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1

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

Callahan, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Risk Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A set of issues that state and local governments should carefully consider, with the goal of helping them assess and anticipate solutions for some worst case or unfortunate case scenarios as they...

6

EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

Wiltse, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Risk Assess - updated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

8

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NUREG-1150 risk assessment methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NCR's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150. After the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, the NRC initiated a sever accident research program to develop an improved understanding of severe accidents and to provide a second technical basis to support regulatory decisions in this area. A key product of this program is NUREG-1150, which provides estimates of risk for several nuclear reactors of different design. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. A major aspect of the work was the development of a methodology that improved upon previous full-scale probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) in several areas which are described.

Benjamin, A.S.; Amos, C.N.; Cunningham, M.A.; Murphy, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Study of Risk Assessment Programs at Federal Agencies and Commercial Industry Related to the Conduct or Regulation of High Hazard Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Recommendation 2009-1, the DOE committed to studying the use of quantitative risk assessment methodologies at government agencies and industry. This study consisted of document reviews and interviews of senior management and risk assessment staff at six organizations. Data were collected and analyzed on risk assessment applications, risk assessment tools, and controls and infrastructure supporting the correct usage of risk assessment and risk management tools. The study found that the agencies were in different degrees of maturity in the use of risk assessment to support the analysis of high hazard operations and to support decisions related to these operations. Agencies did not share a simple, 'one size fits all' approach to tools, controls, and infrastructure needs. The agencies recognized that flexibility was warranted to allow use of risk assessment tools in a manner that is commensurate with the complexity of the application. The study also found that, even with the lack of some data, agencies application of the risk analysis structured approach could provide useful insights such as potential system vulnerabilities. This study, in combination with a companion study of risk assessment programs in the DOE Offices involved in high hazard operations, is being used to determine the nature and type of controls and infrastructure needed to support risk assessments at the DOE.

Bari, R.; Rosenbloom, S.; O'Brien, J.

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

12

Mercury Risk Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

13

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents Y-12 RA Graphic Results Y-12 Baseline Risk Assessment Results Y-12 Screening Risk Assessment Results Bullet Graphic Risk Results Arrow Bear Creek Valley Maps Residential Landuse Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 1 - 900) Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-4 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-5 - 10-4) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-6 - 10-5) Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,2- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,2- Hazard Groundwater - Nitrate Hazard Groundwater - Radium Risk Groundwater - Technetium-99 Risk Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Hazard Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Risk

14

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphic Results Graphic Results Baseline Risk Assessment Results Screening Risk Assessment Results Other Risk Assessment Results Graphic Results K-25 Groundwater Residential Landuse Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-30) Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Bedrock Wells - Total Risk Bedrock Wells - Arsenic Risk Bedrock Wells - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Bedrock Wells - Trichloroethene Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-150) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-4 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-6 - 10-4) Unconsolidated Wells - Arsenic Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Trichloroethene Risk ORNL WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk

15

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Bullet Baseline Risk Assessments Bullet Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Environmental Assessment Report South Campus Facility, Oak Ridge Tenn [DOE/OR/02-1274&D] Bullet Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek [DOE/OR/1119 & D2 & V2] Bullet Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study Report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit [DOE/OR/01 1282 & D1] [ORNL/ER-2] Bullet The Utility of Existing Data Conducting a CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (draft) [ORNL/ER-?] Bullet East Fork Poplar Creek Sewer Line Beltway Remedial Investigation Report [DOE/OR/02-1119&D2] Bullet Screening Risk Assessments Bullet Preliminary Assessment of Radiation Doses to the Public from Cesium

16

Risk Identification and Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitigation Technique |Internal Control (if needed)| ||| ||| ||| References RiskOpportunity Categories People - Risks that affect the individual well being. Mission...

17

Risk Assessment Approaches for Nanomaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%) with extrapolation to lower "acceptable" risk 3. Analogy or comparative toxicity to other substances with similar7/3/2013 1 Risk Assessment Approaches for Nanomaterials Eileen D. Kuempel, PhD Nanotechnology to Nanomaterials Risk Assessment 1. No observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) or lowest (LOAEL) with uncertainty

Farritor, Shane

18

Risk assessment and the law  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Risk assessment and the law ... I am not at all sure that federal judges, immune from the political process, should ever be involved, under any circumstances, as arbiters of the degree of risk acceptable to the public. ...

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

Information needs for risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

PARTITION: A program for defining the source term/consequence analysis interface in the NUREG--1150 probabilistic risk assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The individual plant analyses in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's reassessment of the risk from commercial nuclear power plants (NUREG-1150) consist of four parts: systems analysis, accident progression analysis, source term analysis, and consequence analysis. Careful definition of the interfaces between these parts is necessary for both information flow and computational efficiency. This document has been designed for users of the PARTITION computer program developed by the authors at Sandia National Laboratories for defining the interface between the source term analysis (performed with the XXSOR programs) and the consequence analysis (performed with the MACCS program). This report provides a tutorial that details how the interactive partitioning is performed, along with detailed information on the partitioning process. The PARTITION program was written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 to make the code as machine-independent (i.e., portable) as possible. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Iman, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Helton, J.C. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA)); Johnson, J.D. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transportation risk assessment of radioactive wastes generated by the N-Reactor stabilization program at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential radiological and nonradiological risks associated with specific radioactive waste shipping campaigns at the Hanford Site are estimated. The shipping campaigns analyzed are associated with the transportation of wastes from the N-Reactor site at the 200-W Area, both within the Hanford Reservation, for disposal. The analysis is based on waste that would be generated from the N-Reactor stabilization program.

Wheeler, T.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Environmental Risk Assessment of Paroxetine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ERAs can be categorized according to the problems addressed:? Predictive risk assessments estimate risks from proposed future actions such as marketing a new medicine, operating a new process, or emitting a new aqueous or atmospheric contaminant. ... If SF acceptable risk to the environment. ...

Virginia L. Cunningham; David J. C. Constable; Robert E. Hannah

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Guide for ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological risk assessment evaluates the likelihood that adverse ecological effects may occur or are occurring as a result of exposure to one or more stressors. Ecological risk assessment provides a critical element for environmental decision making by giving risk managers an approach for considering available scientific information along with the other factors they need to consider (e.g., social, legal, political, or economic) in selecting a course of action. The primary audience for this document is risk assessors and risk managers at EPA, although these Guidelines also may be useful to others outside the Agency.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Country Risk Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are a multitude of organizations providing country risk services using their proprietary benchmarking. The central ... in a quantifiable manner, individual country sovereign risk and the implication of such...

Mohamed A. Ramady

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms These definitions are from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Risk Assessment Program staff and affiliates and the following sources: Click on the letter that begins the term for which you are searching. To search for another term, at the end of each definition, click on the. If a link leaves the glossary to go to an outside page you will see a. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abatement: The reduction in degree or intensity of pollution. Absorbed Dose: The energy imparted to a unit mass of matter by ionizing radiation. The unit of absorbed dose is the rad or gray. One rad equals 100 ergs per gram. The amount of a substance absorbed into the body, usually

26

Utility View of Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper will address a utility perspective in regard to risk assessment, reliability, and impact on the utility system. Discussions will also include the critical issues for utilities when contracting for energy and capacity from cogenerators...

Bickham, J.

27

Risk Assessment & Management Information | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Regulatory Framework, April 2012 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) web page DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE...

28

Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) was established to assist DOE in the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety related activities.

29

Use of hazard assessments to support risk-based decision making in the US Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Integrated Safety or ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/ fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The cornerstone of the SS-21 design process is the hazard assessment, which is performed concurrently with process and tooling design. The hazard assessment is used as the key management tool to guide overall risk management associated with the nuclear explosive activity through supporting risk-based decisions made with respect to process design.

Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Rainbolt, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments. A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment More Documents & Publications EIS-0218-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents

31

Qualitative methods for assessing risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Quantitative Risk Assessment and the Notion of Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kristen Shrader-Frechette divides the activity of quantitative risk assessment (QRA) into three stages: (1) risk identification, (2) risk estimation, and (3) risk evaluation.1 Given the present level of developme...

James Humber; Robert Almeder

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment The objective of the PTRA program is to develop new tools and approaches for understanding, limiting, and managing the risks of proliferation and physical security for fuel cycle options. NE, in collaboration with National Nuclear Security Administration, will focus on assessments required to inform domestic fuel cycle technology and system option development, partnering with other organizations to share results of assessments. These analytical/predictive tools for comprehensive proliferation risk assessments will provide important information for discussions and decisions regarding fuel cycle options. These assessments will: Exploit science-based approaches for analyzing difficult-to-quantify

34

Phase 1 data summary report for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: Health risk and ecological risk screening assessment. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The contaminants released since the early 1940s include a variety of radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of Phase 1 of the CRRI. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels in fish, sediment, and water from the CR/WBR; (2) determine the in the range of contaminant concentrations present river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants.

Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Longman, R.C.; McGinn, C.W.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.; Williams, L.F.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5/002F 5/002F April 1998 Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (Published on May 14, 1998, Federal Register 63(93):26846-26924) Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. NOTICE This report contains the full text of the Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. However, the format of this version differs from the Federal Register version, as follows: text boxes that are included in this document at their point of reference were instead listed at the end of the Federal Register document as text notes, due to format limitations for Federal Register documents.

36

Resource handbook on transportation risk assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This resource handbook contains useful information to streamline radioactive material transportation risk assessments for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents prepared for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs. Streamlining refers to instituting steps that can increase the efficiency of future assessments, reduce costs, and promote increased quality and consistency across the DOE complex. This handbook takes advantage of the wealth of information developed through decades of DOE's NEPA experience. It contains a review of historical assessments; a description of comprehensive and generally acceptable transportation risk assessment methodology (i.e., models); and a compilation of supporting data, parameters, and generally accepted assumptions. This handbook also includes a discussion paper that addresses cumulative impacts (Appendix A). The discussion paper illustrates the evolving and sometimes unresolved issues encountered in transportation risk assessment. Other topics, such as sabotage, environmental justice, and human factors, may be addressed in the future. This resource document was developed as the first primary reference book providing useful information for conducting transportation risk assessments for radioactive material in the NEPA context.

Chen, S. Y.; Biwer, B. M.; Monette, F. A.; Environmental Assessment; SNL; BAPL; USOE; Battelle Memorial Inst.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

38

Risk Assessment: Establishing Practical Thresholds for Acceptable and Tolerable Risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Risk assessment therefore requires a broad understanding of ... targeted to determine the acceptability of a given risk for diverse groups or individuals within any society. If certain levels of risk are deemed b...

Graciela Peters-Guarin; Stefan Greiving

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chapter 14 - Pipeline Flow Risk Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Risk assessment is the process of assessing risks and factors influencing the level of safety of a project. It involves researching how hazardous events or states develop and interact to cause an accident. The risk assessment effort should be tailored to the level and source of technical risk involved with the project and the project stage being considered. The assessment of technical risk will take different forms in different stages of the project. Pipeline flow risk mainly includes fluid leakage and blockage happening in the pipelines. This chapter describes the application of Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) for the blockage in the oil and gas pipelines.

Yong Bai; Qiang Bai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nuclear weapon system risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is a process for evaluating hazardous operations by considering what can go wrong, the likelihood of these undesired events, and the resultant consequences. Techniques used in PRA originated in the 1960s. Although there were early exploratory applications to nuclear weapons and other technologies, the first major application of these techniques was in the Reactor Safety Study, WASH-1400, {sup 1} in which the risks of nuclear power accidents were thoroughly investigated for the first time. Recently, these techniques have begun to be adapted to nuclear weapon system applications. This report discusses this application to nuclear weapon systems.

Carlson, D.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P-03/001F P-03/001F March 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1. PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.2. ORGANIZATION AND APPLICATION OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.1. Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.2. Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 1.3. KEY FEATURES OF THE CANCER GUIDELINES .

42

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments.

43

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

44

EPA`s risk assessment guidelines: Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment guidelines for cancer, quantification, and exposure issues are discussed.

Patton, D.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

NUREG-1150 risk assessment results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology developed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) evaluation of severe accident risks in NUREG-1150 is noted. This paper discusses the results. The principal technical analyses for NUREG-1150 were performed at Sandia National Labs. under the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program and the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program. The analyses have been completed so far for four reference plants: (a) a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with a dry, subatmospheric containment (Surry Unit 1), (b) a PWR with an ice condenser containment (Sequoyah Unit 1), (c) a boiling water reactor (BWR) with a Mark I containment (Peach Bottom Unit 2), and (d) a BWR with a Mark III containment (Grand Gulf Unit 1). A fifth NUREG-1150 plant, a PWR with a large, dry containment (Zion Unit 1), has been evaluated separately by Brookhaven National Lab. Sample risk results for one of the plants (Surry) are presented. The results for Sequoyah, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf are broadly compared with those for Surry.

Benjamin, A.S.; Kunsman, D.M.; Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Amos, C.N.; Smith, L.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Biomedical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Biomedical Engineering Program Assessment Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biomedical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Biomedical Engineering Program in science and mathematics to address engineering problems in a biomedical context. a. Demonstrate a working sciences. b. Demonstrate ability to apply basic science concepts as foundations to biomedical engineering

Cantlon, Jessica F.

47

Hanford Site baseline risk assessment methodology. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This methodology has been developed to prepare human health and environmental evaluations of risk as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act remedial investigations (RIs) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facility investigations (FIs) performed at the Hanford Site pursuant to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement. Development of the methodology has been undertaken so that Hanford Site risk assessments are consistent with current regulations and guidance, while providing direction on flexible, ambiguous, or undefined aspects of the guidance. The methodology identifies Site-specific risk assessment considerations and integrates them with approaches for evaluating human and environmental risk that can be factored into the risk assessment program supporting the Hanford Site cleanup mission. Consequently, the methodology will enhance the preparation and review of individual risk assessments at the Hanford Site.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

D&D and Risk Assessment Tools  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ORISE and PNNL both developed tools to assist in the risk assessment and planning of D&D activities. PNNL developed a Risk D&D tool, a rapid prototype computerbased model, to evaluate...

49

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk...

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions This page represents the most commonly approached topics from our users. What internet browser works best for the RAIS? We attempt to accommodate every browser. If there is a problem viewing the RAIS pages or downloading items, let us know what browser you are using and we will try and fix the problem. How can I use the information on the RAIS? The information on the RAIS can be used for teaching material and performing risk assessments that comply with EPA guidance. Feel free to use the information; it is available to the public. However, please give proper credit to the RAIS and the team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and The University of Tennessee where you see fit. Also, the databases we maintain are updated on a quarterly basis or sooner, so you may need to "time-stamp"

51

Environment Pollution Risk Assessment In Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An excessive concentration of industrial facilities and automobile transport in Ukraine has led to an extremely high anthropogenic ... Environment pollution risk assessments for industrial regions of Ukraine have...

G. I. Rudko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Medical Surveillance n Based on risk assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.12 #12;Medical Surveillance Criteria n Based on risk assessment n Pre-placement n evaluate of numbers exists n Predict an outcome given similar events Medical Surveillance Risk Assessment 2.12 #12;n What is the natural host? n Does agent cross species barriers? n Wild-type agent or attenuated? n

Collins, Gary S.

53

Co-SSponsored by: RISK ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co-SSponsored by: RADIATION RISK ASSESSMENT WWoorrkksshhoopp PPrroocceeeeddiinnggss November 5 - 7, 2001 Las Vegas, Nevada Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute U.S. Environmental Protection Agency #12 Noguchi, Jun Funabiki and Kimiaki Saito 118 Radiation Risk Assessment Workshop Proceedings i #12

54

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radionuclide Decay Chain Radionuclide Decay Chain Using the Radionuclide Decay Chain Tool Click on the steps below for detailed instructions about each page of the Radionuclide Chain Tool. 1. Select Isotope 2. Decay Chain Table 3. Decay Chain Animation 1. Select Isotope Select the isotope of interest and click the "Submit" button. 2. Decay Chain Table A table of the ICRP 107 decay chain appears that displays the parent and all daughters in the decay chain through the stable isotope(s). The half-life, decay modes, and the branching fractions are given. Decay chains that are repeated as a result of multiple branching fractions are only presented once in the table. Text below the decay chain table contains decay mode definitions and further information on the daughters included in the +D slope factors for risk assessment purposes. A back button is provided to return to the main page. To watch an animated representation of the decay process, click the link "Click for visual diagram."

55

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide Note The RAIS presents this updated Risk calculator in response to the following: incorporating chemical-specific parameters from the lastest EPI release, addition of air as a media, and conversion to a new database structure. The previous RAIS Risk calculator presented Risks for radionuclides and chemcials together. Recent development of chemical and radionuclide exposure equations has necessitated that the RAIS separate the chemicals and the radionuclides. To calculate risks for chemicals, use the RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals calculator. Currently the agricultural equations for the RAIS chemical and radionuclide risk calculators are identical. The EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goals for

56

Risk assessment activities at NIOSH: Information resources and needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Occupational Safety and Health, and Mine Safety and Health Acts, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is charged with development of recommended occupational safety and health standards, and with conducting research to support the development of these standards. Thus, NIOSH has been actively involved in the analysis of risk associated with occupational exposures, and in the development of research information that is critical for the risk assessment process. NIOSH research programs and other information resources relevant to the risk assessment process are described in this paper. Future needs for information resources are also discussed.

Stayner, L.T.; Meinhardt, T.; Hardin, B. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to bring forth increased efficiency and effectiveness in assessing transportation risks associated with radioactive materials or wastes, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Transportation Program (NTP) published a resource handbook in 2002. The handbook draws from the broad technical expertise among DOE national laboratories and industry, which reflects the extensive experience gained from DOE's efforts in conducting assessments (i.e., environmental impact assessments) within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in the past 20 years. The handbook is intended to serve as a primary source of information regarding the approach and basis for conducting transportation risk assessments under normal or accidental conditions that are associated with shipping radioactive materials or wastes. It is useful as a reference to DOE managers, NEPA assessors, technical analysts, contractors, and also stakeholders. It provides a summary of pertinent U.S. policies and regulations on the shipment of radioactive materials, existing guidance on preparing transportation risk assessments, a review of previous transportation risk assessments by DOE and others, a description of comprehensive and generally accepted transportation risk assessment methodologies, and a compilation of supporting data, parameters, and assumptions. The handbook also provides a discussion paper on an issue that has been identified as being important in the past. The discussion paper focuses on cumulative impacts, illustrating the ongoing evolution of transportation risk assessment. The discussion may be expanded in the future as emerging issues are identified. The handbook will be maintained and periodically updated to provide current and accurate information.

Chen, S. Y.; Kapoor, A. K.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide 1. Introduction The purpose of this calculator is to assist Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On Scene Coordinators (OSC's), risk assessors and others involved in decision-making at hazardous waste sites and to determine whether levels of contamination found at the site may warrant further investigation or site cleanup, or whether no further investigation or action may be required. The risk values presented on this site are chemical-specific values for individual contaminants in air, water, soil and biota that may warrant further investigation or site cleanup. It should be noted that the risks in this calculator are based upon human health risk and do not address potential ecological risk. Some sites in sensitive ecological settings may also need to be evaluated for potential

59

Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Integrated risk assessment for LNG terminals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an integrated risk assessment framework for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminals. The basic steps for risk assessment are the following: a) hazard identification, b) accident sequence modeling, where logic models such as Event Trees and Fault Trees are developed c) data acquisition and parameter estimation, used to estimate frequencies of the initiating events, component unavailability and probabilities of human actions, d) accident sequence quantification, where all accident sequences are assessed, e) consequence assessment, where release, evaporation rate, radiation levels and overpressure owing to immediate or delayed ignition of LNG is performed and f) integration of results where risk indices are assessed. Risk assessment of an onshore and an offshore LNG terminal is performed, according to the basic methodological steps, and the distances where individual risk levels equal to 10?5–10?7/yr are assessed and presented in the form of individual contours. A section dedicated to I.A. Papazoglou, pioneer in Quantitative Risk Assessment both in the nuclear and chemical industry is also provided.

O.N. Aneziris; I.A. Papazoglou; M. Konstantinidou; Z. Nivolianitou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany) [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Renn, Ortwin [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany)] [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany); Vanclay, Frank [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Volker [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany)] [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Karami, Ezatollah [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-3905 or write to the St. Louis District, Corps of Engineers, FUSRAP Project Office, 8945 Latty Avenue, BerkeleySt. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RISK ASSESSMENT "Gateway to Excellence" U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Together, they help determine the most effective way to clean up a site while reducing the overall risk

US Army Corps of Engineers

63

Document Number Q0029500 Baseline Risk Assessment Update 4.0 Baseline Risk Assessment Update  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Risk Assessment Update Baseline Risk Assessment Update 4.0 Baseline Risk Assessment Update This section updates the human health and the ecological risk assessments that were originally presented in the 1998 RI (DOE 1998a). The impacts on the 1998 risk assessments are summarized in Section 2.9. 4.1 Human Health Risk Assessment Several activities completed since 1998 have contributed to changes in surface water and ground water concentrations. Activities that have impacted, or likely impacted surface water and ground water concentrations are Millsite Excavation (Section 2.1) Remediation of Soil and Sediment Along Montezuma Creek (Section 2.3) Millsite Dewatering and Treatment (Section 2.5) PRB Treatability Study (Section 2.6) Surface water and ground water monitoring data have been used to refine the list of COCs

64

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concering that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Animal Burial Site I Animal Burial Site II Animal Burial Site III Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Creek Sediments Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Soils Atomic City Auto Parts - Surface Debris Clinch River/Poplar Creek CSX Railroad David Witherspoon, Inc., 1630 Site David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF) Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - Bruner Site Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - NOAA Site Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Oak Ridge Tool Engineering, Inc. Solway Drums Site Swine Waste Lagoons

65

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. 3001 Storage Canal (OGR) 3517 Filter Pit (Fission Product Development Laboratory) Abandoned Burn Pit Abandoned Sanitary Waste Pipeline and Septic Tank N of 7917 Abandoned Underground Waste Oil Storage Tank 7002A Above-ground Demineralized-water Holding Tanks Aircraft Reactor Experiment Contaminated Tool Storage Aircraft Reactor Experiment Surface Impoundment Buried Scrap Metal Area C-14 Allocation in White Oak Trees C-14 Allocation in White Pine Trees C-14 Allocation in Woody Biomass Plantation Species C-14 Efflux in Yellow Poplar Stand

66

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant: Relative Risk Ranking Sites Plant: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline ACN Drum Yard Bear Creek Burial Grounds Bear Creek Contaminated Floodplain Soils Beta-4 Security Pits Building 81-10 Area Mercury Contaminated Soils Building 9201-2 Transformer and Capacitor Storage Area Building 9201-3 Coolant Salt Technology Facility Building 9201-4 Building 9201-4 External Pipes Building 9201-5E Northeast Yard Waste Storage Area Building 9202 East Pad Waste Storage Area Building 9204-2 West Yard Waste Storage Area Building 9206 Underground Tank Building 9215 West Pad Waste Storage Area

67

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ETTP: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ETTP: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. 518 Main Substation 600 Series Oil Storage Area 695/687 Oil Storage Operations Building 523 Grease {Burial Site} Building 526 Heavy Equipment Shop Building 569 Heavy Equipment Shop Building 665 Steam Shed Building F-29 Gasoline Station Demolition Materials Placement Area Duct Island Road F-05 Laboratory Burial Ground F-07 Material Warehouse F-08 Laboratory Flannagans Loop Road Groundwater Plume Centered Under North Side of K-1070-C/D Groundwater Plume Emanating from K-1401 Acid Line Groundwater Plume near Mitchell Branch Groundwater Plume Originating from K-1420 Building

68

Development of risk assessment methodology for municipal sludge incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by the series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, surface disposal, incineration and ocean disposal. In particular, these reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with incineration of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The procedures are structured to allow calculation of technical criteria for sludge disposal/reuse options based on the potential for adverse health or environmental impacts. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.'' In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, B.E.

