Sample records for risk factors integrated

  1. Risk factors for equine laminitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polzer, John Patrick

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    logistic regression to assess age, breed, sex, and seasonality as risk factors for equine laminitis. There were 70 acute cases, 183 chronic cases, and 779 controls. No statistical association was found between age, breed, sex, or seasonality...

  2. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  3. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  4. HANDBOOK OF INTEGRATED RISK MANAGEMENT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Goker

    HANDBOOK OF INTEGRATED RISK MANAGEMENT IN GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS Onur Boyabatli Lee Kong Chian School SUPPLY RISK MANAGEMENT G¨oker Aydin1 , Volodymyr Babich2 , Damian Beil3 , and Zhibin Yang4 1 Kelley of Integrated Risk Management in Global Supply Chains. By Boyabatli, Dong, Kouvelis and Li Copyright c 2010 John

  5. Need for an Integrated Risk Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is passed to decision makers * Model is needed that (eventually) will integrate seismic risk with other initiators * Scenario approach definition * R

  6. Integrating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Assay With Clinical Parameters Improves Risk Classification for Relapse and Survival in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Christine H., E-mail: cchung11@jhmi.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Zhang Qiang [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hammond, Elizabeth M. [LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Wang Huijun [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Spencer, Sharon [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Zhang Huazhong [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cooper, Jay [New York University Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Maimonides Cancer Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Jordan, Richard [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rotman, Marvin H. [SUNY Health Science Center Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been consistently found to be an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR) after radiotherapy. We assessed the extent by which it can refine risk classification for overall survival (OS) and LRR in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: EGFR expression in locally advanced HNSCC was measured by immunohistochemistry in a series of patients randomized to receive accelerated or conventional radiation regimens in a Phase III trial. Subsequently, data of the two series were pooled (N = 533) for conducting a recursive partitioning analysis that incorporated clinical parameters (e.g., performance status, primary site, T and N categories) and four molecular markers (EGFR, p53, Ki-67, and microvessel density). Results: This study confirmed that patients with higher than median levels of tumor EGFR expression had a lower OS (relative risk [RR]: 1.90, p = 0.0010) and a higher LRR (RR: 1.91, p = 0.0163). Of the four markers analyzed, only EGFR was found to contribute to refining classification of patients into three risk classes with distinct OS and LRR outcomes. The addition of EGFR to three clinical parameters could identify patients having up to a fivefold difference in the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Adding pretreatment EGFR expression data to known robust clinical prognostic variables improved the estimation of the probability for OS and LRR after radiotherapy. Its use for stratifying or selecting patients with defined tumor feature and pattern of relapse for enrollment into clinical trials testing specific therapeutic strategy warrants further investigation.

  7. Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology (December 2013) Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment...

  8. Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Aidong

    data and use these integrated features to effectively predict osteoporosis and bone fractures. We; disease memory; osteoporosis; bone fracture. ! 1 INTRODUCTION Risk factor (RF) analysis based on patients on the study of osteoporosis and bone fracture prediction. Over the past few decades, osteoporosis has been

  9. Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    through private property to waters of the State of Tennessee, and its uptake by fish, plants, and other animal life. DOE, regulators, and the public need to have reasonable...

  10. Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TN Why DOE-EM Did This Review Approximately two million pounds of mercury are unaccounted for at Y-12 and mercury contamination has been detected in both soils and...

  11. TWRS safety and technical integration risk management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fordham, R.A.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety and Technical Integration (STI) programmatic risk management program are to assess, analyze, and handle risks associated with TWRS STI responsibilities and to communicate information about the actions being taken and the results to enable decision making. The objective of this TWRS STI Risk Management Plan is to communicate a consistent approach to risk management that will be used by the organization.

  12. Exogenous and endogenous risk factors management to predict surrender behaviours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ;surrender value; which is nothing else than the sum of earned premiums, potentially reduced by contractualExogenous and endogenous risk factors management to predict surrender behaviours Xavier Milhaud is dedicated to surrender risk management), strengthens the necessity to deeply study and understand this risk

  13. Development of Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    GeoMechanics Technologies has completed a geomechanical caprock integrity analysis and risk assessment study funded through the US Department of Energy. The project included: a detailed review of historical caprock integrity problems experienced in the natural gas storage industry; a theoretical description and documentation of caprock integrity issues; advanced coupled transport flow modelling and geomechanical simulation of three large-scale potential geologic sequestration sites to estimate geomechanical effects from CO2 injection; development of a quantitative risk and decision analysis tool to assess caprock integrity risks; and, ultimately the development of recommendations and guidelines for caprock characterization and CO2 injection operating practices. Historical data from gas storage operations and CO2 sequestration projects suggest that leakage and containment incident risks are on the order of 10-1 to 10-2, which is higher risk than some previous studies have suggested for CO2. Geomechanical analysis, as described herein, can be applied to quantify risks and to provide operating guidelines to reduce risks. The risk assessment tool developed for this project has been applied to five areas: The Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California, Kevin Dome in Montana, the Louden Field in Illinois, the Sleipner CO2 sequestration operation in the North Sea, and the In Salah CO2 sequestration operation in North Africa. Of these five, the Wilmington Graben area represents the highest relative risk while the Kevin Dome area represents the lowest relative risk.

  14. Diabetes Risk Factors, Diabetes Risk Algorithms, and the Prediction of Future Frailty: the Whitehall II Prospective Cohort Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Diabetes Risk Factors, Diabetes Risk Algorithms, and the Prediction of Future Frailty.ac.uk Running head Diabetes risk scores and frailty Key Words Ageing, frailty, diabetes risk scores, diabetes;2 Abstract Objective: To examine whether established diabetes risk factors and diabetes risk algorithms

  15. aspects risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 51 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  16. additional risk factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 47 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  17. agroecological risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 47 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  18. atherosclerosis risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 58 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  19. adolescent risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 77 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  20. adulthood risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 52 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  1. atherosclerotic risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 48 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  2. acquired risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Universit de 45 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  3. analyzing risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 74 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  4. additional risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 47 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  5. aureus risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 58 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  6. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of time outdoors and light levels as risk factors for myopiaH. C. (1995). Constant light produces severe cornealNg, H. , & Phillips, J. (2011) Light exposure patterns in

  7. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  8. Original article Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in dogs and cats were investigated in an unmatched case-control study MRSA cases and 92 controls with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infection. The association

  9. Guidance for Incorporating Organizational Factors Into Nuclear Power Plant Risk Assessments - Phase 1 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Julius; A. Mosleh; M. Golay; V. Guthrie; J. Wreathall; A. Spurgin; B. Hannaman; D. Ziebell

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI sponsored this study in order to help determine the influence of organizational factors on plant safety, risk, and economics. PRA tools provide excellent models for answering the question, ''How does change in an organizational factor impact the risk value?''

  10. Causal Network Methods for Integrated Project Portfolio Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govan, Paul

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Corporate portfolio risk analysis is of primary concern for many organizations, as the success of strategic objectives greatly depends on an accurate risk assessment. Current risk analysis methods typically involve statistical models of risk...

  11. Risk and aversion in the integrated assessment of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crost, Benjamin; Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy under fat-tailed risk: An application of fund’, ESRIR. & Yaron, A. (2004), ‘Risks for the long run: A potentialY. (1996), ‘Understanding risk and return’, The Journal of

  12. AN INTEGRATED VISION TO ASSIST THE EVOLUTION IN INDUSTRIAL RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS IN FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AN INTEGRATED VISION TO ASSIST THE EVOLUTION IN INDUSTRIAL RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS IN FRANCE Management in the field of environmental protection and risk prevention has evolved to the increasing with the complexity of risk management issues, in particular for those related to land-use planning. As technical

  13. Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on

  14. Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheney suggesting a billVehiclesJune59Products28,Into Service ToTech

  15. Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6,Projects |MANAGEMENTMOJAVEApril 17, 2009Projects

  16. Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6,Projects |MANAGEMENTMOJAVEApril 17,

  17. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems for Occupant Symptoms in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-61870 Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-for Occupant Symptoms in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-

  18. Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

  19. Prevalences of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hindu Indian subcommunities in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaiya, K L; Swai, A B; McLarty, D G; Bhopal, Raj; Alberti, K G

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBJECTIVES--To seek differences in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and other coronary heart disease risk factors, and to identify factors associated with these differences within a Hindu Indian community. DESIGN--Population ...

  20. RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer from select US states , Michelle Chino3 , Karl Kingsley1* Abstract Objectives: To examine the primary risk factor for oral cancer in oral cancer incidence and mortality. Methods: Population-based data on oral cancer morbidity

  1. Environmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    their health history, past environmental exposures, and lifestyle. The participants will be given yearly follow Gene The impact of family history on breast cancer risk suggests that genetic factors play an importantEnvironmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk For millions of women whose lives have been affected

  2. A new approach to risk analysis with a focus on organizational risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marais, Karen, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing accidents in complex socio-technical systems requires an approach to risk management that continuously monitors risk and identifies potential areas of concern before they lead to hazards, and constrains hazards ...

  3. SBAS and GBAS Integrity for Non-Aviation Users: Moving Away from "Specific Risk"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    as well as ships near shore. This much larger user base can benefit as much from the integrity componentsSBAS and GBAS Integrity for Non-Aviation Users: Moving Away from "Specific Risk" Sam Pullen, Todd available to other users, such as automobiles, buses, and trains on land as well as ships near shore

  4. An Integrated Suite of Tools to support Human Factors Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques V Hugo

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) work for the nuclear industry imposes special demands on the practitioner in terms of the scope, complexity and safety requirements for humans in nuclear installations. Unfortunately HFE lags behind other engineering disciplines in the development and use of modern, powerful tools for the full range of analysis and design processes. HFE does not appear to be an attractive market for software and hardware developers and as a result, HFE practitioners usually have to rely on inefficient general-purpose tools like standard office software, or they have to use expensive special-purpose tools that offer only part of the solution they require and which also do not easily integrate with other tools. There have been attempts to develop generic software tools to support the HFE analyst and also to achieve some order and consistency in format and presentation. However, in spite of many years of development, very few tools have emerged that have achieved these goals. This would suggest the need for special tools, but existing commercial products have been found inadequate and to date not a single tool has been developed that adequately supports the special requirements of HFE work for the nuclear industry. This paper describes an integrated suite of generic as well as purpose-built tools that facilitate information solicitation, issues tracking, work domain analysis, functional requirements analysis, function allocation, operational sequence analysis, task analysis and development of HSI design requirements. In combination, this suite of tools supports the analytical as well as the representational aspects of key HFE activities primarily for new NPPs, including capturing information from subject matter experts and various source documents directly into the appropriate tool and then linking, analyzing and extending that information further to represent detailed functional and task information, and ultimately HSI design requirements. The paper also describes a tool developed especially for functional requirements analysis, function allocation, and task analysis.

  5. Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

  6. asphyxia-related risk factors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 44 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, and lifestyle modifications for gout CiteSeer Summary: Gout affects more than 1 % of adults in the USA, and it is the most...

  7. Age, gender, and breed as risk factors for acute and chronic equine laminitis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Patricia Lee

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prospective case-control study of risk factors for laminitis analyzed data of the 258 incident cases seen at six collaborating veterinary teaching hospitals over a 32-month period. Case-control pairs were matched on institution, clinician...

  8. Differing risk factor profiles of ischemic stroke subtypes: evidence for a distinct lacunar arteriopathy? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Caroline Anne; Hutchinson, A; Dennis, MS; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Lindgren, A; Norrving, B; Anderson, CS; Hankey, GJ; Jamrozik, K; Appelros, P; Sudlow, Cathie

    Background and Purpose Differences in risk factor profiles between lacunar and other ischemic stroke subtypes may provide evidence for a distinct lacunar arteriopathy, but existing studies have limitations. We overcame ...

  9. Low levels of cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease in a UK Chinese population. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harland, J O; Unwin, Nigel; Bhopal, Raj; White, M; Watson, B; Laker, M; Alberti, K G

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease in Chinese and Europid adults. DESIGN: Population based, cross sectional survey. SETTING: Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, 1991-93. ...

  10. Longitudinal Genome-Wide Association of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Bogalusa Heart Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltonen, Leena

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have pinpointed many loci associated with CVD risk factors in adults. It is unclear, however, if these loci ...

  11. Pharmacological Chaperone Design for Reducing Risk Factor of Parkinson’s Disease from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hung-Jin

    Dysfunction of ?-glucocerebrosidase (GCase) has no hydrolytic activity in patients of Gaucher's disease and increasing the risk factor for Parkinson’s disease occurrence. Pharmacological chaperone design has been used to ...

  12. 4. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SPATIAL FACTORS IN EVALUATION OF RISK 4.1 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    87 4. DEMOGRAPHIC AND SPATIAL FACTORS IN EVALUATION OF RISK 4.1 Overview Species extinction framework for considering the extinction risks to the 82 candidate coral species. The approach entails.1.1). This is one of the reasons it can be difficult to predict a species vulnerability to extinction based on its

  13. Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartmentEnergy Integrated EnergyIntegrated

  14. Improved assessment of population doses and risk factors for a nuclear power plant under accident conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christopher Martin

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering IMPROVED ASSESSMENT OF POPULATION DOSES AND RISK FACTORS FOR A NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UNDER ACCIDENT CONDITIONS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER MARTIN MEYER Approved... as to style and content by: G. A. Schlapper (Chair of Committee R. B. Ko zen (Member) R. R. Hart (Member) . Erdman (Head of Department) August 1985 ABSTRACT Improved Assessment of Population Doses and Risk Factors for a Nuclear Power Plant Under...

  15. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M., E-mail: mortensen.holly@epa.gov [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, 109 TW Alexander Dr., Mailcode B205-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, US EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Mail Code 8623P, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  16. Diagnostic relapse in Borderline Personality Disorder: risk and protective factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, Brian David

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    throughout their lifetimes and they may repeatedly return for psychological treatment. Whereas previous studies have attempted to identify various factors related to relapse in other chronically recurring disorders such as depression, schizophrenia...

  17. Integrative Protein Function Transfer using Factor Graphs and Heterogeneous Data Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Bud

    Integrative Protein Function Transfer using Factor Graphs and Heterogeneous Data Sources Antonina, translation initiation, enzymatic catalysis, and immune re- sponse. However, for a large portion of proteins

  18. Web-Interactive Integration of Regional Weather Networks for Risk Management of Late Blight in Potato Canopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1 Web-Interactive Integration of Regional Weather Networks for Risk Management of Late Blight Category: Pest Management Web-Interactive Integration of Regional Weather Networks for Risk Management of potato late blight. The system integrates regional automated weather network data, fungicide rates

  19. Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lucy L.

    Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the relation of health behaviors and psy- chosocial factors to the incidence of type 2 diabetes are not well established. Methods: Prospective occupational cohort study

  20. An approach for integrating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment: The dibutyl phthalate case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euling, Susan Y., E-mail: euling.susan@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Thompson, Chad M. [ToxStrategies, Inc., 23501 Cinco Ranch Blvd., Suite G265, Katy, TX 77494 (United States); Chiu, Weihsueh A. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Benson, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, Mail code 8P-W, 1595 Wynkoop Street, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for evaluating and integrating genomic data in chemical risk assessment was developed based on the lessons learned from performing a case study for the chemical dibutyl phthalate. A case study prototype approach was first developed in accordance with EPA guidance and recommendations of the scientific community. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was selected for the case study exercise. The scoping phase of the dibutyl phthalate case study was conducted by considering the available DBP genomic data, taken together with the entire data set, for whether they could inform various risk assessment aspects, such as toxicodynamics, toxicokinetics, and dose–response. A description of weighing the available dibutyl phthalate data set for utility in risk assessment provides an example for considering genomic data for future chemical assessments. As a result of conducting the scoping process, two questions—Do the DBP toxicogenomic data inform 1) the mechanisms or modes of action?, and 2) the interspecies differences in toxicodynamics?—were selected to focus the case study exercise. Principles of the general approach include considering the genomics data in conjunction with all other data to determine their ability to inform the various qualitative and/or quantitative aspects of risk assessment, and evaluating the relationship between the available genomic and toxicity outcome data with respect to study comparability and phenotypic anchoring. Based on experience from the DBP case study, recommendations and a general approach for integrating genomic data in chemical assessment were developed to advance the broader effort to utilize 21st century data in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Performed DBP case study for integrating genomic data in risk assessment • Present approach for considering genomic data in chemical risk assessment • Present recommendations for use of genomic data in chemical risk assessment.

  1. Risk and Work Configuration Management as a Function of Integrated Safety Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lana Buehrer, Michele Kelly, Fran Lemieux, Fred Williams

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), has established a work management program and corresponding electronic Facilities and Operations Management Information System (e-FOM) to implement Integrated Safety Management (ISM). The management of work scopes, the identification of hazards, and the establishment of implementing controls are reviewed and approved through electronic signatures. Through the execution of the program and the implementation of the electronic system, NSTec staff work within controls and utilize feedback and improvement process. The Integrated Work Control Manual further implements the five functions of ISM at the Activity level. By adding the Risk and Work Configuration Management program, NSTec establishes risk acceptance (business and physical) for liabilities within the performance direction and work management processes. Requirements, roles, and responsibilities are specifically identified in the program while e-FOM provides the interface and establishes the flowdown from the Safety Chain to work and facilities management processes to company work-related directives, and finally to Subject Matter Expert concurrence. The Program establishes, within the defined management structure, management levels for risk identification, risk mitigation (controls), and risk acceptance (business and physical) within the Safety Chain of Responsibility. The Program also implements Integrated Safeguards and Security Management within the NSTec Safety Chain of Responsibility. Once all information has been entered into e-FOM, approved, and captured as data, the information becomes searchable and sortable by hazard, location, organization, mitigating controls, etc.

  2. Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

  3. An Updated Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Ivans, William J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment, as AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results on augmenting an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors that integrate real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors. Methods to propagate uncertainty through the enhanced risk monitor are evaluated. Available data to quantify the level of uncertainty and the POF of key components are examined for their relevance, and a status update of this data evaluation is described. Finally, we describe potential targets for developing new risk metrics that may be useful for studying trade-offs for economic operation while maintaining adequate safety margins.

  4. Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

  5. A cross-sectional study of the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in rural Nepali women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and risk factors for hypertension in rural Nepali women. BMCHe J: Global burden of hypertension: analysis of worldwideNeupane RP: Prevalence of hypertension in a rural community

  6. Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern Evan Torline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern of its residents are living without access to clean drinking water. This simple issue causes terrible community of Mol, Haiti before the implementation of a chlorine water filtration system in it. A handful

  7. TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk mutations are observed in about 40e70% of lung cancer tissues, and the hot spot codon mu- tations factors that influence TP53 gene mutation in lung cancer patients residing areas with high lung cancer

  8. Heart. Author manuscript Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year mortality in women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Heart. Author manuscript Page /1 13 Cardiorespiratory risk factors as predictors of 40-year.7) mortality, while associations between 2-hour­ ­ glucose and all-cause 1.15 (1.1 1.2), coronary heart disease ; Cause of Death ; Cohort Studies ; Female ; Heart Diseases ; mortality ; physiopathology ; Humans ; Male

  9. Effect of consuming ground beef of differing monounsaturated fatty acid content on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk factors in healthy men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Xiaojuan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is currently the most common cause of death in the United States. Some dietary factors contribute importantly to ASCVD and other factors can reduce risk of ASCVD. Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty...

  10. Breast Cancer After Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Risk Factors That Really Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hughes, Kevin S. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Betts, Keith A. [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Aisenberg, Alan C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: ataghian@partners.org

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of breast cancer (BC) and the contributing risk factors in women after supradiaphragmatic irradiation (SDI) for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Subjects and Methods: Medical records of 248 women 60 years of age or less who received SDI for stage I/II HL between 1964 and 2001 at Massachusetts General Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Results: The median age at SDI was 26 years (range, 5.7-59.3). The median follow-up was 15.2 years (range, 0.1-41.3). In 36 patients, BC developed (bilaterally in 11 patients) at a median interval of 18.4 years (range, 4.3-33.8) after SDI. Based on data from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the standardized morbidity ratio (SMR) for the first BC after SDI was 9.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.64-18.11, p < 0.0001). The SMR of patients who received radiation before age of 30 years was 19.05 (95% CI, 12.33-28.13) compared with 4.64 (95% CI, 2.31-8.30) for patients aged 30 years or more at the time of treatment (p < 0.00003). Risk for BC was significantly higher 15 years or more after SDI compared with the risk during the first 15 years (p = 0.0026). None of HL characteristics or treatment details was associated with higher risk of BC after adjusting for age and calendar time. Conclusions: Age at irradiation and time since therapy appear to be the only significant risk factors for development of BC after treatment of HL. The risk is significantly higher 15 years or more after radiation and for women treated before age 30 years. Long-term surveillance strategies are indicated for women at risk.

  11. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wei, T.Y.; Wright, A.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites.

  12. A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botchev, Mike

    A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution Modeling M on the one hand and its efficiency on the other hand. For example, in air pollution modeling, AMF has been factorization, large sparse linear systems, stiff ODEs, method of lines, Rosenbrock methods, air pollution

  13. A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botchev, Mike

    A New Approximate Matrix Factorization for Implicit Time Integration in Air Pollution Modeling + M on the one hand and its e#ciency on the other hand. For example, in air pollution modeling, AMF has been factorization, large sparse linear systems, sti# ODEs, method of lines, Rosenbrock methods, air pollution

  14. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  15. Comparison of Construction Manager at Risk and Integrated Project Delivery Performance on Healthcare Projects: A Comparative Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbo, David; Bigelow, Ben F.; Escamilla, Edelmiro; Lockwood, Christa

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides information and a basic overview on Construction Manager at Risk (CMR) and Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) as project delivery methods while contrasting their performance in the design and construction of two healthcare...

