELL TANKS (SST) MODIFIED SLUICING WASTE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH, R.D.

    2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this safety evaluation is to determine if the potential risk associated with using the single-shell tank modified sluicing system for retrieval of the 100-series SSTs in the tank farms is adequately addressed and hounded by the current tank farms safety basis documented safety analysis and to determine if additional controls may be required.

  7. Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, W.S.; Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety Technology Group is developing methodology that can be used to assess the risk of operating a plant to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. As an early step in the methodology, a preliminary hazards analysis identifies safety-related incidents. In the absence of appropriate safety features, these incidents could lead to significant consequences and risk to onsite personnel or to the public. This report is a compilation of potential safety-related incidents that have been identified in studies at SRL and in safety analyses of various commercially designed reprocessing plants. It is an expanded revision of the version originally published as DP-1558, Published December 1980.

  8. Revised GCFR safety program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, A.P.; Boyack, B.E.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary of the recently revised gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) safety program plan. The activities under this plan are organized to support six lines of protection (LOPs) for protection of the public from postulated GCFR accidents. Each LOP provides an independent, sequential, quantifiable risk barrier between the public and the radiological hazards associated with postulated GCFR accidents. To implement a quantitative risk-based approach in identifying the important technology requirements for each LOP, frequency and consequence-limiting goals are allocated to each. To ensure that all necessary tasks are covered to achieve these goals, the program plan is broken into a work breakdown structure (WBS). Finally, the means by which the plan is being implemented are discussed.

  9. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which establishes management objectives and requirements for reporting environment, safety and health information. (Paragraphs 2a, 2a(1), 2a(2), 2b, 2b(1), 2b(2), and 2i(3)(a) through 2i(3)(d) of Chapter II, and Appendix A canceled by DOE N 231.1; Chapter IV canceled by DOE O 470.2A.)

  10. Using Addenda in Documented Safety Analysis Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas S. Swanson; Michael A. Thieme

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the use of addenda to the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Addenda were prepared for several systems and processes at the facility that lacked adequate descriptive information and hazard analysis in the DSA. They were also prepared for several new activities involving unreviewed safety questions (USQs). Ten addenda to the RWMC DSA have been prepared since the last annual update.

  11. Using Addenda in Documented Safety Analysis Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, D.S.; Thieme, M.A.

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the use of addenda to the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Addenda were prepared for several systems and processes at the facility that lacked adequate descriptive information and hazard analysis in the DSA. They were also prepared for several new activities involving unreviewed safety questions (USQs). Ten addenda to the RWMC DSA have been prepared since the last annual update.

  12. Nuclear Safety Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

  13. Criteria for safety-related operator actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.H.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety-Related Operator Actions (SROA) Program was designed to provide information and data for use by NRC in assessing the performance of nuclear power plant (NPP) control room operators in responding to abnormal/emergency events. The primary effort involved collection and assessment of data from simulator training exercises and from historical records of abnormal/emergency events that have occurred in operating plants (field data). These data can be used to develop criteria for acceptability of the use of manual operator action for safety-related functions. Development of criteria for safety-related operator actions are considered.

  14. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  15. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  16. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  17. Office of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations with all Department operations.

  18. Pipeline Safety Rule (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pipeline Safety Rule simply states, "The Minimum Federal Safety Standards for the transportation of natural and other gas by pipeline (Title 49, Chapter 1, Part 192) as published in the Federal...

  19. Dam Safety Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

  20. Dam Safety (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety,...

  1. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  2. Department of Environmental Health & Safety Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Management Fire & Life Safety Industrial Hygiene Laboratory Safety Occupational & General Safety Management Environmental Management Fire & Life Safety Industrial Hygiene Laboratory Safety Occupational Values A Note from the Director Environmental Management Fire & Life Safety Lab Safety & Industrial

  3. Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health & Safety Sub Department Name 480 Oak Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 T 650.723.0448 F 650.725.3468 DEPUTY DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Exempt, Full-Time (100% FTE) Posted May 1, 2014 The Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at Stanford University seeks

  4. Earth Sciences Safety Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Report of Earth Sciences Departmental Safety Committee 2011 - 12 5 Chemical Safety 21 - 22 Chemical Waste Assessment Hire Vehicle Checklist Department Driving Protocol: Bullard vehicles 38 - 48 Electrical Safety 24 and outside adjacent to areas which present a particular fire hazard. Persons wishing to smoke are asked to do