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - "Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets." In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's New What's New November 2013 Updates ECO mammalian SSLs were updated for cadmium, antimony , arsenic, inorganic, barium, Beryllium, chromium VI, cobalt, copper, lead, silver, vanadium, cyanide (total complex), methyl mercury, sulfide, thallium and tin. October 2013 Updates The biota intake rates for the radionuclide PRG and risk tools were updated to correct an improper units conversion. September 2013 Updates IRIS updates for 1,4-Dioxane and Biphenyl were completed. PPRTV values have been updated for Biphenyl, 3,4-Dichlorobenzotrifluoride, Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (Tetryl), Endosulfan Sulfate, 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane, Nitromethane, Dibenzothiophene, 2-Ethoxyethanol, 3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine, Butylated hydroxytoluene, Ethyl Acetate, tert-Amyl Alcohol, 2,2-Difluoropropane,

72

Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. July 1995 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) (CAS Reg. No. 108-10-1), a clear liquid with

74

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2-DICHLOROETHANE 2-DICHLOROETHANE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. May 1994 Prepared by Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. 1,2-Dichloroethane is used primarily in the manufacture of vinyl chloride, as well as in the synthesis of tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene,

75

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FLUORANTHENE FLUORANTHENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. August 1993 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Fluoranthene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that can be derived from coal tar. Occurring ubiquitously in products of incomplete combustion

76

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYLENE CHLORIDE Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYLENE CHLORIDE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. September 1993 Prepared by Cheryl B. Bast, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Methylene chloride (CH2Cl2, CAS No. 75-09-2), also known as dichloromethane

77

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LITHIUM LITHIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. May 1995 Prepared by Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Lithium is an alkali metal similar to magnesium and sodium in its properties (Birch, 1988; Arena, 1986) and has a molecular weight of 6.941

78

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Toxicity MetaData Chemical Toxicity MetaData Using the Chemical Toxicity Metadata Tool Click on the steps below for detailed instructions about each page of the CPM Calculator. 1. Select Chemicals 2. Select Toxicity Metadata 3. Results 1. Select Chemicals Highlight the chemicals of interest and use the arrow buttons to move them to the "selected" box. 2. Select Toxicity Metadata Highlight the type of toxicity values to retrieve the desired toxicity metadata and press the "submit form" button. 3. Results The toxicity values and the metadata will be displayed in tables that are available for download. The Chemical Toxicity Metadata tool follows the same hierarchy as the Chemical Toxicity Value tool. Only one toxicity value type is given per chemical even though multiple sources may have values. The RAIS follows a hierarchy when selecting the toxicity values we use in PRG and risk calculations. The hierarchy is as follows:

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The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for TETRACHLOROETHYLENE Condensed Toxicity Summary for TETRACHLOROETHYLENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. MARCH 1993 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Tetrachloroethylene (CAS No. 127-18-4) is a halogenated aliphatic

80

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for ETHYLBENZENE Condensed Toxicity Summary for ETHYLBENZENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group in the Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Ethylbenzene is a colorless, flammable liquid with a pungent odor (Cavender 1994). The water solubility of ethylbenzene is 0.014 g/100 mL and its vapor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BENZO[A]PYRENE BENZO[A]PYRENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. December 1994 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Benzo[a]pyrene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that can be derived from coal tar. Benzo[a]pyrene occurs ubiquitously in products of

82

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for AROCLOR-1260 Condensed Toxicity Summary for AROCLOR-1260 NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. Prepared by C. B. Bast, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 Aroclor® 1260 is a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture containing approximately 38% C12H4Cl6, 41% C12H3Cl7, 8% C12H2Cl8, and 12% C12H5Cl5

83

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for ZINC AND ZINC COMPOUNDS Condensed Toxicity Summary for ZINC AND ZINC COMPOUNDS NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. April 1992 Prepared by Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 Zinc is used primarily in galvanized metals and metal alloys, but zinc

84

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for THALLIUM Condensed Toxicity Summary for THALLIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. DECEMBER 1994 Prepared by: Tim Borges and Mary Lou Daugherty, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. This report is an update of the Toxicity Summary for Thallium (CAS Registry

85

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for ASBESTOS Condensed Toxicity Summary for ASBESTOS NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. August 1995 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Asbestos (CAS No. 1332-21-4) is the generic name for a variety of naturally formed hydrated silicates containing metal cations such as sodium,

86

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-DINITROTOLUENE -DINITROTOLUENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group in the Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. This report is an update of the Toxicity Summary for 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (CAS Registry No. 121-14-2). The original summary for this chemical was

87

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for VANADIUM Condensed Toxicity Summary for VANADIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. DECEMBER 1991 Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, *. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Vanadium is a metallic element that occurs in six oxidation states and

88

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE Condensed Toxicity Summary for MANGANESE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. July 1995 Prepared by A. A. Francis and C. Forsyth, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM *Managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 Manganese is an essential trace element in humans that can elicit a variety of serious toxic responses upon prolonged exposure to elevated

89

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COPPER COPPER NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. DECEMBER 1992 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Copper occurs naturally in elemental form and as a component of many minerals. Because of its high electrical and thermal conductivity, it is

90

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TRICHLOROETHENE TRICHLOROETHENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. MARCH 1993 Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Trichloroethene (TCE) is an industrial solvent used primarily in metal degreasing and cleaning operations. TCE can be absorbed through the lungs,

91

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHLORDANE CHLORDANE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. December 1994 Prepared by: Carol S. Forsyth, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Technical grade chlordane is a mixture of structurally related compounds including trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane, -chlordene, heptachlor, and

92

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY Condensed Toxicity Summary for METHYL MERCURY NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. FEBRUARY, 1992 Prepared by: Robert A. Young, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Methyl mercury is formed by biotic and abiotic methylation of mercury

93

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for BENZENE Condensed Toxicity Summary for BENZENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. September 1992 Prepared by: Mary Lou Daugherty, M.S., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division*, , Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Benzene is absorbed via ingestion, inhalation, and skin application.

94

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SELENIUM SELENIUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. MARCH 1993 Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Selenium is an essential trace element important in many biochemical and physiological processes including the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q (a

95

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for MOLYBDENUM Condensed Toxicity Summary for MOLYBDENUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. JANUARY 1993 Prepared by: Dennis M. Opresko, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Molybdenum (Mo) occurs naturally in various ores; the principal source being molybdenite (MoS2) (Stokinger, 1981). Molybdenum compounds are used

96

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for ALUMINUM Condensed Toxicity Summary for ALUMINUM NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. September 1993 Prepared by Cheryl B. Bast, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. Aluminum is a silver-white flexible metal with a vast number of uses. It is poorly absorbed and efficiently eliminated; however, when absorption does

97

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Toxicity Profiles Toxicity Profiles These profiles were prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM many years ago. Although the toxicity values presented in the formal and condensed toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, the toxicity values are subject to change. Also note that some of the special characters, such as Greek letters and math symbols, in the original document format may not have translated well to html. Select a Profile Analyte CAS Number Formal Version Condensed Version Acenaphthene 83329 Formal Summary Acetone 67641 Formal Summary Aluminum 7429905 Formal Summary Anthracene 120127 Formal Summary Antimony (metallic) 7440360 Formal Summary Aroclor-1254 11097691 Formal Summary Aroclor-1260 11096825 Formal Summary Arsenic 7440382

98

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formal Toxicity Summary for SULFATE Formal Toxicity Summary for SULFATE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 ORAL EXPOSURES 3.2 INHALATION EXPOSURES 3.3 OTHER ROUTES OF EXPOSURE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 5. REFERENCES JUNE 1991 Prepared by: Cheryl Bast, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program.

99

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LEAD LEAD NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. INTRODUCTION 2. METABOLISM AND DISPOSITION 2.1 ABSORPTION 2.2 DISTRIBUTION 2.3 METABOLISM 2.4 EXCRETION 3. NONCARCINOGENIC HEALTH EFFECTS 3.1 HUMAN 3.2 ANIMAL 3.3 REFERENCE DOSE 3.4 TARGET ORGANS/CRITICAL EFFECTS 4. CARCINOGENICITY 4.1 HUMAN 4.2 ANIMAL 4.3 EPA WEIGHT-OF-EVIDENCE 4.4 CARCINOGENICITY SLOPE FACTORS 5. REFERENCES December 1994 Prepared by Kowetha A. Davidson, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Program, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

100

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CYANIDE CYANIDE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. February 1994 Prepared by Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, *, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 Cyanide most commonly occurs as hydrogen cyanide and its salts--sodium and potassium cyanide. Cyanides are both man-made and naturally occurring

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for 1,4-DICHLOROBENZENE Condensed Toxicity Summary for 1,4-DICHLOROBENZENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. Prepared by: James C. Norris, Ph.D, Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group in the Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene (CAS 106-46-7), also referred to as para-DCB, p-DCB, paracide, Paramoth®, Parazene®, PDB, and Santochlor®, has a benzene ring

102

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Condensed Toxicity Summary for 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE Condensed Toxicity Summary for 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE NOTE: Although the toxicity values presented in these toxicity profiles were correct at the time they were produced, these values are subject to change. Users should always refer to the Toxicity Value Database for the current toxicity values. Prepared by: Rosmarie A. Faust, Ph.D., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group in the Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*. Prepared for: Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. 2,6-Dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT; 2-methyl-1,3-dinitrobenzene; CAS Reg. No. 606-20-2) is a pale yellow crystalline solid and one of six possible

103

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area CPM User's Guide Area CPM User's Guide 1. Introduction Field sampling has the potential to be an extremely time-consuming and expensive portion of a radiological site remediation. Collected samples must be shipped to an off-site laboratory or counted in an on-site mobile unit in order to establish areas of contamination and to ensure that acceptable residual levels of contaminants remain. The Area CPM Calculator is a web-based calculator that estimates a gamma detector response for a target level of surface contamination. This calculator provides a rapid, exceptionally cost-effective assessment of contamination and cleanup standards based on field instrument data, which minimizes the use of more expensive sample collection and laboratory analysis. A correction factor for cpm analysis established between this

104

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

105

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

106

Health effects of risk-assessment categories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prepared by C. B. Bast, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Prepared by C. B. Bast, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., Chemical Hazard Evaluation Group, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section, Health Sciences Research Division, *. Prepared for OAK RIDGE RESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM *Managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 Aroclor® 1254 is a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture containing approximately 21% C12H6Cl4, 48% C12H5Cl5, 23% C12H4Cl6, and 6% C12H3Cl7 with an average chlorine content of 54% (USAF 1989). PCBs are inert, thermally and physically stable, and have dielectric properties. In the environment, the behavior of PCB mixtures is directly correlated to the degree of chlorination. Aroclor® is strongly sorbed to soil and remains

108

An Overview of Quantitative Risk Assessment of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of flight hardware, trade studies, and reliability prediction of new hardware. In the risk management area, life limits based on QRA are being used in the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) program [1 been used by MSFC to predict the reliability of newly developed hardware such as X-33 and X-34 engines

Christian, Eric

109

Cable Hot Shorts and Circuit Analysis in Fire Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under existing methods of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), the analysis of fire-induced circuit faults has typically been conducted on a simplistic basis. In particular, those hot-short methodologies that have been applied remain controversial in regards to the scope of the assessments, the underlying methods, and the assumptions employed. To address weaknesses in fire PRA methodologies, the USNRC has initiated a fire risk analysis research program that includes a task for improving the tools for performing circuit analysis. The objective of this task is to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms linking fire-induced cable damage to potentially risk-significant failure modes of power, control, and instrumentation cables. This paper discusses the current status of the circuit analysis task.

LaChance, Jeffrey; Nowlen, Steven P.; Wyant, Frank

1999-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

110

Computation and Visualization of Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computation and Visualization of Risk Assessment in Deep Brain Stimulation Planning Alexandre Research Centre Abstract. Deep Brain Stimulation is a neurosurgical approach for the treatment part of the brain. To safely reach the target of interest, care- ful planning must be performed

Recanati, Catherine

111

RadRAT: a radiation risk assessment tool for lifetime cancer risk projection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Risk projection methods allow for timely assessment of the potential magnitude of radiation-related cancer risks following low-dose radiation exposures. The estimation of such risks directly through observational studies would generally require infeasibly large studies and long-term follow-up to achieve reasonable statistical power. We developed an online radiation risk assessment tool (RadRAT) which can be used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-related cancer with uncertainty intervals following a user-specified exposure history (https://irep.nci.nih.gov/radrat). The uncertainty intervals constitute a key component of the program because of the various assumptions that are involved in such calculations. The risk models used in RadRAT are broadly based on those developed by the BEIR VII committee for estimating lifetime risk following low-dose radiation exposure of the US population for eleven site-specific cancers. We developed new risk models for seven additional cancer sites, oral, oesophagus, gallbladder, pancreas, rectum, kidney and brain/central nervous system (CNS) cancers, using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The lifetime risk estimates are slightly higher for RadRAT than for BEIR VII across all exposure ages mostly because the weighting of the excess relative risk and excess absolute risk models was conducted on an arithmetic rather than a logarithmic scale. The calculator can be used to estimate lifetime cancer risk from both uniform and non-uniform doses that are acute or chronic. It is most appropriate for low-LET radiation doses  

Amy Berrington de Gonzalez; A Iulian Apostoaei; Lene H S Veiga; Preetha Rajaraman; Brian A Thomas; F Owen Hoffman; Ethel Gilbert; Charles Land

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human System Risks in Exploration Missions 21SEP10 2HRP Risk Process ­ D.Grounds Presentation contentsHuman Research ProgramHuman Research Program Human System Risk in Exploration and the Human Research Program 21SEP10 1HRP Risk Process ­ D Grounds #12;Human Research ProgramHuman Research Program

Waliser, Duane E.

113

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the EHAP program stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication which recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all, (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects, and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Assessment of government tribology programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment has been made to determine current tribology research and development work sponsored or conducted by the government. Data base surveys and discussions were conducted to isolate current projects sponsored primarily by 21 different government organizations. These projects were classified by subject, objective, energy relevance, type of research, phenomenon being investigated, variables being studied, type of motion, materials and application. An abstract of each project was prepared which included the classification, sponsor, performing organization and a project description. It was found that current work is primarily materials oriented to meet military requirements. Other than the high temperature programs very few of the tribology projects accomplish energy related objectives.

Peterson, M.B.; Levinson, T.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Risk assessment for organic micropollutants: U. S. point of view  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic research and monitoring of sludge utilization programs have identified specific pathways by which potentially toxic constituents of sewage sludge can reach and cause toxicity to livestock, humans, plants, soil biota, wildlife, etc. In the process of preparing a new regulation for land application of sewage sludge in the US, a pathway approach to risk assessment was undertaken. Two Pathways were found to comprise the greatest risk from persistent lipophilic organic compounds such as PCBs: (1) direct ingestion of sludge by children; and (2) adherence of sludge to forage/pasture crops from surface application of fluid sludge, followed by grazing and ingestion of sludge by livestock used as human food. Each pathway considers risk to Most Exposed Individuals (MEIs) who have high exposure to sludge. Because 1990 sewage sludges contain very low levels of PCBs, the estimated risk level to MEIs was less 0.0001, low sludge PCBs and low probability of simultaneously meeting all the constraints of the MEI indicate that MEIs are at less 0.0000001 lifetime risk. The authors conclude that quantitative risk assessment for potentially toxic constituents in sewage sludge can be meaningfully conducted because research has provided transfer coefficients from sludges and sludge-amended soils to plants and animals needed for many organic compounds.

Chaney, R.L.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Welcome: The Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) is established to assist DOE in the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE ensure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are conducted in a consistent manner, of appropriate quality, properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support and documented. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available risk assessment tools and guidance supporting nuclear safety at its nuclear facilities.

117

Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology (December 2013)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This technical update provides guidance to utilities on developing and implementing a risk assessment process using the failure scenarios developed by the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) program.

118

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ecological risk assessment benefits environmental management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ecological risk assessment process in its ideal form is an unbiased approach for assessing the probability of harm to the environment as a consequence of a given action. This information can then be combined with other societal values and biases in the management of such risks. However, as the process currently is understood, decision makers often are accused of manipulating information in order to generate decisions or achieve buy in from the public in support of a particular political agenda. A clear understanding of the nature of the risk management process can help define areas where information should be free from social or personal bias, and areas where values and judgments are critical. The authors do not propose to discuss the individual`s decision-making process, but rather to address the social process of risk communication and environmentally-related decision-making, identifying which parts of that process require bias-free, scientifically generated information about the consequences of various actions and which parts need an understanding of the social values which underlie the informed choices among those possible actions.

Fairbrother, A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Williams, B.A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Glicken, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Perceived risk, real risk: social science and the art of probabilistic risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...close down the plant in March 1987...first time a nuclear power plant had been closed...safety and risk analysis procedures-in...risks from terrorism appear to be...in ambushing nuclear waste trucks...influence on the assessments-those of...

WR Freudenburg

1988-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Applying a weed risk assessment approach to GM crops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current approaches to environmental risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants are modelled on chemical risk assessment methods, which have a strong focus on toxicity. There are additional types of ha...

Paul K. Keese; Andrea V. Robold; Ruth C. Myers; Sarah Weisman…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

High Performance Lipoprotein Profiling for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the severity of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the related mortality rate to this disease, new methods are necessary for risk assessment and treatment prior to the onset of the disease. The current paradigm in CVD risk assessment has shifted...

Larner, Craig

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

Use of Policy Risk Assessment Results in Political Decision Making  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Notwithstanding the differences in scientific and political contexts, the discussion around risk assessment has been grown up during the...

Liliana Cori; Gabriel Guliš; Joanna Kobza…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN Program Learning Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental20 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN Program Learning Objectives of mathematics, science, and engineering (b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well

Cantlon, Jessica F.

126

Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning, and processes that underlie optics and optical engineering. 2. Strong understanding of the fundamental science, mathematics, and processes that underlie optics and optical

Cantlon, Jessica F.

127

Elderly Risk Assessment of Falls with BSN , L. Atallah1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elderly Risk Assessment of Falls with BSN R.C. King1 , L. Atallah1 , C. Wong1 , F. Miskelly2 and G.king@imperial.ac.uk Abstract- Due to the natural aging process, the risks associated with falling can increase significantly. Clinically, the Tinetti Gait and Balance Assessment has been widely used to assess the risk of falls

Atallah, Louis

128

Simulation and Risk Assessment Archived Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Archived Projects Archived Projects Advanced Analytical Instrumentation and Facilities for In Situ Reaction Studies NETL 6/2002 Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By- Product Disposal and Utilization University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 1/23/2003 Risk Assessment for Long-Term Storage of CO 2 in Geologic Formations NETL 3/2005 Geology and Reservoirs Simulation for Brine Field NETL 6/27/2005 Mercury Speciation in Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas - Experimental Studies and Model Development University of Pittsburgh 7/6/2005 Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment ChemImage Biothreat LLC 9/29/2005 Assessments of Environmental Impacts and Beneficial Use of Coalbed Methane Produced Water in the Powder River Basin Western Research Institute 1/1/2006

129

Assessing political risk for foreign investments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Political risk assessment provides a prediction of the likelihood that future foreign government actions will deteriorate the return on a planned foreign investment. Such political risk predictions are commonly provided with great assurance by political experts. Political risk assessments are frequently quantified to two or three significant figures, so that comparisons can be made between various countries, at various times in the future. It is my contention that most of such quantifications and predictions are nonsense; that the political future is not being accurately predicted. It is useful to describe some general axioms on predicting the future: (1) Future events can be predicted in a rigorous manner only if they represent expected outcomes of physical laws; (2) Future events can be predicted with some statistical confidence if they represent a modest extrapolation of consistent history into the future; (3) The farther into the future one predicts, the less reliable history-based predictions should be: (4) Predictions become less certain as more parameters influence the event; (5) Predictions must be less certain as more precision is required; and (6) Predictions of singular future complex political events are merely guesses, no matter how they may be swaddled in statistical mumbo-jumbo. For proper analysis of political risk it is important to create multiple scenarios of the future, to be well acquainted with foreign politics, and to understand the economic fundamentals of the country where you are considering investments. Such approaches allow management to look for possible flexibilities in investments, to consider insurance, hedging, and other risk abatement techniques against some of the most likely negative political/economic outcomes.

Downey, M.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The property-assessed clean energy (PACE) model is an innovative mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements on private property. PACE programs allow local...

131

Workshop overview: Arsenic research and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chronic exposure of humans through consumption of high levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs)-contaminated drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, and cancers. Additionally, humans are exposed to organic arsenicals when used as pesticides and herbicides (e.g., monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) also known as cacodylic acid). Extensive research has been conducted to characterize the adverse health effects that result from exposure to iAs and its metabolites to describe the biological pathway(s) that lead to adverse health effects. To further this effort, on May 31, 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) sponsored a meeting entitled 'Workshop on Arsenic Research and Risk Assessment'. The invited participants from government agencies, academia, independent research organizations and consultants were asked to present their current research. The overall focus of these research efforts has been to determine the potential human health risks due to environmental exposures to arsenicals. Pursuant in these efforts is the elucidation of a mode of action for arsenicals. This paper provides a brief overview of the workshop goals, regulatory context for arsenical research, mode of action (MOA) analysis in human health risk assessment, and the application of MOA analysis for iAs and DMA{sup V}. Subsequent papers within this issue will present the research discussed at the workshop, ensuing discussions, and conclusions of the workshop.