  16. A comparison between integrated risk assessment and classical health/environmental assessment: Emerging beneficial properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekizawa, Jun [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, University of Tokushima, Japan, 1-1 Minamijosanjimacho, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekizawa@ias.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyocho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both humans and wildlife are exposed to various types of halogenated organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), typically old chemicals, and tris(4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPM) and brominated flame retardants, some new chemicals, simultaneously. Classical risk assessment has evaluated health and ecological risks independently by experts from different disciplines. Taking into considerations the recent concerns about endocrine disrupting chemicals and the progress of research in related areas, we integrated and assessed data on exposure and potential effects in humans and wildlife. Comparisons were made for organ concentrations, body burdens of several organochlorine compounds (OCs), metabolic capacities between humans and various wildlife. When we integrate the knowledge on effects and exposure in humans and in wildlife, new insights were suggested about similarities and/or differences in potential effects among various human populations living on different foods and having different body burdens. Combining existing information with emerging knowledge of mechanisms of actions on endocrine disrupting chemicals after exposure to above chemicals during early developmental stages will further elucidate potential risks from exposure to those chemicals.

  17. Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women in the women’s interagency HIV study (WIHS) and men in the multicenter AIDS cohort study (MACS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women inan increased incidence of lung can- cer among people withis due to HIV or to other lung cancer risk factors such as

  18. Fusion integral experiments and analysis and the determination of design safety factors - I: Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Oyama, Y.; Maekawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of the neutronics experimentation and analysis in fusion neutronics research and development programs is discussed. A new methodology was developed to arrive at estimates to design safety factors based on the experimental and analytical results from design-oriented integral experiments. In this methodology, and for a particular nuclear response, R, a normalized density function (NDF) is constructed from the prediction uncertainties, and their associated standard deviations, as found in the various integral experiments where that response, R, is measured. Important statistical parameters are derived from the NDF, such as the global mean prediction uncertainty, and the possible spread around it. The method of deriving safety factors from many possible NDFs based on various calculational and measuring methods (among other variants) is also described. Associated with each safety factor is a confidence level, designers may choose to have, that the calculated response, R, will not exceed (or will not fall below) the actual measured value. An illustrative example is given on how to construct the NDFs. The methodology is applied in two areas, namely the line-integrated tritium production rate and bulk shielding integral experiments. Conditions under which these factors could be derived and the validity of the method are discussed. 72 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Integrated High-Quality Factor Optical Resonators in Diamond B. J. M. Hausmann,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loncar, Marko

    -performance devices places stringent requirements on the diamond film quality. For example, polycrystalline diamond associated with polycrystalline and ion-sliced single crystal diamond films. For example, low-loss opticalIntegrated High-Quality Factor Optical Resonators in Diamond B. J. M. Hausmann,, I. B. Bulu,, P. B

  20. Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollo, Susan Noble

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , Virginia Fajt H. Morgan Scott J.C. Huber Melissa Libal Head of Department, Evelyn Tiffany-Castiglioni August 2011 Major Subject: Biomedical Sciences iii ABSTRACT Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility...

  1. Heterogeneity of coronary heart disease risk factors in Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and European origin populations: cross sectional study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhopal, Raj; Unwin, Nigel; White, M; Yallop, J; Walker, L; Alberti, K G; Harland, J; Patel, S; Ahmad, N; Turner, C; Watson, B; Kaur, D; Kulkarni, A; Laker, M; Tavridou, A

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: To compare coronary risk factors and disease prevalence among Indians, Pakistanis, and Bangladeshis, and in all South Asians (these three groups together) with Europeans. Design: Cross sectional survey. ...

  2. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) Application in the Evaluation of Management Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soguilon, Nenita M.

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.1. Mechanisms of Prevention ............................................................................................... 11 2.4. Human Factors Process Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) ....................... 11 2.5. FMEA Components... ........................................................................................... 15 2.5.5. Risk Priority Number ....................................................................................................... 17 2.6. FMEA Model...

  3. Non-Mandatory Appendix C to 1910.900: Physical Work Activities and Conditions and the Ergonomic Risk Factors that may be Present.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choobineh, Fred

    Non-Mandatory Appendix C to §1910.900: Physical Work Activities and Conditions and the Ergonomic Risk Factors that may be Present. PHYSICAL WORK ACTIVITIES AND CONDITIONS ERGONOMIC RISK FACTORS ACTIVITIES AND CONDITIONS ERGONOMIC RISK FACTORS THAT MAY BE PRESENT (10) Workstation edges or objects press

  4. High-Oleic Ground Beef, Exercise, and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Men and Postmenopausal Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Linda Anne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    HIGH-OLEIC GROUND BEEF, EXERCISE, AND RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN MEN AND POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN A Dissertation by LINDA ANNE GILMORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2010 Major Subject: Nutrition HIGH-OLEIC GROUND BEEF, EXERCISE, AND RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN MEN AND POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN A Dissertation...

  5. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P. [Kings College London, London (United Kingdom). Dept. for Public Health Science

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  6. Integrated fault seal analysis and risk assessemt: Okan and Meren Fields, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, R.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology, Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Brenneman, R.J. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Co., San Ramon, CA (United States); Adepoju, A.A. [Chevron Nigeria Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of production, geochemical, seismic, well log, and structural data provides important constraints on the sealing capacity and dynamic behavior of fault juxtaposed reservoirs in Okan and Meren fields, offshore Nigeria. Correlations were found between pressure decline histories, juxtaposed fluid types, oil composition, fluid contact relationships, fault sealing/leaking condition, and estimates of the composition of the fault gouge. Fault plane sections defined reservoir juxtapositions and potential cross-fault spill points. Smear gouge ratios calculated from E-logs were used to estimate the composition of fault-gouge materials between juxtaposed reservoirs. These tools augmented interpretation of seal/nonseal character in proved reservoirs and were used to quantify fault seal risk of untested, fault-dependent closures. In the Okan Field juxtapositions of the G-, H, L-, M, and O-sands were analyzed. Smear gouge ratios correlated to fluid contact relationships and pressure decline histories within these juxtaposed reservoirs empirically calibrate sealing potential. The results of these analyses were then used to interpret production-induced fault seal breakdown within the G-sands and to risk seal integrity of fault-dependent closures within the untested 0-sands in an adjacent, upthrown fault block. Within this fault block the presence of potential fault intersection leak points and large areas of sand/sand juxtaposition with high smear gouge ratios (low sealing potential) limits column heights and potential reserves within the O-sand package. In the Meren Field the E- and G-sands are juxtaposed, on different pressure decline, geochemically distinct, and are characterized by low smear gouge ratios. In contrast, the G- and H-sands, juxtaposed across the same fault, contain similar OOWCs and are characterized by high smear gouge ratios.

  7. Integrated fault seal analysis and risk assessemt: Okan and Meren Fields, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, R.A. (Chevron Petroleum Technology, Co., La Habra, CA (United States)); Brenneman, R.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Co., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Adepoju, A.A. (Chevron Nigeria Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of production, geochemical, seismic, well log, and structural data provides important constraints on the sealing capacity and dynamic behavior of fault juxtaposed reservoirs in Okan and Meren fields, offshore Nigeria. Correlations were found between pressure decline histories, juxtaposed fluid types, oil composition, fluid contact relationships, fault sealing/leaking condition, and estimates of the composition of the fault gouge. Fault plane sections defined reservoir juxtapositions and potential cross-fault spill points. Smear gouge ratios calculated from E-logs were used to estimate the composition of fault-gouge materials between juxtaposed reservoirs. These tools augmented interpretation of seal/nonseal character in proved reservoirs and were used to quantify fault seal risk of untested, fault-dependent closures. In the Okan Field juxtapositions of the G-, H, L-, M, and O-sands were analyzed. Smear gouge ratios correlated to fluid contact relationships and pressure decline histories within these juxtaposed reservoirs empirically calibrate sealing potential. The results of these analyses were then used to interpret production-induced fault seal breakdown within the G-sands and to risk seal integrity of fault-dependent closures within the untested 0-sands in an adjacent, upthrown fault block. Within this fault block the presence of potential fault intersection leak points and large areas of sand/sand juxtaposition with high smear gouge ratios (low sealing potential) limits column heights and potential reserves within the O-sand package. In the Meren Field the E- and G-sands are juxtaposed, on different pressure decline, geochemically distinct, and are characterized by low smear gouge ratios. In contrast, the G- and H-sands, juxtaposed across the same fault, contain similar OOWCs and are characterized by high smear gouge ratios.

  8. Gestational and Early Life Exposures as Risk Factors for Childhood Lymphoma, Leukemia, and Wilms' Tumors: an Exploration of Birth Characteristics, Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections, and Pesticide Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcotte, Erin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    risk factors for acute leukemia in the Jerusalem PerinatalRisk factors for acute leukemia in children: a review.of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Int J Cancer,

  9. Derivation of Accident-Specific Material-at-Risk Equivalency Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason P. Andrus; Dr. Chad L. Pope

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for calculating material at risk (MAR) dose equivalency developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) now allows for increased utilization of dose equivalency for facility MAR control. This method involves near-real time accounting for the use of accident and material specific release and transport. It utilizes all information from the committed effective dose equation and the five factor source term equation to derive dose equivalency factors which can be used to establish an overall facility or process MAR limit. The equivalency factors allow different nuclide spectrums to be compared for their respective dose consequences by relating them to a specific quantity of an identified reference nuclide. The ability to compare spectrums to a reference limit ensures that MAR limits are in fact bounding instead of attempting to establish a representative or bounding spectrum which may lead to unintended or unanalyzed configurations. This methodology is then coupled with a near real time material tracking system which allows for accurate and timely material composition information and corresponding MAR equivalency values. The development of this approach was driven by the complex nature of processing operations in some INL facilities. This type of approach is ideally suited for facilities and processes where the composition of the MAR and possible release mechanisms change frequently but in well defined fashions and in a batch-type nature.

  10. Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koschorke, Albrecht; Musanovic, Emina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration By Albrecht Koschorkeby Emina Musanovic [Integration (from Lat. integrare, “toa social unity. Social integration is distinct from systemic

  11. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Huang, Shiew-Mei, E-mail: shiewmei.huang@fda.hhs.go [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  12. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Methodology for the containment, source term, consequence, and risk integration analyses; Volume 1, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, E.D.; Breeding, R.J.; Brown, T.D.; Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Murfin, W.B. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Hawaii Univ., Hilo, HI (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUREG-1150 examines the risk to the public from five nuclear power plants. The NUREG-1150 plant studies are Level III probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) and, as such, they consist of four analysis components: accident frequency analysis, accident progression analysis, source term analysis, and consequence analysis. This volume summarizes the methods utilized in performing the last three components and the assembly of these analyses into an overall risk assessment. The NUREG-1150 analysis approach is based on the following ideas: (1) general and relatively fast-running models for the individual analysis components, (2) well-defined interfaces between the individual analysis components, (3) use of Monte Carlo techniques together with an efficient sampling procedure to propagate uncertainties, (4) use of expert panels to develop distributions for important phenomenological issues, and (5) automation of the overall analysis. Many features of the new analysis procedures were adopted to facilitate a comprehensive treatment of uncertainty in the complete risk analysis. Uncertainties in the accident frequency, accident progression and source term analyses were included in the overall uncertainty assessment. The uncertainties in the consequence analysis were not included in this assessment. A large effort was devoted to the development of procedures for obtaining expert opinion and the execution of these procedures to quantify parameters and phenomena for which there is large uncertainty and divergent opinions in the reactor safety community.

  13. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundstedt, Dan, E-mail: dan.lundstedt@vgregion.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Magnus [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Malmstroem, Per [Skane Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Alsadius, David [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sundberg, Agnetha [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Holmberg, Erik [Oncologic Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long-lasting breast pain compared to older women. Time since treatment may decrease the occurrence of pain.

  14. A comparison of the integration of Risk management Principles in Product Development Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The management and reduction of risk is a central part of product development processes. This paper analyses the extent to which four common product development approaches address risks (waterfall model, stage gate model, ...

  15. Integrated Risk Management at the Local Level: The Gap between Theory and Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Seung-Ho; Carchidi, Arielle; Johnson, Eric; Lester, Sean; Liversidge, Jeremy; Mathis, Lindsey; Vannerson, Andrew

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ? Strategic National Risk Assessment (2011) ? Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 201: Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide (2013) CPG 201 is particularly important to this study because, it provides information about conduction... and the environment.1 This approach serves as the basis of the Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA), as described in Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 201: Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide. THIRAs are required...

  16. Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Tara O., E-mail: thenderson@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Olive, Aliza [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Mertens, Ann [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Meadows, Anna [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hammond, Sue [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)] [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Whitton, John [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Inskip, Peter D. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Robison, Leslie L. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Diller, Lisa [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

  17. Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the Passing of AdmiraltheOil and Less

  18. Four dimensional quantum gravity: The covariant path integral and quantization of the conformal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mottola, E.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After first reviewing the issue of vacuum energy (the cosmological constant problem) in the Einstein theory, the covariant path integral for gravity in four dimensions is constructed. The problem of vacuum energy requires determining the correct ground state of the quantum theory of gravity, and as such is an infrared problem, arising prior to and independently of the physics of the Planck scale. It is addressed in these lectures by studying the infrared fixed point of the low energy effective action of the conformal factor generated by the quantum trace anomaly in four dimensions. The infrared fixed point of this effective theory describes a conformally invariant phase of gravity with a vanishing effective cosmological term.

  19. Four dimensional quantum gravity: The covariant path integral and quantization of the conformal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mottola, E.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After first reviewing the issue of vacuum energy (the cosmological constant problem) in the Einstein theory, the covariant path integral for gravity in four dimensions is constructed. The problem of vacuum energy requires determining the correct ground state of the quantum theory of gravity, and as such is an infrared problem, arising prior to and independently of the physics of the Planck scale. It is addressed in these lectures by studying the infrared fixed point of the low energy effective action of the conformal factor generated by the quantum trace anomaly in four dimensions. The infrared fixed point of this effective theory describes a conformally invariant phase of gravity with a vanishing effective cosmological term.

  20. High-Oleic Ground Beef, Exercise, and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Men and Postmenopausal Women 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Linda Anne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , Guoyao Wu Joanne R. Lupton John E. Bauer Chair of Nutrition Faculty, Stephen B. Smith December 2010 Major Subject: Nutrition iii ABSTRACT High-Oleic Ground Beef, Exercise, and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Men.... Bauer, Dr. Crouse, and Dr. Martin for their guidance and support throughout the course of this research. Thank you also to my colleagues and the department faculty and staff for making my time at Texas A&M University a great experience. I also want...

  1. "Catalyzing Action Towards Sustainability of Deltaic Systems with an Integrated Modeling Framework for Risk Assessment"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    -ecological systems undergoing change (Delta-SRES) 2. Develop and deliver a science-based delta sustainability framework for risk assessment and decision support (Delta-RADS) 3. Build an international repository of data

  2. Risk factors for cognitive decline in older people with type 2 diabetes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinkohl, Insa

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of age-related cognitive impairment. Previous literature has focused on case-control studies comparing rates of cognitive impairment in patients with and without diabetes. ...

  3. First Year Teachers' Technology Use: Perceptions of Factors Affecting Technology Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Elodie

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For decades, technology integration into the classroom and curriculum has been at the forefront of education. Although public perception and technology funding assumes that teachers are integrating technology into the curriculum, research shows...

  4. Epidemiological Investigation of Risk Factors for Microbial Contamination in Produce at the Preharvest Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sangshin

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the use of spray irrigation with contaminated water, with a particular risk of contamination on the lower leaf surface. A total of 955 spinach samples were collected from 12 spinach farms in Colorado and Texas for the second and third study. The second...

  5. Building-related symptoms among U.S. office workers and risks factors for moisture and contamination: Preliminary analyses of U.S. EPA BASE Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Cozen, Myrna

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors assessed relationships between health symptoms in office workers and risk factors related to moisture and contamination, using data collected from a representative sample of U.S. office buildings in the U.S. EPA BASE study. Methods: Analyses assessed associations between three types of weekly, workrelated symptoms-lower respiratory, mucous membrane, and neurologic-and risk factors for moisture or contamination in these office buildings. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the strength of associations for these risk factors as odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for personal-level potential confounding variables related to demographics, health, job, and workspace. A number of risk factors were associated (e.g., 95% confidence limits excluded 1.0) significantly with small to moderate increases in one or more symptom outcomes. Significantly elevated ORs for mucous membrane symptoms were associated with the following risk factors: presence of humidification system in good condition versus none (OR = 1.4); air handler inspection annually versus daily (OR = 1.6); current water damage in the building (OR = 1.2); and less than daily vacuuming in study space (OR = 1.2). Significantly elevated ORs for lower respiratory symptoms were associated with: air handler inspection annually versus daily (OR = 2.0); air handler inspection less than daily but at least semi-annually (OR=1.6); less than daily cleaning of offices (1.7); and less than daily vacuuming of the study space (OR = 1.4). Only two statistically significant risk factors for neurologic symptoms were identified: presence of any humidification system versus none (OR = 1.3); and less than daily vacuuming of the study space (OR = 1.3). Dirty cooling coils, dirty or poorly draining drain pans, and standing water near outdoor air intakes, evaluated by inspection, were not identified as risk factors in these analyses, despite predictions based on previous findings elsewhere, except that very dirty cooling coils were associated with a nonsignificant increase in lower respiratory symptoms. These preliminary findings suggest that some factors that indicate risks for moisture or contamination in office buildings may have adverse effects on respiratory or neurologic health of office workers. More refined analyses are underway that will include these risk factors in simultaneous multivariate models along with additional risk factors that may be confounders, such as ventilation rate and indoor temperature. Future analyses will also use more refined metrics for both health outcomes and environmental risks, as well as assess risk in susceptible sub-groups.

  6. ROGERS, MEGHAN LYNN. Identifying and Evaluating Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Disorders in Equine Veterinary Work. (Under the direction of Dr. David B. Kaber).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    risk scores. Phase 2 involved collecting quantitative hand forces and wrist postures and using the data, palpations, lameness exams, and injections. Based on the quantitative data analysis, the tasks of ultrasoundABSTRACT ROGERS, MEGHAN LYNN. Identifying and Evaluating Risk Factors for Musculoskeletal Disorders

  7. Impact of the Number of Cautionary and/or Unsuitable Risk Factors on Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wobb, Jessica; Wilkinson, J. Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Mitchell, Christina; Wallace, Michelle; Ye, Hong; Stromberg, Jannifer; Grills, Inga [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Chen, Peter Y., E-mail: PChen@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine clinical outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) stratified by the number of American Society for Radiation Oncology consensus statement cautionary/unsuitable risk factors (RFs) present. Methods and Materials: A total of 692 patients were treated with APBI at a single institution between April 1993 and January 2012 using interstitial (n=195), balloon (n=292), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (n=205) techniques. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by risk group and number of RFs. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 0-18.3 years). Most patients were classified as suitable (n=240, 34%) or cautionary (n=343, 50%) risk, whereas 16% (n=109) were unsuitable. In patients with increasing total RFs (1 RF, 2 RF, 3+ RF), higher rates of grade 3 histology (10% vs 18% vs 32%, P<.001), estrogen receptor negativity (0 vs 12% vs 29%, P<.001), close/positive margins (0 vs 6% vs 17%, P<.001), and use of adjuvant chemotherapy (3% vs 12% vs 33%, P<.001) were noted. When pooling cautionary and unsuitable patients, increased ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence/regional recurrence was most notable for patients with 3 or more combined RFs versus 2 or fewer combined RFs (P<.001). Conclusions: Patients with 3 or more cautionary or unsuitable RFs may be at risk for higher local, regional, and distant recurrence after breast-conserving therapy using APBI. Patients with 2 or fewer total RFs have 98% locoregional control at 5 years. Inclusion of total number of RFs in future risk stratification schemes for APBI may be warranted.

  8. Air traffic complexity and the interacting particle system method: An integrated approach for collision risk estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Moral , Pierre

    Air traffic complexity and the interacting particle system method: An integrated approach explore the possibility of using air traffic complexity metrics to accelerate the Interacting Particle to assess the performance and impact of, e.g., possible modifications of the current air traffic management

  9. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  10. Risk assessment of complex mixtures: development of toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Erica Dawn

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RISK ASSESSMENT O F C O M P L E X M I X T U R E S : D E V E L O P M E N T O F T O X I C E Q U I V A L E N C Y F A C T O R S (TEFs) F O R P O L Y C Y C L I C A R O M A T I C H Y D R O C A R B O N S (PAHs) A Thesis by E R I C A D A W N R E E S E... Submitted to the Office o f Graduate Studies o f Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree o f M A S T E R O F S C I E N C E December 2001 Major Subject: C i v i l Engineering RISK A S S E S S M E N T O F C O M P...

  11. Risk assessment of complex mixtures: development of toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Erica Dawn

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RISK ASSESSMENT O F C O M P L E X M I X T U R E S : D E V E L O P M E N T O F T O X I C E Q U I V A L E N C Y F A C T O R S (TEFs) F O R P O L Y C Y C L I C A R O M A T I C H Y D R O C A R B O N S (PAHs) A Thesis by E R I C A D A W N R E E S E... Submitted to the Office o f Graduate Studies o f Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree o f M A S T E R O F S C I E N C E December 2001 Major Subject: C i v i l Engineering RISK A S S E S S M E N T O F C O M P...

  12. Integration of D-dimensional 2-factor spaces cosmological models by reducing to the generalized Emden-Fowler equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. R. Gavrilov; V. N. Melnikov

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The D-dimensional cosmological model on the manifold $M = R \\times M_{1} \\times M_{2}$ describing the evolution of 2 Einsteinian factor spaces, $M_1$ and $M_2$, in the presence of multicomponent perfect fluid source is considered. The barotropic equation of state for mass-energy densities and the pressures of the components is assumed in each space. When the number of the non Ricci-flat factor spaces and the number of the perfect fluid components are both equal to 2, the Einstein equations for the model are reduced to the generalized Emden-Fowler (second-order ordinary differential) equation, which has been recently investigated by Zaitsev and Polyanin within discrete-group analysis. Using the integrable classes of this equation one generates the integrable cosmological models. The corresponding metrics are presented. The method is demonstrated for the special model with Ricci-flat spaces $M_1,M_2$ and the 2-component perfect fluid source.