  5. Earth Sciences Safety Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Report of Earth Sciences Departmental Safety Committee 2012 - 13 5 Chemical Safety 21 - 22 Chemical Waste Assessment Hire Vehicle Checklist Department Driving Protocol: Bullard vehicles 38 - 48 Electrical Safety 24 and outside adjacent to areas which present a particular fire hazard. Persons wishing to smoke are asked to do

  6. US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania TOLERABLE RISK FOR DAMS: HOW SAFE IS SAFE ENOUGH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    2 through a comprehensive and integrated consideration of the overall safety of a reservoir and value judgements. ICOLD (2005) ABSTRACT Risk assessment provides an opportunity to manage dam safety and Environmental Engineering and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management, Utah State University, Logan

  7. September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 7 -Safety Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 7 - Safety Training UW Environmental Health and Safety Page 7-1 Section 7 - Safety Training Contents A. SAFETY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS ......................................................7-1 B. EH&S SAFETY TRAINING AND RECORDS ..............................................7-1 C

  8. Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

  9. Safety Manual Prepared by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    -3113 Emergency maintenance to report a water leak, electrical outage, non-working fume hood, etc. after normal Radiation and Laser Safety 19 Laser Safety 21 Compressed Gas and Cryogenic Safety 22 Electrical Safety 24

  10. Joint Health & Safety Committee Minutes January 13, 2011 1 JOINT HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    -Chair Dan Ryan, Dean of CSAM John Young, Dean of CASHS Erol Toyata, Risk & Safety Coordinator A. AGENDA 1 is not representing the numbers correctly. Peter will follow up with Corey Mooney. 2. No other comments. 3. Report Incidents Report - Graph is not representative of the stats Peter Hickey Peter to follow up with Corey

  11. A neural network mode inference engine for the advisory system for training and safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Thinh Xuan

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the safety record of the private general aviation sector, the Advisory System for Training and Safety (ASTRAS) was conceived. The ASTRAS software provides timely information to the pilot, assisting him in properly configuring the aircraft...

  12. Mixed Waste Management Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Chapters 1 to 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on waste management practices, occupational safety, and a site characterization of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A facility description, safety engineering analysis, mixed waste processing techniques, and auxiliary support systems are included.

  13. Tank safety screening data quality objective. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, J.W.

    1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) will be used to classify 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks containing high-level radioactive waste into safety categories for safety issues dealing with the presence of ferrocyanide, organics, flammable gases, and criticality. Decision rules used to classify a tank as ``safe`` or ``not safe`` are presented. Primary and secondary decision variables used for safety status classification are discussed. The number and type of samples required are presented. A tabular identification of each analyte to be measured to support the safety classification, the analytical method to be used, the type of sample, the decision threshold for each analyte that would, if violated, place the tank on the safety issue watch list, and the assumed (desired) analytical uncertainty are provided. This is a living document that should be evaluated for updates on a semiannual basis. Evaluation areas consist of: identification of tanks that have been added or deleted from the specific safety issue watch lists, changes in primary and secondary decision variables, changes in decision rules used for the safety status classification, and changes in analytical requirements. This document directly supports all safety issue specific DQOs and additional characterization DQO efforts associated with pretreatment and retrieval. Additionally, information obtained during implementation can assist in resolving assumptions for revised safety strategies, and in addition, obtaining information which will support the determination of error tolerances, confidence levels, and optimization schemes for later revised safety strategy documentation.

  14. Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Supervisor's Vehicle Incident Report-Employee Volunteer Drivers License No. State of Issue UO Certification Date UO Driver Training Date Vehicle Information: License No. Make Model Year UO Vehicle # Motorpool Outside Rental Personal Vehicle Incident

  15. Special committee review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's severe accident risks report (NUREG--1150)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouts, H.J.C. (Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (USA)); Apostolakis, G.; Kastenberg, W.E. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Birkhofer, E.H.A. (Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany, F.R.)); Hoegberg, L.G. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)); LeSage, L.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Rasmussen, N.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Camb

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) published a draft report Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-1150. This report updated, extended and improved upon the information presented in the 1974 Reactor Safety Study,'' WASH-1400. Because the information in NUREG-1150 will play a significant role in implementing the NRC's Severe Accident Policy, its quality and credibility are of critical importance. Accordingly, the Commission requested that the RES conduct a peer review of NUREG-1150 to ensure that the methods, safety insights and conclusions presented are appropriate and adequately reflect the current state of knowledge with respect to reactor safety. To this end, RES formed a special committee in June of 1989 under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Committee, composed of a group of recognized national and international experts in nuclear reactor safety, was charged with preparing a report reflecting their review of NUREG-1150 with respect to the adequacy of the methods, data, analysis and conclusions it set forth. The report which precedes reflects the results of this peer review.

