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1

Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superfund Superfund Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A) Final April 1992 Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A) Final Notice: Guidance for Radioanalytical Data Usability in Risk Assessment is Given in Part B Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 NOTICE The policies and procedures set forth here are intended as guidance to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other government employees. They do not constitute rulemaking by the Agency, and may not be relied on to create a substantive or procedural right enforceable by any other person. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may take action that is at variance with the policies and procedures in this guidance and may change them at any time without

2

US EPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, January 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

540-R-070-002 540-R-070-002 OSWER 9285.7-82 January 2009 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part F, Supplemental Guidance for Inhalation Risk Assessment) Final Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Scope .........................................................................................................2 1.3 Effects on Other Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology

3

Comprehensive Risk Assessment Guidance for Federal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... determine the most appropriate risk responses to ongoing cyber attacks or threats stemming from man-made or natural disasters; ...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, Vol.II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States United States Office of Emergency and EPA/540/1-89/001 Environmental Protection Remedial Responce March 1989 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Superfund Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final EPA EPA/540/1-89/001 March 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Disclaimer The policies and procedures set forth here are intended as guidance to Agency and other government employees. They do not constitute rulemaking by the Agency, and may not be relied on to create a substantive or procedural right enforceable by any other person. The Government may take action

5

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

6

Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Appendix C and D, June, 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH APPENDIX C SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH A literature search is conducted to obtain information on contaminants of concern, their potential ecological effects, and species of concern. This appendix is separated into two sections; Section C-1 describes the information necessary for the literature review portion of an ecological risk assessment. Topics include information for exposure profiles, bioavailability or bioconcentration factors for various compounds, life-history information for the species of concern or the surrogate species, and an ecological effects profile. Section C-2 lists information sources and techniques for a literature search and review. Topics include a discussion of how to select key words on which to base a search

8

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

9

Nondestructive Evaluation: Probabilistic Risk Assessment Technical Adequacy Guidance for Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk-informed methodologies have been developed in order to establish alternative in-service inspection (ISI) requirements that are defined as risk-informed in-service inspection (RI ISI) programs. Plant-specific probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are typically used during the RI ISI development process. The ASME PRA Standard (for example, ASME RA Sb 2005) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.200 R1 and R2 have been issued and provide guidance in determining PRA tec...

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publication 9285.7-01D Publication 9285.7-01D January 1998 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part D, Standardized Planning, Reporting, and Review of Superfund Risk Assessments) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Revision No. 0 ii January 1998 NOTICE This document provides guidance to EPA staff. The guidance is designed to communicate National policy on the planning, reporting and review of Superfund risk assessments. The document does not, however, substitute for EPA's statutes or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it cannot impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon

11

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance for Conducting Risk Assessments and Related Risk Activities for the DOE-ORO Environmental Management Program. BJCOR-271 Guidance for Treatment of Variability and...

12

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Step 5-glossary, June, 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OVERVIEW Before the WP and SAP are signed, it is important to verify that the field sampling plan they specify is appropriate and implementable at the site. If this has not already been done, it should be done now. During field verification of the sampling design, the testable hypotheses, exposure pathway models, and measurement endpoints are evaluated for their appropriateness and implementability. The assessment endpoint(s), however, should not be under evaluation in this step; the appropriateness of the assessment endpoint should have been resolved in Step 3. If an assessment endpoint is changed at this step, the risk assessor must return to Step 3, because the entire process leading to the actual site investigation in Step 6 assumes the selection of

13

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Steps 1-4, June, 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 OVERVIEW The screening-level problem formulation and ecological effects evaluation is part of the initial ecological risk screening assessment. For this initial step, it is likely that site- specific information for determining the nature and extent of contamination and for characterizing ecological receptors at the site is limited. This step includes all the functions of problem formulation (more fully described in Steps 3 and 4) and ecological effects analysis, but on a screening level. The results of this step will be used in conjunction with exposure estimates in the preliminary risk calculation in Step 2. STEP 1: SCREENING-LEVEL PROBLEM FORMULATION AND ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS EVALUATION 1.1 INTRODUCTION Step 1 is the screening-level problem formulation process and ecological effects evaluation

14

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

15

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Debra Stewart at (865)482-2657 or dthomas3@utk.edu. Risk assessments conducted for the DOE-ORO should implement Guidance for Conducting Risk Assessments and Related Risk...

16

D & D screening risk evaluation guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Practical Guidance on the Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Risk-Informed Applications with a Focus on the Treatment of Uncert ainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundNeither the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) nor the industry intends to use probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) as a total replacement for traditional deterministic approaches. PRA is viewed as a complement to the deterministic method. In fact, probabilistic and deterministic methods are acknowledged as extensions of each other rather than as separate and distinct.Both the industry and the NRC are incorporating risk concepts and techniques into ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria This document establishes the guidance and criteria for conducting internal and independent Federal Technical Capability Assessments within the Department. The requirements of this document are applicable to those organizations having safety responsibilities for defense nuclear facilities. This includes both headquarters and field organizations. Regardless of the type of assessment conducted, the objectives and criteria within this document are used as a basis for the assessment. Use of consistent objectives and criteria is necessary to establish baselines and to track and trend performance. FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria, 1998 More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program and FTCP Assessment CRADs

19

National Climate Assessment: Guidance for Technical Input Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides an overview of key process milestones for the completion of the 2013 National Climate Assessment. Guidance to Chapter Authors on Eight Priority Topics for the 2013...

20

Transmission line environmental assessment guidance document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1939, U.S. utility companies have been required to obtain a Presidential Permit to construct electric transmission lines that cross a U.S. border and connect with a foreign utility. The purpose of this document is to provide Presidential Permit applicants with two types of guidance: (1) on the type of environmental and project descriptive information needed to assess the potential impacts of the proposed and alternative actions and (2) on compliance with applicable federal and state regulations. The main three chapters present information on the purpose and content of this document (Chapter 1); legislative, regulatory, and consultation requirements for transmission line interconnect projects (Chapter 2); and identification of basic transmission system design parameters and environmental data requirements for analysis of potential impacts of the proposed action (Chapter 3). Chapter 3 also includes information on possible techniques or measures to mitigate impacts. Appendix A presents an overview of NEPA requirements and DOE`s implementing procedures. Appendix B summarizes information on legislation that may be applicable to transmission line projects proposed in Presidential Permit applications.

Jackson, J.; Pentecost, E.; Muzzarelli, J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-22, Management and Independent Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EGS: 01-02 Appendix E- Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 17, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF PRICE-ANDERSON ENFORCEMENT SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-02: Management and Independent Assessment Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. OE typically issues such guidance in the form of Enforcement Guidance Supplements (EGSs), which provide information or recommendations only and impose no

22

Risk assessment handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers' needs and the product have been established.

Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Risk assessment handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG&G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers` needs and the product have been established.

Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Guidance on Dependence Assessment in SPAR-H  

SciTech Connect

As part of the effort to develop the SPAR-H user guidance, particular attention was paid to the assessment of dependence in order to address user questions about proper application of dependence. This paper presents a discussion of dependence from a psychological perspective and provides guidance on applying this information during the qualitative analysis of dependence to ensure more realistic and appropriate dependence assessments with the SPAR-H method. While this guidance was developed with SPAR-H in mind, it may be informative to other human reliability analysis methods that also use a THERP-based dependence approach, particularly if applied at the human failure event level.

April M. Whaley

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

53 53 Guide for Performing Screening Ecological Risk Assessments at DOE Facilities This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; prices available from 615-576-8401 (fax 615-576-2865). Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. ES/ER/TM-153 Guide for Performing Screening Ecological Risk Assessments at DOE Facilities G. W. Suter II Date Issued-September 1995 Prepared by the Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program, Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management under budget and reporting code EW 20

26

Supplemental Guidance for Assessing Susceptibility from Early...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment, ORD Michael P. Firestone, Office of Children's Health Protection, OA Lynn Flowers, National Center for Environmental Assessment, ORD R. Woodrow Setzer,...

27

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Memorandum , Part II. Screening Level Risk Assessment 92-225-161-49 K-33 Cooling Towers screening risk assessments (2) K-770 sites screening risk assessment (9...

29

Risk Assess - updated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

30

Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE AND CRITERIA Federal Technical Capability Panel and the Office of Human Resources and Administration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 September 1998 Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria 1 September 15, 1998 INTRODUCTION The Federal Technical Capability Program provides for the recruitment, deployment, development and retention of federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department' s missions and responsibilities. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (Panel) reports to the Deputy Secretary and oversees and resolves issues affecting the Federal Technical Capability Program. The Panel periodically assesses the effectiveness of the four functions of the

31

Management Assessment Quality Assurance Guidance in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of several guidance documents developed by DOE EM pertaining to environmental restoration and waste management sampling and analysis activities. This guidance contains performance objectives and representative assessment criteria that can be used to conduct management assessments.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Guidelines for Performance of Internal Flooding Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for the performance of an Internal Flood Probabilistic Risk Assessment (IFPRA). The scope of IFPRA tasks supported by this guidance also includes the treatment of High Energy Line Breaks (HELB) which can produce floods as well as other unique challenges to Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) important to the prevention and mitigation of a core damage accident. The guidance includes step-by-step procedures for performing a complete IFPRA, specific examples of approache...

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

Track 2 sites: Guidance for assessing low probability hazard sites at the INEL. Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This document presents guidance for assessment of Track 2 low probability hazard sites (LPHS) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Track 2 classification was developed specifically for the INEL to streamline the implementation of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Track 2 LPHSs are described as sites where insufficient data are available to make a decision concerning the risk level or to select or design a remedy. As such, these types of sites are not described in the National Contingency Plan or existing regulatory guidance. The goal of the Track 2 process is to evaluate LPHSs using existing qualitative and quantitative data to minimize the collection of new environmental data. To this end, this document presents a structured format consisting of a series of questions and tables. A qualitative risk assessment is used. The process is iterative, and addresses an LPHS from multiple perspectives (i.e., historical, empirical, process) in an effort to generate a reproducible and defensible method. This rigorous approach follows the data quality objective process and establishes a well organized, logical approach to consolidate and assess existing data, and set decision criteria. If necessary, the process allows for the design of a sampling and analysis strategy to obtain new environmental data of appropriate quality to support decisions for each LPHS. Finally, the guidance expedites consensus between regulatory parties by emphasizing a team approach to Track 2 investigations.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

35

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions This page represents the most commonly approached topics from our users. What internet browser works best for the RAIS? We attempt to accommodate every browser. If there is a problem viewing the RAIS pages or downloading items, let us know what browser you are using and we will try and fix the problem. How can I use the information on the RAIS? The information on the RAIS can be used for teaching material and performing risk assessments that comply with EPA guidance. Feel free to use the information; it is available to the public. However, please give proper credit to the RAIS and the team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and The University of Tennessee where you see fit. Also, the databases we maintain are updated on a quarterly basis or sooner, so you may need to "time-stamp"

36

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risk assessment information used to evaluate and remediate legacy contamination from the Manhattan Project. The RAIS was designed to provide all risk assessment processes in a...

37

Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Welcome: The Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) is established to assist DOE in the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE ensure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are conducted in a consistent manner, of appropriate quality, properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support and documented. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available risk assessment tools and guidance supporting nuclear safety at its nuclear facilities.

38

Risk Assessment of Toxic Pollutants From Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities operating coal-fired power plants must weigh the cost of controlling toxic releases against the risk of adverse human health effects. An EPRI-developed analytic framework offers guidance for such assessments, outlining mathematical modeling procedures for tracking pollutants in the environment and for estimating potential health risks to nearby populations.

1987-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mercury Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

40

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents Y-12 RA Graphic Results Y-12 Baseline Risk Assessment Results Y-12 Screening Risk Assessment Results Bullet Graphic Risk Results Arrow Bear Creek Valley Maps Residential Landuse Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 1 - 900) Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-4 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-5 - 10-4) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-6 - 10-5) Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,2- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,2- Hazard Groundwater - Nitrate Hazard Groundwater - Radium Risk Groundwater - Technetium-99 Risk Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Hazard Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Risk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Draft Risk Assessment Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cyber security risk assessment process includes the characterization of assets. A thorough asset characterization process can lead to a more robust threat characterization. One means of enhancing the thoroughness of the asset-and-threat characterization processes is to improve the characterization mechanisms. This technical update supports this approach by providing the results of initial research and developing a framework to support further analysis.This project builds upon the work ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphic Results Graphic Results Baseline Risk Assessment Results Screening Risk Assessment Results Other Risk Assessment Results Graphic Results K-25 Groundwater Residential Landuse Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-30) Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Bedrock Wells - Total Risk Bedrock Wells - Arsenic Risk Bedrock Wells - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Bedrock Wells - Trichloroethene Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-150) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-4 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-6 - 10-4) Unconsolidated Wells - Arsenic Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Trichloroethene Risk ORNL WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk

43

RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety-related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE make sure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are: conducted in a consistent manner; of appropriate quality; properly documented; and properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available tools and guidance necessary to support nuclear safety at its nuclear facilities. RWG_Charter_March_2012.pdf

44

Uncertainties in Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides. An Uncertainty Analysis for Risk Coefficients Reported in Federal Guidance Report No. 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (FGR 13) provides risk coefficients for estimation of the risk of cancer due to low-level exposure to each of more than 800 radionuclides. Uncertainties in risk coefficients were quantified in FGR 13 for 33 cases (exposure to each of 11 radionuclides by each of three exposure pathways) on the basis of sensitivity analyses in which various combinations of plausible biokinetic, dosimetric, and radiation risk models were used to generate alternative risk coefficients. The present report updates the uncertainty analysis in FGR 13 for the cases of inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides and expands the analysis to all radionuclides addressed in that report. The analysis indicates that most risk coefficients for inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are determined within a factor of 5 or less by current information. That is, application of alternate plausible biokinetic and dosimetric models and radiation risk models (based on the linear, no-threshold hypothesis with an adjustment for the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor) is unlikely to change these coefficients by more than a factor of 5. In this analysis the assessed uncertainty in the radiation risk model was found to be the main determinant of the uncertainty category for most risk coefficients, but conclusions concerning the relative contributions of risk and dose models to the total uncertainty in a risk coefficient may depend strongly on the method of assessing uncertainties in the risk model.