Sams, Reeder [Integrated Risk Information System Program, National Center for Environmental Assessment, MC: B-243 01, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)], E-mail: sams.reeder@epa.gov; Wolf, Douglas C. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ramasamy, Santhini; Ohanian, Ed [Health and Ecological Criteria Division, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Chen, Jonathan [Antimicrobials Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Lowit, Anna [Health Effects Division, Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments in Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Applications, 12/10 DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments in Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Applications, 12/10 The Department has taken several actions to provide an infrastructure for providing appropriate controls and support for use of risk assessments and risk informed decision making as it applies to nuclear safety including establishing a Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group, revising its Nuclear Safety Policy to explicitly address the use and control of risk assessments, and developing this DOE Technical Standard for Control and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment for interim use and comment.1

133

Livestock Risk Protection-Lamb: New Insurance Program to Help Ranchers Manage Lamb Price Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Livestock Risk Protection-Lamb: New Insurance Program to Help Ranchers Manage Lamb Price Risk Risk Management E-470 RM4-14.0 09-08 *Professor and Extension Economist?Management, Assistant Professor and Extension Economist...1 Livestock Risk Protection-Lamb: New Insurance Program to Help Ranchers Manage Lamb Price Risk Risk Management E-470 RM4-14.0 09-08 *Professor and Extension Economist?Management, Assistant Professor and Extension Economist...

Pena, Jose G.; Thompson, Bill; Bevers, Stan; Anderson, David P.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Financing Financing Structures Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs The property-assessed clean energy (PACE) model is an...

135

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of risk assessment. Working with the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Nuclear Safety, staff from the Office of Health,

136

Hydrogen quantitative risk assessment workshop proceedings.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) Toolkit Introduction Workshop was held at Energetics on June 11-12. The workshop was co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and HySafe, the International Association for Hydrogen Safety. The objective of the workshop was twofold: (1) Present a hydrogen-specific methodology and toolkit (currently under development) for conducting QRA to support the development of codes and standards and safety assessments of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and fueling stations, and (2) Obtain feedback on the needs of early-stage users (hydrogen as well as potential leveraging for Compressed Natural Gas [CNG], and Liquefied Natural Gas [LNG]) and set priorities for %E2%80%9CVersion 1%E2%80%9D of the toolkit in the context of the commercial evolution of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). The workshop consisted of an introduction and three technical sessions: Risk Informed Development and Approach; CNG/LNG Applications; and Introduction of a Hydrogen Specific QRA Toolkit.

Groth, Katrina M.; Harris, Aaron P.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Quantification of escalation effects in offshore quantitative risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Loss-of-containment events on offshore installations can lead to complex escalation effects, especially in congested modules, where the close proximity of processing equipment and control systems creates the potential for very many different escalation paths. Conventional risk analysis tools are not well suited to deriving and evaluating the large number of possibilities, relying on the risk analyst to devise and quantify a ‘representative’ set of scenarios. The danger is that the ‘representative’ scenarios lack realism, may be insufficiently detailed to support upgrade decisions, and tend towards ‘generic’ risk analysis. A novel computer simulation technique has therefore been developed which starts from a list of initiating loss-of-containment events and utilizes physical rule sets and consequence models to generate consistent and detailed accident scenarios from a basic platform description, comprising a collection of equipment items, structural elements and protective systems. The program has proved stable on application to a variety of offshore installations, including simple gas platforms, a typical deep sea oil and gas platform, and a semi-submersible production vessel. It eliminates the manual drafting and analysis of event trees, which is very laborious even when aided by interactive computer tools; and, because the risk model comprises factual information, rather than abstract concepts, it is much more accessible and amenable to scrutiny by discipline engineers, allowing operators to derive and maintain a genuinely ‘living’ quantitative risk assessment.

Mark Morris; Alan Miles; John Cooper

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety-related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE make sure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are: conducted in a consistent manner; of appropriate quality; properly documented; and properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available tools and guidance necessary to support nuclear safety at its nuclear facilities. RWG_Charter_March_2012.pdf

139

DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.

Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Probabilistic Risk Assessment for dairy waste management systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques were used to evaluate the risk of contamination of surface and ground water with wastewater from an open lot dairy in Erath County, Texas. The dairy supported a complex waste management system...

Leigh, Edward Marshall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

P4-10-04: Automated Breast Cancer Risk Assessment: Identifying High Risk Women in the Primary Care Setting.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high risk patients than average risk patients (p0.04). Use of...Conclusions: Performing personalized risk assessment and use of the decision...care setting was feasible and acceptable. These results suggest risk assessment alone may be enough...

E Ozanne; Z Omer; and K Carlson

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 10 (a) An effective self-assessment program must have a clear document trail evidencing a culture of Lessons Learned. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 10 (a)...

145

Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

Hamel, D.R. [Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

DOE (Department of Energy) risk assessment worksheets: A structured approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of the worksheets for each step in completing the guideline. This guideline outlines the approach to conducting risk assessments of computer security. (JEF)

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessments for Nuclear Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

OF PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR NUCLEAR SAFETY APPLICATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release;...

148

Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organohalogen contaminants (dioxins, PCB, PBDE andInvestigation into levels of dioxins, furans, PCBs and PBDEsfor risk assessment of dioxin-contaminated sites. Ambio 36:

Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing potential risk Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nature of risk assessment. For example, the potential ecological risks associated with potato expression... Agricultural and Biological Risk Assessment, Department of...

150

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 6, 2010 May 6, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, May 6, 2010 Risk Assessment Information Notice (IN): HSS provided the draft IN to safety basis experts from SNL, Y-12 and PNNL for their review and comment. Their comments were addressed and the IN is back into concurrence. 2. DNFSB Brief: HSS is coordinated with the RWG and DNFSB to schedule a DNFSB brief in June. 3. Risk Assessment Training: The National Training Center is presenting its risk assessment overview course May 18-20 at DOE headquarters. HS-20 is planning to discuss DOE's nuclear safety risk assessment study and plans for policy and guidance development at the end of the course. 4. External Risk Study: Data collection has been completed at NASA, NEI, NASA, and FDA. HS-20

151

Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

Suski, N; Wuest, C

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

NETL: Carbon Storage - Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulation and Risk Assessment Simulation and Risk Assessment Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area The Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area is an integrated effort to develop advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integrate the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. As the simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decreases, which in turn provides a more accurate risk assessment and mitigation plan for each project site. Both qualitative and quantitative protocols will be developed to ensure the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Results from the simulation models will be incorporated into risk assessments on a project-by-project basis and on a larger basin-scale. As carbon capture and storage (CCS) becomes deployed in major basins, macro model results will be needed to manage reservoirs for pressure management, plume migration, and potential risks of multiple CO2 injection projects across the basin.

153

Risk Analysis and Probabilistic Survivability Assessment (RAPSA): An Assessment Approach for Power Substation Hardening1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or infrastructure system, and cause widespread fear from a major or prolonged service disruption [8]. In assessingRisk Analysis and Probabilistic Survivability Assessment (RAPSA): An Assessment Approach for Power System Analysis (SSA) with Probability Risk Assessment (PRA). The method adds quantitative information

Krings, Axel W.

154

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - NNSA...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - NNSA Production Office - 2014 Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - NNSA Production Office - 2014 In...

155

Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Self-Assessment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Self-Assessment - Chief of Nuclear Safety Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Self-Assessment - Chief of...

156

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group Charter, January 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP CHARTER January 2012 PURPOSE: To support effective and appropriate utilization of risk assessment tools in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. OBJECTIVES: The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety-related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE make sure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are: conducted in a consistent manner; of appropriate quality; properly documented; and properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available tools and

157

Modelling risk and risking models: the diffusive boundary between science and policy in volcanic risk assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the appreciation that the eruptions may continue for 282 decades and should be regarded as a “chronic” problem for planning purposes (Donovan and 283 Oppenheimer, 2014). Managing this transition has required consistent yet innovative 284 approaches to scientific... to their advice. 524 There is abundant evidence of the political challenges of risk assessment and management on 525 Montserrat, and the complex boundaries and connectivities involved (Aspinall et al., 2002; 526 Haynes et al., 2007; Donovan and Oppenheimer...

Donovan, Amy R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

158

An Application of Qualitative Risk Assessment in Park Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Application of Qualitative Risk Assessment in Park Management Janet M. Carey, Mark A. Burgman, Cameron Miller and Yung En Chee * T he identification and prioritisation of natural values we describe an application of ecological risk assessment techniques for identifying and analysing

Burgman, Mark

159

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board(DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009?1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. Thisrecommendation focused on the...

160

ASSESSMENT OF SRSO TRAINING & QUALIFICATION PROGRAM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ASSESSMENT OF SRSO TRAINING & QUALIFICATION PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF SRSO TRAINING & QUALIFICATION PROGRAM This self assessment evaluates the effective implementation of the Technical Qualification Programs (TQP). The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) also reviews the results of the TQP self- assessments and determines if further action is necessary on a Departmental level. Federal Technical Capability: LOIs a. FTC-1. Executive Commitment and Line Management Ownership. Line management is actively involved in all aspects of technical employee recruitment, retention, development, and deployment. 1.1 Line managers are aware of the requirements and administrative flexibilities associated with recruiting, hiring, and retaining high-quality technical employees. 1.2 Senior line management supports the continuous technical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RAWG) Conference Call Minutes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call Minutes May 6, 2010 PARTICIPANTS Members: Don Nichols (CDNS), Jim O'Brien (HSS), Carol Sohn (SC), Rich Stark (NE), Bill Weaver (EM for Steve Krahn), Todd Lapointe (CNS for Chip Lagdon) Others: Kamiar Jamali (NE), Andy Wallo (DNFSB 2009-1 Responsible Manager), Rama Sastry (HSS), Samuel Rosenbloom (HSS) SUMMARY 1. Risk Assessment Information Notice (IN): HSS provided the draft IN to safety basis experts from SNL, Y-12 and PNNL for their review and comment. Their comments were addressed and the IN is back into concurrence. 2. DNFSB Brief: HSS is coordinated with the RWG and DNFSB to schedule a DNFSB brief in June. 3. Risk Assessment Training: The National Training Center is presenting its risk assessment overview

162

Transportation System Risk Assessment (TSRA) bounding release model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation System Risk Assessments (TSRAs) document the compliance of proposed shipments of nuclear components with applicable federal regulations as well as the associated risks involved. If a relatively simple bounding analysis can show that the consequences resulting from a worst case scenario are acceptably low, a more time intensive and costly risk analysis can be avoided. Therefore, a bounding release FORTRAN model has been developed to determine the consequences of a worst case non-criticality transportation accident. The consequences of three conservative bounding accidents are determined by the model: (1) direct radiation exposure, (2) airborne release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material, and (3) release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material into a waterway and subsequent uptake by an individual through drinking water. Program output includes the direct radiation exposure (mrem), maximum downwind concentration (mg/m{sup 3}), radiation dose (mrem) received as a result of the postulated airborne release of radiological material, intake (mg) due to inhalation, radiation dose (mrem) received by an individual resulting from a release of radiological material into a waterway and uptake into drinking water, and uptake (mg) due to ingestion. This report documents the methodologies and correlations used in the numerical model to perform the bounding consequence calculations.

Anderson, J.C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program quarterly report, January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) stated in the proposal to DOE are to: develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all; develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third quarter (January--March) of the third year of the grant. It reports progress against these grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. Questions, comments, or requests for further information concerning the activities under this grant can be forwarded to Jack Davis in the EHAP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (803) 727-6450.

NONE

1995-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of information resources by the state of Tennessee in risk assessment applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major resources used by the Bureau of Environment, and Environmental Epidemiology (EEP) for risk assessment are: the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), Health and Environmental Effects Summary Table (HEAST), Agency for Toxic Substances and disease Registry (ATSDR) Toxicological Profiles, databases at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), World Health Organization (WHO) ENvironmental Criteria, and documents that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published on Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) risk assessment activities. The Risk Assessment Review has been helpful in providing information about availability of new documents or information. No systematic method has been made available to us to locate information resources. IRIS User`s Support has been helpful in making appropriate and timely referrals. Most other EPA resources were located by serendipity and persistence. The CERCLA methodology for risk assessments is being used in environmental programs, and at present, one person is responsible for all risk assessment activities in the department, but plans are underway to train one or two people from each program area. 2 figs.

Bashor, B.S. [Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Nashville (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Capture and Storage » Simulation Carbon Capture and Storage » Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Research in simulation and risk assessment is focused on development of advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integration of the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. Simulation models are critical for predicting the flow of the CO2 in the target formations, chemical changes that may occur in the reservoir, and geomechanical effects that increased pressures might have on the target formation and seal(s). Improved models that can simulate faults/fractures, the subsurface behavior of system fluids, and geochemical/mechanical/flow effects are needed. Research continues to develop innovative, advanced

167

Office of Risk Analysis and Program Evaluation | Department of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on current and future EA program priorities. Analyzes the effectiveness of EA synthesis of independent assessments findings with enhanced DOE safety and security training...

168

Microsoft Word - Assessment-B-ProgramCriteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ATTACHMENT B ATTACHMENT B PROGRAM ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Identify the following for all sites: Program Management * Number FTE's devoted to Records Management o Full-time Federal and Contractor o Part-time Federal and Contractor Percent of time spent on Records Management duties * Percentage of time each Records Management employee is assigned to: o Program Management o Operations Training/Assistance Schedule Application Records Holding/Storage Area Activities EEOICPA Claims * Monthly Claim Volume Other, specify o Contractor Oversight * Manpower/Support Costs o Series and Grade levels for Federal FTE's o Contractor costs * Records Management Expertise o Federal and Contractor Records-related Training received within the last three

169

Conclusions of the Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rationale for the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Program and its results and applications have been examined in the previous 13 articles of this special issue. This paper summarizes the results and discusses its successes and lessons learned. The robust data from the Capstone DU Aerosol Study have provided a sound basis for assessing the inhalation exposure to DU aerosols and the dose and risk to personnel in combat vehicles at the time of perforation and to those entering immediately after perforation. The Human Health Risk Assessment provided a technically sound process for evaluating chemical and radiological doses and risks from DU aerosol exposure using well-accepted biokinetic and dosimetric models innovatively applied. An independent review of the study process and results is summarized, and recommendations for possible avenues of future study by the authors and by other major reviews of DU health hazards are provided.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

171

The Impact of Assessment Procedures and Need for Cognition on Fraud Risk Assessments .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Due to the increasing awareness of fraudulent financial reporting, auditors' responsibility to conduct quality fraud risk assessments has been raised by a current audit standard,… (more)

Trongmateerut, Pailin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NGNP Risk Management through Assessing Technology Readiness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project life cycle, technical risks are identified, analyzed, and mitigated and decisions are made regarding the design and selection of plant and sub-system configurations, components and their fabrication materials, and operating conditions. Risk resolution and decision making are key elements that help achieve project completion within budget and schedule constraints and desired plant availability. To achieve this objective, a formal decision-making and risk management process was developed for NGNP, based on proven systems engineering principles that have guided aerospace and military applications.

John W. Collins

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Risk-Averse Stochastic Dual Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 27, 2013 ... dynamic programming for hydroelectricity generation, Technical report, Electric Power Opti- mization Centre, University of Auckland, ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

A stochastic approach to risk assessment of hazardous waste sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A deterministic risk assessment model was evaluated for the variability in its input parameters, Information on these variables was gathered to characterize the variability. Statistical distributions were assigned to the variables based...

Arangath, Vishwanathan Vasu

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Human Health...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by end of year Status of River Corridor Risk Assessments 2 RCBRA will be used in CERCLA Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study (RIFS) * RCBRA provides "basis for action" to...

177

US EPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, January 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

540-R-070-002 540-R-070-002 OSWER 9285.7-82 January 2009 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part F, Supplemental Guidance for Inhalation Risk Assessment) Final Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Scope .........................................................................................................2 1.3 Effects on Other Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology

178

Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment by Cameco Resources On Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (July 27, 2010), Section 934 Rule Making. As discussed below, Cameco believes that producers and providers of uranium concentrates and UF6 conversion services, whether directly or as an intermediary, should be excluded from the definition of nuclear supplier. In this regard, Cameco generally agrees with the comments submitted by the Nuclear Energy Institute ("NEI") on behalf of its members; however, Cameco disagrees with the implication of NEl's comments that producers of uranium concentrates and providers of conversion services should be included in the

179

Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report explains the goals, methods, and results of a probabilistic analysis of technical risk for a portfolio of R&D projects in the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program.

180

Program Assessment, Program Review, Program Prioritization What's the Difference? Each academic department is required to have an Assessment Plan and submit periodic assessment updates. Additionally, each department is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a program review. A department's failure to have or follow through with their assessment plan strategic plan is part of the review. The department's alignment with institutional prioritiesProgram Assessment, Program Review, Program Prioritization ­ What's the Difference? Each academic

Maxwell, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost benefit and risk assessment for selected tank waste process testing alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program to safely manage wastes currently stored in underground tank at the Hanford Site. A TWRS testing and development strategy was recently developed to define long-range TWRS testing plans. The testing and development strategy considered four alternatives. The primary variable in the alternatives is the level of pilot-scale testing involving actual waste. This study evaluates the cost benefit and risks associated with the four alternatives. Four types of risk were evaluated: programmatic schedule risk, process mishap risk, worker risk, and public health risk. The structure of this report is as follows: Section 1 introduces the report subject; Section 2 describes the test strategy alternative evaluation; Section 3 describes the approach used in this study to assess risk and cost benefit; Section 4 describes the assessment methodologies for costs and risks; Section 5 describes the bases and assumptions used to estimate the costs and risks; Section 6 presents the detailed costs and risks; and Section 7 describes the results of the cost benefit analysis and presents conclusions.

Gasper, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

182

Risk aversion in multistage stochastic programming - Optimization ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 4, 2015 ... Such a choice corresponds to using the one-period worst-case risk measure given by ?(X) = ess sup (X). By solving problem (3.3) we obtain the ...

2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nutrition Can Modulate the Toxicity of Environmental Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century.Pollutants: Implications in Risk Assessment and Human Healthand their implications in risk assessment and human health.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Data validation and risk assessment -- some pitfalls when evaluating VOC measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data validation, as described in Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protocols under the Contract Laboratory Program (CLP), yields false confidence in the data and drives up costs while providing little benefit (Korte and Brown 1992). Commonly, these data are then used to perform a risk assessment. Much of the published guidance for risk assessments in and arid soils is inadequate because it does not take into account vapor migration due to density-driven flow (Korte and others 1992). Investigations into both of these problems have been performed by personnel of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and are described in this presentation.

Korte, N.; Kearl, P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Challenge of Earthquake Risk Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Smith Institute of Geological Nuclear Sciences P.O. Box 30-368...recently been added with the risk of terrorism and issues of homeland security...measures if necessary (e.g., for nuclear power plants). Unlike the AAL, which is...

Warwick Smith

186

Bridge Functionality Relationships for Improved Seismic Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridge Functionality Relationships for Improved Seismic Risk Assessment of Transportation Networks Jamie E. Padgett,a... M.EERI, and Reginald DesRoches,b... M.EERI Relationships between bridge damage and the resulting loss of functionality of the bridge are critical to assessing the impact of an earthquake event

Padgett, Jamie Ellen

187

EL Program: Earthquake Risk Reduction in Buildings and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EL Program: Earthquake Risk Reduction in Buildings and Infrastructure Program Manager: John R. Hayes, Jr., 301 975 5640 Strategic Goal: Disaster-Resilient Buildings, Infrastructure, and Communities to earthquake engineering, including performance-based tools, guidelines, and standards for designing buildings

Magee, Joseph W.

188

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

189

Innovative methods in assessing political risk for business internationalization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Political risk assessment, together with portfolio analysis, has become an important part of international business investment decision making. In this paper, by using different knowledge discovery techniques, we attempt to assess the relevance and actionability of ‘good governance’ indicators in political risk assessment. For that purpose, we have integrated good governance indicators data with political instability classification from the Political Instability Task Force (PITF) research. From this study, two models that capture the intuitive reasoning of investors have been developed. The usefulness of the models has been evaluated by comparison with factual investment data. Our findings suggest that quantitative indicators of good governance may provide the basis for accurate and meaningful models for the assessment and prediction of political risk.

Ruth Rios-Morales; Dragan Gamberger; Tom Šmuc; Francisco Azuaje

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast... Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the iv smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three...

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

Development of risk-assessment methodology for municipal-sludge landfilling. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by this series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, incineration and ocean disposal. These reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with landfilling of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NUREG-1150 risk assessment methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG-1150 constitutes a full-scope reassessment of the risks to the public from several light water reactor plants with various containment types. Emphasis has been placed on determining the magnitude and character of the uncertainties, rather than focusing upon a point estimate. The risk-reduction potential of proposed plant modifications (backfits and procedural changes) has also been studied, and their costs and benefits have been evaluated. It has been found that the risks from internal events are generally lower than previously evaluated in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS). However, certain unresolved phenomenological issues cause the tops of the uncertainty bands to appear at levels that are comparable to or higher than the RSS point estimates. The issues that are important vary from plant to plant. Most of the postulated plant modifications do not appear to be cost-effective, although a few procedural changes are possible exceptions. Several reviews of this work are in progress, and a second iteration is being performed to include external events, incorporate new technical information, and address comments.

Benjamin, A.S.; Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Amos, C.N.; Cunningham, M.A.; Murphy, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

SCIENTIFIC BASIS FOR ECOTOXICOLOGY, ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND MULTIPLE STRESSORS: CANADIAN EXPERIENCE IN DEFINING ACCEPTABLE RISK LEVELS FOR INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Canada, human and ecological risk assessments are supported by administrative and policy ... laboratory exposure and toxicology components. Canada’s risk assessment approach allows and even encourages the ... ...

Ruth N. HULL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Risk identification and assessment in a risk based audit environment: the effects of budget constraints and decision aid use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In particular, this approach has important implications for risk identification and risk assessment. The success of the RBA approach is contingent on understanding what factors improve or interfere with the accuracy of these risk judgments. I examine how budget...