  13. Process of Integrating Screening and Detailed Risk-based Modeling Analyses to Ensure Consistent and Scientifically Defensible Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, John W.; McDonald, John P.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support cleanup and closure of these tanks, modeling is performed to understand and predict potential impacts to human health and the environment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a screening tool for the United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection that estimates the long-term human health risk, from a strategic planning perspective, posed by potential tank releases to the environment. This tool is being conditioned to more detailed model analyses to ensure consistency between studies and to provide scientific defensibility. Once the conditioning is complete, the system will be used to screen alternative cleanup and closure strategies. The integration of screening and detailed models provides consistent analyses, efficiencies in resources, and positive feedback between the various modeling groups. This approach of conditioning a screening methodology to more detailed analyses provides decision-makers with timely and defensible information and increases confidence in the results on the part of clients, regulators, and stakeholders.

  14. Initial Risk Analysis and Decision Making Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercialization of new carbon capture simulation initiative (CCSI) technology will include two key elements of risk management, namely, technical risk (will process and plant performance be effective, safe, and reliable) and enterprise risk (can project losses and costs be controlled within the constraints of market demand to maintain profitability and investor confidence). Both of these elements of risk are incorporated into the risk analysis subtask of Task 7. Thus far, this subtask has developed a prototype demonstration tool that quantifies risk based on the expected profitability of expenditures when retrofitting carbon capture technology on a stylized 650 MW pulverized coal electric power generator. The prototype is based on the selection of specific technical and financial factors believed to be important determinants of the expected profitability of carbon capture, subject to uncertainty. The uncertainty surrounding the technical performance and financial variables selected thus far is propagated in a model that calculates the expected profitability of investments in carbon capture and measures risk in terms of variability in expected net returns from these investments. Given the preliminary nature of the results of this prototype, additional work is required to expand the scope of the model to include additional risk factors, additional information on extant and proposed risk factors, the results of a qualitative risk factor elicitation process, and feedback from utilities and other interested parties involved in the carbon capture project. Additional information on proposed distributions of these risk factors will be integrated into a commercial implementation framework for the purpose of a comparative technology investment analysis.

  15. A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

  16. Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. As the lead Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for this Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with developing and deploying methods and tools that support the quantification and management of safety margin and uncertainty.

  17. Evaluating the risk of non-point source pollution from biosolids: integrated modelling of nutrient losses at field and catchment scales Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 601613, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evaluating the risk of non-point source pollution from biosolids: integrated modelling of nutrient the risk of non-point source pollution from biosolids: integrated modelling of nutrient losses at field catchment scale to evaluate the behaviour of biosolid-derived losses of P in agricultural systems

  18. The integration of Human Factors (HF) in the SAR process training course text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This text provides the technical basis for a two-day course on human factors (HF), as applied to the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) process. The overall objective of this text and course is to: provide the participant with a working knowledge of human factors-related requirements, suggestions for doing a human safety analysis applying a graded approach, and an ability to demonstrate using the results of the human safety analysis, that human factors elements as defined by DOE (human factors engineering, procedures, training, oversight, staffing, qualifications), can support wherever necessary, nuclear safety commitments in the SAR. More specifically, the objectives of the text and course are: (1) To provide the SAR preparer with general guidelines for doing HE within the context of a graded approach for the SAR; (2) To sensitize DOE facility managers and staff, safety analysts and SAR preparers, independent reviewers, and DOE reviewers and regulators, to DOE Order 5480.23 requirements for HE in the SAR; (3) To provide managers, analysts, reviewers and regulators with a working knowledge of HE concepts and techniques within the context of a graded approach for the SAR, and (4) To provide SAR managers and DOE reviewers and regulators with general guidelines for monitoring and coordinating the work of preparers of HE inputs throughout the SAR process, and for making decisions regarding the safety relevance of HE inputs to the SAR. As a ready reference for implementing the human factors requirements of DOE Order 5480.22 and DOE Standard 3009-94, this course text and accompanying two-day course are intended for all persons who are involved in the SAR.

  19. Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

  20. TAYLOR, KINLEY BRITT. Identifying and Modeling Perceptions of Risk Factors in Hand Hygiene during Healthcare Operations. (Under the direction of Dr. David B. Kaber.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    ABSTRACT TAYLOR, KINLEY BRITT. Identifying and Modeling Perceptions of Risk Factors in Hand Hygiene, hand hygiene is considered to be one of the primary practices to prevent hospital acquired infections. However, hand hygiene compliance remains low in the vast majority of healthcare facilities, averaging

  1. CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

  2. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC): Integrated Treatment of Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty in Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Youngblood

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of “margin” has a long history in nuclear licensing and in the codification of good engineering practices. However, some traditional applications of “margin” have been carried out for surrogate scenarios (such as design basis scenarios), without regard to the actual frequencies of those scenarios, and have been carried out with in a systematically conservative fashion. This means that the effectiveness of the application of the margin concept is determined in part by the original choice of surrogates, and is limited in any case by the degree of conservatism imposed on the evaluation. In the RISMC project, which is part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), we are developing a risk-informed characterization of safety margin. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system response. For example, the probabilistic load spectrum will reflect the frequency of challenges of a particular severity. Such a characterization is required if decision-making is to be informed optimally. However, in order to enable the quantification of probabilistic load spectra, existing analysis capability needs to be extended. Accordingly, the INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability whose design will allow for much more efficient parameter uncertainty analysis, and will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin.

  3. Obesity: An Independent Risk Factor for Insufficient Hemostasis Using the AngioSeal Vascular Closure Device After Antegrade Puncture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minko, Peter, E-mail: peterminko@yahoo.com; Katoh, Marcus [University Hospital Saarland, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [University Hospital Saarland, Institute of Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics (Germany); Buecker, Arno [University Hospital Saarland, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of the AngioSeal vascular closure device after antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. Methods: In a prospective study, 120 consecutive patients underwent lower limb vascular intervention by an antegrade access to the common femoral artery (CFA). After intervention, a 6F (n = 88) or an 8F (n = 32) AngioSeal vascular closure device was used to achieve hemostasis. The technical success or the cause of failure was documented. In addition, the coagulation status (platelets, INR, prothrombin time, atrial thromboplastin time (PTT)), hypertonus, locoregional habitus of the groin, body mass index (BMI), presence of calcifications, and history of previous surgical interventions of the CFA were evaluated. Results: Hemostasis was achieved in 97 patients (81%). In 12 patients (10%), persistent bleeding of the puncture site required manual compression. In another nine patients (8%) a kink of the sheath obviated the passage of the collagen plug toward the vessel, and in two patients the anchor dislodged out of the vessel, requiring manual compression. There were no significant differences between the groups of successful and unsuccessful sealing regarding the mean platelets (241 vs. 254 * 10{sup 9}/l; P = 0.86), INR (1.06 vs. 1.02; P = 0.52), prothrombin time (90% vs. 90%; P = 0.86), and PTT (30 vs. 31 s; P = 0.82). However, unsuccessful sealing was more likely in obese patients with an increased BMI (26.6 vs. 28.8 kg/m{sup 2}; P = 0.04). Conclusions: Obesity seems to be an independent risk factor for insufficient sealing using the AngioSeal vascular closure device after antegrade puncture of the CFA. In 8% of our patients, hemostasis could not be achieved due to kink of the flexible sheath.

  4. Integrated investigation of dementia risk factors : insights from geography, record linkage, and individual participant meta-analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russ, Thomas Charles

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Dementia is a public health priority and its importance is projected to increase in coming decades, particularly in low-to middle-income countries. A description of the methodological challenges of observational studies ...

  5. Integration of landslide hazard maps into probabilistic risk assessment in context of global changes: an alpine test site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A. (1) , GRANDJEAN G. (1) , SEDAN O. (1) , PUISSANT A.(2) , MALET J.P.(3) (1) BRGM, Risks division of Safeland project, is supported by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme for Research

  6. Analysis of the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant: Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Volume 8, Seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, J.E.; Lappa, D.A.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Chuang, T.Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Johnson, J.J.; Campbell, R.D.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Ravindra, M.K.; Kincaid, R.H. [EQE, International, Irvine, CA (United States); Sues, R.H.; Putcha, C.S. [NTS Engineering, Long Beach, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used and the results obtained from the application of a simplified seismic risk methodology to the LaSalle County Nuclear Generating Station Unit 2. This study is part of the Level I analysis being performed by the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Using the RMIEP developed event and fault trees, the analysis resulted in a seismically induced core damage frequency point estimate of 6.OE-7/yr. This result, combined with the component importance analysis, indicated that system failures were dominated by random events. The dominant components included diesel generator failures (failure to swing, failure to start, failure to run after started), and condensate storage tank.

  7. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  8. An advanced algorithm for construction of Integral Transport Matrix Method operators using accumulation of single cell coupling factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, B. P.; Azmy, Y. Y. [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Burlington Engineering Labs, 2500 Stinston Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) has been shown to be an effective method for solving the neutron transport equation in large domains on massively parallel architectures. In the limit of very large number of processors, the speed of the algorithm, and its suitability for unstructured meshes, i.e. other than an ordered Cartesian grid, is limited by the construction of four matrix operators required for obtaining the solution in each sub-domain. The existing algorithm used for construction of these matrix operators, termed the differential mesh sweep, is computationally expensive and was developed for a structured grid. This work proposes the use of a new algorithm for construction of these operators based on the construction of a single, fundamental matrix representing the transport of a particle along every possible path throughout the sub-domain mesh. Each of the operators is constructed by multiplying an element of this fundamental matrix by two factors dependent only upon the operator being constructed and on properties of the emitting and incident cells. The ITMM matrix operator construction time for the new algorithm is demonstrated to be shorter than the existing algorithm in all tested cases with both isotropic and anisotropic scattering considered. While also being a more efficient algorithm on a structured Cartesian grid, the new algorithm is promising in its geometric robustness and potential for being applied to an unstructured mesh, with the ultimate goal of application to an unstructured tetrahedral mesh on a massively parallel architecture. (authors)

  9. Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the 580th meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), February10-12, 2011, we reviewed the staff’s white paper, “A Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysisand...

  10. A conserved helicase processivity factor is needed for conjugation and replication of an integrative and conjugative element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jacob

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) are agents of horizontal gene transfer and have major roles in evolution and acquisition of new traits, including antibiotic resistances. ICEs are found integrated in a host ...

  11. Integrated Risk Framework for Gigawatt-Scale Deployments of Renewable Energy: The U.S. Wind Energy Case; October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the potential environmental and human effects of deploying renewable energy on private and public lands, along our coasts, on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and in the Great Lakes requires a new way of evaluating potential environmental and human impacts. The author argues that deployment of renewables requires a framework risk paradigm that underpins effective future siting decisions and public policies.

  12. IMPROVING ACCESS TO CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE FOR THE UNINSURED POLISH POPULATION IN THE GREATER CHICAGO AREA-EXPERIENCE FROM THE POLISH AMERICAN ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK FACTOR MODIFICATION (POLAARIS) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 40% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Also, the lipid profiles indicated high triglycerides, low HDL and normal LDL levels. In fact, an institutional learning has been that being ?Polish? is a risk factor for coronary artery...

  13. University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 Annual Report #12;ERM 2010 Annual Report 2 December 2010 "Enterprise Risk Management" (ERM) - a process - to integrate risk into strategic UW Enterprise Risk Management Framework . . . . . . . . . 6 Illustration of ERM Components

  14. Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orio, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States) and Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: kent.Wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Herstein, Andrew [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Mitsuyama, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Thornton, Ken [Varian Medical Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.

  15. Do changes in traditional coronary heart disease risk factors over time explain the association between socio-economic status and coronary heart disease?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franks, Peter; Winters, Paul C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Fiscella, Kevin A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    case-control study. Heart 2009, Franks P, Tancredi DJ,status in coronary heart disease risk estimation. Ann Famstatus and coronary heart disease risk prediction. JAMA

  16. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systemsfor Occupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: the EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in office buildings that increase risk of indoor contaminants or reduce effectiveness of ventilation may cause adverse exposures and subsequent increase in these symptoms among occupants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. EPA from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations adjusted for potential personal and building confounders. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and selected HVAC system characteristics. Among factors of HVAC design or configuration: Outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground were associated with approximately doubled odds of most symptoms assessed. Sealed (non-operable) windows were associated with increases in skin and eye symptoms (ORs= 1.9, 1.3, respectively). Outdoor air intake without an intake fan was associated with an increase in eye symptoms (OR=1.7). Local cooling coils were associated with increased headache (OR=1.5). Among factors of HVAC condition, maintenance, or operation: the presence of humidification systems in good condition was associated with an increase in headache (OR=1.4), whereas the presence of humidification systems in poor condition was associated with increases in fatigue/difficulty concentrating, as well as upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=1.8, 1.5). No regularly scheduled inspections for HVAC components was associated with increased eye symptoms, cough and upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=2.2, 1.6, 1.5). Less frequent cleaning of cooling coils or drip pans was associated with increased headache (OR=1.6). Fair or poor condition of duct liner was associated with increased upper respiratory symptoms (OR=1.4). Most of the many potential risk factors assessed here had not been investigated previously, and associations found with single symptoms may have been by chance, including several associations that were the reverse of expected. Risk factors newly identified in these analyses that deserve attention include outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground, lack of operable windows, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lack of scheduled inspection for HVAC systems. Infrequent cleaning of cooling coils and drain pans were associated with increases in several symptoms in these as well as prior analyses of BASE data. Replication of these findings is needed, using more objective measurements of both exposure and health response. Confirmation of the specific HVAC factors responsible for increased symptoms in buildings, and development of prevention strategies could have major public health and economic benefits worldwide.

  17. Taking Risk Assessment and Management to the Next Level: Program-Level Risk Analysis to Enable Solid Decision-Making on Priorities and Funding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J. G.; Morton, R. L.; Castillo, C.; Dyer, G.; Johnson, N.; McSwain, J. T.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-level (facility and programmatic) risk assessment was conducted for the facilities in the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) Program and results were included in a new Risk Management Plan (RMP), which was incorporated into the fiscal year (FY) 2010 Integrated Plans. Risks, risk events, probability, consequence(s), and mitigation strategies were identified and captured, for most scope areas (i.e., risk categories) during the facilitated risk workshops. Risk mitigations (i.e., efforts in addition to existing controls) were identified during the facilitated risk workshops when the risk event was identified. Risk mitigation strategies fell into two broad categories: threats or opportunities. Improvement projects were identified and linked to specific risks they mitigate, making the connection of risk reduction through investments for the annual Site Execution Plan. Due to the amount of that was collected, analysis to be performed, and reports to be generated, a Risk Assessment/ Management Tool (RAMtool) database was developed to analyze the risks in real-time, at multiple levels, which reinforced the site-level risk management process and procedures. The RAMtool database was developed and designed to assist in the capturing and analysis of the key elements of risk: probability, consequence, and impact. The RAMtool calculates the facility-level and programmatic-level risk factors to enable a side-by-side comparison to see where the facility manager and program manager should focus their risk reduction efforts and funding. This enables them to make solid decisions on priorities and funding to maximize the risk reduction. A more active risk management process was developed where risks and opportunities are actively managed, monitored, and controlled by each facility more aggressively and frequently. risk owners have the responsibility and accountability to manage their assigned risk in real-time, using the RAMtool database.

  18. Toxicity Assessment of Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Prostate for Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian; Newell, Sherri B.S.; Newman, Francis M.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: david.raben@uchsc.edu

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate for patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective toxicity analysis was performed in 30 consecutive patients treated definitively with pelvic SIB-IMRT, all of whom also received androgen suppression. The IMRT plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 28 fractions (2.5 Gy/fraction) to the prostate while simultaneously delivering 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: The most common acute Grade 2 events were cystitis (36.7%) and urinary frequency/urgency (26.7%). At a median follow-up of 24 months, late toxicity exceeding Grade 2 in severity was uncommon, with two Grade 3 events and one Grade 4 event. Grade 2 or greater acute bowel toxicity was associated with signficantly greater bowel volume receiving {>=}25 Gy (p = .04); Grade 2 or greater late bowel toxicity was associated with a higher bowel maximal dose (p = .04) and volume receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = .02). Acute or late bladder and rectal toxicity did not correlate with any of the dosimetric parameters examined. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT with SIB to the prostate was well tolerated in this series, with low rates of Grade 3 or greater acute and late toxicity. SIB-IMRT combines pelvic radiotherapy and hypofractionation to the primary site and offers an accelerated approach to treating intermediate- to high-risk disease. Additional follow-up is necessary to fully define the long-term toxicity after hypofractionated, whole pelvic treatment combined with androgen suppression.

  19. Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

  20. Molecular Cell, Vol. 12, 271280, August, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press ReviewIntegration of Growth Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nghiem, Paul

    , such as nutrients. Both types of12 Oxford Street Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 signals regulate a common set effectors. This principle is becoming evident from studies of the regulation of cell growth (size), which Research Center Massachusetts General Hospital factor 4E (eIF4E) binding protein (4EBP1) and the S6

  1. UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY & PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY & PROCEDURES 1 INTRODUCTION This document sets out the policy and procedures for risk management within the University and replaces earlier documentation. The risk management process is formally integrated with the University's strategic planning process

  2. Risk factors for equine laminitis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polzer, John Patrick

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case-control study and a retrospective cohort study were conducted at the Texas Veterinary Medical Center between January 1, 1986 and December 31, 1991 and between January 1, 1992 and December 31, 1992 respectively. The case-control study used...

  3. Risk factors of recurrent furunculosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Fathy, Hanan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Between 10-35 percent and 20-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) [ 35 , 36 ]. However, Hedstrom [study reported that MRSA infection was significantly

  4. Gleason Pattern 5 Is the Greatest Risk Factor for Clinical Failure and Death From Prostate Cancer After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Hormonal Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabolch, Aaron [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Daignault-Newton, Stephanie [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Phelps, Laura [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Olson, Karin B. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The division of Gleason score (GS) into three categories (2-6, 7, 8-10) may not fully use its prognostic power, as revealed by recent reports demonstrating the presence of Gleason Pattern 5 (GP5) as a strong predictor for biochemical recurrence. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical outcomes in patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) based on the presence or absence of GP5. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 718 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external-beam RT to a minimum planning target volume dose of at least 75 Gy. We assessed the impact of GP5 and that of pretreatment- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: At biopsy, 89% of patients had no GP5, and 11% (76/718) had GP5. There were no differences in age, comorbid illness, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, or the use or duration of androgen deprivation therapy between GS8 without GP5 and GS8-10 with GP5. The presence of GP5 predicted lower FFM (p < 0.002; hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [1.7-7.1]); CSS (p < 0.0001; HR 12.9 [5.4-31]); and OS (p < 0.0001; HR 3.6 [2.0-6.5]) in comparison with GS8 (without GP5). The 8-year FFM, CSS, and OS were 89%, 98%, and 57%, respectively, for those with Gleason 8 prostate cancer without GP5 in comparison with 61%, 55%, and 31%, respectively, for those with GP5. In addition, both FFM and CSS were strongly influenced by androgen deprivation therapy given concurrently with RT. On multivariate analysis, GP5 was the strongest prognostic factor for all clinical endpoints, including OS. Conclusion: The presence of GP5 predicts for worse clinical behavior, which therefore needs to be accounted for by risk stratification schemes. Further intensification of local and/or systemic therapy may be appropriate for such patients.

  5. DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION VIA POLYHEDRAL RISK FUNCTIONALS the dynamic decision structure appropriately. In energy risk management, which is typically carried out ex, for integrating risk management into a stochastic optimization framework, risk has to be quantified in a definite

  6. Asymptotic behavior of the finite-time expected time-integrated negative part of some risk processes and optimal reserve allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    heavy-tailed and light-tailed claim amount distributions are investigated. The time horizon may theory, heavy-tailed and light-tailed claim size distribution, risk measure, optimal reserve allocation. 1. Introduction The current change of regulation leads the insurance industry to address new

  7. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  8. Fusion integral experiments and analysis and the determination of design safety factors - II: Application to the prediction uncertainty of tritium production rate from the U.S. DOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many fusion integral experiments were performed during the last decade within a well-established collaboration between the United States and Japan on fusion breeder neutronics. The tritium production rate (TPR) has the prime focus among other reactions. The experimental and calculational data sets of local TPR in each experiment were interpolated to give an estimate of the prediction uncertainty, and the standard deviation, of the line-integrated TPR, a quantity that is closely related to the total breeding ratio (TBR) in the test assembly. A novel methodology developed during the collaboration was applied to arrive at estimates to design safety factors that fusion blanket designers can use to ensure that the achievable TBR in a blanket does not fall below a minimum required value. Associated with each safety factor is a confidence level, designers may choose to have, that calculated TPR will not exceed the actual measured value. Higher confidence levels require larger safety factors. Tabular and graphical forms for these factors are given, as derived independently for TPR from Li-6(T{sub 6}), Li-7 (T{sub 7}), and natural lithium (T{sub n}). Furthermore, distinction was made between safety factors based on the technique applied, discrete ordinates methods, and Monte Carlo methods in the U.S. calculations, JAERI`s calculations, and in both calculations considered simultaneously. The derived factors are applicable to TPR in Li{sub 2}O breeding material, 48 refs., 51 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Indoor Environmental Risk Factors for Occupant Symptoms in 100U.S. Office Buildings: Summary of Three Analyses from the EPA BASEStudy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Cozen, M.; Brightman, H.S.; Apte,M.; Erdmann, C.A.; Brunner, G.; Girman, J.R.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes three analyses of data on building-related environmental factors and occupant symptoms collected from 100 representative large U.S. office buildings. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found increased occupant symptoms associated with a number of building-related factors, including lower ventilation rates even at the current guideline levels, lack of scheduled cleaning for air-conditioning drain pans and cooling coils, poor condition of cooling coils, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lower outdoor air intake height. Some expected relationships were not found, and several findings were opposite of expected. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest preventive actions to reduce occupant symptoms in office buildings.