Pawel, David [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Nelson, Christopher [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Defense Transuranic Waste Program. Transuranic waste transportation assessment and guidance report  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Assessment and Guidance Report (TAGR) is designed to provide DOE-managed defense sites with guidance and citable analyses addressing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements for qualifying and transporting transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well developed asset management implementation. Consequently an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in a risk assessment process. However, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require for their successful application some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well-developed asset management implementation. Consequently, an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in the risk assessment process. However, for their application, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment failure. This re...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Bullet Baseline Risk Assessments Bullet Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Environmental Assessment Report South Campus Facility, Oak Ridge Tenn [DOE/OR/02-1274&D] Bullet Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek [DOE/OR/1119 & D2 & V2] Bullet Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study Report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit [DOE/OR/01 1282 & D1] [ORNL/ER-2] Bullet The Utility of Existing Data Conducting a CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (draft) [ORNL/ER-?] Bullet East Fork Poplar Creek Sewer Line Beltway Remedial Investigation Report [DOE/OR/02-1119&D2] Bullet Screening Risk Assessments Bullet Preliminary Assessment of Radiation Doses to the Public from Cesium

49

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 6, 2010 May 6, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, May 6, 2010 Risk Assessment Information Notice (IN): HSS provided the draft IN to safety basis experts from SNL, Y-12 and PNNL for their review and comment. Their comments were addressed and the IN is back into concurrence. 2. DNFSB Brief: HSS is coordinated with the RWG and DNFSB to schedule a DNFSB brief in June. 3. Risk Assessment Training: The National Training Center is presenting its risk assessment overview course May 18-20 at DOE headquarters. HS-20 is planning to discuss DOE's nuclear safety risk assessment study and plans for policy and guidance development at the end of the course. 4. External Risk Study: Data collection has been completed at NASA, NEI, NASA, and FDA. HS-20

50

Probabilistic Risk Assessment - A Bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk analysis is an integration of failure modes and effects analysis (FEMA), fault tree analysis and other techniques to assess the potential for failure and to find ways to reduce risk. This bibliography references 160 documents in the ...

Program NASA Scientific and Technical Information

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. EPA, Washington, D.C. 1992. Risk Assessment Forum. Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook. Vol. I. United Staes Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and...

52

Radiation Risk Assessment at CERCLA Sites, Q&A, December 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AGENCY AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: Dis diation Risk Assessment Q & A's Final Guidance FROM: medial Response (OERR) . mergency Response Indoor Air (ORIA) Office of Air and Radiation I TO: Addressees PURPOSE The purpose of this memorandum is to transmit to you a final guidance document entitled: "Radiation Risk Assessment At CERCLA Sites: Q & A." The guidance provides answers to several common questions about radiation risk assessments at CERCLA sites. It should be especially useful to Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs), and risk assessors.' BACKGROUND The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued guidance entitled "Establishment of Cleanup Levels for CERCLA Levels for CERCLA Sites with Radioactive Contamination"

53

Software products for risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For assessing risks in all environments it is often necessary to use a systematic approach of modeling and simulation with the aim to simplify this process in the framework of designing new technological lines, machines, equipment and processes. Also ... Keywords: crisis management, risk assessment, software products

Jozef Ristvej; Tomas Lovecek

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Problem Formulations for Ecological Risk Assessments Conducted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- deformities, fin erosion, lesions, and tumors ERA - ecological risk assessment HHRA - human health risk assessments ow K - octanol-water partition coefficients oc K - organic...

55

Qualitative methods for assessing risk  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/002F 5/002F April 1998 Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (Published on May 14, 1998, Federal Register 63(93):26846-26924) Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. NOTICE This report contains the full text of the Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. However, the format of this version differs from the Federal Register version, as follows: text boxes that are included in this document at their point of reference were instead listed at the end of the Federal Register document as text notes, due to format limitations for Federal Register documents.

57

The Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to bring forth increased efficiency and effectiveness in assessing transportation risks associated with radioactive materials or wastes, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Transportation Program (NTP) published a resource handbook in 2002. The handbook draws from the broad technical expertise among DOE national laboratories and industry, which reflects the extensive experience gained from DOE's efforts in conducting assessments (i.e., environmental impact assessments) within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in the past 20 years. The handbook is intended to serve as a primary source of information regarding the approach and basis for conducting transportation risk assessments under normal or accidental conditions that are associated with shipping radioactive materials or wastes. It is useful as a reference to DOE managers, NEPA assessors, technical analysts, contractors, and also stakeholders. It provides a summary of pertinent U.S. policies and regulations on the shipment of radioactive materials, existing guidance on preparing transportation risk assessments, a review of previous transportation risk assessments by DOE and others, a description of comprehensive and generally accepted transportation risk assessment methodologies, and a compilation of supporting data, parameters, and assumptions. The handbook also provides a discussion paper on an issue that has been identified as being important in the past. The discussion paper focuses on cumulative impacts, illustrating the ongoing evolution of transportation risk assessment. The discussion may be expanded in the future as emerging issues are identified. The handbook will be maintained and periodically updated to provide current and accurate information.

Chen, S. Y.; Kapoor, A. K.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

59

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Airport risk assessment: a probabilistic approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk reduction is one of the key objectives pursued by transport safety policies. Particularly, the formulation and implementation of transport safety policies needs the systematic assessment of the risks, the specification of residual risk targets and ... Keywords: risk assessment methodology, risk management, safety civil aviation

L. Guerra; T. Murino; E. Romano

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I Human Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies of the Mortality of A-Bomb Survivors. Report 7 Part 1, Cancer Mortality Among Atomic Bomb Survivors, 1950-78. Radiation Research 90:395-432. Kocher, D. 1981. Radioactive...

62

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an absence of phytoplankton. The pond appears to function as a valuable habitat for fish and other wildlife using this area. Preliminary sampling indicated elevated copper...

63

USEPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment: Guidance for Superfund Volume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the specified body part GI Gastrointestinal GSD Geometric standard deviation HHEM Human Health Evaluation Manual IR Ingestion rate (for water, litersday) K ew Equilibrium...

64

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shari Stevens Region VII Steve Wharton Robert Koke Region III Barbara O'Korn Root Robert Davis Region VIII Gerry Henningsen, Ph.D.,D.V.M. Region IV Lynn Wellman Dale Hoff, Ph.D....

65

Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part B)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as the mass of the atmosphere decreases. Cosmic flux density is least near the geomagnetic equator and increases with latitude. At sea level, the flux density is about 10%...

66

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5. What is the condition of the bank (e.g., height, slope, extent of vegetative cover)? 6. Is the system influenced by tides? yes no What information was...

67

Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P-03/001F P-03/001F March 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1. PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.2. ORGANIZATION AND APPLICATION OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.1. Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.2. Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 1.3. KEY FEATURES OF THE CANCER GUIDELINES .

68

Applications of Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of potential and actual applications of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) technology and insights. Individual applications are derived from the experiences of a number of US nuclear utilities. This report identifies numerous applications of PRA techniques beyond those typically associated with PRAs. In addition, believing that the future use of PRA techniques should not be limited to those of the past, areas of plant operations, maintenance, and financial resource allocation are discussed. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

Burns, K.J.; Chapman, J.R.; Follen, S.M.; O'Regan, P.J. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThis report provides updates to the guidelines and approaches for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) that were published in the initial Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide (1002989) in 2003. It provides practical guidelines for SPRA development to support a variety of uses, including risk-informed applications.It is intended that a probabilistic risk ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

EMP Attachment 3 DOE-SC PNNL Site Dose Assessment Guidance  

SciTech Connect

This Dose Assessment Guidance (DAG) describes methods to use to determine the Maximally-Exposed Individual (MEI) location and to estimate dose impact to that individual under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). This guidance applies to public dose from radioactive material releases to the air from PNNL Site operations. This document is an attachment to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) and describes dose assessment guidance for radiological air emissions. The impact of radiological air emissions from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) PNNL Site is indicated by dose estimates to a maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). Reporting requirements associated with dose to members of the public from radiological air emissions are in 40 CFR Part 61.94, WAC 246-247-080, and DOE Order 458.1. The DOE Order and state standards for dose from radioactive air emissions are consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dose standards in 40 CFR 61.92 (i.e., 10 mrem/yr to a MEI). Despite the fact that the current Contract Requirements Document (CRD) for the DOE-SC PNNL Site operations does not include the requirement to meet DOE CRD 458.1, paragraph 2.b, public dose limits, the DOE dose limits would be met when EPA limits are met.

Snyder, Sandra F.

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Rapid Response Risk Assessment Turnaround System (R3ATS)  

SciTech Connect

The Rapid Response Risk Assessment Turnaround System (R3ATS) is a decision support system that can be used for cost and schedule risk assessment as prescribed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Unlike complex and training-intensive project control and accounting risk systems - or naive and statistically incorrect risk assessment approaches - employed throughout the DOE complex R3ATS is a powerful and yet simple decision support system for conducting project risk assessments. Output from R3ATS include: (1) establishing a project risk register which can be periodically updated to regularly monitor and assess a dynamic risk picture, (2) producing statistically derived and justifiable cost and schedule contingency probability density functions, and (3) inclusion, via Bayesian updating, of significant trigger events that result in project cost, schedule or technical risk events. During FY2007, R3ATS was used by the Oak Ridge Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) project to examine the FY 2008 through FY 2009 budget ({approx}$70 million) and the life cycle budget (over $500 million). In less than eight weeks, Oak Ridge DOE personnel and TWPC project management were trained on - and subsequently incorporated - the R3ATS approach thus demonstrating its significance as a viable and rapid turn-around decision support tool for cost and schedule risk assessment. In conclusion: The R3ATS was developed to meet the mission need for a defensible risk-oriented decision support system. We have demonstrated how R3ATS meets DOE ORO budget planning efforts associated with the TWPC life cycle from FY 2008 through FY 2018. We have further identified the critical shortcomings in the entire approach that DOE takes perform risk management. When we realized that DOE guidance for risk management is naive and can easily produce results are not reliable or repeatable, we applied a defensible systems engineering approach to develop R3ATS. The TWPC approach to risk management offers a risk-balancing approach for performance management and ensures that future investment in training enables all users to use risk management as a tool for successful TWPC mission accomplishment. (authors)

Redus, K. [Redus and Associates, LLC, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Escher, R. [Epsilon Systems Solutions, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HABITAT EVALUATION: HABITAT EVALUATION: GUIDANCE FOR THE REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTS EPA Contract No. 68-C0-0070 work Assignments B-21, 1-12 January 1993 Submitted to: Jim Serfis U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Federal Activities 401 M Street, SW Washington, DC 20460 Submitted by: Mark Southerland Dynamac Corporation The Dynamac Building 2275 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD 20850 CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ... ...... .... ... ................................................. 1 Habitat Conservation .......................................... 2 Habitat Evaluation Methodology ................................... 2 Habitats of Concern ........................................... 3 Definition of Habitat ..................................... 4

74

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms These definitions are from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Risk Assessment Program staff and affiliates and the following sources: Click on the letter that begins the term for which you are searching. To search for another term, at the end of each definition, click on the. If a link leaves the glossary to go to an outside page you will see a. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abatement: The reduction in degree or intensity of pollution. Absorbed Dose: The energy imparted to a unit mass of matter by ionizing radiation. The unit of absorbed dose is the rad or gray. One rad equals 100 ergs per gram. The amount of a substance absorbed into the body, usually

75

Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Terrorism Risk Assessment Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Nuclear Reactor Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies International Nuclear Energy Policy and...

76

Criteria for assessing the quality of nuclear probabilistic risk assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The final outcome of a nuclear Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is generally inaccurate and imprecise. This is primarily because not all risk contributors are addressed in the analysis, and there are state-of-knowledge ...

Zhu, Yingli, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide Note The RAIS presents this updated Risk calculator in response to the following: incorporating chemical-specific parameters from the lastest EPI release, addition of air as a media, and conversion to a new database structure. The previous RAIS Risk calculator presented Risks for radionuclides and chemcials together. Recent development of chemical and radionuclide exposure equations has necessitated that the RAIS separate the chemicals and the radionuclides. To calculate risks for chemicals, use the RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals calculator. Currently the agricultural equations for the RAIS chemical and radionuclide risk calculators are identical. The EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goals for

78

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radionuclide Decay Chain Radionuclide Decay Chain Using the Radionuclide Decay Chain Tool Click on the steps below for detailed instructions about each page of the Radionuclide Chain Tool. 1. Select Isotope 2. Decay Chain Table 3. Decay Chain Animation 1. Select Isotope Select the isotope of interest and click the "Submit" button. 2. Decay Chain Table A table of the ICRP 107 decay chain appears that displays the parent and all daughters in the decay chain through the stable isotope(s). The half-life, decay modes, and the branching fractions are given. Decay chains that are repeated as a result of multiple branching fractions are only presented once in the table. Text below the decay chain table contains decay mode definitions and further information on the daughters included in the +D slope factors for risk assessment purposes. A back button is provided to return to the main page. To watch an animated representation of the decay process, click the link "Click for visual diagram."