Diaz, Michelle Chandler

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Pacific Northwest  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Pacific Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Pacific Northwest Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Pacific Northwest Site Office This self-assessment evaluated how well the Technical Qualification and Federal Capability Programs were implemented at the Pacific Northwest Site Office. The assessment was conducted in accordance with the SCMS: Quality Assurance and Oversight: Subject Area: Assessments, Procedure 2, Performing Assessments and SCMS: Quality Assurance and Oversight: Subject Area: Issues Management, Procedure 1, Managing Issues Identified in Oversight Activities. PNSO TQP Self-Assessment More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field Office Technical Qualification Program and FTCP Assessment CRADs

196

Screening Risk Assessment for Possible Radionuclides in the Amchitka Marine Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its environmental stewardship program the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is reevaluating three sites where underground nuclear tests were conducted in the deep subsurface of Amchitka Island, Alaska. The tests (i.e., Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin) were conducted in 1965, 1969, and 1971, respectively. Extensive investigations were conducted on these tests and their effect on the environment. Evaluations at the time of testing indicated limited release of radionuclides and absence of risk related to the testing; however, these are being reevaluated under the current DOE environmental stewardship program. A screening risk assessment of potential radionuclide release into the marine environment is an important part of this reevaluation. The risk assessment is one of three interrelated activities: a groundwater model and this screening risk assessment, both of which guide the decisions in the third activity, the site closure plan. Thus, the overall objective of the work is to understand, and subsequently manage, any risk to humans and the environment through a closure and long-term stewardship plan. The objective of this screening risk assessment is to predict whether possible releases of radionuclides at the ocean floor would represent potential risks to Native Alaskans by consumption of marine subsistence species. In addition, risks were predicted for consumers of commercial catches of marine organisms. These risks were calculated beginning with estimates of possible radionuclide release at the seafloor (from a groundwater modeling study), into the seawater, through possible uptake by marine organisms, and finally possible consumption by humans. The risk assessment model has 11 elements, progressing from potential release at the seafloor through water and food chains to human intake. Data for each of these elements were systematically found and synthesized from many sources, and represent the best available knowledge. Whenever precise data were lacking, the most conservative data were selected. Conservative assumptions and values were used for radionuclide uptake factors and for marine food ingestion rates by human receptors. The dispersion of material in the marine environment utilized a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved model (CORMIX). In addition, the screening level of 1 x 10{sup -6} or 1 excess cancer in 1 million is considered by the EPA to be below the level of concern. The end result, as presented in this report, is a highly conservative estimate of potential risks that are well below the EPA's most conservative risk threshold for both subsistence users and commercial-catch consumers.

NNSA /NV

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

ORISE 04-0115 Human Reliability Program Medical Assessments 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORISE 04-0115 ORISE 04-0115 Office of Security U. S. Department of Energy Human Reliability Program MEDICAL ASSESSMENTS Center for Human Reliability Studies Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Operated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities For the U. S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is a university consortium leveraging the scientific strength of major research institutions to advance science and education by partnering with national laboratories, government agencies, and private industry. ORAU manages the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is a DOE facility focusing on scientific initiatives to research health risks from occupational hazards, assess environmental cleanup, respond to radiation medical

198

Coupling Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Life-Cycle Assessment, and Risk Assessment for Emerging Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coupling Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Life-Cycle Assessment, and Risk Assessment for Emerging Threats ... Emerging environmental threats such as novel chemical compounds, biological agents, and nanomaterials present serious challenges to traditional models of risk analysis and regulatory risk management processes. ... The recent emergence of new materials, technologies, and other environmental stressors in both the marketplace and the public consciousness coincides with increased recognition of the importance of an integrated systems approach to environmental health and safety that includes life-cycle thinking, public participation, and adaptive management of risks associated with emerging threats. ...

Igor Linkov; Thomas P. Seager

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Superfund Superfund Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A) Final April 1992 Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A) Final Notice: Guidance for Radioanalytical Data Usability in Risk Assessment is Given in Part B Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 NOTICE The policies and procedures set forth here are intended as guidance to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other government employees. They do not constitute rulemaking by the Agency, and may not be relied on to create a substantive or procedural right enforceable by any other person. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may take action that is at variance with the policies and procedures in this guidance and may change them at any time without

200

DNFSB Policy Statement 5, Assessing Risk, dated August 15, 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Washington, DC 20004 Policy Statement PS-5 Date: August 15, 2013 Subject Policy Statement on assessing risk. Summary This policy statement establishes the approach the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board will take to assess risk when making recommendations to the Secretary of Energy. Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D. Chairman I. Background The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2013 [Pub. L. No. 112- 239] revised the enabling statute for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The statute now requires the Board to "specifically assess risk (whenever sufficient data exists)" in making recommendations to the Secretary of Energy [ 42 U.S.C. § 2286(a)(5)]. The revised statute reads as follows, with changes in bold italics:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fermilab | Directorate | Internal Audit Services | Risk Assessment and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment and Planning Risk Assessment and Planning How are topics selected for an internal audit? A Year At A Glance Throughout the year we collect ideas and input from the Board of Directors Audit Committee, Management, DOE Fermi Site Office and DOE Office of Inspector General. We also reference the Contractor Assurance System (CAS) web pages for information about the structure of the systems. In addition, CAS (management system) owners are interviewed with respect to Internal Audit's risk assessments and audit plans. We prepare reports that summarize the results of individual audits, as well issue an annual report of activities. Internal audit reports are distributed as they are issued, to a wide audience including the Audit Committee, Management, the DOE Fermi Site Office, the DOE Chicago Office,

202

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety September 20, 2012 Presenter: Commissioner George Apostolakis US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Management of (unquantified at the time) uncertainty was always a concern. Defense-in-depth and safety margins became embedded in the regulations. "Defense-in-Depth is an element of the NRC's safety philosophy that employs successive compensatory measures to prevent accidents or mitigate damage if a malfunction, accident, or naturally caused event occurs at a nuclear facility." [Commission's White Paper, February 1999] Design Basis Accidents are postulated accidents that a nuclear facility must be designed and built to withstand without loss to the

203

June 2010, Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance and Environment Information Notice June 2010 1 BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of

204

Risk assessment of climate systems for national security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change, through drought, flooding, storms, heat waves, and melting Arctic ice, affects the production and flow of resource within and among geographical regions. The interactions among governments, populations, and sectors of the economy require integrated assessment based on risk, through uncertainty quantification (UQ). This project evaluated the capabilities with Sandia National Laboratories to perform such integrated analyses, as they relate to (inter)national security. The combining of the UQ results from climate models with hydrological and economic/infrastructure impact modeling appears to offer the best capability for national security risk assessments.

Backus, George A.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Brown, Theresa Jean; Cai, Ximing [University of Illinois-Urbana; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Constantine, Paul [Stanford University; Dalbey, Keith R.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Fields, Richard; Hart, David Blaine; Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Kerstein, Alan R.; Levy, Michael [National Center for Atmospheric Research; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Najm, Habib N.; Overfelt, James Robert; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Peplinski, William J.; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Taylor, Mark A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Villa, Daniel L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Technology and Risk Sciences Program. FY99 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In making the transition from weapons production to environmental restoration, DOE has found that it needs to develop reliable means of defining and understanding health and environmental risks and of selecting cost-efficient environmental management technologies so that cleanup activities can be appropriately directed. Through the Technology and Risk Sciences Project, the Entergy Spatial Analysis Research Laboratory attempts to provide DOE with products that incorporate spatial analysis techniques in the risk assessment, communication, and management processes; design and evaluate methods for evaluating innovative environmental technologies; and collaborate and access technical information on risk assessment methodologies, including multimedia modeling and environmental technologies in Russia and the Ukraine, while in addition training and developing the skills of the next generation of scientists and environmental professionals.

Regens, James L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Level III probabilistic risk assessment for N Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The objectives of the PRA are to assess the risks to the public and the Hanford site workers posed by the operation of N Reactor, to compare those risks to proposed DOE safety goals, and to identify changes to the plant that could reduce the risk. The scope of the PRA is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operation errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study of five commercial nuclear power plants. The structure of the probabilistic models allowed complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypercube sampling techniques were used to develop uncertainty distributions for the risks associated with postulated core damage events initiated by fire, seismic, and internal events as well as the overall combined risk. The combined risk results show that N Reactor meets the primary DOE safety goals and compared favorably to the plants considered in the NUREG-1150 analysis. 36 figs., 81 tabs.

Camp, A.L.; Kunsman, D.M.; Miller, L.A.; Sprung, J.L.; Wheeler, T.A.; Wyss, G.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

D and D alternatives risk assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Level 3 Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Alternatives Risk Assessment (DARA) performed on Building 3515 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of the risk evaluation process is to provide risk information necessary to assist decision making for Environmental Restoration (ER) Program D and D facilities. This risk information is developed in the baseline risk assessment (BRA) and in the DARA. The BRA provides risk information necessary for determining whether or not a facility represents an unacceptable risk and requires remediation. In addition, the BRA also provides an estimation of the risks associated with the no-action alternative for use in the DARA. The objective of this Level 3 DARA is to evaluate and document the potential risks to human health, human safety, and the environment associated with the proposed remedial action at Building 3515. A Level 3 assessment is the least rigorous type of DARA. The decision to conduct a Level 3 DARA was based on the fact that characterization data from the facility are limited, and currently only one remedial alternative (complete dismantlement) is being evaluated in addition to the no-action alternative. The results of the DARA along with cost and engineering information may be used by project managers in making decisions regarding the final disposition of Building 3515. This Level 3 assessment meets the requirements of the streamlined risk assessment necessary for an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA).

Robers, S.K. [DASKR Ltd. (United States); Golden, K.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 4: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medical University of South Carolina`s (MUSC) vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. The significant growth in the number of environmental/health information systems that has occurred over the past few years has made data access challenging. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: immunological consequences of beryllium exposure; assessment of genetic risks to environmental diseases; low dose-rate radiation health effects; environmental risk perception in defined populations; information support and access systems; and environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Single track effects, biostack and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single hits'' in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth's magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when hit'' by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore B. subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground-based accelerators with beams at low energies in the same LET range, is that high-energy particles can exert their influence a surprising distance from their trajectory and the inactivation cross sections are some twenty times larger than expected. Clearly, beams from high-energy heavy-ion accelerators should be used to confirm these results. For those end points that can also be caused by low-LET beams such as high-energy protons, it is important to measure their action cross sections as well. The ratio of the cross sections for a high-LET beam to that of a low-LET beam is an interesting experimental ratio and, we suggest, of more intrinsic interest than the RBE. It is a measure of the biological'' importance of one particle type relative to another particle type. This ratio will be introduced and given the name RPPE (Relative Per Particle Effectiveness). Values of RPPE will be discussed.

Curtis, S.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Single track effects, biostack and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single ``hits`` in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth`s magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when ``hit`` by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore B. subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground-based accelerators with beams at low energies in the same LET range, is that high-energy particles can exert their influence a surprising distance from their trajectory and the inactivation cross sections are some twenty times larger than expected. Clearly, beams from high-energy heavy-ion accelerators should be used to confirm these results. For those end points that can also be caused by low-LET beams such as high-energy protons, it is important to measure their action cross sections as well. The ratio of the cross sections for a high-LET beam to that of a low-LET beam is an interesting experimental ratio and, we suggest, of more intrinsic interest than the RBE. It is a measure of the ``biological`` importance of one particle type relative to another particle type. This ratio will be introduced and given the name RPPE (Relative Per Particle Effectiveness). Values of RPPE will be discussed.

Curtis, S.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 9: Assess Your Progress  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9: Assess 9: Assess Your Progress to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 9: Assess Your Progress on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 9: Assess Your Progress on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 9: Assess Your Progress on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 9: Assess Your Progress on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 9: Assess Your Progress on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 9: Assess Your Progress on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Set Goals & Objectives Create an Evaluation Plan Conduct Audience Research Identify Target Audiences & Behavior Changes Create Effective Messages

212

Federal Energy Management Program: Assess Potential Agency Size Changes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assess Potential Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Assess

213

Human extinction risk and uncertainty: Assessing conditions for action  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Under what sets of conditions ought humanity undertake actions to reduce the risk of human extinction? Though many agree that the risk of human extinction is high and intolerable, there is little research into the actions society ought to undertake if one or more methods for estimating human extinction risk indicate that the acceptable threshold is exceeded. In addition to presenting a set of patterns of lower and upper probabilities that describe human extinction risks over 1000 years, the paper presents a framework for philosophical perspectives about obligations to future generations and the actions society might undertake. The framework for philosophical perspectives links three perspectives—no regrets, fairness, maintain options—with the action framework. The framework for action details the six levels of actions societies could take to reduce the human extinction risk, ranging from doing nothing (Level I) to moving to an extreme war footing in which economies are organized around reducing human extinction risk (Level VI). The paper concludes with an assessment of the actions that could be taken to reduce human extinction risk given various patterns of upper and lower human extinction risk probabilities, the three philosophical perspectives, and the six categories of actions.

Bruce Tonn; Dorian Stiefel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Grain & Oilseed Production Peace Region snapshot report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri

Pedersen, Tom

215

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Wine Grape & Tree Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry of Environment Pacific Institute for Climate

Pedersen, Tom

216

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Livestock Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry of Environment Pacific Institute for Climate

Pedersen, Tom

217

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Series Fraser Valley & Metro Vancouver snapshot report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

218

Information resource use and need in risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manner in which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses information resources comprises an interesting illustration of federal agency information use. A description of the context in which risk assessment occurs within the FDA is followed by a discussion of information access and use, as well as a practical example.

Turturro, A. [National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled by dangerous substances. The sections below correspond approximately to the sections in the form. The major

220

SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR LEAKAGE AROUND AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA Stephen Jewett, Max Hoberg, Heloise Chenelot, Shawn Harper Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7220 Joanna Burger Division of Life Sciences, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), 604 Allison Road, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082 Michael Gochfeld, CRESP and EOHSI, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 Abstract Amchitka Island, in the Aleutians, had three underground nuclear tests (1 965 to 1971) ranging from approximately 80 kilotons to 5 megatons. Initial surveys (1960s-1970s) did

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 5: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirement of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine; environmental hazards assessment and education program in pharmacy graduate education in risk assessment; and graduate education risk assessment.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Radiological Risk Assessment of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessment of the health risk from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium (DU) is an important outcome of the Capstone aerosol studies that established exposure ranges to personnel in armored combat vehicles perforated by DU munitions. Although the radiation exposure from DU is low, there is concern that DU deposited in the body may increase cancer rates. Radiation doses to various organs of the body resulting from the inhalation of DU aerosols measured in the Capstone studies were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Organs and tissues with the highest calculated committed equivalent 50-yr doses were lung and extrathoracic tissues (nose and nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, mouth and thoracic lymph nodes). Doses to the bone surface and kidney were about 5 to 10% of the doses to the extrathoracic tissues. The methodologies of the ICRP International Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) were used for determining the whole body cancer risk. Organ-specific risks were estimated using ICRP and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodologies. Risks for crewmembers and first responders were determined for selected scenarios based on the time interval of exposure and for vehicle and armor type. The lung was the organ with the highest cancer mortality risk, accounting for about 97% of the risks summed from all organs. The highest mean lifetime risk for lung cancer for the scenario with the longest exposure time interval (2 h) was 0.42%. This risk is low compared with the natural or background risk of 7.35%. These risks can be significantly reduced by using an existing ventilation system (if operable) and by reducing personnel time in the vehicle immediately after perforation.

Hahn, Fletcher; Roszell, Laurie E.; Daxon, Eric G.; Guilmette, Ray A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 23, 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FG01-92EW50625 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). The objectives of the EHAP program stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) Develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication which recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all. (2) Develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and (3) Identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the second year of the grant.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

224

ASSESSMENT OF TECHNICAL QUALIFICATION AND FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAMS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

And TQP Assessment Crads 11 2012 Smooth (2) 1 11/29/12 And TQP Assessment Crads 11 2012 Smooth (2) 1 11/29/12 ASSESSMENT OF TECHNICAL QUALIFICATION AND FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAMS This document provides guidance and objectives and criteria to support assessments required by DOE O 426.1 Federal Technical Capability (FTC), Section 4. REQUIREMENTS, paragraph b. FTC Program Implementation, subparagraph (7) Self- Assessment. This FTC Order paragraph requires self-assessment of TQP and FTC Program implementation within one's organization. To ensure effective implementation of the Technical Qualification Programs (TQP), Headquarters and field elements conduct self-assessments of these programs. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) also reviews the results of the TQP self-assessments and determines if further action is

225

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Triazine herbcides: Ecological risk assessment in North American surface waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The triazine herbicides are some of the most widely used pesticides in North America. Some are found in surface waters in North America and risks to aquatic ecosystems are a possible concern. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive aquatic ecological risk assessment conducted using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The assessment of exposure data concentrated on Midwestern us watersheds, the area of greatest triazine use in North America and showed that concentrations of some triazines rarely exceeded 20 {mu}g/L in rivers, streams, and reservoirs. The effects assessment showed that phytoplankton were the most sensitive organisms to triazines followed, in decreasing order of sensitivity, by macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton and fish. Distribution analysis of sensitivity to atrazine showed 10th percentile of 37 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 5.4 {mu}g/L for LC50s in algae and plants. Simazine showed 10th percentiles of 188 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 27 {mu}g/L for LC50s in aquatic plants. Comparisons of the exposure and effects distributions showed low probabilities of exceeding the 10th percentiles of the sensitivity distributions. These results will be discussed in relation to the mechanism of action of these substances and other stressors in the environment.

Solomon, K.R. [Univ. of Guelph (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

City of Aspen - Energy Assessment Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Aspen - Energy Assessment Rebate Program City of Aspen - Energy Assessment Rebate Program City of Aspen - Energy Assessment Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate $225 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $225 Provider City of Aspen Community Development The City of Aspen encourages interested residents and businesses to increase the energy efficiency of homes and offices through the Energy Assessment Program. Participating homes and offices must located within the city and have a BPI-certified energy assessment performed on the property

229

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Nevada Site Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Nevada Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Nevada Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Nevada Site Office An accreditation assessment of the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Technical Qualification Program (TQP) was conducted during the week of October 5-8, 2009. The accreditation of the TQP will enable NSO to demonstrate that they have an effective program in place to ensure the technical competency of the individuals performing these activities. In order to initiate the accreditation process, a comprehensive self-assessment of the TQP against the objectives and supporting criteria is required. This report documents the details and conclusions of that self-assessment. NNSA-NSO TQP Self-Assessment, October 2009

230

Perceived risk, real risk: social science and the art of probabilistic risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BUSINESS 59 : S225 ( 1986 ). FARHARPILGRIM, B.C., PUBLIC REACTIONS NUC 183 ( 1984 ). FISCHHOFF, B, ACCEPTABLE RISK 33 ( 1981 ). FISCHHOFF, B, ANAL ACTUAL VS PERCE 235 ( 1983 ). FISCHHOFF, B, KNOWING WITH CERTAINTY - APPROPRIATENESS...

WR Freudenburg

231

UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Needs Assessment Program Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Argentina, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Costa Rica, Georgia (country), Guatemala, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Mali, Morocco, Peru, Senegal, Thailand, Vietnam South America, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, Western Asia, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, Western Africa, Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Northern Africa, South America, Western Africa, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1]

232

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Livermore Livermore Field Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field Office The purpose of the Livermore Field Office (LFO) Teclmical Qualification Program (TQP) is to ensure that federal teclmical personnel with safety oversight responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory possess competence commensurate with responsibilities. LFO is committed to ensuring it has the necessary teclmical capabilities to provide the kind of management, direction, and guidance essential to safe operation ofDOE's defense nuclear facilities. LFO TQP Self-Assessment, May 2013 More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Nevada Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Sandia Site Office

233

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Sandia...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Program (TQP) as measured by the current Federal Technical Capability Panel criteria review and approach documents (CRADs) included in the assessment plan. SSO TQP...

234

Kenya-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Country Kenya Eastern Africa References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program1 Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted...

235

Peru-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program1 Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological...

236

Nuclear fuel cycle risk assessment: survey and computer compilation of risk-related literature. [Once-through Cycle and Plutonium Recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated the Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. Both the once-through cycle and plutonium recycle are being considered. A previous report generated by this program defines and describes fuel cycle facilities, or elements, considered in the program. This report, the second from the program, describes the survey and computer compilation of fuel cycle risk-related literature. Sources of available information on the design, safety, and risk associated with the defined set of fuel cycle elements were searched and documents obtained were catalogued and characterized with respect to fuel cycle elements and specific risk/safety information. Both US and foreign surveys were conducted. Battelle's computer-based BASIS information management system was used to facilitate the establishment of the literature compilation. A complete listing of the literature compilation and several useful indexes are included. Future updates of the literature compilation will be published periodically. 760 annotated citations are included.

Yates, K.R.; Schreiber, A.M.; Rudolph, A.W.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conference Conference Call Minutes, March 8, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call Minutes, March 8, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter - The steering committee discussed the draft charter. Two recommended changes were agreed upon: * A sentence will be added to identify that the steering committee will develop protocols to define specifics relative to certain work activities (such as peer reviews) * Agreed to add Steve Koonin, Undersecretary for Science for signature. Note: Sharon Steele is officially the NNSA representative to the steering committee. 2. Web Page - Jim O'Brien reviewed the website. In general, the steering committee agreed that with small changes the web site was ready to go "live."

238

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conference Call Conference Call Minutes, February 20, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, February 20, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter - discussed who should sign and at what level the charter should be authorized. It was concluded that the Under Secretaries as the Central Technical Authorities and HS-1 should ultimately authorize the charter. It was recognized that having such high level approval of the charter would likely increase the time needed to finalize it, However, it was concluded that any delay would not impact activities because the business of the working group will move forward in the interim. Members should provide comments on current draft to Jim O'Brien (with cc to all members) by March 8 with the goal of

239

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, Vol.II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

United States United States Office of Emergency and EPA/540/1-89/001 Environmental Protection Remedial Responce March 1989 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Superfund Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final EPA EPA/540/1-89/001 March 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Disclaimer The policies and procedures set forth here are intended as guidance to Agency and other government employees. They do not constitute rulemaking by the Agency, and may not be relied on to create a substantive or procedural right enforceable by any other person. The Government may take action

240

Baseline ecological risk assessment Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salmon Site (SS), formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site, located in Mississippi was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion tests conducted between 1964 and 1970. A consequence of these testing activities is that radionuclides were released into the salt dome, where they are presently contained. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. As part of the remedial investigation effort, a Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment was conducted at the SS. The purpose is to gauge ecological and other environmental impacts attributable to past activities at the former test facility. The results of this facility-specific baseline risk assessment are presented in this document.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program rapid accident assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report develops a scheme for the rapid assessment of a release of toxic chemicals resulting from an accident in one of the most chemical weapon demilitarization plants or storage areas. The system uses such inputs as chemical and pressure sensors monitoring the plant and reports of accidents radioed to the Emergency Operations Center by work parties or monitoring personnel. A size of release can be estimated from previous calculations done in the risk analysis, from back calculation from an open-air chemical sensor measurement, or from an estimated percentage of the inventory of agent at the location of the release. Potential consequences of the estimated release are calculated from real-time meteorological data, surrounding population data, and properties of the agent. In addition to the estimated casualties, area coverage and no-death contours vs time would be calculated. Accidents are assigned to one of four categories: community emergencies, which are involve a threat to off-site personnel; on-post emergencies, which involve a threat only to on-site personnel; advisory, which involves a potential for threat to on-site personnel; and chemical occurrence, which can produce an abnormal operating condition for the plant but no immediate threat to on-site personnel. 9 refs., 20 tabs.