  16. Electronic DOE Information Security System (eDISS) PIA, Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Information Security System (eDISS) PIA, Office of Health Safety and Security Electronic DOE Information Security System (eDISS) PIA, Office of Health Safety and Security...

  17. Guidance for Incorporating Organizational Factors Into Nuclear Power Plant Risk Assessments - Phase 1 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Julius; A. Mosleh; M. Golay; V. Guthrie; J. Wreathall; A. Spurgin; B. Hannaman; D. Ziebell

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI sponsored this study in order to help determine the influence of organizational factors on plant safety, risk, and economics. PRA tools provide excellent models for answering the question, ''How does change in an organizational factor impact the risk value?''

  18. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkner, K.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP) is to provide specific guidance to all LBL employees and contractors who use hazardous chemicals. This Plan, when implemented, fulfills the requirements of both the Federal OSHA Laboratory Standard (29 CFR 1910.1450) for laboratory workers, and the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) for non-laboratory operations (e.g., shops). It sets forth safety procedures and describes how LBL employees are informed about the potential chemical hazards in their work areas so they can avoid harmful exposures and safeguard their health. Generally, communication of this Plan will occur through training and the Plan will serve as a the framework and reference guide for that training.

  19. Using population risk assessment as a basis for administrative decisions related to storage of irradiated nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Eremenko, V.A. [International Knowledge Bridge LLC (Russian Federation); Linde, J. [Association on Computer Technology and Informational Systems - ACTIS (Russian Federation); Shilova, E. [Moscow Institute of International Economic Relations, 76, Vernadsky av. 119454 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Optimization of safety related decisions by local authorities could be improved using information on potential risks to a regional population. A joint Russia-US effort in 2001-2002 modeled potential population health risks for a proposed nuclear waste storage facility in northern Russia. Conducting such an assessment in addition to the standard PRA is proposed as an innovation in Russia aimed at better meeting the needs of local decision makers. This case-study analysis was conducted for the proposed facility to provide insights into potential population health risks. In the case study results, the background population risks from radiation accident exposures were very low compared to risks from chemical background exposures - an unexpected outcome for those that perceive any nuclear facility as very hazardous to the local population. The paper notes that rather than requiring a proposed low-risk facility for hazardous materials be made even safer, these results give the local authority the option of proposing a trade-off of having a major unrelated regional risks mitigated. The results show the value of conducting a population risk assessment in addition to a facility-oriented PRA as a means of better defining the potential impacts. (authors)

  20. Are subsurface safety valves needed in deepwater?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verret, A.; Hey, C.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this study was to evaluate SCSSV reliability and identify a preferred configuration for subsea completions in deepwater. A system design consisting of subsea, conventional, dual-bore tree, cluster wells was selected for evaluation. The study examined inherent risks associated with six tubing retrievable SCSSV configurations. Risks were evaluated for personnel and environmental safety, and operational and financial impact of: No SCSSV; Single SCSSV; Dual operating system single SCSSV; Tandem hot/hot (both valves active) SCSSVs without lockout features; Tandem hot/hot SCSSVs with lockout features; Tandem hot/cold (one valve active, the other dormant in open position) SCSSVs with lockout features. A ``fault tree`` identifying events that could lead to deleterious incidents was used to evaluate risks. Costs and consequences associated with potential events were determined using existing industry data, and resulting calculated risks were evaluated. Recommendations were developed and compared to current regulations, and potential regulatory conflicts were identified.

  1. Fusion safety program Annual report, Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Carmack, W.J. [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY-95. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A final activity described is work to develop DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Fusion Test Facilities.

  2. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Sawyer, J.C. Jr.; Bari, R.A.; Brown, N.W.; Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; Mcculloch, W.H.; Niederauer, G.F.; Remp, K. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States) NASA, Washington (United States) Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States) NASA, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Tn (United States) L

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of safety functional requirements. In addition, the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed. 9 refs.