79

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIS Chemical Risk Calculator RAIS Chemical Soil to Ground Water Calculator Radionuclide Calculators Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) Radionuclide Calculator RAIS...

80

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide 1. Introduction The purpose of this calculator is to assist Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On Scene Coordinators (OSC's), risk assessors and others involved in decision-making at hazardous waste sites and to determine whether levels of contamination found at the site may warrant further investigation or site cleanup, or whether no further investigation or action may be required. The risk values presented on this site are chemical-specific values for individual contaminants in air, water, soil and biota that may warrant further investigation or site cleanup. It should be noted that the risks in this calculator are based upon human health risk and do not address potential ecological risk. Some sites in sensitive ecological settings may also need to be evaluated for potential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix DOE EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix DOEEVMSRISKMATRIX.docx More Documents & Publications Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting...

82

Security risk assessment: toward a comprehensive practical risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a unique approach to a more integrated security risk assessment SRA. This is formalised based on the proven mathematical methods described in various articles in the literature and combined with the work developed by the author. ...

Danilo Valeros Bernardo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces the basis for understanding, developing, and applying a new set of practical, condition-based risk models for substation equipment. Because of the great variety of risks encountered in the power delivery industry and the diversity in utility equipment and business practices, the focus at this stage of the project is at the conceptual level.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: 1) Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline 2) Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas 3) Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode 4) Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: • Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline • Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas • Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode • Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

011B. Office of Research and Development, Washington, D.C. 1992. Exposure Factors Handbook. EPA6008- 89043. Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Washington, D.C....

88

Introduction to Simplified Generation Risk Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life cycle management (LCM) and risk-informed asset management of nuclear power plants can benefit from improved prediction of the effect of equipment failures or degradation on plant productivity. The Generation Risk Assessment (GRA) model described in this report provides a systematic approach to estimating how equipment reliability relates to the risk of future lost generation from trips and derates and to prioritizing components and systems based on their importance to productivity.

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Probabilistic Risk Assessment - Insights for Executives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development and use of a new Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) training resource, Probabilistic Risk Assessment – Insights for Executives.  It consists of a slide package with speaker notes, for use by EPRI members to expand understanding of PRA and its applications among executives and nuclear power plant leadership teams.BackgroundWhile many technical disciplines in the nuclear industry have gained acceptance and are ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "SPRA Implementation Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs). These cost-effective and practical procedures for SPRA support a variety of purposes, including risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

D&D and Risk Assessment Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D&D and Risk Assessment Tools D&D and Risk Assessment Tools ORISE and PNNL both developed tools to assist in the risk assessment and planning of D&D activities. PNNL developed a...

92

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents Return to Download Page The DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: NEPA Guidance and Requirements Documents Issued by Published A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation DOE 2003 A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard CEQ 2007 A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment DOE 2002 Actions During the NEPA Process - Interim Actions DOE 2003 Administrative Record Guidance DOJ 1991 Aligning the NEPA Process with EMS CEQ 2007 Alternative Actions For Analysis in Site-wide NEPA Reviews DOE 1992 Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance EPA 2012 Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands and NEPA

93

Document Number Q0029500 Baseline Risk Assessment Update 4.0 Baseline Risk Assessment Update  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Risk Assessment Update Baseline Risk Assessment Update 4.0 Baseline Risk Assessment Update This section updates the human health and the ecological risk assessments that were originally presented in the 1998 RI (DOE 1998a). The impacts on the 1998 risk assessments are summarized in Section 2.9. 4.1 Human Health Risk Assessment Several activities completed since 1998 have contributed to changes in surface water and ground water concentrations. Activities that have impacted, or likely impacted surface water and ground water concentrations are Millsite Excavation (Section 2.1) Remediation of Soil and Sediment Along Montezuma Creek (Section 2.3) Millsite Dewatering and Treatment (Section 2.5) PRB Treatability Study (Section 2.6) Surface water and ground water monitoring data have been used to refine the list of COCs

94

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant: Relative Risk Ranking Sites Plant: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline ACN Drum Yard Bear Creek Burial Grounds Bear Creek Contaminated Floodplain Soils Beta-4 Security Pits Building 81-10 Area Mercury Contaminated Soils Building 9201-2 Transformer and Capacitor Storage Area Building 9201-3 Coolant Salt Technology Facility Building 9201-4 Building 9201-4 External Pipes Building 9201-5E Northeast Yard Waste Storage Area Building 9202 East Pad Waste Storage Area Building 9204-2 West Yard Waste Storage Area Building 9206 Underground Tank Building 9215 West Pad Waste Storage Area

95

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETTP: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ETTP: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. 518 Main Substation 600 Series Oil Storage Area 695/687 Oil Storage Operations Building 523 Grease {Burial Site} Building 526 Heavy Equipment Shop Building 569 Heavy Equipment Shop Building 665 Steam Shed Building F-29 Gasoline Station Demolition Materials Placement Area Duct Island Road F-05 Laboratory Burial Ground F-07 Material Warehouse F-08 Laboratory Flannagans Loop Road Groundwater Plume Centered Under North Side of K-1070-C/D Groundwater Plume Emanating from K-1401 Acid Line Groundwater Plume near Mitchell Branch Groundwater Plume Originating from K-1420 Building

96

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concering that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Animal Burial Site I Animal Burial Site II Animal Burial Site III Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Creek Sediments Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Soils Atomic City Auto Parts - Surface Debris Clinch River/Poplar Creek CSX Railroad David Witherspoon, Inc., 1630 Site David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF) Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - Bruner Site Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - NOAA Site Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Oak Ridge Tool Engineering, Inc. Solway Drums Site Swine Waste Lagoons

97

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. 3001 Storage Canal (OGR) 3517 Filter Pit (Fission Product Development Laboratory) Abandoned Burn Pit Abandoned Sanitary Waste Pipeline and Septic Tank N of 7917 Abandoned Underground Waste Oil Storage Tank 7002A Above-ground Demineralized-water Holding Tanks Aircraft Reactor Experiment Contaminated Tool Storage Aircraft Reactor Experiment Surface Impoundment Buried Scrap Metal Area C-14 Allocation in White Oak Trees C-14 Allocation in White Pine Trees C-14 Allocation in Woody Biomass Plantation Species C-14 Efflux in Yellow Poplar Stand

98

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment SFTRA Overview Contents Project and review teams Purpose and goals Basic methodology...

100

Blue print for building a risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal and stet regulations require the operator of a miscellaneous waste treatment unit to demonstrate compliance with environmental performance standard. A sample risk assessment is demonstrated as a means of showing compliance for such a treatment unit. A new Open Burning and Open Detonation (OB/OD) facility for explosive wastes at LLNL experimental site is used. Simplified, the process of performing a risk assessment consists of characterization of the treatment operation and estimation of emission rates; evaluation of the emission dispersion to estimate acute exposure; and evaluation of human and environmental risks. Each step may require the environmental analysts to perform detained date gathering, modeling and calculations, and to negotiate with facility operations personnel and regulatory representatives. The Risk Assessment Protocol, which explains the assumptions, model selection and inputs, and data selection, must ultimately withstand the rigors of regulatory review and public scrutiny.s

Otsuki, H.K.; Eagan-McNeill, E.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New November 2013 Updates ECO mammalian SSLs were updated for cadmium, antimony , arsenic, inorganic, barium, Beryllium, chromium VI, cobalt, copper, lead, silver, vanadium, cyanide (total complex), methyl mercury, sulfide, thallium and tin. October 2013 Updates The biota intake rates for the radionuclide PRG and risk tools were updated to correct an improper units conversion. September 2013 Updates IRIS updates for 1,4-Dioxane and Biphenyl were completed. PPRTV values have been updated for Biphenyl, 3,4-Dichlorobenzotrifluoride, Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (Tetryl), Endosulfan Sulfate, 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane, Nitromethane, Dibenzothiophene, 2-Ethoxyethanol, 3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine, Butylated hydroxytoluene, Ethyl Acetate, tert-Amyl Alcohol, 2,2-Difluoropropane,

102

Assessment of Western North Pacific 96- and 120-h Track Guidance and Present Forecastability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) has only four dynamical models for guidance in making 96- and 120-h track forecasts, an opportunity exists for improving the consensus forecast by the proper removal of a likely erroneous forecast ...

Kathryn A. Payne; Russell L. Elsberry; Mark A. Boothe

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Toxicity MetaData Chemical Toxicity MetaData Using the Chemical Toxicity Metadata Tool Click on the steps below for detailed instructions about each page of the CPM Calculator. 1. Select Chemicals 2. Select Toxicity Metadata 3. Results 1. Select Chemicals Highlight the chemicals of interest and use the arrow buttons to move them to the "selected" box. 2. Select Toxicity Metadata Highlight the type of toxicity values to retrieve the desired toxicity metadata and press the "submit form" button. 3. Results The toxicity values and the metadata will be displayed in tables that are available for download. The Chemical Toxicity Metadata tool follows the same hierarchy as the Chemical Toxicity Value tool. Only one toxicity value type is given per chemical even though multiple sources may have values. The RAIS follows a hierarchy when selecting the toxicity values we use in PRG and risk calculations. The hierarchy is as follows:

104

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area CPM User's Guide Area CPM User's Guide 1. Introduction Field sampling has the potential to be an extremely time-consuming and expensive portion of a radiological site remediation. Collected samples must be shipped to an off-site laboratory or counted in an on-site mobile unit in order to establish areas of contamination and to ensure that acceptable residual levels of contaminants remain. The Area CPM Calculator is a web-based calculator that estimates a gamma detector response for a target level of surface contamination. This calculator provides a rapid, exceptionally cost-effective assessment of contamination and cleanup standards based on field instrument data, which minimizes the use of more expensive sample collection and laboratory analysis. A correction factor for cpm analysis established between this

105

A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita: Climate Change Risk Assessment Elevensectors(forinitial analysis) Health Energy Transport Built-24000 deaths avoided in winter) by 2050s Increases in drought and some pest and diseases could reduce timber

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

107

Dynamic Operational Risk Assessment with Bayesian Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil/gas and petrochemical plants are complicated and dynamic in nature. Dynamic characteristics include ageing of equipment/components, season changes, stochastic processes, operator response times, inspection and testing time intervals, sequential dependencies of equipment/components and timing of safety system operations, all of which are time dependent criteria that can influence dynamic processes. The conventional risk assessment methodologies can quantify dynamic changes in processes with limited capacity. Therefore, it is important to develop method that can address time-dependent effects. The primary objective of this study is to propose a risk assessment methodology for dynamic systems. In this study, a new technique for dynamic operational risk assessment is developed based on the Bayesian networks, a structure optimal suitable to organize cause-effect relations. The Bayesian network graphically describes the dependencies of variables and the dynamic Bayesian network capture change of variables over time. This study proposes to develop dynamic fault tree for a chemical process system/sub-system and then to map it in Bayesian network so that the developed method can capture dynamic operational changes in process due to sequential dependency of one equipment/component on others. The developed Bayesian network is then extended to the dynamic Bayesian network to demonstrate dynamic operational risk assessment. A case study on a holdup tank problem is provided to illustrate the application of the method. A dryout scenario in the tank is quantified. It has been observed that the developed method is able to provide updated probability different equipment/component failure with time incorporating the sequential dependencies of event occurrence. Another objective of this study is to show parallelism of Bayesian network with other available risk assessment methods such as event tree, HAZOP, FMEA. In this research, an event tree mapping procedure in Bayesian network is described. A case study on a chemical reactor system is provided to illustrate the mapping procedure and to identify factors that have significant influence on an event occurrence. Therefore, this study provides a method for dynamic operational risk assessment capable of providing updated probability of event occurrences considering sequential dependencies with time and a model for mapping event tree in Bayesian network.

Barua, Shubharthi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Dry Cask Storage Probabilistic Risk Assessment Scoping Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes and evaluates the current state of risk assessment methodologies applicable to dry cask storage probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and suggests appropriate approaches for performing the various aspects of a dry cask storage PRA.

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Simulation and Risk Assessment Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archived Projects Archived Projects Advanced Analytical Instrumentation and Facilities for In Situ Reaction Studies NETL 6/2002 Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By- Product Disposal and Utilization University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 1/23/2003 Risk Assessment for Long-Term Storage of CO 2 in Geologic Formations NETL 3/2005 Geology and Reservoirs Simulation for Brine Field NETL 6/27/2005 Mercury Speciation in Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas - Experimental Studies and Model Development University of Pittsburgh 7/6/2005 Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment ChemImage Biothreat LLC 9/29/2005 Assessments of Environmental Impacts and Beneficial Use of Coalbed Methane Produced Water in the Powder River Basin Western Research Institute 1/1/2006

112

Technical Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Technical Guidance, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops and issues Government-wide and Department-wide technical guidance to ensure that classified nuclear...

113

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments. A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment More Documents & Publications EIS-0218-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents

114

Acquisition Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Acquisition Letters DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR) DOE Directives Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Federal Register Financial Assistance Guide Headquarters Office...