Chester, C.V.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Risk Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials: A Survey of Industrial Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thus, voluntary industrial risk assessment initiatives can be considered vital to the environmental health and safety issues associated with engineered nanomaterials. ... However, given that NPM may cause harm (3-6) and that there are currently no regulations that take the specific properties of NPM into account, the responsibility for safe production and products is mostly left with industry. ... The prodn. of significant quantities of engineered nanomaterials will inevitably result in the introduction of these materials to the environment. ...

Aasgeir Helland; Martin Scheringer; Michael Siegrist; Hans G. Kastenholz; Arnim Wiek; Roland W. Scholz

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hanford safety analysis and risk assessment handbook (SARAH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 1,2, and 3 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. SARAH describes currently acceptable methodology for development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of technical safety requirements (TSR) based on 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management,'' Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' and provides data to ensure consistency in approach.

GARVIN, L.J.

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Annual Report: National Risk Assessment Partnership (30 September 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is conducting research to advance the science and engineering knowledge base for technologies that will accelerate the business case for CO{sub 2} capture and storage, including prediction and quantification of risks that may relate to potential liabilities. As part of this effort, NETL, through its Office of Research and Development (ORD), is leading a multi-laboratory effort that leverages broad technical capabilities across the DOE complex: the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP). NRAP involves five DOE national laboratories: NETL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This team is working together to develop a science-based method for quantifying the likelihood of risks (and associated potential liabilities) for CO{sub 2} storage sites. NRAP is an effort that harnesses the breadth of capabilities across the DOE National Laboratory (NL) system into a mission-focused platform that will develop the integrated science base that can be applied to risk assessment for long-term storage of CO{sub 2}.

Bromhal, Grant; Guthrie, George

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effect of radon dose on cleanup criteria and using RESRAD for chemical risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has used RESRAD, a pathway analysis program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, in conjunction with the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle to develop site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines (cleanup criteria) for many sites. This study examines the effects of the radon pathway, recently added to the RESRAD program, on the calculation of uranium, radium, and thorium cleanup criteria. The results show that the derived uranium guidelines will not be affected by the radon ingrowth considerations. The effect of radon on radium and thorium generic guidelines is more significant, but the model does indicate that at the generic soil limits used for radium and thorium the indoor radon decay product concentrations would be below the 0.02 working level standard. This study also examines the feasibility of applying RESRAD to chemical risk assessment. The results show that RESRAD can perform risk assessment of toxic chemicals after simple modifications. Expansion of the RESRAD database to include chemical compounds will increase its capability to handle chemical risk assessments. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wallo, A. III (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key area of the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) strategy is the development of methodologies and tools that will be used to predict the safety, security, safeguards, performance, and deployment viability of SMRs. The goal of the SMR PRA activity will be to develop quantitative methods and tools and the associated analysis framework for assessing a variety of risks. Development and implementation of SMR-focused safety assessment methods may require new analytic methods or adaptation of traditional methods to the advanced design and operational features of SMRs. We will need to move beyond the current limitations such as static, logic-based models in order to provide more integrated, scenario-based models based upon predictive modeling which are tied to causal factors. The development of SMR-specific safety models for margin determination will provide a safety case that describes potential accidents, design options (including postulated controls), and supports licensing activities by providing a technical basis for the safety envelope. This report documents the progress that was made to implement the PRA framework, specifically by way of demonstration of an advanced 3D approach to representing, quantifying and understanding flooding risks to a nuclear power plant.

Curtis Smith; Steven Prescott; Tony Koonce

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Critical issues in assessing ecotoxicological risk in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cal/EPA is developing general guidelines for ecotoxicological risk assessment (ERA). Towards this end, Cal/EPA has established, within the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), an Ecotoxicology Unit that has primary responsibility for these guidelines. In order to facilitate guideline development, OEHHA sponsored a series of three workshops that provided a forum for review and discussion of ERA technical issues among risk assessors, regulators, risk managers, and other interested groups. The first workshop provided an overview of ERA practices at the state, federal and international levels and identified controversial aspects of the process. The second workshop reviewed different types of ERAs conducted by regulatory agencies in California, selection and use of assessment endpoints, as well as available methods and models for effects and exposure measurement. The third workshop critically evaluated strengths and weaknesses of current ERA processes and methodologies by examination of several case studies in California. The proceedings of the workshops provided valuable information and expert opinions on critical issues in ERA. A summary of workshop recommendations will be presented.

Donohoe, R.; Ricker, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Donald, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, CA (United States). Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment; Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Self-Assessment -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Self-Assessment - Chief of Nuclear Safety Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Self-Assessment - Chief of Nuclear Safety A self-assessment of the CNS Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) Qualification Program was conducted during the week of July 8, 2013, when all STSM-qualified staff members were present in Germantown, Maryland. This was the first self-assessment that CNS has conducted. In accordance CNS Standard Operating Procedure SOP-016, Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program, a self-assessment is required once every four years. Chief of Nuclear Safety STSM Self-Assessment, August 2013 More Documents & Publications 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Chief of Nuclear

249

Self-assessment program implementation plan. Revision A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This implementation plan identifies and describes the tasks that must be completed in order to successfully implement a Self-Assessment (SA) Program. The purpose of the Self-Assessment Program is to comply with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) directives and orders, Federal, State, and local regulations, operate the Pinellas Plant according to best management practices, and achieve excellence in all operating areas. The Self-Assessment Program will be applied to the Pinellas Plant facility which includes buildings, grounds, equipment, operations, and activities under the control of line management. Furthermore, all applicable disciplines under environmental protection, safety, health and management will be covered by the program. The Self-Assessment Program has been designed to accomplish the following tasks: define the scope of the Self-Assessment Program; assign organizational roles and responsibilities; address EH and S functional elements and management issues; develop a Self-Assessment program charter and policy; identify all applicable EH and S codes, regulations and standards; develop self-assessment procedures and instructions; generate a Self-Assessment Manual; develop a master schedule for facility appraisals and audits; design checklists and report formats for recording appraisal data; implement an assessment tracking and reporting system; implement a root cause analysis and corrective action system; implement a trend analysis and lessons learned system; and establish a formal training program.

Quets, A.L.

1991-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

250

Human health risk assessment for off-shore media at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A human health risk assessment for off-shore media was performed at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine. The purpose was to determine whether any potential human health risks could be posed by exposures to the estuary. Included in the study were the evaluations of potential risks existing from human exposures to surface water and sediment, as well as potential risks posed by ingestion of various species of fish and shellfish which are caught commercially and recreationally in the estuary. Three species were chosen for study. They were lobsters, mussels, and flounder. The USEPA prescribed protocols for performing human health risk assessments under CERCLA and RCRA were followed to estimate risks associated with ingestion of these species caught in the lower estuary, in the vicinity of the Shipyard. USEPA required the evaluation of two potential seafood ingestion scenarios recreational fishermen and subsistence fishermen. The results indicated that the USEPA risk target of 10{sup {minus}6} for carcinogens or the hazard index of one was exceeded in at least one species for the subsistence ingestion scenario for some inorganics and organic compounds. Based on these results, it was necessary to propose Media Protection Standards in the biota, which would represent the USEPA target risk level for carcinogens and noncarcinogens, as potential cleanup targets. In performing this task, a review of regional background levels for these chemicals found in biota throughout the Great Bay Estuarine System, at locations removed from the Shipyard, was performed. Also examined were regional Maine data from the NOAA Mussel Watch Program. Biota concentrations near the Shipyard were found to be within the range of biota concentrations for most of these chemicals throughout the region, suggesting possible multiple, non-point sources for the contaminants found in seafood throughout the region.

Mahoney, E. [Eileen Mahoney Associates, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

How information resources are used by state agencies in risk assessment applications - Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency of the State of Illinois (Illinois EPA) has programs in water, air, and land pollution and water supplies paralleling those of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The organization is part of a tripartite arrangement in which the Pollution Control Board is the judicial arm, the Department of Energy and Natural Resources is the research arm, and the Illinois EPA is the enforcement arm. Other state agencies are also concerned with various aspects of the environment and may do risk assessments for chemicals. Although there are various risk assessment activities, both formal and informal, in our agency and in others, this paper will discuss only recent initiatives in water quality criteria.

Olson, C.S.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI-URBAN COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in dose-response assessment in QMRA. The risks were significantly higher than the acceptable risk level defined by USEPA and WHO for drinking water, which was used as a guideline acceptable risk in this studyi QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI

Richner, Heinz

253

A risk assessment software tool for evaluating potential risks to human health and the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecology and National Environmental Policy Act Division (END), is providing a sitewide evaluation of alternative strategies for the final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant material inventory. This analysis is known as the Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) for the Rocky Flats Plant. The primary intent of the SEA is to support the Rocky Flats Plant decision-making. As part of the SEA project, a risk assessment software tool has been developed which will assist in the analysis by providing an evaluation of potential risks to human health and the environment for the purpose of augmenting future decisions at the site.

Drendel, G. [ICF/Kaiser, Lakewood, CO (United States); Jones, M.; Shain, D. [EG & G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Allen, B.; Gentry, R.; Shipp, A.; Van Landingham, C. [ICF Kaiser, Ruston, LA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Improved Cancer Risk Assessment Using Text Mining Name Mode of Action Precision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved Cancer Risk Assessment Using Text Mining Name Mode of Action Precision Aflatoxin B1 for risk assessment purposes Cancer Risk Assessment examines existing scientific evidence to determine the relationship between exposure to a chemical and the likelihood of developing cancer from that exposure. Text

Korhonen, Anna

255

Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, 14: 919946, 2008 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Tracked Vehicle Movement across Desert the ecological risk assessment, using the MERAF, for the tracked vehicle movement component of the testing or mule deer abundance and reproduction. Key Words: ecological risk assessment, tracked vehicle, desert

Hargrove, William W.

256

An integrated environmental modeling framework for performing Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Standardized methods are often used to assess the likelihood of a human-health effect from exposure to a specified hazard, and inform opinions and decisions about risk management and communication. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is specifically ... Keywords: Integrated environmental modeling, Manure, Pathogens, QMRA, Risk assessment, Watershed modeling

Gene Whelan, Keewook Kim, Mitch A. Pelton, Jeffrey A. Soller, Karl J. Castleton, Marirosa Molina, Yakov Pachepsky, Richard Zepp

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Assessment of mercury health risks to adults from coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is preparing, for the U.S. Congress, a report evaluating the need to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from electric utilities. This study, to be completed in 1995, will have important health and economic implications. In support of these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The approach draws on the extant knowledge in each of the important steps in the calculation chain from emissions to health effects. Estimated results at key points in the chain were compared with actual measurements to help validate the modeled estimates. Two cases were considered: the baseline case (no local impacts), and the impact case (maximum local power-plant impact). The BNL study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Many implicit and explicit sources of uncertainty exist in this analysis. Those that appear to be most in need of improvement include data on doses and responses for potentially sensitive subpopulations (e.g., fetal exposures). Rather than considering hypothetical situations, it would also be preferable to assess the risks associated with actual coal-fired power plants and the nearby sensitive water bodies and susceptible subpopulations. Finally, annual total Hg emissions from coal burning and from other anthropogenic sources are still uncertain; this makes it difficult to estimate the effects of U.S. coal burning on global Hg concentration levels, especially over the long term.

Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.; Saroff, L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NANA Wind Resource Assessment Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NANA Regional Corporation (NRC) of northwest Alaska is located in an area with abundant wind energy resources. In 2007, NRC was awarded grant DE-FG36-07GO17076 by the US Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program for funding a Wind Resource Assessment Project (WRAP) for the NANA region. The NANA region, including Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA) and Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC) have been national leaders at developing, designing, building, and operating wind-diesel hybrid systems in Kotzebue (starting in 1996) and Selawik (2002). Promising sites for the development of new wind energy projects in the region have been identified by the WRAP, including Buckland, Deering, and the Kivalina/Red Dog Mine Port Area. Ambler, Shungnak, Kobuk, Kiana, Noorvik & Noatak were determined to have poor wind resources at sites in or very near each community. However, all five of these communities may have better wind resources atop hills or at sites with slightly higher elevations several miles away.

Jay Hermanson

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application. It is possible to have confidence in the predictions of many of the existing models because of their fundamental physical and chemical mechanistic underpinnings and the extensive work already done to compare model predictions and empirical observations. The working group recommends that modeling tools be applied for benchmarking PBT/POPs according to exposure-to-emissions relationships, and that modeling tools be used to interpret emissions and monitoring data. The further development of models that couple fate, long-range transport, and bioaccumulation should be fostered, especially models that will allow time trends to be scientifically addressed in the risk profile.

Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field Office The purpose of the Livermore Field Office (LFO) Teclmical Qualification Program (TQP) is to ensure that federal teclmical personnel with safety oversight responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory possess competence commensurate with responsibilities. LFO is committed to ensuring it has the necessary teclmical capabilities to provide the kind of management, direction, and guidance essential to safe operation ofDOE's defense nuclear facilities. LFO TQP Self-Assessment, May 2013 More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Pacific Northwest

265

Argentina-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Argentina-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Argentina-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Waste to Energy, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/index.p Program Start 2009 Program End 2013 Country Argentina South America References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects

266

Development of exposure scenarios for CERCLA risk assessments at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA) is performed to determine if there are any potential risks to human health and the environment from waste unit at SRS. The SRS has numerous waste units to evaluate in the RFMU and CMS/FS programs and, in order to provide a consistent approach, four standard exposure scenarios were developed for exposure assessments to be used in human health risk assessments. The standard exposure scenarios are divided into two temporal categories: (a) Current Land Use in the BRA, and (b) Future Land Use in the RERA. The Current Land Use scenarios consist of the evaluation of human health risk for Industrial Exposure (of a worker not involved in waste unit characterization or remediation), a Trespasser, a hypothetical current On-site Resident, and an Off-site Resident. The Future Land Use scenario considers exposure to an On-site Resident following termination of institutional control in the absence of any remedial action (No Action Alternative), as well as evaluating potential remedial alternatives against the four scenarios from the BRA. A critical facet in the development of a BRA or RERA is the scoping of exposure scenarios that reflect actual conditions at a waste unit, rather than using factors such as EPA Standard Default Exposure Scenarios (OSWER Directive 9285.6-03) that are based on upper-bound exposures that tend to reflect worst case conditions. The use of site-specific information for developing risk assessment exposure scenarios will result in a more realistic estimate of Reasonable Maximum Exposure for SRS waste units.

Nix, D.W.; Immel, J.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Phifer, M.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development of exposure scenarios for CERCLA risk assessments at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA) is performed to determine if there are any potential risks to human health and the environment from waste unit at SRS. The SRS has numerous waste units to evaluate in the RFMU and CMS/FS programs and, in order to provide a consistent approach, four standard exposure scenarios were developed for exposure assessments to be used in human health risk assessments. The standard exposure scenarios are divided into two temporal categories: (a) Current Land Use in the BRA, and (b) Future Land Use in the RERA. The Current Land Use scenarios consist of the evaluation of human health risk for Industrial Exposure (of a worker not involved in waste unit characterization or remediation), a Trespasser, a hypothetical current On-site Resident, and an Off-site Resident. The Future Land Use scenario considers exposure to an On-site Resident following termination of institutional control in the absence of any remedial action (No Action Alternative), as well as evaluating potential remedial alternatives against the four scenarios from the BRA. A critical facet in the development of a BRA or RERA is the scoping of exposure scenarios that reflect actual conditions at a waste unit, rather than using factors such as EPA Standard Default Exposure Scenarios (OSWER Directive 9285.6-03) that are based on upper-bound exposures that tend to reflect worst case conditions. The use of site-specific information for developing risk assessment exposure scenarios will result in a more realistic estimate of Reasonable Maximum Exposure for SRS waste units.

Nix, D.W.; Immel, J.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Phifer, M.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 ?Sv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity.

Marco Durante; Mariagabriella Pugliese

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Step 5-glossary, June, 1997  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OVERVIEW Before the WP and SAP are signed, it is important to verify that the field sampling plan they specify is appropriate and implementable at the site. If this has not already been done, it should be done now. During field verification of the sampling design, the testable hypotheses, exposure pathway models, and measurement endpoints are evaluated for their appropriateness and implementability. The assessment endpoint(s), however, should not be under evaluation in this step; the appropriateness of the assessment endpoint should have been resolved in Step 3. If an assessment endpoint is changed at this step, the risk assessor must return to Step 3, because the entire process leading to the actual site investigation in Step 6 assumes the selection of

270

Evaluation of safety assessment methodologies in Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide (1985) and Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report (1987)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FSARs. Rockwell International, as operating contractor at the Rocky Flats plant, conducted a safety analysis program during the 1980s. That effort resulted in Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) for several buildings, one of them being the Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report, June 87 (707FSAR) and a Plant Safety Analysis Report. Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide, March 1985 (RFRAG85) documents the methodologies that were used for those FSARs. Resources available for preparation of those Rocky Flats FSARs were very limited. After addressing the more pressing safety issues, some of which are described below, the present contractor (EG&G) intends to conduct a program of upgrading the FSARs. This report presents the results of a review of the methodologies described in RFRAG85 and 707FSAR and contains suggestions that might be incorporated into the methodology for the FSAR upgrade effort.

Walsh, B.; Fisher, C.; Zigler, G.; Clark, R.A. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

D&D and Risk Assessment Tools  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Tennessee Washington D&D and Risk Assessment Tools Challenge The Department of Energy has numerous facilities which require deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). While carrying out the D&D of these facilities various health, safety and environmental requirements must be met. The challenge addressed in this study is to develop tools to assist the D&D workforce to be in compliance with the requirements, to efficiently and effectively manage risk from health and safety concerns, to promote safety in D&D activities, and to provide computer-based models to people doing the work. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) each undertook a portion of the

272

Advanced Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Demonstration Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratories (INL) has an ongoing research and development (R&D) project to remove excess conservatism from seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRA) calculations. These risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. This report presents a plan for improving our current traditional SPRA process using a seismic event recorded at a nuclear power plant site, with known outcomes, to improve the decision making process. SPRAs are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility).

Justin Coleman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Indonesia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Indonesia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Argentina-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects Overview "Technology needs assessment (TNA) is a set of country-driven activities that identifies and determines the mitigation and adaptation technology

275

Morocco-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Morocco-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Morocco-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Morocco Northern Africa References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects Overview "Technology needs assessment (TNA) is a set of country-driven activities that identifies and determines the mitigation and adaptation technology

276

Thailand-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Thailand-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects Overview "Technology needs assessment (TNA) is a set of country-driven activities that identifies and determines the mitigation and adaptation technology

277

Cambodia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cambodia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Cambodia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Cambodia-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Cambodia South-Eastern Asia References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects Overview "Technology needs assessment (TNA) is a set of country-driven activities that identifies and determines the mitigation and adaptation technology

278

Mali-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mali-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Mali-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Mali-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Mali Western Africa References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects Overview "Technology needs assessment (TNA) is a set of country-driven activities that identifies and determines the mitigation and adaptation technology

279

Georgia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Georgia-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Georgia-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Georgia References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects Overview "Technology needs assessment (TNA) is a set of country-driven activities that identifies and determines the mitigation and adaptation technology

280

Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Heidi Borchers University of New Hampshire, Environmental Ultraviolet (UV) lamps generate ultraviolet light through the vaporization of elemental mercury, by using

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Steps 1-4, June, 1997  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 OVERVIEW The screening-level problem formulation and ecological effects evaluation is part of the initial ecological risk screening assessment. For this initial step, it is likely that site- specific information for determining the nature and extent of contamination and for characterizing ecological receptors at the site is limited. This step includes all the functions of problem formulation (more fully described in Steps 3 and 4) and ecological effects analysis, but on a screening level. The results of this step will be used in conjunction with exposure estimates in the preliminary risk calculation in Step 2. STEP 1: SCREENING-LEVEL PROBLEM FORMULATION AND ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS EVALUATION 1.1 INTRODUCTION Step 1 is the screening-level problem formulation process and ecological effects evaluation

282

Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE AND CRITERIA Federal Technical Capability Panel and the Office of Human Resources and Administration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 September 1998 Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria 1 September 15, 1998 INTRODUCTION The Federal Technical Capability Program provides for the recruitment, deployment, development and retention of federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department' s missions and responsibilities. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (Panel) reports to the Deputy Secretary and oversees and resolves issues affecting the Federal Technical Capability Program. The Panel periodically assesses the effectiveness of the four functions of the

283

Assessment of the basic energy sciences program. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A list of experts reviewing the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program and their organizations are given. The assessment plan is explained; the program examined the following: quality of science being conducted in the program, quality of performers supported by the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program, and the impact of the research on mission oriented needs. The intent of the assessment is to provide an indication of general status relative to these questions for the BES divisions. The approach to the assessment is described. The sampling plan which was used as a guide in determining the sample size and selecting the sample to evaluate the research program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are discussed. Special analyses were conducted on the dispersion of reviewers' ratings, the ratings of the lower funded projects, and the amount of time the principal investigator devoted to the project. These are presented in the final appendix together with histograms for individual rating variables for each program area. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

2009 Technical Risk and Uncertainty Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics R&D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) conducted a 2009 Technical Risk and Uncertainty Analysis to better assess its cost goals for concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV) systems, and to potentially rebalance its R&D portfolio. This report details the methodology, schedule, and results of this technical risk and uncertainty analysis.

McVeigh, J.; Lausten, M.; Eugeni, E.; Soni, A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Guidance manual for health risk assessment of chemically contaminated seafood. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report was written to assist in the evaluation and interpretation of the human health risks associated with chemical contaminate levels in seafood. High concentrations of toxic chemicals have been found in sediments and marine organisms in parts of Puget Sound. Since heavy consumption of contaminated seafood may pose a substantial human health risk, it's important that assessments of the risk associated with seafood consumption be conducted in a consistent, acceptable manner. The report provides an overview of risk assessment, and describes hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Guidance is provided on presentation and interpretation of results.

Pastorok, R.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assessment of the industrial energy-conservation program. Final report of the Committee on Assessment of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial operations in the United States account for some 37% of the nation's consumptions of energy. It has been estimated that this figure will increase to 50% by 1990 unless appropriate industrial energy conservation measures are adopted. However, such measures are difficult to implement in spite of the potential of various existing, emerging, and advanced technologies that can be applied to the problem. Specifically, the application of many industrial energy conservation measures entails high economic, technological, and institutional risks and uncertainties that constrain industries from adopting such measures. Accordingly, in 1975 the federal government started a program designed to mitigate these risks and uncertainties via government-industry partnership arrangements in the interests of national energy conservation. An important element of this program is the Industrial Energy Conservation Program in the Federal Department of Energy (DOE). In June 1980, DOE asked the National Materials Advisory Board, a unit of the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, to form a study committee to assess the effectiveness of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program. The committee concluded that federal support embodied in the DOE program, present and planned, is important to conserving additional industrial energy. However, the committee also concluded that the program needs various improvements in project selection and management and in transfer of results to industry. The committee's findings and recommendations and the results of the deliberation of the committee's three panels, a special report on heat and power, and a report on the visit by four members of the committee to Japan are presented.

none,

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Determining error bounds for hypothesis tests in risk assessment: a research agenda  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in their relative political, economic or social...HYPOTHESIS TESTS IN RISK ASSESSMENT 19 may...HYPOTHESIS TESTS IN RISK ASSESSMENT 23 themselves...democracy theorists in political science have noted...democracy current in political theory (Bessette...At present, risk decision thresholds......