  10. Risk Management In Major Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Scott William

    The integration of risk management in major projects within the construction and oil and gas industries has never been more significant especially as these projects are becoming larger and more complex. The increased ...

  11. Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 21711 Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and...

  12. RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

  13. Risk identification and assessment in a risk based audit environment: the effects of budget constraints and decision aid use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Michelle Chandler

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . In particular, this approach has important implications for risk identification and risk assessment. The success of the RBA approach is contingent on understanding what factors improve or interfere with the accuracy of these risk judgments. I examine how budget...

  14. Impact of demographics on supply chain risk management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanyagui, Kenneth (Kenneth K.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Do demographic factors play a role in the choice of supply chain risk management practices by supply chain professionals? Are there stronger relationships between certain demographic factors and supply chain risk management ...

  15. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human breast milk from various locations in Tunisia: Levels of contamination, influencing factors, and infant risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ennaceur, S. [Laboratory of Environmental Analytical Chemistry (05/UR/12-03), Faculty of Sciences, Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia)], E-mail: ennaceurs@yahoo.fr; Gandoura, N. [Service of Pediatrics, Regional Hospital of Bizerte, Bizerte (Tunisia); Driss, M.R. [Laboratory of Environmental Analytical Chemistry (05/UR/12-03), Faculty of Sciences, Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentrations of dichlorodiphenytrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), dieldrin, and 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in 237 human breast milk samples collected from 12 locations in Tunisia. Gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to identify and quantify residue levels on a lipid basis of organochlorine compounds (OCs). The predominant OCs in human breast milk were PCBs, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, HCHs, and HCB. Concentrations of DDTs in human breast milk from rural areas were significantly higher than those from urban locations (p<0.05). With regard to PCBs, we observed the predominance of mid-chlorinated congeners due to the presence of PCBs with high K{sub ow} such as PCB 153, 138, and 180. Positive correlations were found between concentrations of OCs in human breast milk and age of mothers and number of parities, suggesting the influence of such factors on OC burdens in lactating mothers. The comparison of daily intakes of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, and HCB to infants through human breast milk with guidelines proposed by WHO and Health Canada shows that some individuals accumulated OCs in breast milk close to or higher than these guidelines.

  16. Swimming is an integral part of existence in most fish and has been recognized as one of the most important factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burggren, Warren

    important factors influencing energy turnover (Brett and Groves, 1979). Since many variables are involved to increases in growth rate and food- conversion efficiency in many adult salmonids (Davison and Goldspink internal mechanisms for compensation. In addition, large amounts of energy are required for their extremely

  17. Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Joint Seminar Risk Management Institute & Department of Decision Sciences Details of Seminar Date and statistics is leading to a greatly broadened theory of regression which draws on tools of convex analysis with factor analysis in finance and economics. Risk Management Institute Joint Seminar #12;

  18. Risk D&D Rapid Prototype: Scenario Documentation and Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Report describes process and methodology associated with a rapid prototype tool for integrating project risk analysis and health & safety risk analysis for decontamination and decommissioning projects.

  19. Risk Assessment of Diesel-Fired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    65 20 3.4 Direct Mortality Risk 21 3.5 Ambient PM10 Concentrations 21 4.0 Low Wind Speed (Calm Risk Zones Table 2-7: Emission Factor Sensitivity Analysis Appendix 3: Low Wind Speed (Calm) Conditions Cancer Risk Spreadsheet 4-2: PM Mortality Table 4-3: Engine Size Distribution Table 4-4: Permitted vs

  20. Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    risk Quality of life Health Noncancer risk Costs Cost Technology availability Health risk Testing Management factors Environmental quality Treatment Chemical performance Fairness Cost of technology & Management 48:6, 2005 · Evaluation of drinking water treatment technology: An entropy-based fuzzy application

  1. Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty and managing risk. After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty and managing risk. After reviewing the reasons for addressing uncertainty in the Council's Fifth Power Plan favor going ahead. In this plan, the Council further integrates risk assessment and management into its

  2. Australia's Humanitarian Action Policy and Disaster Risk Reduction Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    to get more information Disaster Risk Reduction Team Disaster Prevention and Risk Reduction Section GrantAustralia's Humanitarian Action Policy and Disaster Risk Reduction Policy A Commitment: · Disaster risk reduction is integrated into the Australian aid program · Capacity of partner governments

  3. Assessing the feasibility of volumetric-modulated arc therapy using simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-VMAT): An analysis for complex head-neck, high-risk prostate and rectal cancer cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cilla, Savino, E-mail: savinocilla@gmail.com [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Deodato, Francesco; Digesù, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Picardi, Vincenzo; Ferro, Marica [Radiation Oncology Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Sallustio, Giuseppina [Radiology Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); De Spirito, Marco; Piermattei, Angelo [Physics Institute, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Morganti, Alessio G. [Radiation Oncology Unit, Fondazione di ricerca e cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allowed the simultaneous delivery of different doses to different target volumes within a single fraction, an approach called simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). As consequence, the fraction dose to the boost volume can be increased while keeping low doses to the elective volumes, and the number of fractions and overall treatment time will be reduced, translating into better radiobiological effectiveness. In recent years, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been shown to provide similar plan quality with respect to fixed-field IMRT but with large reduction in treatment time and monitor units (MUs) number. However, the feasibility of VMAT when used with SIB strategy has few investigations to date. We explored the potential of VMAT in a SIB strategy for complex cancer sites. A total of 15 patients were selected, including 5 head-and-neck, 5 high-risk prostate, and 5 rectal cancer cases. Both a double-arc VMAT and a 7-field IMRT plan were generated for each case using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system for an Elekta Precise linac. Dosimetric indexes for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared based on dose-volume histograms. Conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose-contrast index were used for target analyses. The equivalent uniform doses and the normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for main OARs. MUs number and treatment time were analyzed to score treatment efficiency. Pretreatment dosimetry was performed using 2-dimensional (2D)-array dosimeter. SIB-VMAT plans showed a high level of fluence modulation needed for SIB treatments, high conformal dose distribution, similar target coverage, and a tendency to improve OARs sparing compared with the benchmark SIB-IMRT plans. The median treatment times reduced from 13 to 20 minutes to approximately 5 minutes for all cases with SIB-VMAT, with a MUs reduction up to 22.5%. The 2D-array ion-chambers' measurements reported an agreement of more than 95% for a criterion of 3% to 3 mm. SIB-VMAT was able to combine the advantages of conventional SIB-IMRT with its highly conformal dose distribution and OARs sparing and the advantages of 3D-conformal radiotherapy with its fast delivery.

  4. Need for an Integrated Risk Model

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of EnergyofPROTECTINGofNavy's Section

  5. Strategy Guideline: Mitigation of Retrofit Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) is currently developing strategies designed to promote and achieve increased energy savings and promote upgrades in the residential retrofit sector. These strategies are targeted to retrofit program managers, retrofit contractors, policy makers, academic researchers, and non-governmental organizations. This report focuses on four key areas to promote home energy upgrades: fostering accurate energy savings projections; understanding consumer perceptions for energy savings; measuring energy savings, and ensuring quality control for retrofit installations.

  6. Common risk factors in bank stocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viale, Ariel Marcelo

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    is calculated by dividing the book value of common equity for the fiscal year ending in calendar time t-1 by the market value of equity at the end of December of t-1. I formed 25 portfolios from the intersections of five size and five book-to-market quintiles.... The value-weighted monthly excess return on these 25 portfolios e ti R , is the dependent variables in time-series and cross-sectional regressions. Accounting information is taken both from the Y-9Cs and COMPUSTAT. Only commercial bank holding...

  7. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  8. Risk Assessment Risk communication 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    · 1 1997 2003 WHO #12;6060 NTU Alumni Bimonthly No.87 Fault tree Event tree [2] Nuclear reactor of nuclear power plants. Reliability Engineering and Safety System, 52:297-314. [4] Jonas Hagmann. 2012. Fukushima: probing the analytical and epistemological limits of risk analysis. Journal of Risk Research. 15

  9. Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance Shmuel Oren University of the critical infrastructures in our society. Risk assessment and systematic consideration of risk in the design knowledge for engineers, like physics for instance, consideration of risk has penetrated all engineering

  10. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  11. Hedging and Vertical Integration in Electricity Markets Gilles Chemla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touzi, Nizar

    /or demand insurance rationale for vertical integration as most important. 1 In the 1970s, for example, oil and vertical integration are two separate mechanisms for demand and spot price risk diversification that both integration restores the symmetry between producers' and retailers' exposure to demand risk while linear

  12. Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

  13. Some Results on Factorization in Integral Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Jack Robert

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996), 389-396. [5] J. Bennett and D. Rush, When GradedMathematics by Jack Robert Bennett August 2011 DissertationCopyright by Jack Robert Bennett The Dissertation of Jack

  14. The CORAS Tool for Security Risk Analysis Fredrik Vraalsen, Folker den Braber, Mass Soldal Lund, and Ketil Stlen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    integrates aspects from partly complementary risk analysis techniques, like HazOp [1], FMEA [2], and FTA [3

  15. The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing CKD 75 CKD Abstract The risk factors of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), including diabetes risk factors in a population-based cohort. Compared with single risk factors, diabetes (odds ratio 1

  16. Grid Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

  17. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  18. Risk Without Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Lisa R.; Mahmoud, Ola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mitra, I. (2010). Extreme risk analysis. The Journal offrom the fact that the risk parity strategy was diversifiedboth in capital and in risk weights. Further research into

  19. Prediction markets for cost and risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Taroon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several temporal and political factors can sometimes limit the effectiveness of traditional methods of project tracking and cost estimation. A large organization is susceptible to internal and external risks that are ...

  20. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?" Risk Analysis, Aubrey,quantitative methods of how people do science, engineering and risk analysisthe Quantitative Definition of Risk." Risk Analysis, 1(1),

  1. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE ProjectCrisis and Risk Communication Crisis and Risk

  2. Integrated decision support model for global sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

  3. Evolution integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocco Duvenhage

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework analogous to path integrals in quantum physics is set up for abstract dynamical systems in a W*-algebraic setting. We consider spaces of evolutions, defined in a specific way, of a W*-algebra A as an analogue of spaces of classical paths, and show how integrals over such spaces, which we call ``evolution integrals'', lead to dynamics in a Hilbert space on a ``higher level'' which is viewed as an analogue of quantum dynamics obtained from path integrals. The measures with respect to which these integrals are performed are projection valued.

  4. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  5. Credit Risk Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Credit Risk Analyst in the Transacting and Credit Risk Management department of the Office of Risk Management. The Transacting and Credit Risk...

  6. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  7. Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management, Mar 2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service (Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management) riskmanagement@uoregon.edu Fax: 541-346-7008 As a volunteer Tort Claims Act, ORS 30.260-300, and Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management

  8. Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case extends to any high-value, long-term project where traceability and accountability are determining factors.

  9. Insolation integrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, John J. (Norristown, PA); Rudge, George T. (Lansdale, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric signal representative of the rate of insolation is integrated to determine if it is adequate for operation of a solar energy collection system.

  10. Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in theCleanup SiteSite

  11. Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Steven Prescott; Tony Koonce

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key area of the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) strategy is the development of methodologies and tools that will be used to predict the safety, security, safeguards, performance, and deployment viability of SMRs. The goal of the SMR PRA activity will be to develop quantitative methods and tools and the associated analysis framework for assessing a variety of risks. Development and implementation of SMR-focused safety assessment methods may require new analytic methods or adaptation of traditional methods to the advanced design and operational features of SMRs. We will need to move beyond the current limitations such as static, logic-based models in order to provide more integrated, scenario-based models based upon predictive modeling which are tied to causal factors. The development of SMR-specific safety models for margin determination will provide a safety case that describes potential accidents, design options (including postulated controls), and supports licensing activities by providing a technical basis for the safety envelope. This report documents the progress that was made to implement the PRA framework, specifically by way of demonstration of an advanced 3D approach to representing, quantifying and understanding flooding risks to a nuclear power plant.

  12. Risk and Vulnerability Assessment Using Cybernomic Computational Models: Tailored for Industrial Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Sheldon, Federick T. [University of Memphis; Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many influencing economic factors to weigh from the defender-practitioner stakeholder point-of-view that involve cost combined with development/deployment models. Some examples include the cost of countermeasures themselves, the cost of training and the cost of maintenance. Meanwhile, we must better anticipate the total cost from a compromise. The return on investment in countermeasures is essentially impact costs (i.e., the costs from violating availability, integrity and confidentiality / privacy requirements). The natural question arises about choosing the main risks that must be mitigated/controlled and monitored in deciding where to focus security investments. To answer this question, we have investigated the cost/benefits to the attacker/defender to better estimate risk exposure. In doing so, it s important to develop a sound basis for estimating the factors that derive risk exposure, such as likelihood that a threat will emerge and whether it will be thwarted. This impact assessment framework can provide key information for ranking cybersecurity threats and managing risk.

  13. Risk Management Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Management Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 06-SC-002. There are three specific areas of risk that can be controlled and managed by the EBIS Project team and these are and operations. The BNL ISM clearly indicates that risk management is everybody's business and will be factored

  14. Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management lih@math.wsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    1 Factor Models 2 Principal Component Analysis Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management WeekMath 576: Quantitative Risk Management Haijun Li lih@math.wsu.edu Department of Mathematics Washington State University Week 6 Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 6 1 / 24 #12;Outline

  15. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated.

  16. Risk Management Strategy Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Risk Management Strategy Introduction 1. The risk of adverse consequences is inherent in all activity. Dynamic enterprise will inevitably create new risks. Risk management is about ensuring that all significant relevant risks are understood and prioritised as part of normal management

  17. Quantifying and managing the risk of information security breaches participants in a supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellefeuille, Cynthia Lynn

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical integration between companies can result in an increased risk of information security breaches. This thesis proposes a methodology for quantifying information security risk to a supply chain participant. Given a ...

  18. Alternatives for reducing the environmental risks associated with natural disasters and their effects on pipelines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellborn, Michael Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past pipeline failure reports have typically focused on corrosion and third party related events. However, natural disasters pose a substantial risk to pipeline integrity as well. Therefore, it was the objective of this thesis to analyze the risks...

  19. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  20. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  1. Risk Assessment Techniques and Survey Method for COTS Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rashmi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rational Unified Process a software engineering process is gaining popularity nowadays. RUP delivers best software practices for component software Development life cycle It supports component based software development. Risk is involved in every component development phase .neglecting those risks sometimes hampers the software growth and leads to negative outcome. In Order to provide appropriate security and protection levels, identifying various risks is very vital. Therefore Risk identification plays a very crucial role in the component based software development This report addresses incorporation of component based software development cycle into RUP phases, assess several category of risk encountered in the component based software. It also entails a survey method to identify the risk factor and evaluating the overall severity of the component software development in terms of the risk. Formula for determining risk prevention cost and finding the risk probability is also been included. The overall go...

  2. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  3. Doomed to die? Predicting extinction risk in the true hawks Accipitridae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krüger, Oliver

    is identifying species at risk from extinction and establishing the most likely factors influencing this risk with lower extinction risk and larger population and range sizes. Species with special habitat requirements the size of the species' gene pool and could be a good marker of extinction risk. The analyses also

  4. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 Copyright © 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON SHARED risk analysis is developed to investigate various factors affecting train accident rate, intrusion rate and provides a basis for future quantitative risk analyses and risk mitigation implementations. NOMENCLATURE

  5. Quantification of design margins/safety factors based on the prediction uncertainty in tritium production rate from fusion integral experiments of the USDOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Various engineering-oriented fusion integral experiments were performed within the USDOE/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Blanket Neutronics during the last decade. The objectives of this ten-year program were: (a) to establish new experimental techniques for design-related neutronics experiments, (b) to provide experimental data on local and integrated parameters such as tritium production rate, nuclear heating, and activation for the purpose of assessing the accuracies of present nuclear data and calculational methods, and (c) to provide designers with design margin for important responses. Tritium breeding rate (TPR) has the prime focus among other reactions. The program consisted of three phases in which local and integrated measurements inside a Li{sub 2}O test assembly that has various engineering features of a prototypical blanket (e.g. SS FW, H{sub 2}O coolant channels, beryllium multiplier). The analysis of the experiments were performed independently by the US and JAERI using their own codes/databases. A wide range of the calculated-to-experimental (C/E) values were observed in all these experiments for local TPR from Li-6 (T{sub 6}), from Li-7 (T{sub 7}), and from Li-natural (T{sub n}). In this paper, the experimental and calculational data sets of local TPR in each experiment were interpreted to give estimate to the prediction uncertainty, u{sub i}, of the line-integrated TPR and its standard deviation, {sigma}{sub i}.

  6. Risk and Realities | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15ARisk IdentificationRisk and

  7. Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

  8. Children's resiliency, adjustment, and coping: cancer-related, family context, and within-child factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Katherine Michele

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ; family context factors of parenting stress and family psychosocial risk; and within-child factors of personal resiliency. These factors were assessed among 37 children with leukemia or lymphoma, one of their caretakers (29 mothers, 7 fathers, 1...

  9. Multimedia-modeling integration development environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelton, Mitchell A.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.

    2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many framework systems available; however, the purpose of the framework presented here is to capitalize on the successes of the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) and Multi-media Multi-pathway Multi-receptor Risk Assessment (3MRA) methodology as applied to the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR) while focusing on the development of software tools to simplify the module developer?s effort of integrating a module into the framework.

  10. Novel Threat-risk Index Using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Human Reliability Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George A. Beitel

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of a national need to improve the current state-of-the-art in alerting decision makers to the risk of terrorist attack, a quantitative approach employing scientific and engineering concepts to develop a threat-risk index was undertaken at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result of this effort, a set of models has been successfully integrated into a single comprehensive model known as Quantitative Threat-Risk Index Model (QTRIM), with the capability of computing a quantitative threat-risk index on a system level, as well as for the major components of the system. Such a threat-risk index could provide a quantitative variant or basis for either prioritizing security upgrades or updating the current qualitative national color-coded terrorist threat alert.

  11. Research and design : methods for integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, Richard E

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the major factors which inhibit and foster the integration and application of research knowledge with design practice. The results are presented in two parts: Part I, a generic user handbook, and ...

  12. Comprehensive, Quantitative Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepinski, James

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A Quantitative Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (QFMEA) was developed to conduct comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and sequestration or use in deep saline aquifers, enhanced oil recovery operations, or enhanced coal bed methane operations. The model identifies and characterizes potential risks; identifies the likely failure modes, causes, effects and methods of detection; lists possible risk prevention and risk mitigation steps; estimates potential damage recovery costs, mitigation costs and costs savings resulting from mitigation; and ranks (prioritizes) risks according to the probability of failure, the severity of failure, the difficulty of early failure detection and the potential for fatalities. The QFMEA model generates the necessary information needed for effective project risk management. Diverse project information can be integrated into a concise, common format that allows comprehensive, quantitative analysis, by a cross-functional team of experts, to determine: What can possibly go wrong? How much will damage recovery cost? How can it be prevented or mitigated? What is the cost savings or benefit of prevention or mitigation? Which risks should be given highest priority for resolution? The QFMEA model can be tailored to specific projects and is applicable to new projects as well as mature projects. The model can be revised and updated as new information comes available. It accepts input from multiple sources, such as literature searches, site characterization, field data, computer simulations, analogues, process influence diagrams, probability density functions, financial analysis models, cost factors, and heuristic best practices manuals, and converts the information into a standardized format in an Excel spreadsheet. Process influence diagrams, geologic models, financial models, cost factors and an insurance schedule were developed to support the QFMEA model. Comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments were conducted on three (3) sites using the QFMEA model: (1) SACROC Northern Platform CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Permian Basin, Scurry County, TX, (2) Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-ECBM Site in the San Juan Basin, San Juan County, NM, and (3) Farnsworth Unit CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Anadarko Basin, Ochiltree County, TX. The sites were sufficiently different from each other to test the robustness of the QFMEA model.

  13. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geothermal, digester and landfill gas, small hydro, andenergy sources, such as landfill gas. Market Factors Theenergy sources, such as landfill gas. Integrated Resource

  14. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

  15. Risk Dynamics?An Analysis for the Risk of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Tailin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bookstaber, R. (1999). "Risk Management in ComplexG. E. (2004). "How Useful Is Quantitative Risk Assessment?"Risk Analysis, Aubrey, A. (2010). "Preventing Diabetes:

  16. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, D.J.; Hislop, R.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The only facility at Argonne National Laboratory which is classified as high hazard is EBR-II. A Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), including external events, has been completed for EBR-II. There were several objectives for this project; to provide a quantitative estimate of the risk associated with the operation of EBR-II, to provide a framework for managerial decision-making for the management of risk at the facility, and to provide insights into the nature of the risk of EBR-II that can be applied in the design of future LMRS. Other ANL facilities do not have complete probabilistic assessments. Despite this fact, Risk Management is an essential part of ANL`s approach to safety and operations. Risk management at Argonne National Laboratory is not limited to accelerator or nuclear facilities. It is also an integral part of construction activities. The Advanced Photon Source, a major construction project at the Laboratory, utilizes a variety of risk assessment techniques to identify potential construction loss exposures and to develop measures to eliminate them. Over the past 15 years, in excess of 15,000 pages of regulatory requirements pertaining to environment safety and health have been printed in the Federal Register. Not all of these are applicable to Argonne National Laboratory all of the time, but as a highly-visible, nationally-funded facility, compliance with those that are applicable must be above reproach. Therefore, risk management is also a very important part of construction activities at ANL. This paper will give examples of these activities, such as, the EBR-II PRA, risk-based analyses of Fuel Cycle Facility Safety Systems, reliability studies of the Access Control Interlock System for the Advanced Photon Source and management approaches for controlling risk during the construction activities at APS.