  3. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; McCulloch, W.H. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Sawyer, J.C. Jr. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States)); Bari, R.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Brown, N.W. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States)); Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C. (National Aeronautics and Space Administ

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top- level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed.

  4. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; McCulloch, W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sawyer, J.C. Jr. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Bari, R.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Brown, N.W. [General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States); Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center; Niederauer, G.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remp, K. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Rice, J.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sholtis, J.A. [Department of the Air Force, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top- level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed.

  5. Development, Application, and Implementation of RAMCAP to Characterize Nuclear Power Plant Risk From Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaertner, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Teagarden, Grant A. [ERIN Engineering and Research (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to increased interest in risk-informed decision making regarding terrorism, EPRI and ERIN Engineering were selected by U.S. DHS and ASME to develop and demonstrate the RAMCAP method for nuclear power plant (NPP) risk assessment. The objective is to characterize plant-specific NPP risk for risk management opportunities and to provide consistent information for DHS decision making. This paper is an update of this project presented at the American Nuclear Society (ANS) International Topical Meeting on Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA05) in September, 2005. The method uses a characterization of risk as a function of Consequence, Vulnerability, and Threat. For each site, worst case scenarios are developed for each of sixteen benchmark threats. Nuclear RAMCAP hypothesizes that the intent of the perpetrator is to cause offsite radiological consequences. Specific targets are the reactor core, the spent fuel pool, and nuclear spent fuel in a dry storage facility (ISFSI). Results for each scenario are presented as conditional risk for financial loss, early fatalities and early injuries. Expected consequences for each scenario are quantified, while vulnerability is estimated on a relative likelihood scale. Insights for other societal risks are provided. Although threat frequencies are not provided, target attractiveness and threat deterrence are estimated. To assure efficiency, completeness, and consistency; results are documented using standard RAMCAP Evaluator software. Trial applications were successfully performed at four plant sites. Implementation at all other U.S. commercial sites is underway, supported by the Nuclear Sector Coordinating Council (NSCC). Insights from RAMCAP results at 23 U.S. plants completed to date have been compiled and presented to the NSCC. Results are site-specific. Physical security barriers, an armed security force, preparedness for design-basis threats, rugged design against natural hazards, multiple barriers between fuel and environment, accident mitigation capability, severe accident management procedures, and offsite emergency plans are risk-beneficial against all threat types. (authors)

  6. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    irrigation and decr,ease the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems. Onsite wastewater treatment systems However, homeowners who irrigate their lawns with graywater need to understand the risks and safety issues.... Residential wastewater can be classified as either blackwater (sew- age containing fecal matter or food wastes) or graywater. If graywater is collected separately from blackwater, it can be dispersed as irrigation water with less treatment than...

  7. ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 Ithaca, NY Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/firesafetyreport Environmental Health and Safety Building East Hill Office Building 201 Palm Road 395 Pine Tree Rd, Suite 210 with important information about fire safety on campus. You may obtain a copy of this report and the NYS Kerry

  8. ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2013 Ithaca, NY Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    ://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/firesafetyreport Environmental Health and Safety Building East Hill Office Building 201 Palm Road 395 Pine Tree Rd, Suite 210 with important information about fire safety on campus. You may obtain a copy of this report and the NYS Kerry

  9. Ris-R-1019(EN) Nuclear Safety Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 Severe accidents 7 2.3 Decommissioning of research reactors 9 2.4 Nuclear information 10 3 RadiationRisø-R-1019(EN) Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department Annual Report 1997 Edited by B of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1997. The department´s research

  10. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendell

    for the protection of personnel. #12;RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION DESCRIPTION PAGE` #12;#12;UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL SEPTEMBER, 1996 This information is being provided in accordance with the following State requirements: CALIFORNIA RADIATION

  11. Implementation Guide for Use in Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides information to assist in the implementation and interpretation of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 830.203, Unreviewed Safety Question Process, of the Nuclear Safety Management Rules for applicable nuclear facilities owned or operated by the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Canceled by DOE N 251.93.

  12. Implementation Guide for Use in Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides information to assist in implementation of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 830.203, "Unreviewed Safety Question Process," of the Nuclear Safety Management Rules for Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities owned or operated by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE G 424.1-1.