Peter McBurney; Simon Parsons

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Environmental prediction, risk assessment and extreme events: adaptation strategies for the developing world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Environmental prediction, risk assessment and extreme...community through hedging, insurance and/or government support...perhaps accelerants of political unrest [3,4]. At...twenty-first century to assess risk of future floods and...2. Determining the risk of an extreme event In...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke Chris T In the context of the Cardiovascular Health Study, a comprehensive investigation into the risk factors for stroke of assessing who is at high risk for stroke. 1 Introduction Stroke is the third leading cause of death among

Volinsky, Chris

290

Using Monte-Carlo simulation for risk assessment: application to occupational exposure during remediation works  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to apply the Monte-Carlo techniques to develop a probabilistic risk assessment. The risk resulting from the occupational exposure during the remediation activities of a uranium tailings disposal, in an abandoned uranium mining ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, occupational exposure, risk and dose assessment, uranium tailings disposal

M. L. Dinis; A. Fiúza

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

292

GIS-BASED URBAN SEISMIC RISK ASSESSMENT USING RISK.IITB Ravi Sinha, K.S.P. Aditya and Achin Gupta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS-BASED URBAN SEISMIC RISK ASSESSMENT USING RISK.IITB Ravi Sinha, K.S.P. Aditya and Achin Gupta GIS-based system for seismic risk assessment, namely RISK.iitb, has been described. RISK Using GIS", M.Tech. Thesis, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay

Gupta, Vinay Kumar

293

A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 2: Supporting documents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains presentation material and a transcript of the workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report.

Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

WM2014 Conference- Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions - 14575

295

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ecological risk assessment: An amalgam of populist politics and science-based technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is embroiled in a contentious political debate over the merits, capabilities, and manipulation of Risk Assessments as part of environmental regulation and management. Much of the debate focuses on the scientific basis of risk assessment as if SCIENCE were the dominant force in the process. But is that assumption valid? The science community continues to improve methods and procedures to characterize exposure and predict consequences. Guidelines for developing exposure models, fate and transport mechanisms, data management systems, and statistical tools are emerging in many professional arenas. These efforts can advance the technical features of risk assessment and will increase the likelihood of getting more uniform and consistent analyses but will the products be relevant? Confusion over social values and compromises of scientific principles can easily confound the risk assessment process in ways that diminish the quality of risk estimates and frustrate risk communication. This paper will examine the parallels between risk assessment and the scientific process to illustrate the boundaries of the scientific-technical aspects of the risk assessment process. Key risk assessment issues including exposure assumptions, assessment (safety) factors, deterministic models, and ecological paradigms will be evaluated against Judge Overton`s criteria of science. Clearly identifying what parts are science versus what parts are political/social constructs should, in the long run, improve risk assessment, management, and communication.

Kapustka, L.A.; Fairbrother, A.; Williams, B.A.; Bennett, R.S. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Technical assessment of the Office of Industrial Programs' Advanced Heat Exchanger Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE's AHX Program is an integral part of the OIP's Waste Heat Recovery Program whose goals are to increase the end-use energy efficiency of industry and agricultural operations, and to expand the energy options for manufacturing processes by providing technologies which use various fuels including coal, renewables, oil, and natural gas. The OIP and PNL convened a panel of industry experts to conduct a technical assessment of OIP's AHX program. This report documents the results of the panel's assessment.

Rinker, F.G.; Bergles, A.E.; Marciniak, T.J.; Batman, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells Magnetic Switching under Pressure Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion DECEMBER 17, 2010 Bookmark and Share Mineralogy, percent arsenic bioaccessibility and total arsenic concentration of samples from Nova Scotia mine tailings. Detailed mineralogical analyses of individual samples revealed up to seven arsenic species in individual samples (six shown here as major arsenic phases). Results of a physiologically based extraction test are for the < 150 µm

299

Probabilistic risk assessment of N Reactor using NUREG-1150 methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) Category A production reactor. The main contractor is Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The PRA methodology developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the NUREG-1150 (Reference 1) effort were used for this analysis. N Reactor is a graphite-moderated pressurized water reactor designed by General Electric. The dual-purpose 4000 MWt nuclear plant is located within the Hanford Site in the south-central part of the State of Washington. In addition to producing special materials for the DOE, N Reactor generates 860 MWe for the Washington Public Power Supply System. The reactor has been operated successfully and safely since 1963, and was put into standby status in 1988 due to the changing need in special nuclear material. 3 refs., 4 tabs.

Wang, O.S.; Baxter, J.T.; Coles, G.A.; Powers, T.B.; Zentner, M.D.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Applications of the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A research reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and has been performed with close collaboration between PRA analysts and engineering and operations staff. A product of this Involvement of plant personnel has been a excellent acceptance of the PRA as a tool, which has already resulted In a variety of applications of the EBR-11 PRA. The EBR-11 has been used in support of plant hardware and procedure modifications and In new system design work. A new application in support of the refueling safety analysis will be completed in the near future.

Roglans, J.: Ragland, W.A.; Hill, D.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Applications of the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A research reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and has been performed with close collaboration between PRA analysts and engineering and operations staff. A product of this Involvement of plant personnel has been a excellent acceptance of the PRA as a tool, which has already resulted In a variety of applications of the EBR-11 PRA. The EBR-11 has been used in support of plant hardware and procedure modifications and In new system design work. A new application in support of the refueling safety analysis will be completed in the near future.

Roglans, J.: Ragland, W.A.; Hill, D.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Second Line of Defense Spares Program Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is part of the Department of Energy‘s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The SLD Program accomplishes its critical global security mission by forming cooperative relationships with partner countries to install passive radiation detection systems that augment traditional inspection and law enforcement measures by alerting border officials to the presence of special nuclear or other radiological materials in cross-border traffic. An important tenet of the program is to work collaboratively with these countries to establish the necessary processes, procedures, infrastructure and conditions that will enable them to fully assume the financial and technical responsibilities for operating the equipment. As the number of operational deployments grows, the SLD Program faces an increasingly complex logistics process to promote the timely and efficient supply of spare parts.

Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a simple and transparent approach for assessing CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk associated with CO{sub 2} injection at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. The approach, called the Certification Framework (CF), is based on the concept of effective trapping, which takes into account both the probability of leakage from the storage formation and impacts of leakage. The effective trapping concept acknowledges that GCS can be safe and effective even if some CO{sub 2} and brine were to escape from the storage formation provided the impact of such leakage is below agreed-upon limits. The CF uses deterministic process models to calculate expected well- and fault-related leakage fluxes and concentrations. These in turn quantify the impacts under a given leakage scenario to so-called 'compartments,' which comprise collections of vulnerable entities. The probabilistic part of the calculated risk comes from the likelihood of (1) the intersections of injected CO{sub 2} and related pressure perturbations with well or fault leakage pathways, and (2) intersections of leakage pathways with compartments. Two innovative approaches for predicting leakage likelihood, namely (1) fault statistics, and (2) fuzzy rules for fault and fracture intersection probability, are highlighted here.

Oldenburg, C.; Jordan, P.; Zhang, Y.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess radiological risk Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 7 TRAINING & QUALIFICATIONS PROGRAM OFFICE Summary: and the policies and procedures in place to minimize their risk. Radiological Worker 1 Training is...

307

Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Risk assessment of gaseous emissions from municipal solid waste landfill: case study Rafah landfill, Palestine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the risk assessment of gaseous emissions from the municipal solid waste at Rafah landfill, Palestine. In this study, Gas-Sim model was used to quantify the gaseous emissions from the landfill and the Land-Gem model was used to verify the results. Risk assessment of both carcinogens and non-carcinogens were performed. Two scenarios were conducted namely with plant uptake and without plant uptake. The scenario with plant uptake revealed that the risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.45 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is not acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.69 × 10?6 risk to residents is acceptable for non-carcinogens (risk value 0.42 > 1.0), while the risk to residents is acceptable for carcinogens (risk value 2.855 × 10?7 > 10?6).

Ahmad A. Foul; Mazen Abualtayef; Basel Qrenawi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing risk perceptions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Global Change (HDGC) Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 36 Frey, H.C., and B. Hubbell, "A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework For Multipollutant Air...

310

Building Energy Codes Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Commercial and residential buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage in the United States. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions over the life of buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP or the Program), supports the improvement of energy efficiency in buildings. BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the

311

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Education Programs PIA Template  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Education Education Programs PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Elernent'& (Site 24/Jun/09 Idaho National Laboratory Information Operations and Research Center (IORC) Nameofll,f..,rrnatlon INL Education Programs System or IfPi'()ject Business Enclave Exhibit Proj.ctlUO NA NewPIA D Update [~] DOE PIA - INL Education Program Finallxw.doc N T "tl I Contact Information arne,

312

Self-Assessment Program Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SELF-ASSESSMENT SELF-ASSESSMENT Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self- assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect people and

313

Speaking the Truth in Maritime Risk Assessment Several major risk studies have been performed in recent years in the maritime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speaking the Truth in Maritime Risk Assessment Abstract Several major risk studies have been accidents in maritime transportation. The consequences of these accidents ranged from severe environmental questions of how to prevent such accidents in the future and how to mitigate their consequences

van Dorp, Johan René

314

Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Appendix C and D, June, 1997  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH APPENDIX C SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH A literature search is conducted to obtain information on contaminants of concern, their potential ecological effects, and species of concern. This appendix is separated into two sections; Section C-1 describes the information necessary for the literature review portion of an ecological risk assessment. Topics include information for exposure profiles, bioavailability or bioconcentration factors for various compounds, life-history information for the species of concern or the surrogate species, and an ecological effects profile. Section C-2 lists information sources and techniques for a literature search and review. Topics include a discussion of how to select key words on which to base a search

316

U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment program final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data in Your Program Review... Creativity: Student Writing Showcase Judith Chitwood Creativity: Dance Program Assessment Christine Herrmann... in Your Program's Review Cycle...

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment program cariogram Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data in Your Program Review... Creativity: Student Writing Showcase Judith Chitwood Creativity: Dance Program Assessment Christine Herrmann... in Your Program's Review Cycle...

319

Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, semiinteractive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer. The program language is FORTRAN-77. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incidentfree models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionudide inventory and dose conversion factors.

Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y, Orchard Park, NY (United States); Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rothman, R. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radiological accidents potentially important to human health risk in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human health risks as a consequence of potential radiological releases resulting from plausible accident scenarios constitute an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes. As part of this program, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks that could result from managing five different waste types. This paper (1) briefly reviews the overall approach used to assess process and facility accidents for the EM PEIS; (2) summarizes the key inventory, storage, and treatment characteristics of the various DOE waste types important to the selection of accidents; (3) discusses in detail the key assumptions in modeling risk-dominant accidents; and (4) relates comparative source term results and sensitivities.

Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

Suter, G.W. II

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Guatemala-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Guatemala-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Guatemala-UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program Agency/Company /Organization UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Pathways analysis Website http://tech-action.org/ Country Guatemala Central America References UNEP Risoe-Technology Needs Assessment Program[1] Abstract UNEP DTIE in collaboration with the UNEP Risoe Centre will provide targeted financial, technical and methodological support to assist a total of 35 to 45 countries to conduct TNA projects

324

2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Getting the most out of your Safety Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Getting the most out of your Safety Assessment

325

2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment

326

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Risk Assessment: scale-dependent effects of urban air pollution on mortality M. Valari(1), L (food, water etc.) -Population exposure: [c] x dt -Health data & air pollution health effects Health risk assessment #12;Pollutants concentrations [c] Population exposure [c] x dt Air pollution health

Menut, Laurent

327

COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS ­ EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD assessment of contaminated aquatic sediments has to consider both sediment hydraulics and ecology. Since layers of contaminated sediments are often buried under less polluted deposits, the risk of erosion

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

328

Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Step kinnection: a hybrid clinical test for fall risk assessment in older adults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe Step Kinnection, an interactive step training system for the elderly that incorporates mechanisms to simultaneously perform a hybrid clinical test for fall risk assessment. The interactivity demonstration includes a simple ... Keywords: elderly, fall risk assessment, kinect, reaction time test, stepping performance

Jaime Andres Garcia; Yusuf Pisan; Chek Tien Tan; Karla Felix Navarro

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Peer Review of the ESR Health Risk Assessment on Dung Beetles 31 October 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peer Review of the ESR Health Risk Assessment on Dung Beetles 31 October 2013 General In general terms, the confidential peer reviewers (drawn from universities and CRIs) considered the ESR public findings of the ESR review (pg 94 of their risk assessment) were not supported by the peer reviewers

Sun, Jing

331

A comparative risk assessment of genetically engineered, mutagenic, and conventional wheat production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production systems Robert K.D. Peterson* & Leslie M. Shama Agricultural and Biological Risk Assessment engineered, mutagenic, and conventional wheat production systems. Replacement of traditional herbicides with different wheat production systems in the US and Canada using the risk assessment paradigm. Specifically, we

Peterson, Robert K. D.

332

Assessing Climate Risks: Extremes in the "A process-based rapprochement to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-frequency variability of extreme wind events 24Ch. Welker #12;r Ch. Welker Swiss storms vs. cyclone frequencyAssessing Climate Risks: Extremes in the Alps "A process-based rapprochement to the future" Olivia #12;Assessing Climate Risks: Extremes in the Alps Many thanks go to: H. Davies, P. Froidevaux, P

Richner, Heinz

333

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

334

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 2, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the months of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Radioactive contamination, aging, medical ethics, and environmental risk analysis.

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Current Directions in the Practice of Environmental Risk Assessment in the United Kingdom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental risk assessment, where applied to these situations, must be able to inform and improve regulatory and business decisions on how best to manage risks from environmental hazards. ... The handling of “risk” by governments and their agencies has moved up the political agenda in the last 10 years. ... The Environment Agency and DEFRA have put significant investment into understanding environmental extremes. ...

Simon J. Pollard; Roger Yearsley; Nick Reynard; Ian C. Meadowcroft; Raquel Duarte-Davidson; Susan L. Duerden

2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

RAVEN and Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Software overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 [], currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism has been employed by providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These interfaces are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable to investigate the system response, investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The paper presents an overview of the software capabilities and their implementation schemes followed by some application examples.

Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita; Antonio Naviglio

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Self-Assessment Standard for DOE Contractor Criticality Safety Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 10 March 2010 DOE STANDARD SELF-ASSESSMENT STANDARD FOR DOE CONTRACTOR CRITICALITY SAFETY PROGRAMS DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1158-2010 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ................................................................................................................... v ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ..................................................................................................vi DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................ vii

338

Environmental Assessment : Squawfish Management Program : Final.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to decrease the number of northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in reservoirs in the Columbia River system. The goal of the Squawfish Management Program is to reduce losses of outmigrating juvenile salmon and steelhead (salmonids) to northern squawfish predation. The objective is to reduce the number of northern squawfish that feed on juvenile salmonids (smolts) by 10 to 20 percent to alter the age and size structure of the northern squawfish population. The hypothesis, based on computer modeling, indicates that sustained northern squawfish harvest (5 to 10 years) and the resultant population restructuring may reduce losses of juvenile salmonids to predation by up to 50 percent or more within 10 years. The proposed action would target northern squawfish 11 inches and longer, the size in which northern squawfish being preying significantly on juvenile salmonids. BPA proposes to fund three types of fisheries to harvest northern squawfish. BPA also proposes to fund monitoring activities of these fisheries to determine whether desired or other results occur. The three fisheries methods proposed are: (1) commercial Tribal fishing; (2) sport reward fishing; and (3) fishing from restricted areas of each dam ( dam angling''). These fisheries were tested in 1990 and 1991.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment guidelines cancer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the NYS Cancer Services Program Summary: cancer and should be referred to an appropriate health care provider for a full risk assessment which can... for risk assessment (http:...

340

Mutuality and solidarity: assessing risks and sharing losses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...allow a better specification of risks for life assurance than was...cases the mathematics of the risk are simple. For example, with...of the disease and would be acceptable for life insurance at normal...premium rates. Whether those at risk would consider the information...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Imagining flood futures: risk assessment and management in practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consequences. risk management|risk analysis|flooding|simulacra...we have come to deem as more acceptable than others in predicting the...how do they become deemed as acceptable and, crucially, what effect...science, public policy and risk management in order to make...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

From Chemical Risk Assessment to Environmental Quality Management: The Challenge for Soil Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the 1960s there was considerable investment in wastewater treatment, and 1965 saw the first explicit national policy for water pollution prevention and control. ... Rothstein, H.; Irving, P.; Walden, T.; Yearsley, R. The risks of risk-based regulation: Insights from the environmental policy domain Environ. ... Risk assessment tools used in soil quality assessment include both political and scientific elements, which are often interwoven. ...

James Bone; Martin Head; David T. Jones; Declan Barraclough; Michael Archer; Catherine Scheib; Dee Flight; Paul Eggleton; Nikolaos Voulvoulis

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Risk sharing in contracts : the use of fuel surcharge programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various industries employ risk sharing contracts to manage the risks and volatility associated with commodity prices, inaccurate customer demand forecasts, or unpredictable events. For example commodity futures that enable ...

Kanteti, Madhavi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

BA Political Science Assessment Plan Program Learning Goals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BA Political Science ­ Assessment Plan Program Learning Goals Undergraduate students gain familiarity with American political behavior and institutions, the nature of politics in the rest of the world, and the sources of international conflict and cooperation. All students majoring in political science take

Cantlon, Jessica F.

346

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

347

Level III probabilistic risk assessment for N Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, Volume 3; provide Appendices D and E of this report. The information provided is consequence analysis and risk analysis supporting information respectively. (FL)

Camp, A.L.; Kunsman, D.M.; Miller, L.A.; Sprung, J.L.; Wheeler, T.A.; Wyss, G.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Global Risk Assessment of Natural Disasters: new perspectives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides and volcanic activities has had devastating effects on human life. Risk is the probability of harmful consequences from… (more)

Mona, Khaleghy Rad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

SCHIFFERT HEALTH CENTER TUBERCULOSIS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM (REQUIRED)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

symptoms? ___ NO If YES, check all that apply. Persistent cough for more than 3 weeks ___ Yes Unexplained weight loss ___ Yes Productive cough with bloody sputum ___ Yes Exposure Risks

Buehrer, R. Michael

350

Insights for Quantitative Risk Assessment of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional techniques of risk analysis have been fitted for the application to combined cycle power plants and the results of several...

Gabriele Ballocco; Andrea Carpignano…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Microdosemeter instrument (MIDN) for assessing risk in space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......dose, radiation quality and regulatory risk. This group is developing...impossible to measure. RESEARCH PLAN The proposed research consists...Navy and DoD Space Experiments Review Boards for a potential flight...dose, radiation quality and regulatory risk. This group is developing......

V. L. Pisacane; Q. E. Dolecek; H. Malak; F. A. Cucinotta; M. Zaider; A. B. Rosenfeld; A. Rusek; M. Sivertz; J. F. Dicello

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

354

Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated facility life of WTP.

Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

List of Topics for Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Discussion

357

25.07.03.M3.01 Energy Risk Management Program Page 1 of 5 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25.07.03.M3.01 Energy Risk Management Program Page 1 of 5 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 25.07.03.M3.01 Energy Risk Management Program Approved July 14, 2010 Revised August 26, 2010 Next scheduled/procedures to be used in the implementation of the Texas A&M University Energy Risk Management Program (ERMP

358

An Assessment of Energy-Related Career Paths of Senior Industrial Assessment Center Program Alumni  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the career paths of alumni from the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. IAC was originally named the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program when it began in association with four schools in 1976. The current IAC program provides funding to 26 engineering colleges, located in centers across the United States, to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small- to medium-sized manufacturing establishments within their respective regions. Through part-time employment with the university, students receive training and in turn conduct assessments for local manufacturers, under the direct supervision of engineering faculty. Annually, IAC participants conduct over 700 assessments, and each assessment generates recommendations for energy savings, energy cost savings, and waste and productivity cost savings customized for individual clients. An earlier study determined that energy savings could be attributed to alumni of the IAC program who take their IAC experiences with them to the professional workplace. During their careers, the alumni conduct additional energy assessments as well as influence energy efficiency through design, teaching and training, and other activities. Indeed, a significant level of program benefits can be attributed to the alumni. This project addressed such specific questions as: How many years after graduation are IAC alumni involved in energy-efficiency activities? What different methods do they use to influence energy-efficiency decisions? To answer these questions, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT) surveyed IAC senior alumni, defined as those who graduated in 1995 or earlier. Section 2 describes the survey used in this research. The actual survey can be found in Appendix A. Section 3 describes our approach to data collection. Section 4 presents descriptive statistics about the senior alumni who responded to the survey. Section 5 begins with the presentation of two frameworks used to help analyze the data about alumni career paths and then presents the career path results. Section 6 offers concluding remarks.

Martin, M.A.

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management [EVS Program Area]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management Radiation and Chemical Risk Management EVS helps meet the challenge of protecting human health and the environment through the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. Protecting human health, welfare, and the environment in a world affected by energy production and technology is a global challenge. EVS helps to meet this challenge through research and analysis on the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. To improve the management of risk associated with nuclear and chemical materials and wastes at contaminated sites, we develop information and tools that support decision making related to health, safety, environmental, economic, and social-cultural concerns. Nuclear Materials and Waste Disposition

360

Multi-State Physics Models of Aging Passive Components in Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-state Markov modeling has proved to be a promising approach to estimating the reliability of passive components - particularly metallic pipe components - in the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). These models consider the progressive degradation of a component through a series of observable discrete states, such as detectable flaw, leak and rupture. Service data then generally provides the basis for estimating the state transition rates. Research in materials science is producing a growing understanding of the physical phenomena that govern the aging degradation of passive pipe components. As a result, there is an emerging opportunity to incorporate these insights into PRA. This paper describes research conducted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Pathway of the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. A state transition model is described that addresses aging behavior associated with stress corrosion cracking in ASME Class 1 dissimilar metal welds – a component type relevant to LOCA analysis. The state transition rate estimates are based on physics models of weld degradation rather than service data. The resultant model is found to be non-Markov in that the transition rates are time-inhomogeneous and stochastic. Numerical solutions to the model provide insight into the effect of aging on component reliability.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 There have been significant developments with regard to the risk assessment and risk informed decision making, as it applies to nuclear and other safety areas, since the Department of Energy (DOE) developed its approach to managing nuclear safety. The developments and associated technical insights may be of use to DOE in its efforts to continuously improve safety performance at its nuclear facilities. The Department has taken several actions to provide an infrastructure for providing appropriate controls and

362

Risk Assessment Revision for 40 CFR Part 61 Subpart W  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tailings Task 4 ­ Detailed Risk Estimates Prepared by: S. Cohen & Associates 1608 Spring Hill Road, Suite: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N ..............................................................................................1 1.1 Dose Calculation Methodology

363

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or equivalent toxicological potency in which case they are not considered ?sufficiently? similar. Currently, this method is only useful for inhalation 4 routes of exposure because epidemiological data for human oral and dermal exposures are not yet... available. Consequently, it is only feasible to use in cases where inhalation risk will be the dominant contributor to the overall risk estimates. This method is not considered a viable option for mixtures that have originated from unknown sources...