  17. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  18. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  19. Analytical Study of Thermonuclear Reaction Probability Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Chaudhry; H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic study of the reaction probability integrals corresponding to the various forms of the slowly varying cross-section factor $S(E)$ is attempted. Exact expressions for reaction probability integrals are expressed in terms of the extended gamma functions.

  20. Sandia Energy - Security Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Risk Assessment Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Security Risk Assessment Security Risk Assessmentcwdd2015-05-04T21:...

  1. Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), ‘Risk, ambiguity and the savage

  2. Essays in time and risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprenger, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.4.1 Risk Attitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.1 Additional Risk Preference Measures . . . . . . . .An Endowment Effect for Risk: Experimental Tests of

  3. Learning and risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyarzun, Carlos

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

  4. Livestock Risk Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bill; Bennett, Blake; Jones, Diana

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    risk insurance with an ending date of coverage that meets their risk management objectives. Feeder cattle producers may want the end date of coverage to match the William Thompson, Blake Bennett and DeDe Jones* Figure 1: Livestock Risk Protection...

  5. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management: comparing models infestans) risk at 26 locations in the Great Lakes region. Accuracies of predictions made using an early number of early warning systems for crop disease risk that integrate with crop- specific decision support

  6. An Overview of Value at Risk Darrell Duffie and Jun Pan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    . The measurement and management of counterparty default risk involves a range of different modeling issues evidence. 1 Background In managing market risk, there are related objectives: 1. Measure the extent's financial integrity and risk­management tech­ nology to contractual counterparties, regulators, auditors

  7. ON VALUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT AT THE INTERFACE OF INSURANCE AND FINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Møller, Thomas

    ON VALUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT AT THE INTERFACE OF INSURANCE AND FINANCE Thomas Møller ABSTRACT, and integrated risk-management solutions. This paper describes some of these new products in detail and discusses This paper reviews methods for hedging and valuation of insurance claims with an inherent financial risk

  8. Adaptive risk management for certifiably sustainable forestry B.A. Wintle a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaptive risk management for certifiably sustainable forestry B.A. Wintle a, *, D.B. Lindenmayer b Adaptive risk management Due diligence Monitoring Population viability analysis (PVA) Multi-model inference for biodiversity, (ii) formal risk assessment of competing management options that integrate impacts

  9. ON VALUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT AT THE INTERFACE OF INSURANCE AND FINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Møller, Thomas

    ON VALUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT AT THE INTERFACE OF INSURANCE AND FINANCE Thomas Møller ABSTRACT insurance contracts, catastro­ phe insurance futures and bonds, and integrated risk­management solutions for valuation (pricing) and hedging (risk management) of their liabilities. We review several possible

  10. The impact of individualised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk estimates and lifestyle advice on physical activity in individuals at high risk of CVD. A Pilot 2x2 Factorial "Understanding Risk" Trial.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Hermione C; Tucker, Lynne; Griffin, Simon J; Holman, Rury R

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    in adults at high risk of CVD. Methods/Design In a 2 × 2 factorial design participants are allocated at random to a personalised 10-year CVD risk estimate or numerical CVD risk factor values (systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and fasting glucose...

  11. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printable Version Energy Systems Integration Facility Newsroom The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) will be one of the only megawatt-scale test facilities in the United...

  12. Risk management of student-run small satellite programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deems, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Carolina)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes an approach for failure mode identification in university-affiliated, small satellite programs. These small programs have a unique set of risks due to many factors, including a typically inexperienced ...

  13. An application of agribusiness strategic planning under risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Charles Tudor

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture entered a new era with the passage of the 1996 FAIR Act. This new era will likely be associated with increasing risk factors that agribusiness managers must consider in developing appropriate management strategies. Managers who can...

  14. Risk & QualityRisk & Quality ManagementManagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    liability."" [Balsaono RR, Brown[Balsaono RR, Brown MK, Risk ManagementMK, Risk Management inin Legal

  15. Incentive Games and Mechanisms for Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpcan, Tansu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incentives play an important role in (security and IT) risk management of a large-scale organization with multiple autonomous divisions. This paper presents an incentive mechanism design framework for risk management based on a game-theoretic approach. The risk manager acts as a mechanism designer providing rules and incentive factors such as assistance or subsidies to divisions or units, which are modeled as selfish players of a strategic (noncooperative) game. Based on this model, incentive mechanisms with various objectives are developed that satisfy efficiency, preference-compatibility, and strategy-proofness criteria. In addition, iterative and distributed algorithms are presented, which can be implemented under information limitations such as the risk manager not knowing the individual units' preferences. An example scenario illustrates the framework and results numerically. The incentive mechanism design approach presented is useful for not only deriving guidelines but also developing computer-assistan...

  16. Exploring the factors associated with preconception health behaviors among women of childbearing age: a naturalistic inquiry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delissaint, Dieula

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Poor maternal health is one of the major risk factors related to adverse birth outcomes. Women entering pregnancy with poor health status are at higher risk of these outcomes. Prenatal care has been established as the standard prevention paradigm...

  17. The amplification of risk in experimental diffusion chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moussaid, Mehdi; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how people form and revise their perception of risk is central to designing efficient risk communication methods, eliciting risk awareness, and avoiding unnecessary anxiety among the public. However, public responses to hazardous events such as climate change, contagious outbreaks, and terrorist threats are complex and difficult-to-anticipate phenomena. Although many psychological factors influencing risk perception have been identified in the past, it remains unclear how perceptions of risk change when propagated from one person to another and what impact the repeated social transmission of perceived risk has at the population scale. Here, we study the social dynamics of risk perception by analyzing how messages detailing the benefits and harms of a controversial antibacterial agent undergo change when passed from one person to the next in 10-subject experimental diffusion chains. Our analyses show that when messages are propagated through the diffusion chains, they tend to become shorter, grad...

  18. Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Risk Policy and Risk Management Procedures Preface The University's Risk Policy sets out The University's approach to risk and its management together with the means for identifying, analysing and managing risk in order to minimise its frequency and impact. The risks considered significant

  19. Professional Certificate in Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    Professional Certificate in Risk Management 2010 Program 3 Part-time Courses CRM01: Essentials of Risk Management ­ Next Session Fall 2010 CRM02: Risk Control ­ Jan. 12 - April 26, 2010 CRM03: Risk to apply for the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) designation. #12;Professional Certificate in Risk

  20. The Influence of Friendship Networks on Adolescents' Health-Risk Behaviors: A Social Network Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Kwon Chan

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Friendships among adolescents can exert significant influence on behaviors that pose risk to their health. However, empirical evidence for friendships’ influence is mixed due to various factors. Among these factors, are the complex mechanisms...

  1. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  2. Conditional Risk Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words: Risk; Conjugate Duality; Stochastic Optimization; Dynamic ... MSC2000 Subject Classification: Primary: 90C15,90C48; Secondary: 91B30,

  3. Distribution Integrity Management Plant (DIMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Jerome F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the distribution integrity management plan (Plan) for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 192, Subpart P Distribution Integrity Management Programs (DIMP) for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan was developed by reviewing records and interviewing LANL personnel. The records consist of the design, construction, operation and maintenance for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. The records system for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System is limited, so the majority of information is based on the judgment of LANL employees; the maintenance crew, the Corrosion Specialist and the Utilities and Infrastructure (UI) Civil Team Leader. The records used in this report are: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) 7100.1-1, Report of Main and Service Line Inspection, Natural Gas Leak Survey, Gas Leak Response Report, Gas Leak and Repair Report, and Pipe-to-Soil Recordings. The specific elements of knowledge of the infrastructure used to evaluate each threat and prioritize risks are listed in Sections 6 and 7, Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization respectively. This Plan addresses additional information needed and a method for gaining that data over time through normal activities. The processes used for the initial assessment of Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization are the methods found in the Simple, Handy Risk-based Integrity Management Plan (SHRIMP{trademark}) software package developed by the American Pipeline and Gas Agency (APGA) Security and Integrity Foundation (SIF). SHRIMP{trademark} uses an index model developed by the consultants and advisors of the SIF. Threat assessment is performed using questions developed by the Gas Piping Technology Company (GPTC) as modified and added to by the SHRIMP{trademark} advisors. This Plan is required to be reviewed every 5 years to be continually refined and improved. Records for all piping system installed after the effective date of this Plan will be captured and retained in the UI records documentation system. Primary Utility Asbuilts are maintained by Utilities Mapping (UMAP) and additional records are maintained on the N drive. Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) are stored on the N drive under configuration management and kept up by Utilities and Infrastructure Division Office (UI-DO). Records include, at a minimum, the location where new piping and appurtenances are installed and the material of which they are constructed.

  4. Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is working to develop and demonstrate a high-performance solar thermochemical reaction system in an end-to-end demonstration that produces electricity. A highly efficient solar thermochemical reaction system would allow for 24-hour operation without the need for storage technology, and reductions in total system costs while providing a relatively low-risk deployment option for CSP systems.

  5. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ? 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873K and 83 CRI. As such, the package’s performance exceeds DOE’s warm-white phosphor LED efficacy target for 2013. At the end of the program, we assembled an A19 sized demonstration bulb housing the integrated package which met Energy Star intensity variation requirements. With further development to reduce overall component cost, we anticipate that an integrated remote converter package such as developed during this program will find application in compact, high-efficacy LED-based lamps, particularly those requiring omnidirectional emission.

  6. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  7. ASSESSING THE LIQUEFACTION RISK REDUCTION OF REINFORCED SOILS: A HOMOGENIZATION APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    liquefaction risk reduction factor. Then section 4 develops the same evaluation for a cross trench reinforcedASSESSING THE LIQUEFACTION RISK REDUCTION OF REINFORCED SOILS: A HOMOGENIZATION APPROACH Maxime for the reduction of the liquefaction risk, which can be expected from reinforcing the soil by a periodic array

  8. Risk Perception and Willingness to Pay for Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sihong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , THMs, radon as Ill as PCBs, are similar. First, they can cause many diseases (the effects on the probability of mortality and morbidity are confounded) and the latency of diseases is long (this suggests a discount rate should be elicited). Second... of uncer- tainty in risk assessment. They got the results based on a multiplicative model for cancer risk from ingestion of radon in drinking water, where the risk R was the product of n risk 16 factors. These risk factors were assumed to follow a...

  9. Essays on risk aversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jindapon, Paan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the preferred distribution by a simple mean-preserving spread and the cost is a utility cost. Higher-order increases in risk lead to higher-order generalizations, and the com- parative statics method yields a unified approach to the problem of comparative risk...

  10. Integrated Project Delivery: Managing Liability Risks for the Design Professional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, Brian

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    - The term used to include new construction, reconstruction, renovation, restoration, major repair, demolition and all similar work upon buildings and ancillary facilities, including any draining, dredging, excavation, grading or similar work upon real... Delivery Method defined by the following characteristics: • Design and Construction are separate contracts (versus Design-Build, in which the contracts are combined) • The only criterion for final selection is lowest total construction cost Design...

  11. Risk and aversion in the integrated assessment of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crost, Benjamin; Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uncertainty a?ects the social cost of carbon and the optimalabatement rate and social cost of carbon than the standardsubstitution on the social cost of carbon and the optimal

  12. Risk Analysis, Grid Integration, and Resiliency - State and Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    What is likelihood of customers losing power? How many customers will lose power? What would be the likely length of the outage? What energy assets could be...

  13. Risk-Limiting Dispatch for Integrating Renewable Power Ram Rajagopal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    be balanced. Based on the forecasts, the SO purchases blocks of conventional power ahead of real time. The purchase contracts guarantee delivery of power over a specified block or interval of time, with each block block. Figure 1: Power block si is purchased ti-ahead of real time t; net demand is D(t). In addition

  14. Integrated Finance Organization Balancing Risk and Performance with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Petroleum Industry CFOs IBM GLOBAL BusIness seRvICes #12;Expanding the Innovation Horizon #12; Balancing of the earth's population is now engaged." ­ Ben Bernanke, Chairman, U.S. Federal Reserve, quoted in The New York Times In the globally interdependent marketplace, Chemical and Petroleum (C&P) organizations need

  15. Need for An Integrated Risk Model | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y ear R enewable E nergyEnergyNeed for An

  16. Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEtheInspection Report:InstructionsEnergy SafetyMethodology

  17. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation. The solar radiation data, in W/m 2 , werelight sensor and solar radiation data are shown in Figure 2-exceed those of the solar radiation data. Figure 2-3. Light

  18. Risk factors for infertility in nursing cows linked to calving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - sis model of etiological interactions, the complementary use of a logistic model and factorial as their market value, par- ticularly in relation to birth dates (Grenet, 1991). Our knowledge of the causes in a third of cases, while the others practiced mixed farming, cereal and oil-seed pro- duction

  19. Manifold Integration: Data Integration on Multiple Manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hee Youl

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    MANIFOLD INTEGRATION: DATA INTEGRATION ON MULTIPLE MANIFOLDS A Dissertation by HEE YOUL CHOI Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... May 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science MANIFOLD INTEGRATION: DATA INTEGRATION ON MULTIPLE MANIFOLDS A Dissertation by HEE YOUL CHOI Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements...

  20. Numerical Integration Numerical Summation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Henri

    Numerical Integration Numerical Summation Numerical Extrapolation Numerical Recipes for Multiprecision Computations #12;Numerical Integration Numerical Summation Numerical Extrapolation Multiprecision, integration, summation, extrapolation, evaluation of continued fractions, Euler products and sums, complete

  1. Risk assessment of climate systems for national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Brown, Theresa Jean; Cai, Ximing [University of Illinois-Urbana; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Constantine, Paul [Stanford University; Dalbey, Keith R.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Fields, Richard; Hart, David Blaine; Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Kerstein, Alan R.; Levy, Michael [National Center for Atmospheric Research; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Najm, Habib N.; Overfelt, James Robert; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Peplinski, William J.; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Taylor, Mark A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Villa, Daniel L.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change, through drought, flooding, storms, heat waves, and melting Arctic ice, affects the production and flow of resource within and among geographical regions. The interactions among governments, populations, and sectors of the economy require integrated assessment based on risk, through uncertainty quantification (UQ). This project evaluated the capabilities with Sandia National Laboratories to perform such integrated analyses, as they relate to (inter)national security. The combining of the UQ results from climate models with hydrological and economic/infrastructure impact modeling appears to offer the best capability for national security risk assessments.

  2. RADTRAN3. Radioactive Material Transport Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, M.M.; Taylor, J.M.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Reardon, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADTRAN3 is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, ingestion, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN3 can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  3. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  4. The Cauchy Integral Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Bell

    2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 23, 2009 ... Cauchy Integral Formula basics. I'm using the enumerate environment on this slide. 1. The Cauchy Integral Formula was discovered by Cauchy ...

  5. Risk Management in Biopharmaceutical Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply Chain Risk Managementof Recent Work on Supply Chain Risk Management . . . . .M. , Supply chain risk management: Outlining an agenda for

  6. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  7. (Energy Risk Professional, ERP), (GARP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    · ­ Dragana Pilipovic. Energy Risk: Valuing and Managing Energy Derivatives,2nd Edition (New York: Mc). 9: Risk Management of Energy Derivatives · ­ Alexander Triantis. Handbook of Modern Finance (New 1 ( ) : . (Energy Risk Professional, ERP

  8. Risk in the Weapons Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

  9. Cultural resource management: The risk of compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, S.A.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The statutory mandate for federal agencies to involve American Indians in the management of cultural resources may create a cultural risk for the people those statutes are intended to protect. A conceptual framework is given to help understand this dilemma. Factors that can exacerbate the severity of the adverse cultural impacts for tribal people are also examined. Policy recommendations are offered for reducing tensions among an the participants in the statutory process.

  10. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Le, A. Z. Khan, Improving integration for integrated coastal347 ISSUE 6225 Systems integration for global sustainabilitySUSTAINABILITY Systems integration for global sustainability

  11. Risk-Based Comparison of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe an integrated probabilistic risk assessment methodological framework and a decision-support tool suite for implementing systematic comparisons of competing carbon capture technologies. Culminating from a collaborative effort among national laboratories under the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), the risk assessment framework and the decision-support tool suite encapsulate three interconnected probabilistic modeling and simulation components. The technology readiness level (TRL) assessment component identifies specific scientific and engineering targets required by each readiness level and applies probabilistic estimation techniques to calculate the likelihood of graded as well as nonlinear advancement in technology maturity. The technical risk assessment component focuses on identifying and quantifying risk contributors, especially stochastic distributions for significant risk contributors, performing scenario-based risk analysis, and integrating with carbon capture process model simulations and optimization. The financial risk component estimates the long-term return on investment based on energy retail pricing, production cost, operating and power replacement cost, plan construction and retrofit expenses, and potential tax relief, expressed probabilistically as the net present value distributions over various forecast horizons.

  12. ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crisis and Risk Communication Crisis and Risk Communication Because a natural disaster, act of terrorism or other public emergency can happen without notice, having a planned,...

  13. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-7.

  14. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS application hosted in the cloud · Alaska DHHS fined $1.7M ­ Portable device stolen from vehicle · Mass Eye

  15. Turnitin Moodle Direct Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Turnitin Moodle® Direct Integration Instructor User Manual Turnitin Moodle Integration Manual: 1. Turnitin Moodle Integration Manual: 2 Contents Instructor User Manual 1 Creating a Turnitin Assignment 3 Accessing GradeMark® 15 Glossary 16 #12;Instructor User Manual Turnitin Moodle Integration Manual: 3

  16. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  17. Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique le Bihan Perceptions and Risk Management Strategies in French Oyster Farming Véronique Le Bihan, Sophie Pardo, Patrice and their businesses contribute to defining their degree of risk perception and reliance on management tools. Beyond

  18. THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uryasev, Stanislav

    THE FUNDAMENTAL RISK QUADRANGLE IN RISK MANAGEMENT, OPTIMIZATION AND STATISTICAL ESTIMATION1 R be confronted in numerous situations. Dealing with them systematically for purposes in risk management Statistical estimation is inevitably a partner with risk management in handling hazards, which may be known

  19. CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF INFORMATION SECURITY: AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF INFORMATION SECURITY: AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT OF RISK MANAGEMENT Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute) security, and the assurance of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information

  20. FRACTURE RISK PREDICTION USING BMD AND CLINICAL RISK FACTORS IN EARLY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,5 , Jacques Laparra 1 , Claude A. Ribot 1,2,3 and Patricia Dargent-Molina 4,5 1 Menopause Center, Hôpital post-menopausal women (mean age ( SD): 54 4 yr) with a mean follow-up period of 13.4 years ( 1.4 years WHO definition of osteoporosis (1), i.e. a bone mineral density (BMD) value less than 2.5 standard

  1. Identification of High-Speed Rail Ballast Flight Risk Factors and Risk Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Francesco Bedini Jacobini, Erol Tutumluer, Mohd Rapik Saat Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (Rail

  2. Rethinking Risk: Aspiration as Pure Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Greg B

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of an environmental decision problem where di¤erent investment packages (acts) lead to di¤erent possible levels of global wealth and overall levels of global warming. Avoiding the all too easy economic assumption that the global wealth levels can simply be adjusted... by some amount to re‡ect the e¤ect of the global temperature levels, we are now left with two numerical components in this problem. There are thus separate measures of risk aversion that deal with wealth and temperature, and therefore two di¤erent concepts...

  3. Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Policy is to formalize an Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) framework. Safeguards and security management systems provide a formal, organized process for planning, performing, assessing, and improving the secure conduct of work in accordance with risk-based protection strategies. These systems are institutionalized through Department of Energy (DOE) directives and contracts. Does not cancel other directives. Canceled by DOE P 470.1A.

  4. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT January 2008 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT CP-320 714-278-7346 #12;2006 ­ 2007 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management

  5. Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Eighth Annual Risk Management Conference Risk Management Amidst Global Rebalancing 10 ­ 11 July 2014, Singapore The Risk Management Institute (RMI) at the National University of Singapore invites submissions for its 8th annual conference on risk management in Singapore on 10 and 11 July 2014. We

  6. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT November 2006 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT LH-806C 714-278-7346 #12;2005 ­ 2006 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive Summary A. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management

  7. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT November 2005 OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT LH-806C 714-278-7346 #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Introduction The Office of University Risk Management provides resources, advice and training that allow

  8. Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus for the UK and the Republic of Ireland #12;2 PRA for Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus C.E. Sansford 23rd May 2013 Pest Risk Analysis Pest Risk Analysis for Hymenoscyphus (Kowalski and Holdenrieder, 2009). 1 Please cite this document as: Sansford, CE (2013). Pest Risk Analysis

  9. The Resilient Economy: Integrating Competitiveness and Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debbie van Opstal

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Globalization, technological complexity, interdependence, terrorism, climate and energy volatility, and pandemic potential are increasing the level of risk that societies and organizations now face. Risks also are increasingly interrelated; disruptions in one area can cascade in multiple directions. The ability to manage emerging risks, anticipate the interactions between different types of risk, and bounce back from disruption will be a competitive differentiator for companies and countries alike in the 21st century. What Policymakers Should Know The national objective is not just homeland protection, but economic resilience: the ability to mitigate and recover quickly from disruption. Businesses must root the case for investment in resilience strategies to manage a spectrum of risks, not just catastrophic ones. Making a business case for investment in defenses against low-probability events (even those with high impact) is difficult. However, making a business case for investments that assure business continuity and shareholder value is not a heavy lift. There are an infinite number of disruption scenarios, but only a finite number of outcomes. Leading organizations do not manage specific scenarios, rather they create the agility and flexibility to cope with turbulent situations. The investments and contingency plans these leading companies make to manage a spectrum of risk create a capability to respond to high-impact disasters as well. Government regulations tend to stovepipe different types of risk, which impedes companies abilities to manage risk in an integrated way. Policies to strengthen risk management capabilities would serve both security and competitiveness goals. What CEOs and Boards Should Know Operational risks are growing rapidly and outpacing many companies abilities to manage them. Corporate leadership has historically viewed operational risk management as a back office control function. But managing operational risks increasingly affects real-time financial performance. The 835 companies that announced a supply chain disruption between 1989 and 2000 experienced 33 percent to 40 percent lower stock returns than their industry peers. Twenty-five percent of companies that experienced an IT outage of two to six days went bankrupt immediately. Ninety-three percent of companies that lost their data center for 10 days or more filed for bankruptcy within a year.