115

Transition Process Pilot Report—NEI 04-02 Guidance for Implementing a Risk-Informed, Performance-Based Fire Protection Program Under 10 CFR 50.48(c)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) document 04-02, "Guidance for Implementing a Risk-Informed, Performance-Based Fire Protection Program Under 10 CFR 50.48(c)," is under development to provide implementing guidance for a new fire protection licensing basis based upon National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 805, "Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Light Water Reactor Generating Plants." This report documents two pilot projects that tested this guidance.

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assessment of asbestos removal carried out using EPA Purple Book guidance. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A statistical evaluation of airborne asbestos data collected before, during, and after removal of spray-applied asbestos-containing fireproofing at three university buildings is presented. Each abatement project was conducted in accordance with the work practices and procedures recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Guidance for Controlling Asbestos-Containing Materials in Buildings, (the Purple Book). Containment barriers should be designed to effectively prevent a significant increase in airborne concentrations outside the work area during and after abatement. An increase in asbestos concentration outside the work area could allow an abatement site to be cleared when the level inside the containment is similarly elevated. This holds true whether PCM or TEM is used for the clearance. This weakness in the guidance for location of sampling outside of the containment barrier is one of the major findings of the study. A requirement to monitor the concentration of asbestos outside the work area before and after abatement is recommended to be added to the clearance procedure.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Assessing risk of solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the movement of metals in soils and their accumulation in plants. Research with sewage sludge compost indicates that these risks can be minimized with proper handling and management. The objectives of this study were: (I) to evaluate potential groundwater contamination due to plant nutrients and heavy metals in the compost; and (II) to assess the accumulation of metals in plants grown on compost-amended soil. Data are presented for analyses of nickel, lead, cadmium, copper and zinc in snap beans.

Dyer, J.M.; Razvi, A.S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Stevens Point (USA))

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Session: Pre-development project risk assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the presentations was on the practices and methodologies used in the wind energy industry for assessing risk to birds and bats at candidate project sites. Presenters offered examples of pre-development siting evaluation requirements set by certain states. Presentation one was titled ''Practices and Methodologies and Initial Screening Tools'' by Richard Curry of Curry and Kerlinger, LLC. Presentation two was titled ''State of the Industry in the Pacific Northwest'' by Andy Linehan, CH2MHILL.

Curry, Richard; Linehan, Andy

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments in Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Applications, 12/10 DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments in Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Applications, 12/10 The Department has taken several actions to provide an infrastructure for providing appropriate controls and support for use of risk assessments and risk informed decision making as it applies to nuclear safety including establishing a Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group, revising its Nuclear Safety Policy to explicitly address the use and control of risk assessments, and developing this DOE Technical Standard for Control and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment for interim use and comment.1

120

Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment The objective of the PTRA program is to develop new tools and approaches for understanding, limiting, and managing the risks of proliferation and physical security for fuel cycle options. NE, in collaboration with National Nuclear Security Administration, will focus on assessments required to inform domestic fuel cycle technology and system option development, partnering with other organizations to share results of assessments. These analytical/predictive tools for comprehensive proliferation risk assessments will provide important information for discussions and decisions regarding fuel cycle options. These assessments will: Exploit science-based approaches for analyzing difficult-to-quantify

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table of Table of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents Return to Download Page The DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: NEPA Guidance and Requirements Documents Issued by Published A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation DOE 2003 A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard CEQ 2007 A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment DOE 2002 Actions During the NEPA Process - Interim Actions DOE 2003 Administrative Record Guidance DOJ 1991 Aligning the NEPA Process with EMS CEQ 2007 Alternative Actions For Analysis in Site-wide NEPA Reviews DOE 1992 Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance EPA 2012 Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands and NEPA

122

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of risk assessment. Working with the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Nuclear Safety, staff from the Office of Health,

123

QA in Design Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Guidance Document for Integrating Quality Assurance During the Design and Construction Life Cycle September 2011 Page 2 of 29 FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) guidance document is approved for use by all DOE EM organizational units and contractors performing work for EM. A project's Quality Assurance Program assigns responsibilities and authorities, defines policies and requirements, and provides for the performance and assessment of work that provides confidence that required level of quality is achieved, commensurate with the various project requirements. This guidance document offers for evaluation, by project personnel from EM and contractor

124

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gasbuggy site is in northern New Mexico in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County (Figure 1-1). The Gasbuggy experiment was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation, a tight, gas-bearing sandstone formation. The 29-kiloton-yield nuclear device was placed in a 17.5-inch wellbore at 4,240 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), approximately 40 ft below the Pictured Cliffs/Lewis shale contact, in an attempt to force the cavity/chimney formed by the detonation up into the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The test was conducted below the southwest quarter of Section 36, Township 29 North, Range 4 West, New Mexico Principal Meridian. The device was detonated on December 10, 1967, creating a 335-ft-high chimney above the detonation point and a cavity 160 ft in diameter. The gas produced from GB-ER (the emplacement and reentry well) during the post-detonation production tests was radioactive and diluted, primarily by carbon dioxide. After 2 years, the energy content of the gas had recovered to 80 percent of the value of gas in conventionally developed wells in the area. There is currently no technology capable of remediating deep underground nuclear detonation cavities and chimneys. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must continue to manage the Gasbuggy site to ensure that no inadvertent intrusion into the residual contamination occurs. DOE has complete control over the 1/4 section (160 acres) containing the shot cavity, and no drilling is permitted on that property. However, oil and gas leases are on the surrounding land. Therefore, the most likely route of intrusion and potential exposure would be through contaminated natural gas or contaminated water migrating into a producing natural gas well outside the immediate vicinity of ground zero. The purpose of this report is to describe the current site conditions and evaluate the potential health risks posed by the most plausible contaminant exposure scenario, drilling of natural gas wells near the site. The results of this risk evaluation will guide DOE's future surveillance and monitoring activities in the area to ensure that site conditions are adequately protective of human health. This evaluation is not a comprehensive risk assessment for the site; it is intended to provide assurance that DOE's monitoring approach can detect the presence of site-related contamination at levels well below those that would pose an unacceptable risk to human health.

None

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Petri net modeling of fault analysis for probabilistic risk assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fault trees and event trees have been widely accepted as the modeling strategy to perform Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). However, there are several limitations associated… (more)

Lee, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOE (Department of Energy) risk assessment worksheets: A structured approach  

SciTech Connect

This volume consists of the worksheets for each step in completing the guideline. This guideline outlines the approach to conducting risk assessments of computer security. (JEF)

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Status of Cumulative Risk Methods in Air-Based Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments in cumulative risk assessment practices and influence on public health and environmental regulation continue to increase. Primary drivers include stakeholder-based concerns over environmental justice, as well as recent initiatives to reevaluate the current regulatory risk assessment paradigm. The United States Environmental Protection Agencyalong with other state agencies, public health advocates, and researcherscontinues to strive toward application of cumulative risk methodologies capable ...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

The April 1990 Floods over Eastern Australia: Synoptic Description and Assessment of Regional NWP Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 17 and 22 April 1990 widespread flooding occurred throughout Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria, with several record rainfalls recorded. This paper investigates the forcing of the rainfall, assesses the quality of the operational ...

Graham A. Mills; Ian Russell

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Office of Technical Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Director's Perspective Welcome to the Office of Technical Guidance Edith A. Chalk, Director Welcome to the Office of Technical Guidance. The Office of Technical Guidance...

132

Treatment of Parameter and Modeling Uncertainty for Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both the industry and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) incorporate risk concepts and techniques into activities for effective risk management. The NRC is using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in its regulatory activities in a manner that promotes consistency, predictability, and efficiency in the performance of the NRCs roles of risk manager and protector of public health and safety. The nuclear industry uses PRA to identify and manage risks, as a tool to promote efficient regulatory inte...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NETL: Carbon Storage - Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation and Risk Assessment Simulation and Risk Assessment Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area The Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area is an integrated effort to develop advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integrate the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. As the simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decreases, which in turn provides a more accurate risk assessment and mitigation plan for each project site. Both qualitative and quantitative protocols will be developed to ensure the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Results from the simulation models will be incorporated into risk assessments on a project-by-project basis and on a larger basin-scale. As carbon capture and storage (CCS) becomes deployed in major basins, macro model results will be needed to manage reservoirs for pressure management, plume migration, and potential risks of multiple CO2 injection projects across the basin.

135

Discussions on qualitative assessment or risk quantification in adopting decisions concerning risk in financial auditing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents some insights concerning qualitative and semi-quantitative audit risk assessment methods. We consider that semi-quantitative assessment collaborated with qualitative interpretation can be a better solution in evaluation auditors' ... Keywords: IAS, audit, business decisions, financial reporting, qualitative interpretation, semi-quantitative risk assessment

Diana-Laura Radu; Sabina-Cristiana Necula

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment Methods Enhancements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the interim guidance of the industry and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on several issues from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 805 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Program arising from use of EPRI 1011989, NUREG/CR-6850 (a joint report of EPRI and the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research [NRC-RES]) fire PRA methodology for nuclear facilities. The FAQ program was established by the NRC Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRC/NRR) to supp...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Enforcement Guidance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EGS:01-02 Appendix E- Operational Procedures for Enforcement Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 17, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR: DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF PRICE-ANDERSON ENFORCEMENT SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-02: Management and Independent Assessment Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) to periodically issue clarifying guidance regarding the processes used in its enforcement activities. OE typically issues such guidance in the form of Enforcement Guidance Supplements (EGSs), which provide information or recommendations only and impose no requirements or actions on DOE contractors.

138

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group Charter, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP CHARTER January 2012 PURPOSE: To support effective and appropriate utilization of risk assessment tools in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. OBJECTIVES: The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety-related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE make sure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are: conducted in a consistent manner; of appropriate quality; properly documented; and properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available tools and

139

Toxicology and Risk Assessment for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toxicology and Risk Assessment references for 3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )or process contaminants. Toxicology and Risk Assessment for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs apri

140

NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contracting Reform Guidance Contracting Reform Guidance NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance This documents provides guidance on NEPA contracting strategy, including: defining the work of the contractor; establishing contracts ahead of time; minimizing cost while maintaining quality. Guidance also provides: model statements of work, direction on NEPA contract management by NEPA Document Manager; a system for measuring NEPA costs and for evaluating contractor procedures; details on the DOE NEPA website. NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance More Documents & Publications NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance (December 1996) Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support Services Acquisition: Preparation and Review of Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Assessments, Environmental Reports, and other Environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Databases and Tools | Waste and Cleanup Risk Assessment | OSWER...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage and Limitations: thumbtack These calculations are based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance. The guidance must be read before...

142

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RAWG) Conference Call Minutes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call Minutes May 6, 2010 PARTICIPANTS Members: Don Nichols (CDNS), Jim O'Brien (HSS), Carol Sohn (SC), Rich Stark (NE), Bill Weaver (EM for Steve Krahn), Todd Lapointe (CNS for Chip Lagdon) Others: Kamiar Jamali (NE), Andy Wallo (DNFSB 2009-1 Responsible Manager), Rama Sastry (HSS), Samuel Rosenbloom (HSS) SUMMARY 1. Risk Assessment Information Notice (IN): HSS provided the draft IN to safety basis experts from SNL, Y-12 and PNNL for their review and comment. Their comments were addressed and the IN is back into concurrence. 2. DNFSB Brief: HSS is coordinated with the RWG and DNFSB to schedule a DNFSB brief in June. 3. Risk Assessment Training: The National Training Center is presenting its risk assessment overview

143

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments.

144

Risk Impact Assessment of Extended Integrated Leak Rate Testing Intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a risk impact assessment for extending integrated leak rate test (ILRT) surveillance intervals to 15 years. The assessment demonstrates that on an industry-wide basis there is small risk associated with the extension, provided that the performance bases and defense-in-depth are maintained. There is an obvious benefit in not performing costly, critical-path, time-consuming tests that provide a limited benefit from a risk perspective.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Surry Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Pilot Plant Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) have developed the "Standard for Level 1/Large Early Release Frequency Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Nuclear Power Plant Applications." The objective of the standard is to provide basic requirements for performing probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) that would support future risk-informed decisions. The standard limits its requirements to performing a Level 1 analysis of the core damage frequency and a limite...

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cavity degradation risk insurance assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examined the risks and risk management issues involved with the implementation by electric power utilities of compressed air energy storage and underground pumped hydro storage systems. The results are listed in terms of relative risks for the construction and operation of these systems in different geologic deposits, with varying amounts of pressurization, with natural or man-made disasters in the vicinity of the storage equipment, and with different modes of operating the facilities. (LCL)

Hampson, C.; Neill, P.; de Bivort, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Risk assessment technique for evaluating research laboratories  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed to evaluate research laboratories according to risk, where risk is defined as the product of frequency and consequence. This technique was used to evaluate several laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the direction of the Department of Energy, Idaho Field Office to assist in the risk management of the Science and Technology Department laboratories. With this technique, laboratories can be compared according to risk, and management can use the results to make cost effective decisions associated with the operation of the facility.

Bolander, T.W.; Meale, B.M.; Eide, S.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - List of Contents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

List of List of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - List of Contents Return to Download Page The NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation [DOE][2003] A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard [CEQ][2007] A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment [DOE][2002] Actions During the NEPA Process - Interim Actions [DOE][2003] Administrative Record Guidance [DOJ][1991] Aligning the NEPA Process with EMS [CEQ][2007] Alternative Actions For Analysis in Site-wide NEPA Reviews [DOE][1992] Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance [EPA][2012] Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands and NEPA [CEQ][1980] Analysis of Impacts to Workers in NEPA Documentation [DOE][1988]

150

Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Storage » Simulation Carbon Capture and Storage » Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Storage Research in simulation and risk assessment is focused on development of advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integration of the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. Simulation models are critical for predicting the flow of the CO2 in the target formations, chemical changes that may occur in the reservoir, and geomechanical effects that increased pressures might have on the target formation and seal(s). Improved models that can simulate faults/fractures, the subsurface behavior of system fluids, and geochemical/mechanical/flow effects are needed. Research continues to develop innovative, advanced

151

Prediction markets for cost and risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several temporal and political factors can sometimes limit the effectiveness of traditional methods of project tracking and cost estimation. A large organization is susceptible to internal and external risks that are ...