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Framework for Considering Social, Political and Economic Factors in Risk Assessments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The importance of making accurate risk assessments has grown during the past several decades. The rapid-paced introduction of new technologies and their unprecedented influence over the health and safety of so...

Judith Kildow

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Understanding Population and Individual Risk Assessment: The Case of Polychlorinated Biphenyls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University Medical Center, 3800 Reservoir...Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC...population-risk assessment process intended...Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists A1-Confirmed...

Peter G. Shields

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Model for Fuzzy Logic Assessment of Real Estate Investment Risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing the real estate investment risks is a major issue for the responsible management and the sustainable regional development. The paper proposes a fuzzy logic model for complex estimation of the real estate

Plamena Zlateva; Dimiter Velev…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Risk-Based Technology Assessment for Capital Equipment Acquisition Decisions in Small Firms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hospital’s technology assessment decision are used to find the risk of the medical technology using the computational architecture developed. Widely-available, no-cost software tools are employed. Results of the health care example suggest...

Merriweather, Samuel P.

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A model-based fuzzy set-OWA approach for integrated air pollution risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a fuzzy set—ordered weighted averaging (FSOWA) approach for the integrated health risk assessment associated with multiple air pollution factors and evaluation criteria. A number of ... the sa...

Baozhen Wang; Zhi Chen

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Risks and Rewards of Participation in Demand Side Bidding Programs; an Energy Service Company Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this paper is to summarize from an ESCO viewpoint some of the risks and rewards of participating in DSM bidding programs before deciding to submit a bid....

Machold, W. D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

373

Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B188 Summary of methods proposed for risk informing the design and regulation of future nuclear power plants. All elements of the historical design and regulation process are preserved, but the methods proposed for new plants use probabilistic risk assessment methods as the primary decision making tool.

Ritterbusch, Stanley; Golay, Michael; Duran, Felicia; Galyean, William; Gupta, Abhinav; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Malsch, Marty

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Risk–benefit assessment in medical research—critical review and open questions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......profile of the established standard of care (by satisfying...formulate and pursue a life plan based on a conception...profile of the established standard of care (i.e. these...2001) Institutional review board assessment of risks...the daily life risks standard from the definition of......

Annette Rid; David Wendler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National Parks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National of inundation risk from sea level rise and storm surge in northeastern coastal national parks. Journal of Coastal Research, 00(0), 000­000. Coconut Creek (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Sea level rise and an increase

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

376

Automation to Support Risk Assessment and Management at DHS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DHS is pursuing a portfolio of research and development projects known as the Threat Assessment Portfolio, conducting a range of cross-cutting analytic automation research to address...

Dennis, Stephen

377

A comparative study of selected agencies providing outdoor adventure programs for youth-at-risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and guidance in the midst of growing up. Outdoor adventure programs instill an appreciation for the wilderness, provide an acceptable way for the participants to make use of leisure time, challenge themselves and experience "risk" in a socially acceptable... and guidance in the midst of growing up. Outdoor adventure programs instill an appreciation for the wilderness, provide an acceptable way for the participants to make use of leisure time, challenge themselves and experience "risk" in a socially acceptable...

Keck, Mary A.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Assessment of the O2Diesel Operational Safety Program: December 23, 2002 -- June 30, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses O2Diesel's operational safety program using its ethanol-diesel blended fuel product.

TIAX LLC

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Assessing and Implementing LTS&M Requirements for Remediation Sites Under the FUSRAP Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assessing and Implementing LTS&M Requirements for Remediation Sites Under the FUSRAP Program (Waste Management Conference 2007)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

382

Health risk assessment for the Building 3001 Storage Canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This human health risk assessment has been prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The objectives of this risk assessment are to evaluate the alternatives for interim closure of the Building 3001 Storage Canal and to identify the potential health risk from an existing leak in the canal. The Building 3001 Storage Canal connects Buildings 3001 and 3019. The volume of water in the canal is monitored and kept constant at about 62,000 gal. The primary contaminants of the canal water are the radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 90}Sr; a layer of sediment on the canal floor also contains radionuclides and metals. The prime medium of contaminant transport has been identified as groundwater. The primary route for occupational exposure at the canal is external exposure to gamma radiation from the canal water and the walls of the canal. Similarly, the primary exposure route at the 3042 sump is external exposure to gamma radiation from the groundwater and the walls of the sump. Based on the exposure rates in the radiation work permits (Appendix C) and assuming conservative occupational work periods, the annual radiation dose to workers is considerably less than the relevant dose limits. The potential risk to the public using the Clinch River was determined for three significant exposure pathways: ingestion of drinking water; ingestion of contaminated fish; and external exposure to contaminated sediments on the shoreline, the dominant exposure pathway.

Chidambariah, V.; White, R.K.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the workshop was to share lessons learned and provide a technology exchange to support development of a technically defensible waste qualification program. The objective of this report is to provide a review, from SRNL's perspective, of the WTP waste qualification program as presented during the workshop. In addition to SRNL's perspective on the general approach to the waste qualification program, more detailed insight into the specific unit operations presented by WTP during the workshop is provided. This report also provides a general overview of the SRS qualification program which serves as a basis for a comparison between the two programs. Recommendations regarding specific steps are made based on the review and SRNL's lessons learned from qualification of SRS low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to support maturation of the waste qualification program leading to WTP implementation.

Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

ARAMIS: An integrated risk assessment methodology for SEVESO Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, SEVESO, land use planning, risk reduction, safety barriers, safety culture, safety management the needs of various stakeholders concerned by the safety of industrial plants. ARAMIS is divided into six, published in "2. International Conference on safety and environment in process industry (CISAP-2), Naples

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

The Ranavirus Project Assessing the risk of introducing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological consequences Establishment in ecosystem Economic consequences Entrance into fish / frog farm · Acknowledgements #12;7/16/2011 2 3 The RANA-project · Risk Assesment of New and emerging systemic i id i l di f E of Ranaviruses, Minneapolis July 2011Symposium of Ranaviruses, Minneapolis July 2011 Interaction with wilddlife

Gray, Matthew

386

High efficiency motor program impact assessment: Load analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incentive programs that encourage customers to purchase new or replacement high efficiency motors (HEM) are an element of many utilities DSM efforts. Such a program has been in place at Ontario Hydro since late 1989. The program was expected to rebate up to 800,000 HP over its five year duration. This paper reports on the results of a recently completed load analysis study to assess the load impacts of the program. The findings are based on field metering of integral HP, three-phase induction motors up to 500HP in size, at thirty industrial sites. Using a database of manufacturers`reported effiiencies, loadings and operating times for each of 181 standard and high efficiency motors are estimated. The results will be used as part of program impact evaluation. They indicate lower motor loadings and longer operating hours than had been assumed for interim evaluation. The paper provides detailed estimates of loading by HP group, industrial segment, and end-use. Issues in sample design, field metering and extrapolation to the rebated motor population are also discussed.

Whiting, R. Sr.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Model for quantitative risk assessment on naturally ventilated metering-regulation stations for natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a model for quantitative risk assessment on metering stations and metering-regulation stations for natural gas with natural ventilation. The model enables the assessment of risk for people who live in the vicinity of these stations and complements the existing models for risk assessment on natural gas pipelines. It is based on risk assessment methods suggested in relevant guides, recommendations and standards. Explosion and jet fire are considered as major hazardous events and are modelled according to analytical models and empirical data. Local or other accessible databases are used for modelling of event frequencies and ignition probabilities. A case study on a sample station is carried out. For each hazardous event, fault tree and event tree analysis is performed. Results show influence of each hazardous event on the whole risk relative to the distance from the hazardous source. Ventilation is found to be a significant factor in determination of risk magnitude; its influence on individual risk is presented in a quantitative way. The model should be of use for pipeline operators as well as for environmental- and urban planners.

Tom Bajcar; Franc Cimerman; Brane Širok

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050-00487175,version2-10Feb2011 #12;1. Introduction Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing the CO2 is assessed integrating all steps of the CCS chain: additional coal production, coal transportation, carbon

389

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens C to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

Radiation Risk Assessment at CERCLA Sites, Q&A, December 1999  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGENCY AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: Dis diation Risk Assessment Q & A's Final Guidance FROM: medial Response (OERR) . mergency Response Indoor Air (ORIA) Office of Air and Radiation I TO: Addressees PURPOSE The purpose of this memorandum is to transmit to you a final guidance document entitled: "Radiation Risk Assessment At CERCLA Sites: Q & A." The guidance provides answers to several common questions about radiation risk assessments at CERCLA sites. It should be especially useful to Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs), and risk assessors.' BACKGROUND The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued guidance entitled "Establishment of Cleanup Levels for CERCLA Levels for CERCLA Sites with Radioactive Contamination"

391

Reflections on new directions for risk assessment of environmental chemical mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently risk assessment of chemicals tackles them as single substances affecting individual health endpoints. In reality, human exposure occurs to mixtures of chemicals, as they are present in the environment and consumer products. Combining the information from environmental fate analysis, epidemiological data and toxicokinetic/dynamic models helps estimate internal exposure. Coupling these data with gene and protein expression profiles as signatures of exposure to classes of toxicants to derive biologically-based dose-response estimates may open the way towards adopting a biological connectivity approach to risk assessment. This work gives examples of applications of this approach on combined exposure to mixtures of volatile organic chemicals and estimation of body burden from chronic exposure to mixtures of chemicals and of the associated health risk. Conclusions are drawn as to the future scientific developments that will meet the requirements of integrated health risk assessment to protect public health from environmental and consumption-related stressors.

D. Sarigiannis; A. Gotti; G. Cimino Reale; E. Marafante

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Health-risk assessment of chemical contamination in Puget Sound seafood. Final report 1985-1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides resource management and health agencies with a general indication of the magnitude of potential human health risks associated with consumption of recreationally harvested seafoods from Puget Sound. Data collection and evaluation focused on a variety of metal and organic contaminants in fish, shellfish and edible seaweeds from 22 locations in the Sound. EPA risk assessment techniques were used to characterize risks to average and high consumer groups for both carcinogens and noncarcinogens. Theoretical risks associated with consumption of both average and high quantities of Puget Sound seafood appear to be comparable to or substantially less than those for fish and shellfish from other locations in the United States.

Williams, L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

RISK MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK: HELPING ORGANIZATIONS IMPLEMENT EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizational managers in making informed decisions regarding the security of their information systems. NIST agencies implementing risk-based planning and management also must consider effectiveness, efficiency for their information and information systems with the gains in capabilities and improved support of organizational

395

Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

Lebrun, Philippe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pasture, Rangeland and Forage Risk Management Insurance Pilot Program Continues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

began in specific counties in Colorado, Idaho, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Dakota and Texas, has been expanded to include the entire state of Alabama. The vegetation greenness program index piloted in specific counties in Colorado, E-415 10... began in specific counties in Colorado, Idaho, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Dakota and Texas, has been expanded to include the entire state of Alabama. The vegetation greenness program index piloted in specific counties in Colorado, E-415 10...

Pena, Jose G.; Bevers, Stan; Thompson, Bill

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

ABSTRACT: The Prince William Sound (PWS) risk assessment was a joint project of Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rensselaer Polytechnic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adverse consequences (accidents). The PWS risk assessment did not attempt to determine an "acceptable. The determination of acceptable risk will be a product of the stakeholder's use of the PWS analysisABSTRACT: The Prince William Sound (PWS) risk assessment was a joint project of Det Norske Veritas

van Dorp, Johan René

399

RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the technical details of RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, interactive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer under the Windows{trademark} environment. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incident-free models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionuclide inventory and dose conversion factors. In addition, the flexibility of the models allows them to be used for assessing any accidental release involving radioactive materials. The RISKIND code allows for user-specified accident scenarios as well as receptor locations under various exposure conditions, thereby facilitating the estimation of radiological consequences and health risks for individuals. Median (50% probability) and typical worst-case (less than 5% probability of being exceeded) doses and health consequences from potential accidental releases can be calculated by constructing a cumulative dose/probability distribution curve for a complete matrix of site joint-wind-frequency data. These consequence results, together with the estimated probability of the entire spectrum of potential accidents, form a comprehensive, probabilistic risk assessment of a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident.

Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y Consultants, Orchard Park, NY (US); Chen, S.Y.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Power plant system assessment. Final report. SP-100 Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assessment was to provide system-level insights into 100-kWe-class space reactor electric systems. Using these insights, Rockwell was to select and perform conceptual design studies on a ''most attractive'' system that met the preliminary design goals and requirements of the SP-100 Program. About 4 of the 6 months were used in the selection process. The remaining 2 months were used for the system conceptual design studies. Rockwell completed these studies at the end of FY 1983. This report summarizes the results of the power plant system assessment and describes our choice for the most attractive system - the Rockwell SR-100G System (Space Reactor, 100 kWe, Growth) - a lithium-cooled UN-fueled fast reactor/Brayton turboelectric converter system.

Anderson, R.V.; Atkins, D.F.; Bost, D.S.; Berman, B.; Clinger, D.A.; Determan, W.R.; Drucker, G.S.; Glasgow, L.E.; Hartung, J.A.; Harty, R.B.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Assessment and management of roof fall risks in underground coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accidents caused by roof falls are commonly faced problems of underground coal mines. These accidents may have detrimental effects on workers in the form of injury, disability or fatality as well as mining company due to downtimes, interruptions in the mining operations, equipment breakdowns, etc. This study proposes a risk and decision analysis methodology for the assessment and management of risk associated with mine roof falls in underground coal mines. In the proposed methodology, risk assessment requires the determination of probabilities, possible consequences and cost of consequences. Then the risk is managed by the application of decision-making principles. The probabilities are determined by the analysis of 1141 roof fall data from 12 underground mines in the Appalachian region. The consequences are assessed based on the type of injuries observed after roof falls and the place of the mining activity. The cost of consequences is modeled by the so-called “relative cost criterion”. A decision analysis framework is developed in order to manage the evaluated risk for a single mine. Then this model is extended to a regional model for the management of the roof fall risks in the mines of whole Appalachia. The proposed model is illustrated with an example and it is found to be a powerful technique for coping with uncertainties and the management of roof fall risks.

H.S.B. Duzgun; H.H. Einstein

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

403

SU?E?T?240: Risk Assessment for Stereotactic Intracranial Radiosurgery (SRS) in Brazil Using FMEA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this work is develop a study capable of help the radiotherapy centers to apply a quality management program based on a process analysis methods with the application of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: This (FMEA) methodology has been tested initially in two radiotherapy centers both of which perform SRS with a linear accelerator Novalis using a 6 MV of photon beam.The FMEA method allows documenting potential failure modes determining its effects identifying causes of failures developing plans documenting team concurrence and actions taken.The FMEA method determines a value to the risk probability number (RPN) for each potential cause of failure using the product of three categories: O the probability that a specific cause will Results in a failure mode; S the severity of the effects resulting from a specific failure mode; D the probability that the failure mode will be detected. Results: This work presents preliminary results and shows that the most failures are somewhat related of the human factors issues. It have been already found values 38 sub process and it was identified 59 different potential failure modes and 140 potential causes of failure. Among the potential cause of failure mode 40 7% can be considered an error associated to human factors issues. The larger value for RPN was 432 and the lower was 12. Conclusion: Although FMEA contains a very subjective component it is a useful and simple tool for prospective risk assessment with respect to patient care. This work is still in development but it is already possible to conclude that some conditions for operating are indispensable to achieving a high quality in patient care such as: adequate training clear procedures clear level of the responsibility.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Work plan for conducting an ecological risk assessment at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland, and activities at the Edgewood Area since World War II have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. The J-Field site was used to destroy chemical agents and munitions by open burning and open detonation. This work plan presents the approach proposed to conduct an ecological risk assessment (ERA) as part of the RI/FS program at J-Field. This work plan identifies the locations and types of field studies proposed for each area of concern (AOC), the laboratory studies proposed to evaluate toxicity of media, and the methodology to be used in estimating doses to ecological receptors and discusses the approach that will be used to estimate and evaluate ecological risks at J-Field. Eight AOCs have been identified at J-Field, and the proposed ERA is designed to evaluate the potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors from contaminated media at each AOC, as well as over the entire J-Field site. The proposed ERA approach consists of three major phases, incorporating field and laboratory studies as well as modeling. Phase 1 includes biotic surveys of the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, biological tissue sampling and analysis, and media toxicity testing at each AOC and appropriate reference locations. Phase 2 includes definitive toxicity testing of media from areas of known or suspected contamination or of media for which the Phase 1 results indicate toxicity or adverse ecological effects. In Phase 3, the uptake models initially developed in Phase 2 will be finalized, and contaminant dose to each receptor from all complete pathways will be estimated.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Baseline risk assessment for exposure to contaminants at the St. Louis Site, St. Louis, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The St. Louis Site comprises three noncontiguous areas in and near St. Louis, Missouri: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS), and the Latty Avenue Properties. The main site of the Latty Avenue Properties includes the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and the Futura Coatings property, which are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. Contamination at the St. Louis Site is the result of uranium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1970s. Uranium processing took place at the SLDS from 1942 through 1957. From the 1940s through the 1960s, SLAPS was used as a storage area for residues from the manufacturing operations at SLDS. The materials stored at SLAPS were bought by Continental Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1966, and moved to the HISS/Futura Coatings property at 9200 Latty Avenue. Vicinity properties became contaminated as a result of transport and movement of the contaminated material among SLDS, SLAPS, and the 9200 Latty Avenue property. This contamination led to the SLAPS, HISS, and Futura Coatings properties being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the St. Louis Site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The primary goal of FUSRAP is the elimination of potential hazards to human health and the environment at former Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) sites so that, to the extent possible, these properties can be released for use without restrictions. To determine and establish cleanup goals for the St. Louis Site, DOE is currently preparing a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS). This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is a component of the process; it addresses potential risk to human health and the environment associated wi

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Multimedia transport and risk assessment of organophosphate pesticides and a case study in the northern San Joaquin Valley of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multimedia transport and risk assessment of organophosphate pesticides and a case study) pesticides in the northern San Joaquin Valley of California. Chemical concentrations in environmental media guidelines for cumulative risk analysis. Uncertainty in the human exposure parame- ters was included

Zhang, Minghua

408

Brief Report: Assessment of Early Sensory Processing in Infants at High-Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assessed sensory processing differences between 24-month infants at high-risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), each with an older sibling with ASD, and low-risk infants with no family history of A...

Tamara Germani; Lonnie Zwaigenbaum…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

Cook, James R.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

410

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

Uhart, M.; et al,

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

ANDROS: A code for Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ANDROS (Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection) is a computer code written to compute doses and health effects from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. ANDROS has been designed as an integral part of the CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System). ANDROS reads air concentrations and environmental concentrations of radionuclides to produce tables of specified doses and health effects to selected organs via selected pathways (e.g., ingestion or air immersion). The calculation may be done for an individual at a specific location or for the population of the whole assessment grid. The user may request tables of specific effects for every assessment grid location. Along with the radionuclide concentrations, the code requires radionuclide decay data, dose and risk factors, and location-specific data, all of which are available within the CRRIS. This document is a user manual for ANDROS and presents the methodology used in this code.

Begovich, C.L.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A multiperiod risk-programming analysis of forward contracting with credit restraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MULTIPERIOD RISK-PROGRAMMINC ANALYSIS OF I'ORWARD CONTRACTING WITH CREDIT CONSTRAINTS A Thesis DAVID RAY WILLMANN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics A MHLTIPERIOD RISK-PROGRAMMING ANALYSIS OF FORWARD CONTRACTING WITH CREDIT CONSTRAINTS A Thesis DAVID RAY WILLMANN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairma of Comm' ee) ead of De...

Willmann, David Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Application of probabilistic safety assessment models to risk-based inspection of piping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the beginning, one of the most useful applications of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is its use in evaluating the risk importance of changes to plant design, operations, or other plant conditions. Risk importance measures the impact of a change on the risk. Risk is defined as a combination of the likelihood of failure and consequence of the failure. The consequence can be safety system unavailability, core melt frequency, early release, or various other consequence measures. The goal in this PSA application is to evaluate the risk importance of an ISI process, as applied to plant piping systems. Two approaches can be taken in this evaluation: Current PSA Approach or the Blended Approach. Both are discussed here.

Chapman, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Risk assessment of toxic pollutants from fossil fuel power plants: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development and application of a methodology for assessing the control costs and chronic health risks of toxic pollutant emissions from coal-fired electric power plants. The approach emphasizes surface water discharges and pollution, but incorporates emissions to air, water, soil, and groundwater and transfers of pollutants between these media. The components of the general framework include (1) pollutant emission characterization, (2) environmental transport and fate analysis, (3) population exposure calculation, and (4) quantitative health risk assessment. The report provides a basic overview of the approach, discusses each component in detail, and describes its application to an hypothetical, simplified case study. 234 refs., 32 figs., 32 tabs.

Bolten, J.G.; Morrison, P.F.; Solomon, K.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances . The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment.

Liolios, T E

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Effect of Direct-to-Consumer Genomewide Profiling to Assess Disease Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...still unknown. Direct-to-consumer genomic risk testing recently attracted national attention when one company that offers such testing, Pathway Genomics, announced it would sell its DNA saliva kits at Walgreen stores nationwide. This announcement led the Food and Drug Administration to consider whether... Direct-to-consumer genomewide profiling to assess disease risk provides information about a person's genetic risk of 20 to 40 common polygenic diseases. The tests simultaneously genotype approximately 500,000 variant bases of a person's DNA. Consumers can ...

Bloss C.S.Schork N.J.Topol E.J.