  10. The Gulf Investment Framework, 20102025: Opportunities, Limitations, and Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Løw, Erik

    ­ is likely to remain a key area to the global oil industry for decades to come. The Gulf Investment Framework1 The Gulf Investment Framework, 2010­2025: Opportunities, Limitations, and Risks An integrated in other parts of the world, and despite efforts to make Western economies less dependent on oil, the Gulf

  11. Communicating Coastal Risk Analysis in an Age of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communicating Coastal Risk Analysis in an Age of Climate Change TR-11-04 Brian Blanton, John Mc in an Age of Climate Change Brian Blanton, John McGee, Oleg Kapeljushnik Renaissance Computing Institute of climate change complicates matters further. An immersive visualization environment integrating data from

  12. Wind Integration Study Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of common elements, differences, integration costs, and errors in integration analysis.

  13. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  14. CCSI Risk Estimation: An Application of Expert Elicitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a multi-laboratory simulation-driven effort to develop carbon capture technologies with the goal of accelerating commercialization and adoption in the near future. One of the key CCSI technical challenges is representing and quantifying the inherent uncertainty and risks associated with developing, testing, and deploying the technology in simulated and real operational settings. To address this challenge, the CCSI Element 7 team developed a holistic risk analysis and decision-making framework. The purpose of this report is to document the CCSI Element 7 structured systematic expert elicitation to identify additional risk factors. We review the significance of and established approaches to expert elicitation, describe the CCSI risk elicitation plan and implementation strategies, and conclude by discussing the next steps and highlighting the contribution of risk elicitation toward the achievement of the overarching CCSI objectives.

  15. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated risk assessment that could assist in the EM prioritization efforts. (authors)

  16. ITER risk workshop facilitator guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of planning risk management is to make everyone involved in a program aware that risk should be a consideration in the design, development, and fielding of a system. Risk planning is a tool to assess and mitigate events that might adversely impact the program. Therefore, risk management increases the probability/likelihood of program success and can help to avoid program crisis management and improve problem solving by managing risk early in the acquisition cycle.

  17. ITER risk workshop participant guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of planning risk management is to make everyone involved in a program aware that risk should be a consideration in the design, development, and fielding of a system. Risk planning is a tool to assess and mitigate events that might adversely impact the program. Therefore, risk management increases the probability/likelihood of program success and can help to avoid program crisis management and improve problem solving by managing risk early in the acquisition cycle.

  18. Int Psychogeriatr . Author manuscript Does the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile predict white-matter changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (DTI), we investigated whether the Framingham stroke risk profile (FSRP), a well validated risk participants would show reduced white-matter integrity with higher FSRP, and non-depressed controls (matched with major depression (age 71.8 7.7 years, mean FSRP 10.3 7.6) and 25 controls (age 71.8 7.3 years, mean FSRP

  19. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  20. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  1. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

  2. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins; John M. Beck

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

  3. Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.

    1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

  4. Risk Communication - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15A MegawattElectricity:Risk

  5. ASYMPTOTICS OF OSCILLATORY INTEGRALS ZACH LAMBERTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the associated toric resolution. Contents Introduction 1 1. Classical Analysis 4 1.1. The Gamma Function 4 1 stationary points. The present thesis is devoted to the understanding of the nature of this asymptotics when, the integral I(a) changes only by the multiplicative factor eic which does not affect the nature

  6. A tissue engineering strategy for integrative cartilage repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroszczyk, Keri A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue engineering for cartilage repair is a promising approach for improving the healing of articular defects, as biomaterials and growth factors can be supplied directly to a focal lesion. However, integrating neo-tissue ...

  7. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides a framework for identifying and managing key technical, schedule, and cost risks through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-7A, dated 1-12-11. Does not cancel other directives.

  8. Transmission Commercial Project Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improvement (CBPI) Customer Forum Energy Imbalance Market Generator Interconnection Reform Implementation Network Integration Transmission Service (NT Service) Network Open...

  9. Maximally Helicity Violating Disk Amplitudes, Twistors and Transcendental Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Stieberger; Tomasz R. Taylor

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain simple expressions for tree-level maximally helicity violating amplitudes of N gauge bosons from disk world-sheets of open superstrings. The amplitudes are written in terms of (N-3)! hypergeometric integrals depending on kinematic parameters, weighted by certain kinematic factors. The integrals are transcendental in a strict sense defined in this work. The respective kinematic factors can be succinctly written in terms of "dual" momentum twistors. The amplitudes are computed by using the prescription proposed by Berkovits and Maldacena.

  10. Economic development through biomass system integration: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. Chapters describe alfalfa basics, production risks, production economics, transportation and storage, processing, products, market analysis, business analysis, environmental impact, and policy issues. 69 figs., 63 tabs.

  11. Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

  12. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  13. KH Computational Physics-2006 Basic Numerical Algorithms Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    KH Computational Physics- 2006 Basic Numerical Algorithms Integration Numerical integration competing factors one needs to consider · speed - number of function evaluations or grid points · precision or "smart" meshes with lower order routines Kristjan Haule, 2006 ­1­ #12;KH Computational Physics- 2006

  14. Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

  15. Community-oriented information integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.6.1 Community-oriented Integration . . 2.6.2Chapter 5 Integration Conclusions and FutureFigure Community-oriented Integration Architecture . . . .

  16. Art Integration and Cognitive Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Dawn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    journal on arts integration in schools and communities. 1(Art Integration and Cognitive Development Dawn Baker,in the curriculum. Art integration involves learning core

  17. Motion Integration Using Competitive Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shuang; Lu, Hongjing; Lee, Alan; Yuille, Alan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to investigate motion integration across orientation andspace. VSS 2006. Motion integration using competitive priorsMotion integration using competitive priors Shuang Wu 1 ,

  18. Motion Integration Using Competitive Priors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang Wu; Hongjing Lu; Alan Lee; Alan Yuille

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to investigate motion integration across orientation andspace. VSS 2006. Motion integration using competitive priorsMotion integration using competitive priors Shuang Wu 1 ,

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Integration Energy Supply Transformation Needed On February 20, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Surety, Grid Integration,...

  20. Sports activities and risk of testicular cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Coldman; J. M. Elwooda; R. P. Gallagher; Nottingham Nottingham

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary.-The relationship of testicular seminoma with several factors was explored using a case-control study. Previously recognized associations with cryptorchidism and infantile inguinal hernia were confirmed and relationships were also found with cycling and horse-riding. These findings represent the first relationships of testicular cancer with well-defined postnatal risk factors. TESTICULAR CANCER is now the most common neoplasm in men aged 25-34 in England and Wales (Davies, 1981) and follows only non-melanoma skin cancer in Canada (Statistics Canada, 1980). Mortality in young men has been rising during this century in a number of countries (Davies, 1981; Grumet & MacMahon, 1958). Similar increases in incidence have been reported by several cancer registries for the age range 15-30 (Muir & Nectoux, 1978; Schottenfeld et al., 1980; Clemmesen, 1969; Petersen & Lee, 1972). Current estimates of incidence in British Columbia indicate that approximately 1 in 400 males will develop testicular cancer (Cancer Registry, 1975). The majority of studies of the epidemiology of testicular tumours have used routinely collected data to analyse the effects of factors such as social class, marital status, geography, racial group and religious preference. Case-control studies have analysed factors such as cryptorchidism and other prenatal conditions. Where it was examined, these studies have shown that, while differences exist in the age-specific incidence, treatment and prognosis of seminoma compared to other types of testicular cancer, the relationship to known risk factors is similar (Morrison, 1976b; Graham et al., 1977). The present report examines a number of characteristics of childhood and adolescence in a case-control study of all patients treated for seminoma of the testis at a regional treatment centre in the period 1970-77.

  1. Information Security Office Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    or Approved) 6/01/2013 CISO Jason Pufahl, CISO Approved 6/01/2013 RMAC Risk Management Advisory Council

  2. Environmental epidemiology: risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, R.L.; Whittemore, A.S. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the symposium are in the disciplines of biometry, environmental medicine, epidemiology, mathematics, and statistics. Attention is given to assessing risk due to environmental agents, particularly those known to be carcinogenic; both the complex medical issues involved and the mathematical and statistical methodologies used in analysis are presented. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  3. DRAFT NISTIR 8023 Risk Management for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with replication devices. Keywords 3D printers; 3D scanners; copiers; countermeasures; exploits; mitigation; multifunction devices; printers; replication devices; risk; risk assessment; risk management; scanners; security

  4. Sandia Energy - Risk and Safety Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk and Safety Assessment Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Risk and Safety AssessmentTara...

  5. Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    risk management process The cybersecurity risk management process explained in the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline has two primary...

  6. Risk transfer via energy savings insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fields of energy management and risk management are thusand Renewable Energy Options For Risk Management andbarriers to energy efficiency projects: risk of under-

  7. Equity Risk Premium and Insecure Property Rights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magin, Konstantin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper # 2009 -01 Equity Risk and Insecure Property Rightsof California Berkeley Equity Risk Premium and InsecureHow much of the equity risk premium puzzle can be attributed

  8. Risk-Averse Stochastic Dual Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Václav Kozmík

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2013 ... Abstract: We formulate a risk-averse multi-stage stochastic program using conditional value at risk as the risk measure. The underlying random ...

  9. Vulnerability, Risk Management, and Agricultural Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fafchamps, Marcel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. (1980). “Attitudes Towards Risk: Experimental MeasurementIncentive Flexibility, and Risk. ” Americal Journal ofCaria, A. S. (2009), Risk Attitudes and The Formation of

  10. Risk Taking and Gender in Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scotchmer, Suzanne

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Investors’ Attitudes toward Risk. ” forthcoming (2003)in attitudes toward ?nancial risk. ” Evolution and HumanGrossman. 2005a. “Sex and Risk: Experimen- tal Evidence. ” (

  11. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & INSTRUCTIONAL SAFETY 2009 ANNUAL REPORTS #12;2009 Annual Report Page 2 RISK MANAGEMENT I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management program is to compare the annual cost

  12. Algorithmic Aspects of Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stehr, Mark-Oliver

    Algorithmic Aspects of Risk Management Ashish Gehani1 , Lee Zaniewski2 , and K. Subramani2 1 SRI International 2 West Virginia University Abstract. Risk analysis has been used to manage the security of sys configuration. This allows risk management to occur in real time and reduces the window of exposure to attack

  13. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT 2003-04 ANNUAL REPORT OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RISK MANAGEMENT #12;2 I. Introduction "Of course you have to go out on a limb sometimes, that's where the best outcome in a changing environment, is the essence of risk management.3 This Report was developed

  14. Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Human Resources, Safety & Risk Management 1600 Holloway Avenue, ADM 252 San Francisco, California OF RISK AND AGREEMENT TO PAY CLAIMS Activity: San Francisco State University Campus Recreation Department participating in this Activity. I am aware of the risks associated with traveling to/from and participating

  15. Quantitative Risk Management Rudiger Frey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Rüdiger

    Lecture Quantitative Risk Management R¨udiger Frey Universit¨at Leipzig Wintersemester 2010 risk management C. Introduction to Portfolio Credit Derivatives c 2010 (Frey) 1 #12;A. Introduction of counterparties. Measuring and management of credit risk is of high importance for financial institutions

  16. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 ANNUAL REPORT #12;2010 Annual Report Page 2 I. Program Cost One method to assess the effectiveness of the University's risk management,538 $ 197,196 TOTAL Risk Management Costs $ 4,675,390 $ 4,541,975 $ 3,764,749 $ 3,703,959 $ 4

  17. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  18. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGER (FRM ) CERTIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Dec 2013 (Save 30%) (Save 15%) Module 1 Foundation of Risk Management & Quantitative Analysis 1086FINANCIAL RISK MANAGER (FRM® ) CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAM 2014 JANUARY INTAKE 4 January to 10 1321 1552 Module 2 Financial Markets and Products & Valuation and Risk Models 1637 1985 2333 Module 3

  19. RISK AND INVESTMENT IN LIBERALIZED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK AND INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT IN LIBERALIZED ELECTRICITY MARKETS Jacob Lemming Department during the period 2000­2003. The papers are centered around the theme Financial Risk in a Liberalized at Risk Management To be included in: Modelling Prices in Competitive Electricity Markets, edited by Derek

  20. Making Risk Models Operational for Situational Awareness and Decision Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Coles, Garill A.; Shoemaker, Steven V.

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Modernization of nuclear power operations control systems, in particular the move to digital control systems, creates an opportunity to modernize existing legacy infrastructure and extend plant life. We describe here decision support tools that allow the assessment of different facets of risk and support the optimization of available resources to reduce risk as plants are upgraded and maintained. This methodology could become an integrated part of the design review process and a part of the operations management systems. The methodology can be applied to the design of new reactors such as small nuclear reactors (SMR), and be helpful in assessing the risks of different configurations of the reactors. Our tool provides a low cost evaluation of alternative configurations and provides an expanded safety analysis by considering scenarios while early in the implementation cycle where cost impacts can be minimized. The effects of failures can be modeled and thoroughly vetted to understand their potential impact on risk. The process and tools presented here allow for an integrated assessment of risk by supporting traditional defense in depth approaches while taking into consideration the insertion of new digital instrument and control systems.

  1. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  2. K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Three bounding accidents postdated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing, and a hydrogen explosion. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

  3. Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    outcomes. This study built on this literature by investigating how child, parent, and family risk factors predicted school readiness in Head Start children using two statistical models. Specific aims of this study included identifying 1) to what degree...

  4. An Introduction to Risk with a Focus on Design Diversity in the Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The maintenance and security of nuclear weapons in the stockpile involves decisions based on risk analysis and quantitative measures of risk. Risk is a factor in all decisions, a particularly important factor in decisions of a large scale. One example of high-risk decisions we will discuss is the risk involved in design diversity within the stockpile of nuclear weapons arsenal. Risk is defined as 'possibility of loss or injury' and the 'degree of probability of such loss' (Kaplan and Garrick 12). To introduce the risk involved with maintaining the weapons stockpile we will draw a parallel to the design and maintenance of Southwest Airlines fleet of Boeing 737 planes. The clear benefits for cost savings in maintenance of having a uniform fleet are what historically drove Southwest to have only Boeing 737s in their fleet. Less money and resources are need for maintenance, training, and materials. Naturally, risk accompanies those benefits. A defect in a part of the plane indicates a potential defect in that same part in all the planes of the fleet. As a result, safety, business, and credibility are at risk. How much variety or diversity does the fleet need to mitigate that risk? With that question in mind, a balance is needed to accommodate the different risks and benefits of the situation. In a similar way, risk is analyzed for the design and maintenance of nuclear weapons in the stockpile. In conclusion, risk must be as low as possible when it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk, and to help balance options in stockpile stewardship.

  5. Montpellier 2125 July 2008 33 33 Integrative Acarology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these pathogens, and our perception of disease risk. Indeed, due to their ability to trigger sudden have become a major focus in ecology and evolution and the importance of integrating). The spatial environment of parasites is structured at two ecologically different spatial levels: the host

  6. DYNAMIC MODELING Commercial Office Building Measurements and Dynamic Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    in significantly increased consumption of natural gas (or other fuels). Implications: 1.Fuel risk · How do the gas infrastructure handle DG (both on the micro and macro scales)? 3.Natural gas or other fuel costs markets? Integration Issues: Regulation Regulation is necessary to make DG economical and safe

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies three loci associated with melanoma risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    Genome-wide association study identifies three loci associated with melanoma risk D Timothy Bishop1-wide association study of melanoma conducted by the GenoMEL consortium based on 317K tagging SNPs for 1 and cutaneous sun sensitivity, well-recognized melanoma risk factors. Common variants within the 9p21 locus have

  8. Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and Water-Saving Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Risk," in the context of measurement and verification (M&V), refers to the uncertainty that expected savings will be realized. Assumption of risk implies acceptance of the potential monetary consequences. Energy service companies (ESCOs) and agencies are each reluctant to assume responsibility for factors they cannot control, and holding certain parameters fixed in the M&V plan can match up responsibilities.

  9. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Wind Integration Datasets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmission Planning andStudy PhaseWind

  10. Assessment of ISLOCA risk-methodology and application to a combustion engineering plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISOLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed of description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Combustion Engineering plant.

  11. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  12. Technology Integration Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Integration Overview Dennis A. Smith - Clean Cities Deployment Connie Bezanson - Vehicle Education June 17, 2014 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE This presentation does not...

  13. Integrated Technology Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated technology deployment is a comprehensive approach to implementing solutions that increase the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Federal, state, and local...

  14. Technology Integration Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -Technology Integration Overview - Dennis A. Smith Connie Bezanson U. S. Department of Energy Headquarters Office - Washington, D.C. May 2013 Project ID: TI000 2013 Department of...

  15. Algal Integrated Biorefineries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Algae Program works closely with the Demonstration and Deployment Program on projects that can validate advancements toward commercialization at increasing scales. Integrated biorefineries...

  16. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Arthur J [ORNL] [ORNL; Joergensen, Mads [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL] [ORNL; Mikkelson, Ruth L [ORNL] [ORNL; Mikkelson, Dennis J [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL] [ORNL; Peterson, Peter F [ORNL] [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Hoffmann, Christina [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  17. Optimal risk sharing under distorted probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Michael; Young, Virginia R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory of risk. Geneva Pap. Risk Insurance Theory 25, 141–A. : Two-persons ef?cient risk-sharing and equilibria for36(2), 189–223 (2008) Optimal risk sharing under distorted

  18. Power Factor Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

  19. Risk Identification and Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15ARisk Identification and

  20. Risk Management RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -DepartmentRetail DemandEnergyRisk Management Review

  1. AMERIND Risk Annual Conference and Trade Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the AMERIND Risk, this three-day conference includes risk management training, workers' safety, human resources, and more.

  2. The integrity of oil and gas wells Robert B. Jacksona,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    COMMENTARY The integrity of oil and gas wells Robert B. Jacksona,b,1 a Department of Environmental concerns about oil and natural gas extraction these days inevitably turn to hydraulic fracturing, where--nearer the surface--emphasizing risks from spills, wastewater disposal, and the integrity of oil and natural gas

  3. Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risk Management Policy Category: Strategic Management 1. PURPOSE To support the University will be encouraged to speak openly and honestly. (iii) Managers will monitor risk and will disclose risks identified's risk appetite. 2.3. Risk management standards 2.3.1 The University's risk management framework

  4. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  5. Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Systems Integration (SI) subprogram works closely with industry, universities, and the national laboratories to overcome technical barriers to the large-scale deployment of solar technologies. To support these goals, the subprogram invests primarily in four areas: grid integration, technology validation, solar resource assessment, and balance of system development.

  6. On the Error in QR Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ] . . . [R(t2, t1) +E2][R(t1, t0) +E1]R(t0) , k = 1, 2, . . . , where Q(tk) is the exact Q-factor at tk and the triangular transitions R(tj , tj?1) are also the exact ones. Moreover, the factors Ej , j = 1, . . . , k, are bounded in norm by the local error... committed during integration of the relevant differential equations; see Theorems 3.1 and 3.16.” We will henceforth simply write (2.7) ?Ej? ? ?, j = 1, 2, . . . , and stress that ? is computable, in fact controllable, in terms of local error tolerances...

  7. Form factors in finite volume I: form factor bootstrap and truncated conformal space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pozsgay; G. Takacs

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the volume dependence of matrix elements of local fields to all orders in inverse powers of the volume (i.e. only neglecting contributions that decay exponentially with volume). Using the scaling Lee-Yang model and the Ising model in a magnetic field as testing ground, we compare them to matrix elements extracted in finite volume using truncated conformal space approach to exact form factors obtained using the bootstrap method. We obtain solid confirmation for the form factor bootstrap, which is different from all previously available tests in that it is a non-perturbative and direct comparison of exact form factors to multi-particle matrix elements of local operators, computed from the Hamiltonian formulation of the quantum field theory. We also demonstrate that combining form factor bootstrap and truncated conformal space is an effective method for evaluating finite volume form factors in integrable field theories over the whole range in volume.

  8. Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

  9. Risk assessment in environmental management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asante-Duah, D.K.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a straightforward exposition of US EPA-based procedures for the risk assessment and risk management of contaminated land, interwoven with discussions on some of the key fundamentals on the fate and transport of chemicals in the environment and the toxic action of environmental chemicals. The book is logically structured, commencing with a general overview of the principles of risk assessment and the interface with environmental legislation. There follows an introduction to environmental fate and transport, modeling, toxicology and uncertainty analysis, and a discussion of the elements of a risk assessment (site characterization, exposure analysis, toxic action and risk characterization), intake of a chemical with its environmental concentration and activity-related parameters such as inhalation rate and exposure time. The book concludes with a discussion on the derivation of risk-based action levels and remediation goals.

  10. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania TOLERABLE RISK FOR DAMS: HOW SAFE IS SAFE ENOUGH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    2 through a comprehensive and integrated consideration of the overall safety of a reservoir and value judgements. ICOLD (2005) ABSTRACT Risk assessment provides an opportunity to manage dam safety and Environmental Engineering and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management, Utah State University, Logan

  12. Factors for Bioenergy Market Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, A.; Hektor, B.; Graham, R.L.; Rakos, C.

    1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Focusing on the development of the whole bioenergy market rather than isolated projects, this paper contributes to the identification of barriers and drivers behind bioenergy technology implementation. It presents a framework for the assessment of the potentials for bioenergy market growth to be used by decision makers in administration and industry. The conclusions are based on case studies of operating bioenergy markets in Austria, US and Sweden. Six important factors for bioenergy market growth have been identified: (1) Integration with other business, e.g. for biomass procurement, (2) Scale effects of bioenergy market, (3) Competition on bioenergy market, (4) Competition with other business, (5) National policy, (6) Local policy and local opinion. Different applications of the framework are discussed.