Aggarwal, Taroon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions From Coal-Fired Power Plants Given that mercury emissions from coal power plants will almost certainly be limited by some form of national regulation or legislation, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is performing an assessment of the reduction in human health risk that may be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk assessment focuses on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Preliminary Risk Assessment A preliminary risk assessment was conducted using a simplified approach based on three major topics: Hg emissions and deposition (emphasizing coal plants), Hg consumption through fish, and dose-response functions for Hg. Using information available from recent literature, dose response factors (DRFs) were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions.

153

Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment: An Advanced Education of Risk Professionals Module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides documentation for Level 2 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA): An Advanced Education of Risk Professionals Module. This new training, offered by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is designated as PRA 310, Level 2 PRA. It is the first advanced module in the Education of Risk Professionals program. Level 2 PRA builds upon and complements the PRA fundamentals training in the Education of Risk Professionals 100 series.This Level 2 PRA training course consists ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ARRA Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GUIDANCE FOR MODIFICATIONS GUIDANCE FOR MODIFICATIONS AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT (ARRA) This guidance is for contracting officers who are obligating ARRA funds on existing contracts. 1. All contracts obligating ARRA funds shall include the applicable contract language referenced in Flash 2009-28 if this language has not already been added to the subject instrument. The modification incorporating the ARRA unique terms and conditions must be added by a bilateral modification to the contract. 2. ARRA funding has unique tracking and reporting requirements. The Recovery Act funds must remain segregable from obligation through costing and disbursement. Recovery Act funds must be disbursed by September 30, 2015. Contracting Officers should so notify their impacted contractors.

156

Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stored Co 2 and Methane Leakage riSk aSSeSSMent and Monitoring tooL deveLopMent: Co 2 Capture projeCt phaSe 2 Background Unmineable coal seams at depths beyond conventional...

157

Utility Application Experiences of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensuring the reliable delivery of electricity is the primary challenge facing power system operators and planners. This technical report summarizes recent utility experiences of applying EPRI's Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methodology.

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Development of a Shutdown Qualitative Risk Assessment Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents development of a shutdown qualitative risk assessment (QLRA) standard. This standard has been developed in support of Working Group ANS-58.22 of the Standards Committee of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) in conjunction with ongoing efforts to develop a standard for low power and shutdown (LPSD) probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). This Technical Update will provide a starting point for review and comment by the ANS Working Group and other interested parties on the proposed qual...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Using environmental risk assessment to evaluate chemical waste disposal in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Rapid industrialization of countries in the Pacific Basin has been accompanied by dramatic increases in the manufacture, formulation, use, and disposal of hazardous materials and residuals. Countries, particularly those with more developed industrial economies, have implemented waste management strategies in various ways and to varying degrees. Although existing strategies provide useful guidance for developing and newly industrialized countries, each country must consider various factors as it independently develops approaches adapted to its particular circumstances. For example, individual strategies must take into account the types and quantities of wastes being generated or those projected to be generated as a result of anticipated economic development; the ability to access trained staff and capital for effective use of available technologies; the environmental and demographic setting of the alternative sites of the associated facilities; the perceptions as to what risks are acceptable relative to other possibly more traditional health and safety risks; and the institutions available for implementing the waste management strategy. This paper discusses how the principles of risk assessment and comparison can be a constructive force in thinking through these complex decisions and describes how a risk-based analysis contributed to the development of a hazardous waste management strategy in Thailand. 6 refs.

Habegger, L.; Fingleton, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Liengcharernsit, W.; Hastings, P. (Thailand Development Research Inst., Bangkok (Thailand))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Understanding the system in risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the assessment of a system, understanding the system is central. Even so, most of the current literature takes a narrow view of understanding, making only the catalog of system ``assets`` explicit, while maintaining the balance of the analyst`s understanding inside the analyst`s head. This can lead to problems with non-repeatability and incompleteness of assessment results. This paper introduces the notion of using explicit system models to document the analyst`s understanding of the system and shows that, from these models, standard assessment products, such as fault trees and event trees, can be automatically derived. This paper also presents five ``views`` of a system that can be used to document the analyst`s understanding of the system. These views go well beyond the standard instruction to identify the system`s assets to show that a much richer understanding of the system can be required for effective assessment.

Craft, R.; Vandewart, R.; Wyss, G.; Funkhouser, D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Low Power and Shutdown Risk Assessment Benchmarking Study  

SciTech Connect

(B204)Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) insights are now used by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to confirm the level of safety for plant operations and to justify changes in nuclear power plant operating requirements, both on an exception basis and as changeds to a plant's licensing basis. This report examines qualitative and quantitative risk assessments during shutdown plant states, providing feedback to utilities in the use of qualitative models for outage risk management, and also providing input to the development of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) Low Power and Shutdown PRA Standard.

J.Mitman, J. Julius, R. Berucio, M. Phillips, J. Grobbelaaar, D. Bley, R. Budniz

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Gasbuggy Site Assessment and Risk Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geologic and hydrologic conditions and evaluates potential health risks to workers in the natural gas industry in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site, where the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission detonated an underground nuclear device in 1967. The 29-kiloton detonation took place 4,240 feet below ground surface and was designed to evaluate the use of a nuclear detonation to enhance natural gas production from the Pictured Cliffs Formation in the San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, on land administered by Carson National Forest. A site-specific conceptual model was developed based on current understanding of the hydrologic and geologic environment. This conceptual model was used for establishing plausible contaminant exposure scenarios, which were then evaluated for human health risk potential. The most mobile and, therefore, the most probable contaminant that could result in human exposure is tritium. Natural gas production wells were identified as having the greatest potential for bringing detonation-derived contaminants (tritium) to the ground surface in the form of tritiated produced water. Three exposure scenarios addressing potential contamination from gas wells were considered in the risk evaluation: a gas well worker during gas-well-drilling operations, a gas well worker performing routine maintenance, and a residential exposure. The residential exposure scenario was evaluated only for comparison; permanent residences on national forest lands at the Gasbuggy site are prohibited

None

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Risk assessment and life prediction of complex engineering systems  

SciTech Connect

Many complex engineering systems will exceed their design life expectancy within the next 10 to 15 years. It is also expected that these systems must be maintained and operated beyond their design life. This paper presents a integrated approach for managing the risks associated with aging effects and predicting the residually expectancy these systems, The approach unifies risk assessment, enhanced surveillance and testing, and robust computational models to assess the risk, predict age, and develop a life-extension management procedure. It also relies on the state of the art in life-extension and risk assessment methods from the nuclear power industry. Borrowing from the developments in decision analysis, this approach should systematically identify the options available for managing the existing aging systems beyond their intended design life.

Garcia, M.D.; Varma, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heger, A.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Databases and Tools | Waste and Cleanup Risk Assessment | OSWER | USEPA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radionuclides (RSSG) Radionuclides (RSSG) RSSG Home RSSG Search Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides Topics for Key Radiation Guidances and Reports These calculations are based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides. The guidance must be read before attempting to calculate values. The guidance is available through: Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides: User's Guide EPA Document Number: EPA/540-R-00-007 Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides: Technical Background Document EPA Document Number: EPA/540-R-00-006, October 2000 Highlight 1: Key Attributes of the Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides Standardized equations are presented to address human exposure pathways in a residential setting consistent with Superfund's concept of "Reasonable Maximum Exposure" (RME).

166

Sediments Guidance Compendium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of contaminated sediments poses a complicated, expensive problem, exacerbated by the fact that contamination is often the cumulative result of inputs from numerous sources over many years. Contaminated sediments are of particular concern among owners of former manufactured gas plant sites. This "Sediment Guidance Compendium" is designed to help site owners faced with remedial challenges determine how to manage contaminated sediments. The compendium discusses the rationale behind risk assessmen...

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

169

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - "Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets." In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.'' In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, B.E.

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

DNFSB Policy Statement 5, Assessing Risk, dated August 15, 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Washington, DC 20004 Policy Statement PS-5 Date: August 15, 2013 Subject Policy Statement on assessing risk. Summary This policy statement establishes the approach the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board will take to assess risk when making recommendations to the Secretary of Energy. Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D. Chairman I. Background The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2013 [Pub. L. No. 112- 239] revised the enabling statute for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The statute now requires the Board to "specifically assess risk (whenever sufficient data exists)" in making recommendations to the Secretary of Energy [ 42 U.S.C. § 2286(a)(5)]. The revised statute reads as follows, with changes in bold italics:

172

Fermilab | Directorate | Internal Audit Services | Risk Assessment and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment and Planning Risk Assessment and Planning How are topics selected for an internal audit? A Year At A Glance Throughout the year we collect ideas and input from the Board of Directors Audit Committee, Management, DOE Fermi Site Office and DOE Office of Inspector General. We also reference the Contractor Assurance System (CAS) web pages for information about the structure of the systems. In addition, CAS (management system) owners are interviewed with respect to Internal Audit's risk assessments and audit plans. We prepare reports that summarize the results of individual audits, as well issue an annual report of activities. Internal audit reports are distributed as they are issued, to a wide audience including the Audit Committee, Management, the DOE Fermi Site Office, the DOE Chicago Office,

173

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety September 20, 2012 Presenter: Commissioner George Apostolakis US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Management of (unquantified at the time) uncertainty was always a concern. Defense-in-depth and safety margins became embedded in the regulations. "Defense-in-Depth is an element of the NRC's safety philosophy that employs successive compensatory measures to prevent accidents or mitigate damage if a malfunction, accident, or naturally caused event occurs at a nuclear facility." [Commission's White Paper, February 1999] Design Basis Accidents are postulated accidents that a nuclear facility must be designed and built to withstand without loss to the

174

Probabilistic Risk Assessment Compendium of Candidate Consensus Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a compendium of candidate consensus models in use in current probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). The ASME PRA Standard, as modified and endorsed by Regulatory Guide 1.200, establishes that the identification, sensitivity analysis, and documentation of key sources of uncertainties and key assumptions may be reduced in scope if the PRA makes use of consensus models to implement the supporting requirements. As part of the process of treating the uncertainties associated with a risk-...

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Review of the independent risk assessment of the proposed Cabrillo liquified natural gas deepwater port project.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2005, the United States Coast Guard requested that Sandia National Laboratories provide a technical review and evaluation of the appropriateness and completeness of models, assumptions, analyses, and risk management options presented in the Cabrillo Port LNG Deepwater Port Independent Risk Assessment-Revision 1 (Cabrillo Port IRA). The goal of Sandia's technical evaluation of the Cabrillo Port IRA was to assist the Coast Guard in ensuring that the hazards to the public and property from a potential LNG spill during transfer, storage, and regasification operations were appropriately evaluated and estimated. Sandia was asked to review and evaluate the Cabrillo Port IRA results relative to the risk and safety analysis framework developed in the recent Sandia report, ''Guidance on Risk Analysis and Safety Implications of a Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spill over Water''. That report provides a framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. This report summarizes the results of the Sandia review of the Cabrillo Port IRA and supporting analyses. Based on our initial review, additional threat and hazard analyses, consequence modeling, and process safety considerations were suggested. The additional analyses recommended were conducted by the Cabrillo Port IRA authors in cooperation with Sandia and a technical review panel composed of representatives from the Coast Guard and the California State Lands Commission. The results from the additional analyses improved the understanding and confidence in the potential hazards and consequences to people and property from the proposed Cabrillo Port LNG Deepwater Port Project. The results of the Sandia review, the additional analyses and evaluations conducted, and the resolutions of suggested changes for inclusion in a final Cabrillo Port IRA are summarized in this report.

Gritzo, Louis Alan; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Rapid Risk Assessment: FY05 Annual Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing decision support tools that will assist in the transition of incident information into Protective Action Recommendations (PARs) that are understandable and can be executed in a real-world, operational environment. During emergencies, responders must rapidly assess risks and decide on the best course of action—all within minutes to hours. PNNL is blending existing modeling and decision support technology to develop new methods for transitioning science-based threat assessment to PARs. The rapid risk assessment tool will be both understandable and applicable to the emergency management community and would be a valuable tool during any water security-related incident. In 2005, PNNL demonstrated the integration of the multi-thematic modeling with emergency management decision support tools to create a Rapid Risk Assessment (RRA) tool that will transition risk to PARs that assist in responding to or mitigating the direct and indirect impacts of the incident(s). The RRA tool does this by aligning multi-thematic modeling capabilities with real-world response zones established by emergency and site operations managers. The RRA tool uses the risk assessment tool to drive prognostic models that use the type of incident, time of impact, severity of impact, and duration of impact to select the most appropriate PAR. Because PARs (and the thresholds by which they are selected) are jointly established by the technologists and the emergency management and operations decision makers, the science-based risk assessment can transition into a recommendation that can be understood and executed by people in the field.

Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Strenge, Dennis L.; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Simpson, Mary J.; Young, Joan K.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Downing, Timothy R.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Hachmeister, Lon E.