  13. Information Safety in University Chemistry Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    at the workplace 13 2.3.3 Food, drink and smoking 13 2.3.4 Cleaning and prophylactic skin care 13 3 Handling 52 8.1.1 Rules for handling radioactive substances 52 8.1.2 Protection from external irradiation 53 8.1.3 Protection from internal irradiation 53 8.1.4 Protection from contamination 54 8.2 Working with X-rays 55 8

  14. User Site Safety Orientation Emergency Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ­ contact LCLS Floor Coordinator if needed Fire or other emergency evacuation Follow building residents out/room number (LCLS Building 950 Near Experimental Hall). Call Security at x5555 to notify of the 911 call. #12 LOS Bldg. 137 Main Control LCLS NEH Bldg 950 PEP Ring Road Alpine Gate Open Monday-Friday 6 am-6 pm

  15. Fire and Life Safety Information - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs and EventsFiberFire

  16. Facility Safety (For Informational Purposes Only)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This draft has been scheduled for final review before the Directives Review Board on 12/18/14. All major comments and concerns should be provided to your DRB representative, following your organization process. If you do not know who your representative is, please see the list of DRB members. If your office is represented by Ingrid Kolb, Director, Office of Management, please submit your major concerns and comments to the DRB Liaison, Camille Beben (Camille.Beben@hq.doe.gov; 202-586-1014). All major comments and concerns should be submitted by COB 12/16/2014.

  17. Ladder Safety Information Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControl Concept | Department

  18. Safety and Operational Guidelines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBY Solutions JumpFacility | OpenSacketsSadaOperational

  19. Nuclear Safety Information | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /76Safeguards and Security

  20. Public Order and Safety | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This

  1. Aviation Management and Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish a policy framework that will ensure safety, efficiency and effectiveness of government or contractor aviation operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2B.

  2. Dam Safety Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

  3. Battery Safety Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Battery Safety Testing Christopher J. Orendorff, Leigh Anna M. Steele, Josh Lamb, and Scott Spangler Sandia National Laboratories 2014 Energy Storage Annual Merit Review...

  4. BNL | ATF Laser Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be continuously escorted by someone who has such training: The training consists of an eye exam, BNL general laser safety lecture, and formal ATF laser familiarization. Untrained...

  5. Coiled Tubing Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, W.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses safety concerns regarding the use of coiled tubing as it pertains to the preservation of personnel, environment and the wellbore.

  6. Safety Hazards of Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the...

  7. Pipeline Safety (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission has the authority enact regulations pertaining to pipeline safety. These regulations address pipeline monitoring, inspections, enforcement, and penalties.

  8. Intrastate Pipeline Safety (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide standards for gas and liquid pipeline maintenance and operating procedures, per the Federal Hazardous Liquid and Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Acts, and give the...

  9. Pipeline Safety (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The South Dakota Pipeline Safety Program, administered by the Public Utilities Commission, is responsible for regulating hazardous gas intrastate pipelines. Relevant legislation and regulations...

  10. Gas Safety Law (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law authorizes the establishment of rules and regulations covering the design, fabrication, installation, inspection, testing and safety standards for installation, operation and maintenance...

  11. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual describes DOE's explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives.

  12. Hanford Site Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) FY 1999 and FY 2000 Execution Commitment Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the S&H resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 1999 and 2000 information (Sieracki 1999) and data contained in the ''Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk Management Summary'' (RL 1999) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2000 finding of Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) activities is based on the President's budget of $1,065.1 million and $28.0 million, plus $2.7 million carryover finding, respectively, as of October 31, 1999. Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2002 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2000. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 1999 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H ''Guidance for FY200l Budget Formulations and Execution'' (DOE 1999).

  13. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  14. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  15. Let The People Know the Facts: Can Government Information Removed From the Internet Be Reclaimed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acting Director of the Information Security Oversight OfficeActing Director, Information Security Oversight Office,Chemical Safety Information, Site Security and Fuels

  16. Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Technical Exchange Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY13, the INL developed an advanced SMR PRA framework which has been described in the report Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Technical Framework Specification, INL/EXT-13-28974 (April 2013). In this framework, the various areas are considered: Probabilistic models to provide information specific to advanced SMRs Representation of specific SMR design issues such as having co-located modules and passive safety features Use of modern open-source and readily available analysis methods Internal and external events resulting in impacts to safety All-hazards considerations Methods to support the identification of design vulnerabilities Mechanistic and probabilistic data needs to support modeling and tools In order to describe this framework more fully and obtain feedback on the proposed approaches, the INL hosted a technical exchange meeting during August 2013. This report describes the outcomes of that meeting.