  13. Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Process Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, J. A.

    HUMAN FACTORS ASPECTS OF ADVANCED PRO?CESS CONTROL John A. Shaw Combustion Engineering Taylor Instrument Division Rochester, New York ABSTRACT Energy conservation practices, such as heat recovery and integration, require that many... chemical and related processes use advanced control systems. Many of the more advanced process control strategies and algorithms can cause operator confusion, leading to incorrect operator actions and negating the advantages of the advanced control...

  14. Measurement of the ??*?? and ??*??' transition form factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Botov, A. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the reactions e?e??e?e??(') in the single-tag mode and measure the ??*??(') transition form factors in the momentum-transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV². The analysis is based on 469 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e?e? center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  15. Optimization of Convex Risk Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megiddo

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Key words: Convex analysis; Stochastic optimization; Risk measures; Duality. MSC2000 Subject Classification: Primary: 90C15,90C48; Secondary: 91B30, ...

  16. Section 10: Risk Management Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 2, 2014 ... In this lesson we will discuss some concepts from risk management and insurance. We will go over the basic definitions and discuss some ...

  17. Integrated assessment briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

  18. Risk assessment for improved treatment of health considerations in EIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demidova, Olga [Ecoline Environmental Assessment Center, PO Box 7 125047, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: odemidova@eac-ecoline.ru; Cherp, Aleg [Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Central European University (CEU), Nador u. 9, 1051, Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: cherpa@ceu.hu

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Risk Assessment (RA) processes are rarely used to complement each other despite potential benefits of such integration. This paper proposes a model for procedural and methodological integration of EIA and RA based on reported best practice approaches. The proposed model stipulates 'embedding' RA into EIA and is organized in accordance with the generic stages of the EIA process. The model forms the basis for the proposed Evaluation Package which can be used as a benchmarking tool for evaluating the effectiveness of integration of RA within particular EIAs. The current paper uses the package for evaluating seven Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) of waste incineration facilities in the UK produced between 1990 and 2000. Though RA was found to be an element of these EIAs, its prominence varied considerably from case to case. Systematic application of RA in accordance with the best practice was not observed. Particular omissions were demonstrated in assessing health impacts not directly associated with air emissions, identifying the receptors of health impacts (affected population), interpreting health impacts as health risks, dealing with uncertainties, and risk communications.

  19. PEV Integration with Renewables (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on integrating plug-in electric vehicles with the grid and using renewable energy to charge the grid. The Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI) and Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) are addressing the opportunities and technical requirements for vehicle grid integration that will increase marketability and lead to greater petroleum reduction.

  20. Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Supervisor's Vehicle Incident Report-Employee Volunteer Drivers License No. State of Issue UO Certification Date UO Driver Training Date Vehicle Information: License No. Make Model Year UO Vehicle # Motorpool Outside Rental Personal Vehicle Incident

  1. Study of factors related to childhood leukemia and to central nervous system tumors in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oksuzyan, Sona

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ross, Epidemiology of acute leukemia in children and adults.Risk factors for acute leukemia in children: a review.syndrome and childhood acute leukemia. Prog Clin Biol Res,

  2. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  3. Collective Risk Control And Group Security: The Unexpected Consequences of Differential Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Martin C; Ihori, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003) Group formation in risk-sharing arrangements, Reviewof Tokyo, Conference on risk management, August 2, 2002.2002) Collective international risk control: failure of the

  4. Risk information in support of cost estimates for the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Section 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelston, G.M.; Jarvis, M.F.; Warren, B.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Von Berg, R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(1) effort on the overall Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) project consists of four installation-specific work components performed in succession. These components include (1) development of source terms, 92) collection of data and preparation of environmental settings reports, (3) calculation of unit risk factors, and (4) utilization of the unit risk factors in Automated Remedial Action Methodology (ARAM) for computation of target concentrations and cost estimates. This report documents work completed for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for components 2 and 3. The product of this phase of the BEMR project is the development of unit factors (i.e., unit transport factors, unit exposure factors, and unit risk factors). Thousands of these unit factors are gene rated and fill approximately one megabyte of computer information per installation. The final unit risk factors (URF) are transmitted electronically to BEMR-Cost task personnel as input to a computer program (ARAM). Abstracted files and exhibits of the URF information are included in this report. These visual formats are intended to provide a sample of the final task deliverable (the URF files) which can be easily read without a computer.

  5. Problems on Integration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    INTEGRATION. V2.0. 1. One-liners. Problem 1. True of false: If f is a non-negative function defined on. R and. ?. R f dx < ?, then lim|x|?? f(x) = 0. Problem 2.

  6. INTEGRATING PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware February 2006 #12;INTEGRATING PHOTOVOLTAIC Delmarva Power Delaware Energy Office University of Delaware Center for Energy and Environmental Policy..................................................................................................... 5 3.3.1 Delaware's Solar Resource

  7. On Web Taxonomy Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dell

    We address the problem of integrating objects from a source taxonomy into a master taxonomy. This problem is not only pervasive on the nowadays web, but also important to the emerging semantic web. A straightforward approach ...

  8. SOLAR PROGRAM: SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 2. Current Request for Information (RFI) 3. Questions 4 | Systems Integration eere.energy.gov Summary of 1W Workshop Date: August 11th and 12th, 2010 Attendees: 86 total;...

  9. Integrated optical isolators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaman, Tauhid R

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Optical isolators are important components in lasers. Their main function is to eliminate noise caused by back-reflections into these lasers. The need for integrated isolators comes from the continuing growth ...

  10. The risk implications of approaches to setting soil remediation goals at hazardous waste contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labieniec, P.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated exposure and carcinogenic risk assessment model for organic contamination in soil, SoilRisk, was developed and used for evaluating the risk implications of both site-specific and uniform-concentration approaches to setting soil remediation goals at hazardous-waste-contaminated sites. SoilRisk was applied to evaluate the uncertainty in the risk estimate due to uncertainty in site conditions at a representative site. It was also used to evaluate the variability in risk across a region of sites that can occur due to differences in site characteristics that affect contaminant transport and fate when a uniform concentration approach is used. In evaluating regional variability, Ross County, Ohio and the State of Ohio were used as examples. All analyses performed considered four contaminants (benzene, trichloroethylene (TCE), chlordane, and benzo[a]pyrene (BAP)) and four exposure scenarios (commercial, recreational and on- and offsite residential). Regardless of whether uncertainty in risk at a single site or variability in risk across sites was evaluated, the exposure scenario specified and the properties of the target contaminant had more influence than variance in site parameters on the resulting variance and magnitude of the risk estimate. In general, variance in risk was found to be greater for the relatively less degradable and more mobile of the chemicals studied (TCE and chlordane) than for benzene which is highly degradable and BAP which is very immobile in the subsurface.

  11. READ AND SIGN THE PARTIAL ASSUMPTION OF RISK ON REVERSE Risk Management 12/2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    READ AND SIGN THE PARTIAL ASSUMPTION OF RISK ON REVERSE Risk Management 12/2012 Risk Management Conditions of Volunteer Service Please send completed form to the Office of Risk Management: riskmanagement ___________________________________________ (name/title of department supervisor) and the Office of Risk Management, (541) 346-8316, within 24 hours

  12. About the relevance ofthe concept of risk acceptability in the risk analysis and risk management process: A decisional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    About the relevance ofthe concept of« risk acceptability » in the risk analysis and risk management analysis and risk management are taken. This can be introduced by: ft) giving an image ofwhat are involved and participate to the risk management process. In France, the Toulouse disaster has revealed

  13. IDC Integrated Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, David J.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project Integrated Master Plan (IMP). The IMP presents the major accomplishments planned over time to re-engineer the IDC system. The IMP and the associate Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) are used for planning, scheduling, executing, and tracking the project technical work efforts. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  14. Simplistic Integration for Complex Wigglers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y (c) and (d) are for 35 integration steps, (e) and (f) arey — p y plot for 15 integration steps which is equivalent to32792 UC-410 Symplectic Integration for Complex Wigglers E.

  15. China's Civil-Military Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAFFERTY, Brian; SHRABERG, Aaron; CLEMENS, Morgan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China’s civil-military integration, and China’s high tech2013 China’s Civil-Military Integration Brian LAFFERTY Aarons pursuit of civil-military integration (CMI) intensified in

  16. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented.

  17. Integrated Project Management System description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Program Management System (IPMS) Description is a ``working`` document that describes the work processes of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA) and IPMS Group. This document has undergone many revisions since the UMTRA Project began; this revision not only updates the work processes but more clearly explains the relationships between the Project Office, contractors, and other participants. The work process flow style has been revised to better describe Project work and the relationships of participants. For each work process, more background and guidance on ``why`` and ``what is expected`` is given. For example, a description of activity data sheets has been added in the work organization and the Project performance and reporting processes, as well as additional detail about the federal budget process and funding management and improved flow charts and explanations of cost and schedule management. A chapter has been added describing the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program. The Change Control Board (CCB) procedures (Appendix A) have been updated. Project critical issues meeting (PCIM) procedures have been added as Appendix B. Budget risk assessment meeting procedures have been added as Appendix C. These appendices are written to act as stand-alone documentation for each process. As the procedures are improved and updated, the documentation can be updated separately.

  18. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  19. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  20. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Systems Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit |Infrastructure The foundation of

  1. ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TERRORIST ATTACKS Zimmerman, R. CREATE REPORT Under FEMA Grant EMW-2004-GR-0112 May 31, 2005 Center for Risk and Economic #12;2 Abstract The major economic effects of electric power outages are usually associated with three

  2. Physiological Integration and Phenotypic Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Physiological Integration and Phenotypic Variation in Vertebrates Seminar and Roundtable Guest Speaker: Lynn "Marty" Martin, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Integrative Biology, University

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IEC 61400-26 Availability Standard On June 12, 2014, in Analysis, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events,...

  4. Systems Integration | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Integration SHARE Systems Integration The Distributed Energy Communications and Controls (DECC) Laboratory offers a unique test bed for testing distributed energy...

  5. Development of a Risk-Based Comparison Methodology of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Thompson, Julie; Leclaire, Rene; Edward, Bryan; Jones, Edward

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the varying degrees of maturity among existing carbon capture (CC) technology alternatives, an understanding of the inherent technical and financial risk and uncertainty associated with these competing technologies is requisite to the success of carbon capture as a viable solution to the greenhouse gas emission challenge. The availability of tools and capabilities to conduct rigorous, risk–based technology comparisons is thus highly desirable for directing valuable resources toward the technology option(s) with a high return on investment, superior carbon capture performance, and minimum risk. To address this research need, we introduce a novel risk-based technology comparison method supported by an integrated multi-domain risk model set to estimate risks related to technological maturity, technical performance, and profitability. Through a comparison between solid sorbent and liquid solvent systems, we illustrate the feasibility of estimating risk and quantifying uncertainty in a single domain (modular analytical capability) as well as across multiple risk dimensions (coupled analytical capability) for comparison. This method brings technological maturity and performance to bear on profitability projections, and carries risk and uncertainty modeling across domains via inter-model sharing of parameters, distributions, and input/output. The integration of the models facilitates multidimensional technology comparisons within a common probabilistic risk analysis framework. This approach and model set can equip potential technology adopters with the necessary computational capabilities to make risk-informed decisions about CC technology investment. The method and modeling effort can also be extended to other industries where robust tools and analytical capabilities are currently lacking for evaluating nascent technologies.

  6. RMI 357e spring 2013 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    RMI 357e ­ spring 2013 1 Risk Management R M 357e Professor: Christopher McClellan Office: CBA 3 thomaspjacob@utexas.edu Syllabus ­ spring 2013 Textbook Risk Management for Enterprises and Individuals, v.1://students.flatworldknowledge.com/course/1112649 Risk Management: 357E. Risk Management - Upper-Division Course Principles of risk management

  7. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, R. S. [Ohio State Univ., 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  8. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  9. Examining Implicit Acculturation and Bicultural Identity Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miramontez, Daniel Robert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bicultural identity Integration (BII): Components, andBicultural identity integration (BII) and valence ofassimilation, separation, integration, and marginalization.

  10. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration: Workshop Proceedings Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings Proceedings for the Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop...

  11. PRA and Risk Informed Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernsen, Sidney A.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Balkey, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has introduced a risk based approach into Section XI that covers Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. The risk based approach requires application of the probabilistic risk assessments (PRA). Because no industry consensus standard existed for PRAs, ASME has developed a standard to evaluate the quality level of an available PRA needed to support a given risk based application. The paper describes the PRA standard, Section XI application of PRAs, and plans for broader applications of PRAs to other ASME nuclear codes and standards. The paper addresses several specific topics of interest to Section XI. Important consideration are special methods (surrogate components) used to overcome the lack of PRA treatments of passive components in PRAs. The approach allows calculations of conditional core damage probabilities both for component failures that cause initiating events and failures in standby systems that decrease the availability of these systems. The paper relates the explicit risk based methods of the new Section XI code cases to the implicit consideration of risk used in the development of Section XI. Other topics include the needed interactions of ISI engineers, plant operating staff, PRA specialists, and members of expert panels that review the risk based programs.

  12. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  13. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers` short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners` (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  14. Financial Policy Manual RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES 2601 Departmental Scope & Responsibility;Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2601 DEPARTMENTAL SCOPE & RESPONSIBILITY Subject: Risk Management & Insurance Effective: December 1986 Revised: May 2011 Last Reviewed: March 2014 Resp. Office: Risk Management

  15. Implementing Risk-Limiting Audits in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cast09.pdf. Philip B. Stark. Risk-limiting post-electionthe N.J. law the ?rst “risk-based statistical audit law. ”Holt bill does not limit risk. The Holt bill has a clause

  16. Predicting risk for the appearance of melanoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyskens, Frank L Jr; Ransohoff, David F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for projecting the absolute risk of breast cancer. J NatlD, Gail MH, et al: Cancer risk prediction models: A workshopal model of breast cancer risk prediction and implications

  17. Equity Risk Premium and Insecure Property Right

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magin, Konstantin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magin, K. , 2012. The Equity Risk Premium Puzzle: A Res-Edelstein, The Coleman Fung Risk Management Research CenterMagin, K. , 2009. Equity Risk Premium and Insecure Property

  18. DHS Office of Risk Management and Analysis | May 2011 1 Risk Management Issue Brief May 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    DHS Office of Risk Management and Analysis | May 2011 1 Risk Management Issue Brief May 2011 Geomagnetic Storms: An Evaluation of Risks and Risk Assessments By the Office of Risk Management and Analysis thoughtful discussion of critical risk management subjects among homeland security enterprise partners

  19. Parental occupational exposures and risk of childhood cancer: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, L.M.; Hicks, A.M.; Peters, J.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors reviewed the literature in order to summarize the present knowledge on the association between parental occupational exposures to chemicals and the risk of childhood malignancy. The 32 studies pertaining to this topic were evaluated by considering various study qualities such as sample size, specificity of outcome, confounding, exposure specificity, and control selection. When evaluating the findings from any epidemiologic study, the potential sources of bias have to be considered. The selection of subjects, misclassification of exposure or outcome, and confounding from extraneous factors can contribute to a biased estimate of effect. Studies done to minimize these potential biases will be more valid, and these studies should be given the most weight when parental occupational exposures are evaluated as risk factors for childhood malignancy. We conclude that the preponderance of evidence supports the hypothesis that occupational exposure of parents to chemicals increases the risk of childhood malignancy. The parental occupational exposures implicated in childhood malignancy risk are exposure to chemicals including paints, petroleum products, solvents (especially chlorinated hydrocarbons) and pesticides, and exposure to metals. The available data do not allow the identification of specific etiologic agents within these categories of compounds. Future epidemiologic and toxicologic studies should be designed to pursue these leads. 49 references.

  20. Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth in Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (ISBN 0471 975761) Edited by Peter Armitage and Theodore Colton John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 1998 #12;Numerical Integration Numerical integration is the study of how the numerical value of an integral can be found. Also called

  1. Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Numerical Integration Gordon K. Smyth May 1997 Numerical integration is the study of how the numerical value of an integral can be found. Also called quadrature, which refers to finding a square whose \\Lambda . Of central interest is the process of approximating a definite integral from values of the in

  2. Twisted symmetries and integrable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cicogna; G. Gaeta

    2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetry properties are at the basis of integrability. In recent years, it appeared that so called "twisted symmetries" are as effective as standard symmetries in many respects (integrating ODEs, finding special solutions to PDEs). Here we discuss how twisted symmetries can be used to detect integrability of Lagrangian systems which are not integrable via standard symmetries.

  3. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  4. Integrity at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department, HR

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fulfillment of its mission, CERN relies upon the trust and material support of its Member States and partners, and is committed to exercising exemplary stewardship of the resources with which it is entrusted. Accordingly, CERN expects the highest level of integrity from all its contributors (whether members of the personnel, consultants, contractors working on site, or persons engaged in any other capacity at or on behalf of CERN). Integrity is a core value of CERN, defined in the Code of Conduct as “behaving ethically, with intellectual honesty and being accountable for one’s own actions”.

  5. Integrated heterodyne terahertz transceiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A heterodyne terahertz transceiver comprises a quantum cascade laser that is integrated on-chip with a Schottky diode mixer. An antenna connected to the Schottky diode receives a terahertz signal. The quantum cascade laser couples terahertz local oscillator power to the Schottky diode to mix with the received terahertz signal to provide an intermediate frequency output signal. The fully integrated transceiver optimizes power efficiency, sensitivity, compactness, and reliability. The transceiver can be used in compact, fieldable systems covering a wide variety of deployable applications not possible with existing technology.

  6. Integrated heterodyne terahertz transceiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Nordquist, Christopher D. (Albuquerque, NM); Cich, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heterodyne terahertz transceiver comprises a quantum cascade laser that is integrated on-chip with a Schottky diode mixer. A terahertz signal can be received by an antenna connected to the mixer, an end facet or sidewall of the laser, or through a separate active section that can amplify the incident signal. The quantum cascade laser couples terahertz local oscillator power to the Schottky diode to mix with the received terahertz signal to provide an intermediate frequency output signal. The fully integrated transceiver optimizes power efficiency, sensitivity, compactness, and reliability. The transceiver can be used in compact, fieldable systems covering a wide variety of deployable applications not possible with existing technology.

  7. Integrated Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heins, S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 Customer Story Bemis Manufacturing Sheboygan Falls, WI Before After Energy & Financial Impacts Annual Energy Savings $317,897 Maintenance Savings $63,579 Payback Period Less than 2 years Annual Displaced Energy 6,300,289 kWh Displaced Capacity 731... 10 Off The Grid Sensor Integration Natural Daylight Base and Peak Energy Reduction 11 Lowest Cost Renewable Solar Integrated Lighting $1.0 million/MW $6 – 9 million/MW Wind $1.3 - 1.9 million/MW Biomass $1.5 – 2.5 million/MW Geothermal $1.6 million...

  8. Development of prototype guidelines for risk management against terror attack in the tourism industry: a Delphi study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Clifford Keith

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to gather strategies and factors from tourism security professionals from which terrorism risk management policies can be developed. This study utilized the Delphi method in order to provide ...

  9. DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline May 23, 2012 -...

  10. Optimization Online - Multilevel Optimization Modeling for Risk ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Eckstein

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 24, 2014 ... Abstract: Coherent risk measures have become a popular tool for incorporating risk aversion into stochastic optimization models. For dynamic ...

  11. Utility View of Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickham, J.

    This paper will address a utility perspective in regard to risk assessment, reliability, and impact on the utility system. Discussions will also include the critical issues for utilities when contracting for energy and capacity from cogenerators...

  12. Health risks of energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  13. Risk Aversion in Inventory Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xin

    Traditional inventory models focus on risk-neutral decision makers, i.e., characterizing replenishment strategies that maximize expected total profit, or equivalently, minimize expected total cost over a planning horizon. ...

  14. Inherited risk for common disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banava, Helen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linkage disequilibrium studies have discovered few gene-disease associations for common diseases. The explanation has been offered that complex modes of inheritance govern risk for cancers, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ...

  15. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  16. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  17. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  18. Integrated Safety Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The order ensures that DOE/NNSA, systematically integrates safety into management and work practices at all levels, so that missions are accomplished efficiently while protecting the workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels DOE M 450.4-1 and DOE M 411.1-1C

  19. Integrated Safety Management Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy establishes DOE's expectation for safety, including integrated safety management that will enable the Department’s mission goals to be accomplished efficiently while ensuring safe operations at all departmental facilities and activities. Cancels DOE P 411.1, DOE P 441.1, DOE P 450.2A, DOE P 450.4, and DOE P 450.7

  20. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sayler, Gary S. (Blaine, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for environmental pollutant detection, oil exploration, drug discovery, industrial process control, and hazardous chemical monitoring.