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

177

Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

June 2010, Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance and Environment Information Notice June 2010 1 BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of

179

Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Risk assessment of climate systems for national security.  

SciTech Connect

Climate change, through drought, flooding, storms, heat waves, and melting Arctic ice, affects the production and flow of resource within and among geographical regions. The interactions among governments, populations, and sectors of the economy require integrated assessment based on risk, through uncertainty quantification (UQ). This project evaluated the capabilities with Sandia National Laboratories to perform such integrated analyses, as they relate to (inter)national security. The combining of the UQ results from climate models with hydrological and economic/infrastructure impact modeling appears to offer the best capability for national security risk assessments.

Backus, George A.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Brown, Theresa Jean; Cai, Ximing [University of Illinois-Urbana; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Constantine, Paul [Stanford University; Dalbey, Keith R.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Fields, Richard; Hart, David Blaine; Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Kerstein, Alan R.; Levy, Michael [National Center for Atmospheric Research; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Najm, Habib N.; Overfelt, James Robert; Parks, Mancel Jordan; Peplinski, William J.; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Taylor, Mark A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Villa, Daniel L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Identification of External Hazards for Analysis in Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on the assessment of current practices related to the identification of external events (hazards) that can potentially affect the safety of nuclear power plants and provides recommendations on the screening criteria used to perform this identification process. The identification process is intended for use by individual plants, and the identified external events are appropriate candidates for evaluation using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). One of the outcomes of an external ev...

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

A Tool For Assessing Contamination Risk in Wellhead Protection Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Facility siting and operation restrictions aimed at groundwater protection can potentially affect a wide range of industrial activities located in or near designated Wellhead Protection Areas (WHPAs). This study provides a simple tool -- EPRI's Health Standard Exceedance (HSE) index -- for assessing the potential groundwater contamination risk associated with organic compounds in a WHPA.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

Generation Risk Assessment (GRA) at Cooper Nuclear Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous EPRI guide described how generating plants can implement various forms of component and system models for generation risk assessment (GRA). This report describes a trial application of GRA modeling at the Cooper Nuclear Station and evaluates the usefulness and accuracy of the EPRI GRA guide.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

Initial risk assessment of emergency events in cooperative operating control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is often encountered some cases in the industrial control systems, where emergency situations require a vital, irreversible, and relatively quick decision, concerning further operations of the controlled process. The outcome of the decision can be ... Keywords: cooperative operating control, distributed expertise, emergency management, risk assessment, wastewater treatment

Mieczyslaw Metzger; Grzegorz Polaków

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR LEAKAGE AROUND AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA Stephen Jewett, Max Hoberg, Heloise Chenelot, Shawn Harper Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7220 Joanna Burger Division of Life Sciences, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), 604 Allison Road, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082 Michael Gochfeld, CRESP and EOHSI, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 Abstract Amchitka Island, in the Aleutians, had three underground nuclear tests (1 965 to 1971) ranging from approximately 80 kilotons to 5 megatons. Initial surveys (1960s-1970s) did

187

Radiological Risk Assessment of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of the health risk from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium (DU) is an important outcome of the Capstone aerosol studies that established exposure ranges to personnel in armored combat vehicles perforated by DU munitions. Although the radiation exposure from DU is low, there is concern that DU deposited in the body may increase cancer rates. Radiation doses to various organs of the body resulting from the inhalation of DU aerosols measured in the Capstone studies were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Organs and tissues with the highest calculated committed equivalent 50-yr doses were lung and extrathoracic tissues (nose and nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, mouth and thoracic lymph nodes). Doses to the bone surface and kidney were about 5 to 10% of the doses to the extrathoracic tissues. The methodologies of the ICRP International Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) were used for determining the whole body cancer risk. Organ-specific risks were estimated using ICRP and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodologies. Risks for crewmembers and first responders were determined for selected scenarios based on the time interval of exposure and for vehicle and armor type. The lung was the organ with the highest cancer mortality risk, accounting for about 97% of the risks summed from all organs. The highest mean lifetime risk for lung cancer for the scenario with the longest exposure time interval (2 h) was 0.42%. This risk is low compared with the natural or background risk of 7.35%. These risks can be significantly reduced by using an existing ventilation system (if operable) and by reducing personnel time in the vehicle immediately after perforation.

Hahn, Fletcher; Roszell, Laurie E.; Daxon, Eric G.; Guilmette, Ray A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

188

Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages: Methodologies and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract- This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the first of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. This paper is intended to be a reference document to summarize the state of the art in the methodologies for performing risk assessment of cascading outages caused by some initiating event(s). A risk assessment should cover the entire potential chain of cascades starting with the initiating event(s) and ending with some final condition(s). However, this is a difficult task and heuristic approaches and approximations have been suggested. This paper discusses different approaches to this and suggests directions for future development of methodologies. The second paper summarizes the state of the art in modeling tools for risk assessment of cascading outages.

Vaiman, Marianna; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Chowdhury, Badrul; Dobson, Ian; Hines, Paul; Papic, Milorad; Miller, Stephen; Zhang, Pei

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Defining resilience within a risk-informed assessment framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of resilience is the subject of considerable discussion in academic, business, and governmental circles. The United States Department of Homeland Security for one has emphasised the need to consider resilience in safeguarding critical infrastructure and key resources. The concept of resilience is complex, multidimensional, and defined differently by different stakeholders. The authors contend that there is a benefit in moving from discussing resilience as an abstraction to defining resilience as a measurable characteristic of a system. This paper proposes defining resilience measures using elements of a traditional risk assessment framework to help clarify the concept of resilience and as a way to provide non-traditional risk information. The authors show various, diverse dimensions of resilience can be quantitatively defined in a common risk assessment framework based on the concept of loss of service. This allows the comparison of options for improving the resilience of infrastructure and presents a means to perform cost-benefit analysis. This paper discusses definitions and key aspects of resilience, presents equations for the risk of loss of infrastructure function that incorporate four key aspects of resilience that could prevent or mitigate that loss, describes proposed resilience factor definitions based on those risk impacts, and provides an example that illustrates how resilience factors would be calculated using a hypothetical scenario.

Coles, Garill A.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Holter, Gregory M.; Bass, Robert B.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Review of the Diablo Canyon probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report details the review of the Diablo Canyon Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DCPRA). The study was performed under contract from the Probabilistic Risk Analysis Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Research, USNRC by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The DCPRA is a full scope Level I effort and although the review touched on all aspects of the PRA, the internal events and seismic events received the vast majority of the review effort. The report includes a number of independent systems analyses sensitivity studies, importance analyses as well as conclusions on the adequacy of the DCPRA for use in the Diablo Canyon Long Term Seismic Program.

Bozoki, G.E.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Bohn, M.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sabek, M.G. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Regulatory and Safety Center, Cairo (Egypt); Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J. [EQE Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Guidance | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Guidance Classification Atomic Energy Act of 1954 - Establishes Government-wide policies for classifying, safeguarding, and declassifying Restricted Data information. 10...

194

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Conference Call Minutes, March 8, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) Conference Call Minutes, March 8, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter - The steering committee discussed the draft charter. Two recommended changes were agreed upon: * A sentence will be added to identify that the steering committee will develop protocols to define specifics relative to certain work activities (such as peer reviews) * Agreed to add Steve Koonin, Undersecretary for Science for signature. Note: Sharon Steele is officially the NNSA representative to the steering committee. 2. Web Page - Jim O'Brien reviewed the website. In general, the steering committee agreed that with small changes the web site was ready to go "live."

195

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Call Conference Call Minutes, February 20, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG)Conference Call Minutes, February 20, 2010 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group Charter - discussed who should sign and at what level the charter should be authorized. It was concluded that the Under Secretaries as the Central Technical Authorities and HS-1 should ultimately authorize the charter. It was recognized that having such high level approval of the charter would likely increase the time needed to finalize it, However, it was concluded that any delay would not impact activities because the business of the working group will move forward in the interim. Members should provide comments on current draft to Jim O'Brien (with cc to all members) by March 8 with the goal of

196

Risk assessment data bank design at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has designed and implemented a database system containing a series of compilations of incidents used primarily for risk assessment. Four databases have been designed and implemented using advanced database management system computer software. These databases exist for reprocessing, fuel fabrication, waste management, and the Savannah River Technology Center. They are combined into one system caged the Risk Assessment Methodology (RAM) Fault Tree Data Banks. This paper will discuss the logical design of the data, the menus, and the operating platform. Built-in updating features, such as batch and on-line data entry; data validation methods; automatic update features; and expert system programs, will also be discussed. User functions, such as on-line search/view/report and statistical functions, will be presented. Security features and backup and recovery methods will also be covered.

Townsend, C.S.; Johnson, K.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Risk assessment data bank design at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has designed and implemented a database system containing a series of compilations of incidents used primarily for risk assessment. Four databases have been designed and implemented using advanced database management system computer software. These databases exist for reprocessing, fuel fabrication, waste management, and the Savannah River Technology Center. They are combined into one system caged the Risk Assessment Methodology (RAM) Fault Tree Data Banks. This paper will discuss the logical design of the data, the menus, and the operating platform. Built-in updating features, such as batch and on-line data entry; data validation methods; automatic update features; and expert system programs, will also be discussed. User functions, such as on-line search/view/report and statistical functions, will be presented. Security features and backup and recovery methods will also be covered.

Townsend, C.S.; Johnson, K.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Arsenic Cancer Risk Assessment: Recent Advances & Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been an on-going debate on the appropriate regulatory approach for evaluating the carcinogenicity of inorganic arsenic compounds, specifically in the best methods and data sources for establishing a cancer potency, or cancer slope factor (CSF). The CSF is applied to the development of environmental standards, regulation and risk assessments under a variety of federal and state programs. Currently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to rely on chemical non-...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

An approach to assessing stochastic radiogenic risk in medical imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This letter suggests a formalism, the medical effective dose (MED), that is suitable for assessing stochastic radiogenic risks in diagnostic medical procedures. Methods: The MED is derived from radiobiological and probabilistic first principals, including: (1) The independence of radiation-induced biological effects in neighboring voxels at low doses; (2) the linear no-threshold assumption for stochastic radiation injury (although other dose-response relationships could be incorporated, instead); (3) the best human radiation dose-response data currently available; and (4) the built-in possibility that the carcinogenic risk to an irradiated organ may depend on its volume. The MED involves a dose-risk summation over irradiated voxels at high spatial resolution; it reduces to the traditional effective dose when every organ is irradiated uniformly and when the dependence of risk on organ volumes is ignored. Standard relative-risk tissue weighting factors can be used with the MED approach until more refined data become available. Results: The MED is intended for clinical and phantom dosimetry, and it provides an estimate of overall relative radiogenic stochastic risk for any given dose distribution. A result of the MED derivation is that the stochastic risk may increase with the volume of tissue (i.e., the number of cells) irradiated, a feature that can be activated when forthcoming radiobiological research warrants it. In this regard, the MED resembles neither the standard effective dose (E) nor the CT dose index (CTDI), but it is somewhat like the CT dose-length product (DLP). Conclusions: The MED is a novel, probabilistically and biologically based means of estimating stochastic-risk-weighted doses associated with medical imaging. Built in, ab initio, is the ability to link radiogenic risk to organ volume and other clinical factors. It is straightforward to implement when medical dose distributions are available, provided that one is content, for the time being, to accept the relative tissue weighting factors published by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). It requires no new radiobiological data and avoids major problems encountered by the E, CTDI, and CT-E formalisms. It makes possible relative inter-patient dosimetry, and also realistic intercomparisons of stochastic risks from different protocols that yield images of comparable quality.

Wolbarst, Anthony B.; Hendee, William R. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine and Division of Radiation Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55901 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integrated Substation Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment Tool for Asset Management and Smart Grid Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and risk management are key elements in any well-developed asset management plan, and an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to improving their ability to understand and make risk-based decisions. Consequently, there is growing interest in the tools and methodologies required to better assess equipment performance and risk and provide quantitative information to drive asset management decision processes. In addition, risk and performance assessment tools can be in...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Goa, India Risk Assessment of Surface Miner for Estonian Oil Shale Mining Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper deals with risk assessment of a high-selective oil-shale mining technology using surface miner Wirtgen 2500SM. This study addresses risk associated with productivity and cutting quality on example of Estonian oil shale deposit in areas with complicated layering conditions. The risk assessment method allows choosing relevant technology with friendly environment and economic value. For risk estimation the event tree is used. The results of the risk assessment are of practical interest for different purposes. 1

S. Sabanov; J-r. Pastarus; O. Nikitin; E. Väli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Assessment of mercury health risks to adults from coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is preparing, for the U.S. Congress, a report evaluating the need to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from electric utilities. This study, to be completed in 1995, will have important health and economic implications. In support of these efforts, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The approach draws on the extant knowledge in each of the important steps in the calculation chain from emissions to health effects. Estimated results at key points in the chain were compared with actual measurements to help validate the modeled estimates. Two cases were considered: the baseline case (no local impacts), and the impact case (maximum local power-plant impact). The BNL study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Many implicit and explicit sources of uncertainty exist in this analysis. Those that appear to be most in need of improvement include data on doses and responses for potentially sensitive subpopulations (e.g., fetal exposures). Rather than considering hypothetical situations, it would also be preferable to assess the risks associated with actual coal-fired power plants and the nearby sensitive water bodies and susceptible subpopulations. Finally, annual total Hg emissions from coal burning and from other anthropogenic sources are still uncertain; this makes it difficult to estimate the effects of U.S. coal burning on global Hg concentration levels, especially over the long term.

Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.; Saroff, L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance Guidance Guidance Cybersecurity These documents are currently under revision and awaiting management review and approval Cybersecurity Strategy - 2011 Cybersecurity Architecture - 2011 OMB Requirements Enterprise Architecture Enterprise Architecture Transition Plan - April 2011 Enterprise Architecture Guidance Records Management Centers of Excellence (pdf) Procedures and Instructions Records Management Handbook Design Criteria Standard for Electronic Records Management Software Applications NARA Bulletin 2011-02, Guidance on Managing Records in Web 2.0/Social Media Platforms NWM 27 2010, NARA Guidance for Developing Media Neutral Records Schedules and Notifications to NARA for Previously Scheduled Permanent Records NWM NARA Bulletin 2010-05, Guidance on Manageing Records in Cloud

207

EPRI Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRA) Computer Based Training (CBT) v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Computer Based Training (CBT) module provides a high level introduction to the fundamentals of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and its use in Risk Informed (RI) Regulation. The EPRI Risk and Safety Management (RSM) Program is developing a series of CBT Modules to assist in the socialization of risk technology, more specifically the understanding of the plant specific Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRA) and risk informed regulation. The series of PRA CBT modules are developed in a hierarchical o...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

Suski, N; Wuest, C

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound PAHs and binary mixtures of PAHs in order to bridge the gap between component assessment and mixture assessment. Seven pure parent compound PAHs and four binary mixtures of PAHs were examined in the Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity Assay, a Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) assay and the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay (EROD). These assays were chosen for their ability to measure specific toxic endpoints related to the carcinogenic process (i.e. initiation, promotion, progression). Data from these assays was used in further studies to build Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) to estimate toxic endpoints and to test the additive assumption in PAH mixtures. These QSAR models will allow for the development of bioassay based potential potencies (PPB) or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) that are derived not only from bioassay data, but also from structure, activity, and physical/chemical properties. These models can be extended to any environmental media to evaluate risk to human health from exposures to PAHs.

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

D&D and Risk Assessment Tools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Tennessee Washington D&D and Risk Assessment Tools Challenge The Department of Energy has numerous facilities which require deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). While carrying out the D&D of these facilities various health, safety and environmental requirements must be met. The challenge addressed in this study is to develop tools to assist the D&D workforce to be in compliance with the requirements, to efficiently and effectively manage risk from health and safety concerns, to promote safety in D&D activities, and to provide computer-based models to people doing the work. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) each undertook a portion of the

211

DOE nano guidance pres-EDF-7jul08-.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano Risk Management: Evolution of Guidance DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Symposium: Safe Handling of Engineered Nanoscale Materials July 7, 2008 Argonne, IL Scott Walsh...

212

Risk identification and assessment in a risk based audit environment: the effects of budget constraints and decision aid use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk based audit (RBA) approaches represent a major trend in current audit methodology. The approach is based on risk analysis used to identify business strategy risk. The RBA has created a new set of research issues that need investigation. In particular, this approach has important implications for risk identification and risk assessment. The success of the RBA approach is contingent on understanding what factors improve or interfere with the accuracy of these risk judgments. I examine how budget constraints and decision aid use affect risk identification and risk assessment. Unlike previous budget pressure studies, I cast budget constraints as a positive influence on auditors. I expect more stringent budget constraints to be motivating to the auditor as they provide a goal for the auditor to achieve. I also expect budget constraints to induce feelings of pressure leading to the use of time-pressure adaptation strategies. When auditors have use of a decision aid, they take advantage of these motivational goals and/or use beneficial adaptive strategies. Overall, I find that auditor participants tend to be more accurate when identifying financial statement risks compared to business risks. Budget constraints have no effect on risk identification for financial or business risks; they also have no effect on financial risk assessments. On the other hand, business risk assessments are improved by implementing more stringent budget constraints, but only when a decision aid is also provided. Budget constraints can affect performance through a goal theory route or a time-pressure adaptation route. I investigate the paths through which budget constraints improve business risk assessments under decision aid use. I find that budget constraints directly affect performance, supporting a goal theory route. However, I do not find that budget constraints are mediated by perceived budget pressure as expected. Auditors appear to use a positive adaptive strategy to respond to perceived budget pressure, however perceived budget pressure is not induced by providing a more stringent budget.

Diaz, Michelle Chandler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

USING COPULAS TO MODEL DEPENDENCE IN SIMULATION RISK ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

Typical engineering systems in applications with high failure consequences such as nuclear reactor plants often employ redundancy and diversity of equipment in an effort to lower the probability of failure and therefore risk. However, it has long been recognized that dependencies exist in these redundant and diverse systems. Some dependencies, such as common sources of electrical power, are typically captured in the logic structure of the risk model. Others, usually referred to as intercomponent dependencies, are treated implicitly by introducing one or more statistical parameters into the model. Such common-cause failure models have limitations in a simulation environment. In addition, substantial subjectivity is associated with parameter estimation for these models. This paper describes an approach in which system performance is simulated by drawing samples from the joint distributions of dependent variables. The approach relies on the notion of a copula distribution, a notion which has been employed by the actuarial community for ten years or more, but which has seen only limited application in technological risk assessment. The paper also illustrates how equipment failure data can be used in a Bayesian framework to estimate the parameter values in the copula model. This approach avoids much of the subjectivity required to estimate parameters in traditional common-cause failure models. Simulation examples are presented for failures in time. The open-source software package R is used to perform the simulations. The open-source software package WinBUGS is used to perform the Bayesian inference via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling.

Dana L. Kelly

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

HTGR: an assessment of safety and investment risk  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in the present LWR designs which do not change the basic features that raise safety and economic concerns would not be expected to change public perception or be sufficient to encourage new nuclear investments by the utilities. The HTGR offers an attractive alternative, an alternative with proven operating experience and safety characteristics. This is demonstrated in this paper by an assessment of HTGR inherent safety features and by examining Fort St. Vrain operating experience data, which establish the HTGR as a forgiving design with respect to potential accidents. A further quantification of HTGR safety is made from a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of the 2240 MWt High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor-Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (HTGR-SC/C) reference plant. These results are compared to NRC risk goals and achieved LWR safety. Finally, a proposed small HTGR reactor design is discussed. Although the relative costs and marketability of such a small reactor have yet to be determined, several additional passive safety characteristics of the small HTGR make such a plant essentially benign.

Fisher, C.; Fortescue, P.; Goodjohn, A.J.; Olsen, B.E.; Silady, F.A.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Managing Radiation Emergencies: Prehospital Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance for Prehospital Emergency Services Guidance for Hospital Medical Management Procedure Demonstration How do you manage emergencies? Guidance for Prehospital Emergency...

216

[Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Survey of environmental management training coordinators: Risk assessment/risk management training needs  

SciTech Connect

The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) is conducting a survey of Risk Assessment and Risk Management. They are developing information on the existing level of risk associated with training and the perceived need for this training by both federal and private organizations. The purpose of the questionnaire is to determine the available training and the perception of the Risk Management process in the DOE. Of particular interest is the requirement for Risk Assessment/Management training in organizations that will be involved in the Decontamination and Decommissioning of DOE Facilities. The survey questions and instructions are included.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Risk-Managed Technical Specifications (RMTS) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has assessed the role of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the regulation of nuclear power station Technical Specifications. This report presents nuclear utilities with a framework and associated general guidance for implementing Risk-Managed Technical Specifications (RMTS) as a partial replacement for existing Technical Specifications. This report was prepared for EPRI with extensive technical input and review by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Risk-I...

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Risk-Managed Technical Specifications (RMTS) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has assessed the role of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the regulation of nuclear power plant technical specifications. This report presents nuclear utilities with a framework and associated general guidance for implementing risk managed technical specifications (RMTS) as a partial replacement of existing technical specifications. This report was prepared for EPRI with extensive technical input and review by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Risk-Informed Technical Specifications Task Force...

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Using Monte-Carlo simulation for risk assessment: application to occupational exposure during remediation works  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to apply the Monte-Carlo techniques to develop a probabilistic risk assessment. The risk resulting from the occupational exposure during the remediation activities of a uranium tailings disposal, in an abandoned uranium mining ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, occupational exposure, risk and dose assessment, uranium tailings disposal

M. L. Dinis; A. Fiúza

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Management Transition Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Records and Information Records and Information Management Transition Guidance November 2013 Records and Information Management Transition Guidance i Records and Information Management Transition Guidance Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 1 1.0 Introduction and Purpose ..................................................................................................... 1 LM Records Functions ................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 The Records Life Cycle ....................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Organizational Responsibilities ........................................................................................... 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Facility Representative Program: Program Directives and Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) Program Directives and Guidance FR Program Standard, DOE STD 1063-2011,...

222

Analysis of Regulatory Guidance for Health Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the connection between current FAA regulations and the incorporation of Health Management (HM) systems into commercial aircraft. To address the overall objectives ARINC (1) investigated FAA regulatory guidance, ...

Munns Thomas E.; Beard Richard E.; Culp Aubrey M.; Murphy Dennis A.; Kent Renee M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance Draft reporting guidance for the Smart Grid Investment Grant project under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Submitted to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval and subject to revision. Includes guidance on DOE corporate reporting, Project Management Value System (PVMS) reporting, risk management reporting, and DOE jobs reporting guidance. Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance More Documents & Publications Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance, Updated Questions and Answers for the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program: Reporting of Jobs Created/Retained in SIPRIS Questions and Answers for the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program:

224

Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance, Updated | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance, Updated Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance, Updated Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance, Updated Reporting guidance for the Smart Grid Investment Grant project under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Includes guidance on DOE corporate reporting, Project Management Value System (PVMS) reporting, risk management reporting, milestone reporting, and DOE jobs reporting guidance. Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance, Updated More Documents & Publications Smart Grid Grant Program Recipient Reporting Guidance Notice of OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants Comments regarding U.S. Department of Energy Proposed Agency Information

225

Consequence assessment for the high-level waste tanks probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

At the US DOE Hanford Site, there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total volume is about 60 million gallons containing approximately 120 Curies of radioactivity. The radioactive material consists primarily of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and transuranics. Risk concerns with the tanks are associated with possible energy releases because of the presence of flammable gases, organic liquids, reactive chemical compounds, and radioactive decay heat. Because of the high concentration of radioactivity in the wastes and because a large number of the older single-shell tanks have some history or evidence of leaking, there is a public perception that they pose a serious risk to the onsite workers and the offsite public. The tank farm probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) was performed for two reasons: (1) to develop a baseline estimate of the risks these wastes pose to the workers and the public for the present tank contents and configurations and (2) to provide a relative ranking of the risks associated with individual groups of tanks. The latter information would be helpful in planning the order of the tank remediation work by indicating which tanks pose the greatest risk; the former could help allay concerns.

MacFarlane, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kindinger, J.; Deremer, R.K. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits An Electronic Dance of Spins and Orbits How a Virus Prepares to Infect Cells Magnetic Switching under Pressure Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Assessing the Risk of Arsenic Ingestion DECEMBER 17, 2010 Bookmark and Share Mineralogy, percent arsenic bioaccessibility and total arsenic concentration of samples from Nova Scotia mine tailings. Detailed mineralogical analyses of individual samples revealed up to seven arsenic species in individual samples (six shown here as major arsenic phases). Results of a physiologically based extraction test are for the < 150 µm

227

Demonstrate Ames Laboratory capability in Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the damage which occurred during the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has implemented a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) program to evaluate the safety of nuclear power facilities during events with a low probability of occurrence. The PRA can be defined as a mathematical technique to identify and rank the importance of event sequences that can lead to a severe nuclear accident. Another PRA application is the evaluation of nuclear containment buildings due to earthquakes. In order to perform a seismic PRA, the two conditional probabilities of ground motion and of structural failure of the different components given a specific earthquake are first studied. The first of these is termed probability of exceedance and the second as seismic fragility analysis. The seismic fragility analysis is then related to the ground motion measured in terms of ``g`` to obtain a plant level fragility curve.

Bluhm, D.; Greimann, L.; Fanous, F.; Challa, R.; Gupta, S.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Applications of the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A research reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and has been performed with close collaboration between PRA analysts and engineering and operations staff. A product of this Involvement of plant personnel has been a excellent acceptance of the PRA as a tool, which has already resulted In a variety of applications of the EBR-11 PRA. The EBR-11 has been used in support of plant hardware and procedure modifications and In new system design work. A new application in support of the refueling safety analysis will be completed in the near future.

Roglans, J.: Ragland, W.A.; Hill, D.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Applications of the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A research reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and has been performed with close collaboration between PRA analysts and engineering and operations staff. A product of this Involvement of plant personnel has been a excellent acceptance of the PRA as a tool, which has already resulted In a variety of applications of the EBR-11 PRA. The EBR-11 has been used in support of plant hardware and procedure modifications and In new system design work. A new application in support of the refueling safety analysis will be completed in the near future.

Roglans, J.: Ragland, W.A.; Hill, D.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

231

Trial Plant Review of an American Nuclear Society External Event Probabilistic Risk Assessment Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined a representative set of Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessments (SPRAs) and Seismic Margin Assessments (SMAs) performed for U.S. nuclear plants and evaluated them against the American Nuclear Society's draft External-Event PRA Methodology Standard for conducting Probabilistic Risk Assessment of external events.