  17. EM Health and Safety Plan Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information about the Health and Safety Plan Guidelines. Topics discussed include: Regulatory framework; key personnel; hazard assessment; training requirements; personal protective equipment; extreme temperature disorders or conditions; medical surveillance; exposure monitoring/air sampling; site control; decontamination; emergency response/contingency plan; emergency action plan; confined space entry; and spill containment.

  18. SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Kyu Yong

    . Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. For additional information on toxicity, please refer - Exposure Controls / PPE ENGINEERING CONTROLS Safety shower and eye bath. Mechanical exhaust required. ALDRICH - M80806 www.sigma-aldrich.com Page 2 #12;PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Respiratory: Government

  19. Tritium radioluminescent devices, Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traub, R.J.; Jensen, G.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document consolidates available information on the properties of tritium, including its environmental chemistry, its health physics, and safe practices in using tritium-activated RL lighting. It also summarizes relevant government regulations on RL lighting. Chapters are divided into a single-column part, which provides an overview of the topic for readers simply requiring guidance on the safety of tritium RL lighting, and a dual-column part for readers requiring more technical and detailed information.

  20. Risk Management for Distributed Authorization Christian Skalka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoyang "Sean"

    Risk Management for Distributed Authorization Christian Skalka University of Vermont X. Sean Wang assess risk, but risk in trust management is usually an informal consideration. In this paper, we de trust management systems treat all assertions as equally valid up to certificate authentication

  1. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  2. affecting probabilistic safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10.4204EPTCS.28.8 2010-01-01 2 Safety Analysis of an Airbag System using Probabilistic FMEA and Probabilistic Counter Examples Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  3. An Updated Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Ivans, William J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment, as AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results on augmenting an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors that integrate real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors. Methods to propagate uncertainty through the enhanced risk monitor are evaluated. Available data to quantify the level of uncertainty and the POF of key components are examined for their relevance, and a status update of this data evaluation is described. Finally, we describe potential targets for developing new risk metrics that may be useful for studying trade-offs for economic operation while maintaining adequate safety margins.

  4. SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR PRECLOSURE SAFETY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.N. Lindner

    2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this seismic preclosure safety analysis is to identify the potential seismically-initiated event sequences associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain and assign appropriate design bases to provide assurance of achieving the performance objectives specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR Part 63 for radiological consequences. This seismic preclosure safety analysis is performed in support of the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. In more detail, this analysis identifies the systems, structures, and components (SSCs) that are subject to seismic design bases. This analysis assigns one of two design basis ground motion (DBGM) levels, DBGM-1 or DBGM-2, to SSCs important to safety (ITS) that are credited in the prevention or mitigation of seismically-initiated event sequences. An application of seismic margins approach is also demonstrated for SSCs assigned to DBGM-2 by showing a high confidence of a low probability of failure at a higher ground acceleration value, termed a beyond-design basis ground motion (BDBGM) level. The objective of this analysis is to meet the performance requirements of 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b) for offsite and worker doses. The results of this calculation are used as inputs to the following: (1) A classification analysis of SSCs ITS by identifying potential seismically-initiated failures (loss of safety function) that could lead to undesired consequences; (2) An assignment of either DBGM-1 or DBGM-2 to each SSC ITS credited in the prevention or mitigation of a seismically-initiated event sequence; and (3) A nuclear safety design basis report that will state the seismic design requirements that are credited in this analysis. The present analysis reflects the design information available as of October 2004 and is considered preliminary. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that seismic hazards are properly evaluated and identified. This document supersedes the seismic classifications, assignments, and computations in ''Seismic Analysis for Preclosure Safety'' (BSC 2004a).

  5. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  6. Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs establishes nuclear safety requirements related to safety management programs that are essential to the safety of DOE nuclear facilities.

  7. Facility Safety - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change, Safety, The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety,...