  1. Modular Integrated Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Building 3147 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 April 27, 2006 Prepared by: Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive Honeywell #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 5 Prototype Development Reference Design Documentation: Steve Gabel, Program Manager (612) 951-7555 Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis

  2. Modular Integrated Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Building 3147 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 July 22, 2005 Prepared by: Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive­April 2005 Honeywell #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 6 Field Monitoring Interim Report Period Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Prepared by: Steve Gabel, Program Manager (612) 951-7555 Honeywell Laboratories

  3. Modular Integrated Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Building 3147 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 March 24, 2005 Prepared by: Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive­December 2004 Honeywell #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 6 Field Monitoring Interim Report Period Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Prepared by: Steve Gabel, Program Manager (612) 951-7555 Honeywell Laboratories

  4. Modular Integrated Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Honeywell Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 6 Field Monitoring Interim Report Period Covered 3147 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Prepared by: Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis, MN 3147 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Prepared by: Steve Gabel, Program Manager (612) 951-7555 Honeywell

  5. integration division Human Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    integration division Human Systems Eye-Movement Metrics: Non-Intrusive Quantitative Tools for Monitoring Human Visual Performance Objective Approach Impact A reliable quantitative yet non-intrusive methodologies that provide quantitative yet non-intrusive measures of human visual performance for use

  6. Predicting the Risk of Pelvic Node Involvement Among Men With Prostate Cancer in the Contemporary Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Paul L. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu; Chen, M.-H. [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Katz, Matthew S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saints Medical Center, Lowell, MA (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The 'Roach formula' for the risk of pelvic lymph node metastases [(2/3) * PSA + (Gleason score - 6) * 10] was developed in the early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era. We examined the accuracy of this formula in contemporary patients. Methods: We included men in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry with a diagnosis of clinical T1c-T4 prostate cancer in 2004 who had a surgical lymph node evaluation, Gleason score (typically from prostatectomy), and baseline PSA level (n = 9,387). Expected and observed rates of node positivity were compared. Results: Ninety-eight percent were clinical T1c/T2, and 97% underwent prostatectomy. Overall, 309 patients (3.29%) had positive lymph nodes. Roach scores overestimated the actual rate of positive lymph nodes in the derivation set by 16-fold for patients with Roach score less than or equal to 10%, by 7-fold for scores greater than 10-20%, and by approximately 2.5-fold for scores greater than 20%. Applying these adjustment factors to Roach scores in the validation data set yielded accurate predictions of risk. For those with Roach score less than or equal to 10%, adjusted expected risk was 0.2% and observed risk was 0.2%. For Roach score greater than 10-20%, adjusted expected risk was 2.0% and observed risk was 2.1%. For Roach score greater than 20-30%, adjusted expected risk was 9.7% and observed risk was 6.5%. For Roach score greater than 30-40%, adjusted expected risk was 13.9% and observed risk was 13.9%. Conclusion: Applied to contemporary patients with mainly T1c/T2 disease, the Roach formula appears to overestimate pelvic lymph node risk. The adjustment factors presented here should be validated by using biopsy Gleason scores and extended lymphadenectomies.

  7. Direct numerical integration for multi-loop integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Becker; Stefan Weinzierl

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to construct a suitable contour deformation in loop momentum space for multi-loop integrals. This contour deformation can be used to perform the integration for multi-loop integrals numerically. The integration can be performed directly in loop momentum space without the introduction of Feynman or Schwinger parameters. The method can be applied to finite multi-loop integrals and to divergent multi-loop integrals with suitable subtraction terms. The algorithm extends techniques from the one-loop case to the multi-loop case. Examples at two and three loops are discussed explicitly.

  8. The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    to assess the nation's military preparedness. However, risk management is not a panacea for the problemsThe Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated Techniques Provide the Predicted Benefits? Chris. W. Johnson, Glasgow

  9. A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

  10. Operational risk of a wind farm energy production by Extreme Value Theory and Copulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we use risk management techniques to evaluate the potential effects of those operational risks that affect the energy production of a wind farm. We concentrate our attention on three major risk factors: wind speed uncertainty, wind turbine reliability and interactions of wind turbines due mainly to their placement. As a first contribution, we show that the Weibull distribution, commonly used to fit recorded wind speed data, underestimates rare events. Therefore, in order to achieve a better estimation of the tail of the wind speed distribution, we advance a Generalized Pareto distribution. The wind turbines reliability is considered by modeling the failures events as a compound Poisson process. Finally, the use of Copula able us to consider the correlation between wind turbines that compose the wind farm. Once this procedure is set up, we show a sensitivity analysis and we also compare the results from the proposed procedure with those obtained by ignoring the aforementioned risk factors.

  11. Rapid Risk Assessment: FY05 Annual Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Strenge, Dennis L.; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Simpson, Mary J.; Young, Joan K.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Downing, Timothy R.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Hachmeister, Lon E.

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing decision support tools that will assist in the transition of incident information into Protective Action Recommendations (PARs) that are understandable and can be executed in a real-world, operational environment. During emergencies, responders must rapidly assess risks and decide on the best course of action—all within minutes to hours. PNNL is blending existing modeling and decision support technology to develop new methods for transitioning science-based threat assessment to PARs. The rapid risk assessment tool will be both understandable and applicable to the emergency management community and would be a valuable tool during any water security-related incident. In 2005, PNNL demonstrated the integration of the multi-thematic modeling with emergency management decision support tools to create a Rapid Risk Assessment (RRA) tool that will transition risk to PARs that assist in responding to or mitigating the direct and indirect impacts of the incident(s). The RRA tool does this by aligning multi-thematic modeling capabilities with real-world response zones established by emergency and site operations managers. The RRA tool uses the risk assessment tool to drive prognostic models that use the type of incident, time of impact, severity of impact, and duration of impact to select the most appropriate PAR. Because PARs (and the thresholds by which they are selected) are jointly established by the technologists and the emergency management and operations decision makers, the science-based risk assessment can transition into a recommendation that can be understood and executed by people in the field.

  12. Quantum measure and integration theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan Gudder

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article begins with a review of quantum measure spaces. Quantum forms and indefinite inner-product spaces are then discussed. The main part of the paper introduces a quantum integral and derives some of its properties. The quantum integral's form for simple functions is characterized and it is shown that the quantum integral generalizes the Lebesgue integral. A bounded, monotone convergence theorem for quantum integrals is obtained and it is shown that a Radon-Nikodym type theorem does not hold for quantum measures. As an example, a quantum-Lebesgue integral on the real line is considered.

  13. RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application OIA/OCA Risk Methodology, Document # 04 to LBNL #12;RISK SEVERITY GUIDELINES For Issues Management Application OIA/OCA Risk Methodology, Document.03.001.000, Rev. 3 Issue Management Program Application 11-30-13 IMPACT Impact is determined by considering what

  14. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellekens, Michel P.

    1 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY 1. Risk Management 1.1 Responsibility of accountability, probity and compliance. Risk management is an essential element of the process of governance. 1.2 The HEA Code of Governance of Irish Universities emphasises the importance of Risk Management to good

  15. MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREES IN Risk Management About Queens College Often referred to as "the jewel.92$4#"!,&&%"*)0&$(.&/$6):,$)$-#")5,#$)*5$5,,4,#$&'%00$ &,/$%!$/6,7$6"4,$/"$&/)7$"*$/"4$"!$/6,%#$3,05&; Queens College master's degrees in Risk Management will help Master's Degrees in Risk Management Queens College offers 30credit MS in Risk Management degrees

  16. QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS* Paul Embrechts Department of Mathematics ETH Zurich www.math.ethz.ch/~embrechts #12;QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES Theorems of Quantitative Risk Management · PE's Desert-Island Copula · Example 1: Credit Risk · Example 2

  17. Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts ETH-Z¨urich 1. Basel II and its risk management consequences 2. An overview of credit risk models 3. Modelling extremes: use and limitations 4@math.ethz.ch Homepage: http://www.math.ethz.ch/embrechts #12;Lecture 1: Basel II and its risk management consequences

  18. Annual Report: National Risk Assessment Partnership (30 September 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromhal, Grant; Guthrie, George

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is conducting research to advance the science and engineering knowledge base for technologies that will accelerate the business case for CO{sub 2} capture and storage, including prediction and quantification of risks that may relate to potential liabilities. As part of this effort, NETL, through its Office of Research and Development (ORD), is leading a multi-laboratory effort that leverages broad technical capabilities across the DOE complex: the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP). NRAP involves five DOE national laboratories: NETL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This team is working together to develop a science-based method for quantifying the likelihood of risks (and associated potential liabilities) for CO{sub 2} storage sites. NRAP is an effort that harnesses the breadth of capabilities across the DOE National Laboratory (NL) system into a mission-focused platform that will develop the integrated science base that can be applied to risk assessment for long-term storage of CO{sub 2}.

  19. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany) [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Renn, Ortwin [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany)] [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany); Vanclay, Frank [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Volker [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany)] [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Karami, Ezatollah [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

  20. Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050-00487175,version2-10Feb2011 #12;1. Introduction Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing the CO2 is assessed integrating all steps of the CCS chain: additional coal production, coal transportation, carbon

  1. Ecological Risk Assessment: A Tool for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    #12;#12;Ecological Risk Assessment: A Tool for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach for Southern Current Large Marine Ecosystem Programme (BCLME), the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and Integrating Multiple Demands on Coastal Zones with Emphasis on Aquatic Ecosystems and Fisheries (INCOFISH

  2. Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Risk Analyses and Implications for Public Acceptance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    siting. Survey respondents were asked whether they would accept the construction of a natural gas in global greenhouse gas emissions, but one of the unanswered questions about CCS is whether assessment perspectives and methods is then integrated with the GS risk review to forecast whether GS

  3. Robust Strategy Synthesis for Probabilistic Systems Applied to Risk-Limiting Renewable-Energy Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Robust Strategy Synthesis for Probabilistic Systems Applied to Risk-Limiting Renewable-Energy pricing and dispatch strategies in smart grids that integrate re- newable sources of energy. We use}@eecs.berkeley.edu ABSTRACT We address the problem of synthesizing control strategies for El- lipsoidal Markov Decision

  4. Tradeable risk permits to prevent future introductions of invasive alien species into the Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    or control of IAS populations (e.g., integrated pest management [IPM]), or adaptation. Historically, efforts; Risk management; Permit trading 1. Introduction Invasive alien species (IAS)--species that establish, damage, or degrade assets (e.g., power plants, boats, piers, and reservoirs) and result in significant

  5. Call for Participation in a Workshop on Inter-Infrastructure Risks Due to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    that will help distribute renewable energy through to the SESAR proposals for European software integrationCall for Participation in a Workshop on Inter-Infrastructure Risks Due to Natural Hazards systems (e.g., transport, water supply and sewers, energy, communications). These interdependencies

  6. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  7. Influence of graphene on quality factor variation in a silicon ring resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Rai, E-mail: takahashi.rai@lab.ntt.co.jp [NTT Nanophotonics Center, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); NTT Microsystem Integration Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Tanabe, Shinichi; Hibino, Hiroki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Tsuchizawa, Tai; Yamada, Koji [NTT Nanophotonics Center, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); NTT Microsystem Integration Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi [NTT Microsystem Integration Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Nakajima, Hirochika [Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Selectively patterned graphene is integrated onto a silicon ring resonator to investigate the quality factor (Q factor) variation. The Q factor sharply decreases from 7900 to 1200 as the patterned graphene length increases from 0 to 20??m. A numerical estimation, which takes into account optical absorption by graphene, shows an exponential damping of the Q factor with increasing graphene length and is consistent with the experimental result. We expect these fundamental characterizations to be helpful in developing graphene-integrated silicon photonics applications.

  8. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  9. Integrated Optical Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Frogget, Douglas DeVore, Vincent Romero, David Esquibel, and David Holtkamp

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical probes used in velocimetry measurements have typically been individual probes that collect data for a single diagnostic at a single point. These probes have been used in diagnostics such as VISAR, PDV, and radiometry, which measure surface velocity, temperature, and other characteristics. When separate probes are used for these measurements, the different diagnostic points measured must be significantly separated. We have developed integrated probes that collect data for multiple optical diagnostics; these probes measure points in close proximity.

  10. Integrated Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heins, S.

    Integrated Energy Efficiency Steve Heins VP Communications and Government Affairs Orion Energy Systems, Inc. 2 MegaTrend Convergence We need companies to commercialize technologies that use less energy without compromise to operations. Energy... Environment US electricity consumption growing 43% by 2030 Power generation expected to account for 50% of CO 2 emission increases 3 How Electricity Is Used 24 Hour Operation Midnight 6 a.m. Noon 6 p.m. Midnight kW 4 Lighting is a Major Component...

  11. Nonlinear Optics in Doped Silica Glass Integrated Waveguide Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchesne, David; Razzari, Luca; Morandotti, Roberto; Little, Brent; Chu, Sai T; Moss, David J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated photonic technologies are rapidly becoming an important and fundamental milestone for wideband optical telecommunications. Future optical networks have several critical requirements, including low energy consumption, high efficiency, greater bandwidth and flexibility, which must be addressed in a compact form factor.

  12. Visual Sample Plan (VSP) - FIELDS Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsipher, Brent A.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Carlson, Deborah K.; Bing-Canar, John; Cooper, Brian; Roth, Chuck

    2003-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Two software packages, VSP 2.1 and FIELDS 3.5, are being used by environmental scientists to plan the number and type of samples required to meet project objectives, display those samples on maps, query a database of past sample results, produce spatial models of the data, and analyze the data in order to arrive at defensible decisions. VSP 2.0 is an interactive tool to calculate optimal sample size and optimal sample location based on user goals, risk tolerance, and variability in the environment and in lab methods. FIELDS 3.0 is a set of tools to explore the sample results in a variety of ways to make defensible decisions with quantified levels of risk and uncertainty. However, FIELDS 3.0 has a small sample design module. VSP 2.0, on the other hand, has over 20 sampling goals, allowing the user to input site-specific assumptions such as non-normality of sample results, separate variability between field and laboratory measurements, make two-sample comparisons, perform confidence interval estimation, use sequential search sampling methods, and much more. Over 1,000 copies of VSP are in use today. FIELDS is used in nine of the ten U.S. EPA regions, by state regulatory agencies, and most recently by several international countries. Both software packages have been peer-reviewed, enjoy broad usage, and have been accepted by regulatory agencies as well as site project managers as key tools to help collect data and make environmental cleanup decisions. Recently, the two software packages were integrated, allowing the user to take advantage of the many design options of VSP, and the analysis and modeling options of FIELDS. The transition between the two is simple for the user – VSP can be called from within FIELDS, automatically passing a map to VSP and automatically retrieving sample locations and design information when the user returns to FIELDS. This paper will describe the integration, give a demonstration of the integrated package, and give users download instructions and software requirements for running the integrated package.

  13. Environmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    - son 1974; Webster et al. 2005), and the Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index (Bell et al. 2000, the PDI is also accumulated over each year. Annually accumulated integral metrics such as ACE and PDI showEnvironmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL Program

  14. Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Werner, M.; Spikes, A.; Komomua, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility. In anticipation of the opening of the ESIF, NREL held the workshop August 21-23, 2012 and invited participants from utilities, government, industry, and academia to discuss renewable integration challenges and discover new ways to meet them by taking advantage of the ESIF's capabilities.

  15. Integrative Bioengineering Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddington, David; Magin,L,Richard; Hetling, John; Cho, Michael

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfabrication enables many exciting experimental possibilities for medicine and biology that are not attainable through traditional methods. However, in order for microfabricated devices to have an impact they must not only provide a robust solution to a current unmet need, but also be simple enough to seamlessly integrate into standard protocols. Broad dissemination of bioMEMS has been stymied by the common aim of replacing established and well accepted protocols with equally or more complex devices, methods, or materials. The marriage of a complex, difficult to fabricate bioMEMS device with a highly variable biological system is rarely successful. Instead, the design philosophy of my lab aims to leverage a beneficial microscale phenomena (e.g. fast diffusion at the microscale) within a bioMEMS device and adapt to established methods (e.g. multiwell plate cell culture) and demonstrate a new paradigm for the field (adapt instead of replace). In order for the field of bioMEMS to mature beyond novel proof-of-concept demonstrations, researchers must focus on developing systems leveraging these phenomena and integrating into standard labs, which have largely been ignored. Towards this aim, the Integrative Bioengineering Institute has been established.

  16. Risk management in concurrent engineering in presence of intelligent agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    Risk management in concurrent engineering in presence of intelligent agents Taner Bilgi describe how a specific facet of systems engineering (risks) can be managed for large, concurrent with risks. Risk management has three stages to it: 1. Risk assessment 2. Risk analysis 3. Risk handling Risk

  17. Structure of the EGF receptor transactivation circuit integrates with cell context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joslin, Elizabeth J.

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is thought to be a process by which a variety of cellular inputs can be integrated into a single signaling pathway through either stimulated proteolysis ...

  18. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baynes, P.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies.

  19. Risk management & organizational uncertainty implications for the assessment of high consequence organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, C.T.

    1995-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Post hoc analyses have demonstrated clearly that macro-system, organizational processes have played important roles in such major catastrophes as Three Mile Island, Bhopal, Exxon Valdez, Chernobyl, and Piper Alpha. How can managers of such high-consequence organizations as nuclear power plants and nuclear explosives handling facilities be sure that similar macro-system processes are not operating in their plants? To date, macro-system effects have not been integrated into risk assessments. Part of the reason for not using macro-system analyses to assess risk may be the impression that standard organizational measurement tools do not provide hard data that can be managed effectively. In this paper, I argue that organizational dimensions, like those in ISO 9000, can be quantified and integrated into standard risk assessments.

  20. The Role of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Regulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation and Function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Harmony 1985-

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase integral in regulating cell growth, survival, and migration. EGFR signaling, which is dependent on localization of the receptor within lipid rafts, is often...

  1. Computational studies on the factors influencing stabilities of collagen-like peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Nai-yuan, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, thermodynamic integration and molecular dynamics methods were used to elucidate the factors affecting stabilities of collagen-like peptides. We proposed to investigate three specific aspects: (1) the stabilizing ...

  2. A socio-technical account of risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Wesley Raymond

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to determining risk. Roger E. and Jeanne X. Kasperson propose a conception of risk that is nevertheless still a species of the positivist concept. Unlike Starr and Whipple, the Kaspersons conception of risk focuses heavily on the influence of the human... Roger and Jeanne Kasperson. Not only does she question the manner in which risks are chosen for analysis, she also challenges the legitimacy of the methodologies associated with quantitative risk analysis. Jasanoff does this by performing a cross...

  3. January 2005 INTEGRATING IT SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2005 INTEGRATING IT SECURITY INTO THE CAPITAL PLANNING AND INVESTMENT CONTROL PROCESS By Joan S. Hash, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology Introduction To assist federal agencies with effec tively integrating security

  4. Unit 15: Risk Management To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 15: Risk Management Objectives Ð To explain the concept of risk & to develop its role within the software development process Ð To introduce the use of risk management as a means of identifying ¥ Techniques & heuristics for the identification, analysis, treatment & monitoring of risk ¥ Risk management

  5. RISK MANAGEMENT AND RISK ANALYSIS-BASED DECISION TOOLS FOR ATTACKS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    RISK MANAGEMENT AND RISK ANALYSIS- BASED DECISION TOOLS FOR ATTACKS ON ELECTRIC POWER Simonoff, J.usc.edu/create Report #04-004DRAFT #12;Risk Management and Risk Analysis-Based Decision Tools for Attacks on Electric for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events University of Southern California Los Angeles

  6. Methodology of organizational learning in risk management A method of organizational risk perception by the stakeholders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Methodology of organizational learning in risk management A method of organizational risk Experience reflection, organizational risks, food-related sanitary alert, risk perception. Abstract for organizational risks applied to the management of sanitary alerts by the General Directorate for Food (DGAl

  7. Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

  8. Public Health FAT FACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    : THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

  9. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabala, Dana [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  10. Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15A MegawattElectricity: 30Risk

  11. Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15ARisk IdentificationRisk

  12. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration: Policy vs. practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. (Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)); Wolff, T.A. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overwhelmed with environmental protection documentation requirements, a number of Federal agencies are grappling with the complexities of attempting to integrate'' the documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). While there is some overlap between the general environmental policy objectives of NEPA, and the much more specific waste cleanup objectives of CERCLA and RCRA, there are also major differences and outright conflicts. This paper identifies both problems and opportunities associated with implementing emerging and evolving Federal agency policy regarding integration of the procedural and documentation requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. The emphasis is on NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration policy and practice at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The paper provides a comparative analysis of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA processes and discusses special integration issues including scoping, development and analysis of alternatives, risk assessment, tiering, scheduling, and the controversy surrounding applicability of NEPA to CERCLA or RCRA cleanup activities. Several NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy options are evaluated and an annotated outline of an integrated NEPA/CERCLA document is included.

  13. Pendulum Integration and Elliptic Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. L. Garrido; G. Gallavotti

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Revisiting canonical integration of the classical pendulum around its unstable equilibrium, normal hyperbolic canonical coordinates are constructed

  14. Noncommutative integrable systems and quasideterminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamanaka, Masashi [Department of Mathematics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss extension of soliton theories and integrable systems into noncommutative spaces. In the framework of noncommutative integrable hierarchy, we give infinite conserved quantities and exact soliton solutions for many noncommutative integrable equations, which are represented in terms of Strachan's products and quasi-determinants, respectively. We also present a relation to an noncommutative anti-self-dual Yang-Mills equation, and make comments on how 'integrability' should be considered in noncommutative spaces.

  15. Integrated Biorefineries | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    displayed. Integrated biorefineries use novel technologies and diverse biomass feedstocks-requiring significant investments in research, development, and deployment to...

  16. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  17. Initial Decision and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision and Risk Analysis capabilities will be developed for industry consideration and possible adoption within Year 1. These tools will provide a methodology for merging qualitative ranking of technology maturity and acknowledged risk contributors with quantitative metrics that drive investment decision processes. Methods and tools will be initially introduced as applications to the A650.1 case study, but modular spreadsheets and analysis routines will be offered to industry collaborators as soon as possible to stimulate user feedback and co-development opportunities.

  18. Lectures on integrable Hamiltonian systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sardanashvily

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider integrable Hamiltonian systems in a general setting of invariant submanifolds which need not be compact. For instance, this is the case a global Kepler system, non-autonomous integrable Hamiltonian systems and integrable systems with time-dependent parameters.

  19. In vitro model of injury/cytokine-induced cartilage catabolism modulated by dynamic compression, growth factors, and glucocorticoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation of articular cartilage is the hallmark in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). It still remains largely unknown which precise mechanisms initiate cartilage degradation. However, risks factors include ...

  20. J Bone Miner Res . Author manuscript Fracture risk prediction using BMD and clinical risk factors in early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ,651 peri- and early post-menopausal women (mean age (± SD): 54 4 yr) with a mean follow-up period of 13 Density ; Female ; Fractures, Bone ; etiology ; Humans ; Middle Aged ; Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal definition of osteoporosis ( ), i.e. a bone mineral density (BMD) value less than 2.5 standard deviations