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

South African farm workers' interpretation of risk assessment data expressed as pictograms on pesticide labels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pesticide companies and regulators in developing countries use the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) recommended pictograms on pesticide labels to communicate risk information based on toxicological and environmental risk assessment data. The pesticide label not only is often the only access people have to pesticide risk information, but also in many countries is a legally binding document. As a result of the crucial role pesticide labels play in protecting health and the environment and as a legal instrument, pictograms are used to overcome literacy challenges in transmitting pesticide risk information. Yet, this risk communication tool is often prone to misinterpretations of the risk information which results in hazardous exposures to pesticides for farm workers and end-users generally. In this paper, results are presented from a study with 115 farm workers on commercial vineyards in the Western Cape, South Africa, assessing their interpretations of 10 commonly used pictograms. A standardized questionnaire based on four commonly used pesticide labels was administered. Overall, 50% or more of the study farm workers had misleading, incorrect and critically confused interpretations of the label pictograms. Interpretations often reflected farm workers' social and cultural frames of reference rather than the technically intended risk information. For example, the pictogram indicating a pesticide's toxicity requires boots must be worn, evoked interpretations of 'dangerous to pedestrians' and 'don't walk through pesticides'. Furthermore, there was a gender variation in pictogram comprehension whereby males generally had more correct interpretations than females. This is a result both of a lack of training for women who are assumed to not work with pesticides, as well as a lack of pictograms relevant for female exposures. These findings challenge the viability of the United Nations current initiative to globally harmonize pictograms used on all chemical labels under the new Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). Particularly as the GHS pictograms were not piloted prior to adoption of the system and represent complex risk assessment data such as chronic hazards. Public health and pesticide policy, backed by relevant research, need to address developing applicable and effective pesticide risk communication tools, particularly for developing country populations. Merely providing risk assessment derived information in a pictogram does not ensure that an end-user will interpret the message as intended and be able to make risk decisions which mitigate risks from exposures to pesticides or chemicals in general.

Rother, Hanna-Andrea [Occupational and Environmental Health Research Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa)], E-mail: andrea.rother@uct.ac.za

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

N reactor level III probabilistic risk assessment using NUREG-1150 methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that in the late 1980s, a level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was performed for the N Reactor, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford site in Washington State. The PRA objectives were to assess the risks to the public and to the Hanford on-site workers posed by the operation of the N Reactor, to compare those risks to proposed DOE nuclear safety guidelines, and to identify risk-reduction changes to the plant. State-of-the-art methodology was employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study of five commercial nuclear power plants. The structure of the probabilistic models allowed complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin hypercube sampling techniques were used to develop uncertainty distribution for the risks associated with postulated core damage events initiated by fire, seismic, and internal events as well as the overall combined risk. The risk results show that the N Reactor meets the proposed DOE nuclear safety guidelines and compares favorably to the commercial nuclear power plants considered in the NUREG-1150 analysis.

Wang, O.S.; Coles, G.A.; Kelly, J.E.; Powers, T.B.; Rainey, T.E.; Zentner, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US)); Wyss, G.D.; Kunsman, D.M.; Miller, L.A.; Wheeler, T.A.; Sprung, J.L.; Camp, A.L. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (US))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with the Baseline Risk Assessment for the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment of the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin.

Palmer, E.

1997-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

422

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

423

Human and animal health risk assessments of chemicals in the food chain: Comparative aspects and future perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemicals from anthropogenic and natural origins enter animal feed, human food and water either as undesirable contaminants or as part of the components of a diet. Over the last five decades, considerable efforts and progress to develop methodologies to protect humans and animals against potential risks associated with exposure to such potentially toxic chemicals have been made. This special issue presents relevant methodological developments and examples of risk assessments of undesirable substances in the food chain integrating the animal health and the human health perspective and refers to recent Opinions of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). This introductory review aims to give a comparative account of the risk assessment steps used in human health and animal health risk assessments for chemicals in the food chain and provides a critical view of the data gaps and future perspectives for this cross-disciplinary field. - Highlights: ? Principles of human and animal health risk assessment. ? Data gaps for each step of animal health risk assessment. ? Implications of animal risk assessment on human risk assessment. ? Future perspectives on chemical risk assessment.

Dorne, J.L.C.M., E-mail: jean-lou.dorne@efsa.europa.eu [Emerging Risk Unit, Via Carlo Magno 1A, 43126 Parma (Italy); Fink-Gremmels, J. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM Utrecht (Netherlands)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Field studies of wildlife at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA): Relevance to risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies of wildlife at contaminated sites can provide information about past and present effects, but are limited in spatial and temporal resolution. They cannot be used to predict future risks without utilizing risk assessment methodologies, including exposure-response relationships. RMA is unusual among Superfund sites in that its large size permits the existence of diverse wildlife populations in peripheral areas, despite high levels of contamination in central areas. Risk assessments conducted at RMA predict steep gradients in severity of effects from high in the central areas to low in peripheral areas. The population effects of such gradients will vary among species, depending on their exposure ranges and dispersal behavior. Effects on survival or reproduction in core areas may be partly or wholly offset by immigration from peripheral or offsite areas. Most field studies of wildlife populations at RMA have been conducted at scales inappropriate for ecological risk characterization, and have not been integrated with information on patterns of contamination or exposure. Hence, they do not provide much useful information to complement or modify the results of risk assessments. More focused field studies are needed to provide useful information on wildlife effects before and after remediation.

Nisbet, I.C.T. [I.C.T. Nisbet and Co., Inc., N. Falmouth, MA (United States); Swain, W.R. [ECO Logic, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Star, I. [GeoTrans, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage : 10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.07.004 #12;2 1. Introduction Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing of carbon and the cost of capture. From the engineering, psychological or climatic point of view, one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

Gas Migration from Closed Coal Mines to the Surface RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY AND PREVENTION MEANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Migration from Closed Coal Mines to the Surface RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY AND PREVENTION to the surface is especially significant in the context of coal mines. This is because mine gas can migrate of the scheduled closure of all coal mining operations in France, INERIS has drawn up, at the request of national

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

427

HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE L DELERY1 Verneuil-en-halatte-F ABSTRACT Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is a solvent used mostly in the dry health effects caused by chronic inhalation exposure of PCE. PCE is suspected to be probably carcinogenic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

428

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

429

Risk Assessment of Scramjet Unstart Using Adjoint-Based Sampling Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk Assessment of Scramjet Unstart Using Adjoint-Based Sampling Methods Qiqi Wang Massachusetts it to approximate the unstart probability of a supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) engine under changes for approximately 10 s in 2004. The X-43 waspoweredby asupersonic combustionramjet (scramjet) engine, in which air

Alonso, Juan J.

430

Risk Assessment of Scramjet Unstart Using Adjoint-Based Sampling Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk Assessment of Scramjet Unstart Using Adjoint-Based Sampling Methods Qiqi Wang Massachusetts in a SCRamjet engine under uncertain conditions that are characterized by various Gaussian and non (SCRamjet) engine, in which air at supersonic speed is mixed with hydrogen in the combustion chamber

Wang, Qiqi

431

New report assesses offshore wind technology challenges and potential risks and benefits.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New report assesses offshore wind technology challenges and potential risks and benefits of the offshore wind energy industry, Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States. It provides a broad understanding of the offshore wind resource, and details the associated technology challenges, econom- ics

432

Uncertainty in Octanol?Water Partition Coefficient:? Implications for Risk Assessment and Remedial Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

U. S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4201; USGS:? Reston, VA, 2001. ... (37)?Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment for the Hudson River Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study; U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Prepared by Menzie-Cura & Associates and TAMS Consultants, Inc. July, 1999. ...

Igor Linkov; Michael R. Ames; Edmund A. C. Crouch; F. Kyle Satterstrom

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Sandia Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self Assessment Report, October 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technical Qualification Program Self Assessment Report Technical Qualification Program Self Assessment Report ASRP-N0-10.2.2012-469406 Title : Sandia Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self Assessment Lead Assessor: James Todd, SSO FTCP Agent Team Members: Shirley Ireland, Dave Rast, Wendy Sawyer, and Allen Tate Self assessnnent ASM-N0-9.13.2012-464813 Number: Dates Conducted: 9/17 -10/12, 2012 Self Asse;ssment Scope This self assessment examined how Sandia Site Office (SSO) executes the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) as measured by the current Federal Technical Capability Panel criteria review and approach documents (CRADs) included in the assessment plan. Self Asse.ssment Summary The Sandia Site Office Technical Qualification Program is implemented. Site office technical personnel responsible for providing assistance, guidance, direction, or oversight that could affect

435

Risk-Informed Safety Requirements for H2 Codes and Standards Development - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Aaron Harris (Primary Contact), Jeffrey LaChance, Katrina Groth Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969 Livermore, CA 94551-0969 Phone: (925) 294-4530 Email: apharri@sandia.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2003 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Present results of indoor refueling risk assessment to the * National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Fueling Working Group. Perform and document required risk assessment (with * input from NFPA 2 and others) for developing science- based risk-informed codes and standards for indoor

436

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

BA Economics and BA Financial Economics Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BA Economics and BA Financial Economics ­ Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives The program will prepare graduates: 1. Understand the "economic way model economic decisions. 3. The ability to analyze historical and current events

Cantlon, Jessica F.

438

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Geological Storage CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operational risks for CCS projects include: risks of capturing, compressing, transporting and injecting CO?; risks of well blowouts; risk that CO? will leak into shallow aquifers and contaminate potable water; and risk that sequestered CO? will leak into the atmosphere. This report examines these risks by using information on the risks associated with analogue activities such as CO2 based enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), natural gas storage and acid gas disposal. We have developed a new analysis of pipeline risk based on Bayesian statistical analysis. Bayesian theory probabilities may describe states of partial knowledge, even perhaps those related to non-repeatable events. The Bayesian approach enables both utilizing existing data and at the same time having the capability to adsorb new information thus to lower uncertainty in our understanding of complex systems. Incident rates for both natural gas and CO2 pipelines have been widely used in papers and reports on risk of CO2 pipelines as proxies for the individual risk created by such pipelines. Published risk studies of CO2 pipelines suggest that the individual risk associated with CO2 pipelines is between 10-3 and 10-4, which reflects risk levels approaching those of mountain climbing, which many would find unacceptably high. This report concludes, based on a careful analysis of natural gas pipeline failures, suggests that the individual risk of CO2 pipelines is likely in the range of 10-6 to 10-7, a risk range considered in the acceptable to negligible range in most countries. If, as is commonly thought, pipelines represent the highest risk component of CCS outside of the capture plant, then this conclusion suggests that most (if not all) previous quantitative- risk assessments of components of CCS may be orders of magnitude to high. The potential lethality of unexpected CO2 releases from pipelines or wells are arguably the highest risk aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), carbon capture, and storage (CCS). Assertions in the CCS literature, that CO2 levels of 10% for ten minutes, or 20 to 30% for a few minutes are lethal to humans, are not supported by the available evidence. The results of published experiments with animals exposed to CO2, from mice to monkeys, at both normal and depleted oxygen levels, suggest that lethal levels of CO2 toxicity are in the range 50 to 60%. These experiments demonstrate that CO2 does not kill by asphyxia, but rather is toxic at high concentrations. It is concluded that quantitative risk assessments of CCS have overestimated the risk of fatalities by using values of lethality a factor two to six lower than the values estimated in this paper. In many dispersion models of CO2 releases from pipelines, no fatalities would be predicted if appropriate levels of lethality for CO2 had been used in the analysis.

Duncan, Ian

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Sandia Site Office- 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This self assessment examined how Sandia Site Office (SSO) executes the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) as measured by the current Federal Technical Capability Panel criteria review and approach documents (CRADs) included in the assessment plan.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Pacific Northwest Site Office- 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This self-assessment evaluated how well the Technical Qualification and Federal Capability Programs were implemented at the Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO).

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment program 5-year Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(5 YEARS) Summary: and assessment to programs and services to increase efficiency and cost effectiveness. CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTOR (5... FY11 ASSESSMENTCRITICAL SUCCESS FACTOR (5...

443

The Dempster-Schafer Theory of Belief Functions for Managing Uncertainties: An Introduction and Fraud Risk Assessment Illustration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where management fraud risk is assessed to be high. In addition, we discuss whether audit planning is better served by an integrated audit/fraud risk assessment as now suggested in SAS 107 (AICPA 2006a, see also ASA 200 in AUASB 2007) or by the approach...

Srivastava, Rajendra P.; Mock, Theodore J.; Gao, Lei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

DOE safety goals comparison using NUREG-1150 PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scope Level 3 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) including external events has been performed for N Reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) Category A production reactor. This four-year, multi-million dollar task was a joint effort by Westinghouse Hanford Company, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Technical lead in external events and NUREG-1150 methodology was provided by SNL. SAIC led the effort in the Level 1 analysis for the internally initiated events. Westinghouse Hanford supported the task in many key areas, such as data collection and interpretation, accident progression, system interaction, human factor analyses, expert elicitation, peers review, etc. The main objective of this Level 3 PRA are to assess the risks to the public and onsite workers posed by the operation of N Reactor, to identify modifications to the plant that could reduce the overall risk, and to compare those risks to the proposed DOE and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) quantitative safety goals. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Westinghouse Hanford and SNL for estimating individual health risks, and the comparison of the N Reactor results and DOE quantitative nuclear safety guidelines. This paper is devoted to DOE quantitative safety guidelines interpretation and comparison; the NRC safety objectives are also presented in order to compare N Reactor results to commercial nuclear power plants included in the NUREG-1150 study. 7 refs., 7 tabs.

Wang., O.S.; Zentner, M.D.; Rainey, T.E.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Probabilistic risk assessment of the N Reactor using NUREG-1150 methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A level-III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) reactor located on the Hanford site in Washington state. The methods developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the NUREG-1150 effort were adapted for the analysis. The objectives of the study are to assess the risks to the public (off-site) and to workers at colocated DOE facilities (on-site) posed by the operation of N reactor, compare those risks to proposed DOE safety guidelines and NRC safety goals, and identify changes to the plant for safety enhancement. This summary is based on results from internally initiated events only. Off-site risk resulted from externally initiated events and on-site risk will be reported at a later date. The entire study is based on best-estimate inputs except that a number of areas, such as source term inventory and progression of metal/water reaction, apply conservative assumptions.

Wang, O.S.; Coles, G.A.; Zentner, M.D.; Powers, T.B.; Baxter, J.T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessment of ecological risks in weed biocontrol: Input from retrospective ecological analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of the outcomes of natural enemy introductions remains the most fundamental challenge in biological control. Quantitative retrospective analyses of ongoing biocontrol projects provide a systematic strategy to evaluate and further develop ecological risk assessment. In this review, we highlight a crucial assumption underlying a continued reliance on the host specificity paradigm as a quantitative prediction of ecological risk, summarize the status of our retrospective analyses of nontarget effects of two weevils used against exotic thistles in North America, and discuss our prospective assessment of risk to a federally listed, threatened species (Cirsium pitcheri) based on those studies. Our analyses quantify the fact that host range and preference from host specificity tests are not sufficient to predict ecological impact if the introduced natural enemy is not strictly monophagous. The implicit assumption when such use is made of the host specificity data in risk assessment is that population impacts are proportional to relative preference and performance, the key components of host specificity. However, in concert with shifting awareness in the field, our studies demonstrate that the environment influences and can alter host use and population growth, leading to higher than expected direct impacts on the less preferred native host species at several spatial scales. Further, we have found that straightforward, easily anticipated indirect effects, on intraguild foragers as well as on the less preferred native host plant species, can be both widespread and significant. We conclude that intensive retrospective ecological studies provide some guidance for the quantitative prospective studies needed to assess candidate biological control agent dynamics and impacts and, so, contribute to improved rigor in the evaluation of total ecological risk to native species.

Svata M. Louda; Tatyana A. Rand; F. Leland Russell; Amy E. Arnett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Title Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6349E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Therkelsen, Peter, Aimee T. McKane, Ridah Sabouni, and Tracy Evans Conference Name American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 07/2013 Keywords ACEEE Conference Paper, energy efficiency, Energy Performance Program Abstract Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE's contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEPcertified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

448

(Environmental impact assessment as applied to policies, plans and programs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposal to study the application of the principles of environmental impact assessment (EIA) to policy, plans, and programs was submitted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the Senior Advisors on Environmental and Water Problems of the United Nations Economic Commission. On approval, EPA asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support its efforts as lead participant on an international task force. ORNL is responsible for overall project management, including development of the report. At the first meeting in Geneva on June 18--19, there were representatives from Austria, Canada, Finland, Norway, Poland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The administrative/legal setting for EIA in each country was reviewed. The objectives of the task force were defined, and issues related to the application of EIA at the policy level were discussed. At the second meeting, in addition to those countries represented at the first meeting the Commission of Economic Communities, Czech and Slovak Federal Republic, Remark, Federal Republic of Germany, Hungary, and The Netherlands were represented. A brief review was given by the new participants of legal/administrative requirements for EIA in their countries. Case studies were presented by Canada, Finland, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United States.

Sigal, L.L.

1990-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

449

Legacy Risk Measure for Environmental Management Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is investigating the development of a comprehensive and quantitative risk model framework for environmental management activities at the site. Included are waste management programs (high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, mixed low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, and special nuclear materials), major environmental restoration efforts, major decontamination and decommissioning projects, and planned long-term stewardship activities. Two basic types of risk estimates are included: risks from environmental management activities, and long-term legacy risks from wastes/materials. Both types of risks are estimated using the Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) developed at the INEEL. Given these two types of risk calculations, the following evaluations can be performed: • Risk evaluation of an entire program (covering waste/material as it now exists through disposal or other end states) • Risk comparisons of alternative programs or activities • Comparisons of risk benefit versus risk cost for activities or entire programs • Ranking of programs or activities by risk • Ranking of wastes/materials by risk • Evaluation of site risk changes with time as activities progress • Integrated performance measurement using indicators such as injury/death and exposure rates. This paper discusses the definition and calculation of legacy risk measures and associated issues. The legacy risk measure is needed to support three of the seven types of evaluations listed above: comparisons of risk benefit versus risk cost, ranking of wastes/materials by risk, and evaluation of site risk changes with time.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Nitschke, Robert Leon

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS RISK ASSESSMENT FORM Summary of Assessment -Tick Box  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hands or body YES/NO. Electrical Hazards Is electrical equipment, other than tested 240V portable the heat capacity of samples of copper to check the calibration of the measuring system. Once or respiratory/ear protection required. 6. The aim of the Assessment is to satisfy Regulation 3 of "The

Hampshire, Damian

451

Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Trails Management Program, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 31 Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Trails Management Program, Los Alamos, New Mexico September 2, 2003 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Environmental Assessment for the Proposed LANL Trails Management Program DOE LASO September 2, 2003 iii Contents Acronyms and Terms................................................................................................................................vii Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................................ix 1.0 Purpose and Need ..............................................................................................................................1

452

Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

56 56 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation Oak Ridge, Tennessee February 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations i ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ac acres ALARA as low as reasonably achievable AMSA American Metropolitan Sewer Association CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CSF cancer slope factor DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment EFPC East Fork Poplar Creek EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPS Effluent Polishing System (West End Treatment Facility) FONSI Finding of No Significant Impact g gram ha hectares HEAST Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables HI hazard index HQ hazard quotient IDP Industrial Discharge Permit IRIS Integrated Risk Information System kg kilogram

453

The use of probabilistic risk assessment to satisfy the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s maintenance rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintenance and inspection at nuclear power plants consumes a large portion of a utility`s resources, making resource allocation for such procedures vital. The NRC Maintenance Rule, due to be implemented in July of 1996, requires utilities to select systems, structures, and components (SSCS) important to safety and to develop a monitoring program to ensure that these SSCs are capable of fulfilling their intended functions. In light of these concerns, two ratios were developed to compare the risk significance of individual components with the amount of plant staff time, or burden, associated with inspecting the component. These risk/burden ratios point out existing disparities between current inspection practices and safety concerns. These ratios can be used to develop new inspection schedules constituting a more equitable risk to burden distribution.

Dubord, R.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Phase 1 data summary report for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: Health risk and ecological risk screening assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The contaminants released since the early 1940s include a variety of radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of Phase 1 of the CRRI. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels in fish, sediment, and water from the CR/WBR; (2) determine the in the range of contaminant concentrations present river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants.

Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Longman, R.C.; McGinn, C.W.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.; Williams, L.F.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

NATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PARTNERSHIP (NRAP) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Grant Bromhal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PARTNERSHIP (NRAP) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Grant Bromhal NATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PARTNERSHIP (NRAP) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Grant Bromhal Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Dzombak, David A PI CMU Acid Gas Interactions w ith Seal Materials under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Nakles, David V CO-PI CMU Small, Mitchell J CO-PI CMU Siriw ardane, Hema J PI WVU Develop Second Generation ROMs for Release and Transport through Seals Mohaghegh, Shahab PI WVU Develop Second Generation ROMs for Reservoir Behavior Mohaghegh, Shahab PI WVU Develop Third Generation ROMs for Reservoir Behavior Siriw ardane, Hema J PI WVU Develop Third Generation ROMs for Release and Transport through Seals Li, Li PI PSU Brunet, Jean-Patrick Researcher PSU Karpyn, Zuleima T PI PSU Cao, Peilin Grad Student PSU Karamalidis, Athanasios PI

456

Appendices and Risk Assessment Spreadsheet Version No. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Links to related documents referenced within the Engineering Manual: Links to related documents referenced within the Engineering Manual: Appendices and Risk Assessment Spreadsheet Version No. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual 07/10 Overview i Engineering at Fermilab 4 ii Purpose and Scope 5 iii Responsibilities 7 Fermilab Engineering Process 1 Requirements and Specifications 9 2 Engineering Risk Assessment 10 3 Requirements and Specifications Review 17 4 System Design 18 5 Engineering Design Review 21 6 Procurement and Implementation 23 7 Testing and Validation 26 8 Release to Operations 28 9 Final Documentation 29 Closing Thoughts 31 Appendices 33 Table of Contents Overview Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual Page No. Version No. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual

457

Approach to proliferation risk assessment based on multiple objective analysis framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach to the assessment of proliferation risk using the methods of multi-criteria decision making and multi-objective optimization is presented. The approach allows the taking into account of the specifics features of the national nuclear infrastructure, and possible proliferation strategies (motivations, intentions, and capabilities). 3 examples of applying the approach are shown. First, the approach has been used to evaluate the attractiveness of HEU (high enriched uranium)production scenarios at a clandestine enrichment facility using centrifuge enrichment technology. Secondly, the approach has been applied to assess the attractiveness of scenarios for undeclared production of plutonium or HEU by theft of materials circulating in nuclear fuel cycle facilities and thermal reactors. Thirdly, the approach has been used to perform a comparative analysis of the structures of developing nuclear power systems based on different types of nuclear fuel cycles, the analysis being based on indicators of proliferation risk.

Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of NNRU MEPhI (Russian Federation); Studgorodok 1, Obninsk, Kaluga region, 249030 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and