  8. A RE-LOOK AT THE US NRC SAFETY GOALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mubayi v.

    2013-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Since they were adopted in 1986, the US NRC’s Safety Goals have played a valuable role as a de facto risk acceptance criterion against which the predicted performance of a commercial nuclear power reactor can be evaluated and assessed. The current safety goals are cast in terms of risk metrics called quantitative health objectives (QHOs), limiting numerical values of the risks of the early and latent health effects of accidental releases of radioactivity to the offsite population. However, while demonstrating compliance with current safety goals has been an important step in assessing the acceptance of the risk posed by LWRs, new or somewhat different goals may be needed that go beyond the current early fatality and latent cancer fatality QHOs in assessing reactor risk. Natural phenomena such as hurricanes seem to be suitable candidates for establishing a background rate to derive a risk goal as their order of magnitude cost of damages is similar to those estimated in severe accident Level 3 PRAs done for nuclear power plants. This paper obtains a risk goal that could have a wider applicability, compared to the current QHOs, as a technology-neutral goal applicable to future reactors and multi-unit sites.

  9. Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance Shmuel Oren University of the critical infrastructures in our society. Risk assessment and systematic consideration of risk in the design knowledge for engineers, like physics for instance, consideration of risk has penetrated all engineering

  10. Integrated Safety Management Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy establishes DOE's expectation for safety, including integrated safety management that will enable the Department’s mission goals to be accomplished efficiently while ensuring safe operations at all departmental facilities and activities. Cancels DOE P 411.1, DOE P 441.1, DOE P 450.2A, DOE P 450.4, and DOE P 450.7

  11. SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 #12;2 Boise State University 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report From the Vice President for Campus Operations and General Counsel At Boise State University, we are committed to providing a safe and secure environment for students, staff

  12. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2A. Certified 5-13-08. Canceled by DOE O 420.2C.

  13. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The order defines accelerators and establishes accelerator specific safety requirements and approval authorities which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, promote safe operations to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels DOE O 420.2B.

  14. Safety of Accelerator Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish accelerator-specific safety requirements which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, will serve to prevent injuries and illnesses associated with Department of Energy (DOE) or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) accelerator operations. Cancels DOE O 420.2. Canceled by DOE O 420.2B.

  15. Selected Component Failure Rate Values from Fusion Safety Assessment Tasks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers.

  16. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRAHN, D.E.

    2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt of multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) containing spent nuclear fuel. removal of free water from the MCOs using the cold vacuum drying process, and inerting and testing of the MCOs before transport to the Canister Storage Building. Controls required for public safety, significant defense in depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological and toxicological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines are included.

  17. Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

  18. Subsystem fragility: Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R. P.; Campbell, R. D.; Hardy, G.; Banon, H.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic fragility levels of safety related equipment are developed for use in a seismic oriented Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) being conducted as part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The Zion Nuclear Power Plant is being utilized as a reference plant and fragility descriptions are developed for specific and generic safety related equipment groups in Zion. Both equipment fragilities and equipment responses are defined in probabilistic terms to be used as input to the SSMRP event tree/fault tree models of the Zion systems. 65 refs., 14 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, D.J.; Hislop, R.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The only facility at Argonne National Laboratory which is classified as high hazard is EBR-II. A Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), including external events, has been completed for EBR-II. There were several objectives for this project; to provide a quantitative estimate of the risk associated with the operation of EBR-II, to provide a framework for managerial decision-making for the management of risk at the facility, and to provide insights into the nature of the risk of EBR-II that can be applied in the design of future LMRS. Other ANL facilities do not have complete probabilistic assessments. Despite this fact, Risk Management is an essential part of ANL`s approach to safety and operations. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory is not limited to accelerator or nuclear facilities. It is also an integral part of construction activities. The Advanced Photon Source, a major construction project at the Laboratory, utilizes a variety of risk assessment techniques to identify potential construction loss exposures and to develop measures to eliminate them. Over the past 15 years, in excess of 15,000 pages of regulatory requirements pertaining to environment safety and health have been printed in the Federal Register. Not all of these are applicable to Argonne National Laboratory all of the time, but as a highly-visible, nationally-funded facility, compliance with those that are applicable must be above reproach. Therefore, risk management is also a very important part of construction activities at ANL. This paper will give examples of these activities, such as, the EBR-II PRA, risk-based analyses of Fuel Cycle Facility Safety Systems, reliability studies of the Access Control Interlock System for the Advanced Photon Source and management approaches for controlling risk during the construction activities at APS.

  20. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.