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

Development and application of a system for dynamic wildfire risk assessment in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the architecture and the application of a system designed for the assessment of the distribution of dynamic wildland fire risk over the whole Italian territory are presented. Such an assessment takes place on the basis of static information ... Keywords: Civil protection, Decision support, Forecasting, Fuel moisture model, Risk assessment, Wildfires

Paolo Fiorucci; Francesco Gaetani; Riccardo Minciardi

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Interim Report on Cumulative Risk Assessment for Radiological and Chemical Constituents of Concern at Decommissioning Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear facilities focus extensive efforts on site characterization to demonstrate regulatory compliance in the termination of site licenses. Many decommissioning sites, while recognizing radiological characterization and assessment needs, lacked experience in chemical risk assessment. This report documents plant approaches for performing cumulative risk assessments of both radiological and non-radiological constituents of concern.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Enforcement Guidance Supplements (EGS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplements (EGS) Supplements (EGS) EGS 05-01: Contractor Investigation, Causal Analysis, and Corrective Actions (09/23/2005) EGS 03-02: Revision to Occurrence Report-Based Noncompliance Tracking System Reporting Criteria (09/05/2003) EGS 03-01: Supplemental Guidance Concerning the Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 (07/21/2003) EGS 02-01: Enforcement Position Relative to 10 CFR 835 Bioassay Accreditation (02/21/2002) EGS 01-02: Management and Independent Assessment (12/17/2001) EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapons Program Enforcement Issues (10/15/2001) EGS 00-04: Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 and Compliance Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR Subpart C (10/26/2000) EGS 00-03: Specific Issues on Applicability of 10 CFR 830 (09/12/2000)

235

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline May 23, 2012 - 9:30am Addthis News Media Contact: (202) 586-4940 For Immediate Release: May 23, 2012 Department of Energy Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline Public-Private Sector Collaboration Produces Guidance to Help Electric Utilities Better Understand and Assess Cybersecurity Risk WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), today released guidance to help

236

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Historical Relationship Between Performance Assessment for Radioactive Waste Disposal and Other Types of Risk Assessment in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of the process for assessing the hazards of a geologic disposal system for radioactive waste and, similarly, nuclear power reactors, and the relationship of this process with other assessments of risk, particularly assessments of hazards from manufactured carcinogenic chemicals during use and disposal. This perspective reviews the common history of scientific concepts for risk assessment developed to the 1950s. Computational tools and techniques developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to analyze the reliability of nuclear weapon delivery systems were adopted in the early 1970s for probabilistic risk assessment of nuclear power reactors, a technology for which behavior was unknown. In turn, these analyses became an important foundation for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the late 1970s. The evaluation of risk to human health and the environment from chemical hazards is built upon methods for assessing the dose response of radionuclides in the 1950s. Despite a shared background, however, societal events, often in the form of legislation, have affected the development path for risk assessment for human health, producing dissimilarities between these risk assessments and those for nuclear facilities. An important difference is the regulator's interest in accounting for uncertainty and the tools used to evaluate it.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Policy and Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance Guidance Policy and Guidance Strategic directions are influenced by an analysis of budget and workforce projections and plans, congressional mandates, administration goals, Departmental priorities and mission needs. Human capital management strategies, policy, programs and plans are developed and assessed for overall success and compliance with merit system principals, civil service laws and regulations, and Departmental HCM directives. OCHCO is the primary representative body for the Department when coordinating with the Office of Personnel Management, the Office of Management and Budget, the General Accounting Office, and other Federal and non-Federal customers and organizations in connection with human resources and human capital management areas of responsibility.

239

Site Transition Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Guidance March 2010 Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington D. C. 20585 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Technical Framework for EM...

240

Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves.

Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Business risks and security assessment for mobile devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology advances over the past decade have elevated business risk from mobile devices to an unparalleled high. The relationships between security, business risks, and their corresponding costs are increasingly complex. Corporate security measures ... Keywords: PDA threat, business risk, malware, network threat, security, smart phone threat, wireless

Patricia Mayer Milligan; Donna Hutcheson

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hybrid Kansei-SOM model using risk management and company assessment for stock trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk management and stock assessment are key methods for stock trading decisions. In this paper, we present a new stock trading method using Kansei evaluation integrated with a Self-Organizing Map model for improvement of a stock trading system. The ... Keywords: Hybrid intelligent trading system, Investment risk, Kansei evaluation, Risk management, Self-Organizing Map, Stock trading system

Hai V. Pham, Eric W. Cooper, Thang Cao, Katsuari Kamei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Databases and Tools | Waste and Cleanup Risk Assessment | OSWER | USEPA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radionuclides (RSSG) Radionuclides (RSSG) RSSG Home RSSG Search Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides Topics for Key Radiation Guidances and Reports Analytes for Soil Screening Calculations Select Analytes. Select one or more analytes for the screening (or click on the "Select All" check box), one or more pathways, and an output format. Then click on the "Next" button. The next page will prompt you for equation parameters. Ac-223 Ac-224 Ac-225 Ac-226 Ac-227 Ac-227+D Ac-228 Ag-102 Ag-103 Ag-104 Ag-104m Ag-105 Ag-106 Ag-106m Ag-108 Ag-108m Ag-109m Ag-110 Ag-110m Ag-111 Ag-112 Ag-115 Al-26 Al-28 Am-237 Am-238 Am-239 Am-240 Am-241 Am-242 Am-242m Am-242m+D Am-243 Am-243+D Am-244 Am-244m Am-245 Am-246 Am-246m Ar-37 Ar-39 Ar-41 As-69 As-70 As-71 As-72 As-73 As-74 As-76 As-77 As-78 At-207 At-211

244

High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance More Documents &...

245

Information and Records Management Transition Guidance | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information and Records Management Transition Guidance Information and Records Management Transition Guidance Information and Records Management Transition Guidance (March 2004)...

246

Corporate information management guidance  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Guidelines for Preparing Risk-Informed Graded Quality Assurance Program Implementation Request Submittals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has assessed the role of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the regulation of nuclear power plant quality assurance programs. This report presents nuclear utilities with one example of a methodology and formatting guidance for developing submittals to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requesting implementation of risk-informed, performance-based "graded" quality assurance programs.

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

248

EMSL: Proposal Guidance:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance for Fiscal Year 2014 Guidance for Fiscal Year 2014 Published December 2013 EMSL awards the majority of resources to proposals responding to the annual calls/cycles. To expedite the decision process, please contact the appropriate Capability Lead(s) based on your resource needs before beginning a proposal. Capabilities and contact information are detailed on EMSL's capability web pages. Additional Information User Portal 2014 Call for Proposals 2014 Proposal Guidance 2014 Proposal Review Criteria Guidance for Letters of Intent to JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Call Guidance for Full Proposals to JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Call (Invited Only) 2014 Proposal Planning 2014 Proposal Summary/Extension Previous Calls External Peer Reviewers Fellowships and Awards Nufo, logo An EMSL user proposal requires detailed information for a thorough peer and

249

Guidance for Planning Exercises  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Planning, Conducting and Evaluating for Planning, Conducting and Evaluating Transportation Emergency Preparedness Tabletops, Drills and Exercises Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-10.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools Guidance f Guidance f Guidance f Guidance f Guidance for Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Evaluating aluating aluating aluating aluating T T T T Tr r r r ransportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emergenc genc genc genc gency Pr y Pr y Pr y Pr y Prepar epar epar epar eparedness T

250

ARM - Social Media Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CenterSocial Media Guidance CenterSocial Media Guidance Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance Social Media Guidance Comments The ARM Climate Research Facility (ARM) welcomes comments on our website, blog, and our social media sites such as Facebook, Flickr, and YouTube. Comments are welcome at any time; however, responses to comments will

251

NETL: Health Effects - Risk Assessment of Reduced Mercury Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of mercury. The primary pathway for mercury exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to mercury exposure is the fetus. Therefore, the risk...

252

DOE Guidance-Category Rating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTORS FROM: SARA"iJ. Boku1, DIRECToR OF HUMAN C~TAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #10 CATEGORY RATING The purpose of this memorandum is to establish the Department of Energy's (DOE's) policy for the use of Category Rating. Authorities: Public Law 107-296; Title 5 USC 3319; 5 CFR, Part 337, Subpart C., Presidential Memorandum of May 11, 2010 This guidance is established in accordance with 5 USC 3319, which authorizes Federal Agencies to use alternative rating proced.ures in assessing applicants for employment using category rating and selection procedures, and to ensure consistency in complying with federal regulations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Department of

253

Risk-Informed and Performance-Based Safety Culture Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the risk management effectiveness assessment (RMEA) described in EPRI Report 1011761, Risk Management Effectiveness Assessment Application Guide. This update was performed to evaluate the capability of the RMEA to assess the effectiveness of the plant safety culture. The update considered results reported in the research literature since the 2005 publication of the application guide. It also evaluated the RMEA against the safety culture components identified by the U.S. ...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

Guidance & Opinions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hiring Process Guidance on Inherently Governmental Functions Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations Employment Discrimination EEO Policy and Diversity Statement DOE...

255

Functional Specification: Operations and Maintenance Excellence PlantView Risk Assessment Module Modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report specifies changes to the Risk module of the PlantView software as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Operations and Maintenance Excellence (OMX) initiative. The proposed concept for a risk-informed fossil plant maintenance module builds on previous EPRI research and development that has produced applications such as REaP, LP Rim Life, Turbo-X, Boiler-OIO, and the PlantView Risk Assessment module. Risk assessment will then be more effectively integrated with other key pro...

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Risk Informed Safety Categorization (RISC-3) Seismic Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has amended its regulations to provide an alternative approach for treatment of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) for nuclear power reactors using a risk-informed method of categorizing SSCs according to their safety significance.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

GENII Guidance Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GENII Computer Code GENII Computer Code Application Guidance for Documented Safety Analysis Final Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety, and Health 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-2040 July 2004 GENII Guidance Report July 2004 Final Report INTENTIONALLY BLANK ii GENII Guidance Report July 2004 Final Report FOREWORD This document provides guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) facility analysts in the use of the GENII computer code for supporting Documented Safety Analysis applications. Information is provided herein that supplements information found in the GENII documentation provided by the code developer. GENII is one of six computer codes designated by the DOE Office of Environmental, Safety and Health as a toolbox code for safety analysis.

258

Oral Presentation Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 09 ORAL PRESENTATION GUIDANCE The following guidance is not intended to replace or circumvent any existing agency-level guidance or regulation; the guidance is intended to enhance the agency's effectiveness when interviewing potential Energy Service Company (ESCOs). NOTE: Use for down selection of two or more ESCOs INSTRUCTIONS * Preplan your interview(s) * Be prepared o Decide whether to have video conference; webinar, telephonically or face-to-face interview (recommended). o Meet with the Acquisition Team (including your DOE Project Facilitator) at least one hour prior to the first ESCO interview. o Prepare questions and discussion issues based on the Team's comments and concerns. * Be brief o Recommend scheduling a 1 or 1-1/2 hour for each interview.

259

Oral Presentation Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 09 ORAL PRESENTATION GUIDANCE The following guidance is not intended to replace or circumvent any existing agency-level guidance or regulation; the guidance is intended to enhance the agency's effectiveness when interviewing potential Energy Service Company (ESCOs). NOTE: Use for down selection of two or more ESCOs INSTRUCTIONS * Preplan your interview(s) * Be prepared o Decide whether to have video conference; webinar, telephonically or face-to-face interview (recommended). o Meet with the Acquisition Team (including your DOE Project Facilitator) at least one hour prior to the first ESCO interview. o Prepare questions and discussion issues based on the Team's comments and concerns. * Be brief o Recommend scheduling a 1 or 1-1/2 hour for each interview.

260

MAAP4 Applications Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing Modular Accident Analysis Program Version 4 (MAAP4) documentation consists of the MAAP4 User's Manual, the MAAP4 user's guides for input preparation, and transmittal documents that describe individual revisions. These components contain detailed information on the mechanics of running the code as well as detailed descriptions of the individual models, but they do not include specific applications guidance. This applications guidance document is intended to fill that gap by providing sufficie...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 There have been significant developments with regard to the risk assessment and risk informed decision making, as it applies to nuclear and other safety areas, since the Department of Energy (DOE) developed its approach to managing nuclear safety. The developments and associated technical insights may be of use to DOE in its efforts to continuously improve safety performance at its nuclear facilities. The Department has taken several actions to provide an infrastructure for providing appropriate controls and

262

Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

Vukelich, S.E. [Golder Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hierarchical planning and multi-level scheduling for simulation-based probabilistic risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation of dynamic complex systems---specifically, those comprised of large numbers of components with stochastic behaviors---for the purpose of probabilistic risk assessment faces challenges in every aspect of the problem. Scenario generation confronts ...

Hamed S. Nejad; Dongfeng Zhu; Ali Mosleh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Rice Cropping Schedule for Central Hokkaido, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A framework for the probabilistic risk assessment of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping schedule (PRARCS) is presented. The method accounts for interannual meteorological variation, as opposed to the traditional cultivation schedule planning ...

Manabu Nemoto; Takahiro Hamasaki; Ryoji Sameshima; Etsushi Kumagai; Hiroyuki Ohno; Yasuyuki Wakiyama; Atsushi Maruyama; Shinkichi Goto; Kiyoshi Ozawa

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Risk Assessment and Management for Interconnected and Interactive Critical Flood Defense Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to engineer-based RAM analyses. What is needed is a suite ofunits and levels of analysis for ICIS RAM, the island alsoanalysis (Phase II) for performing Risk Assessment and Management (RAM)

Hamedifar, Hamed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Assessment of the risk of transporting plutonium oxide and liquid plutonium nitrate by truck  

SciTech Connect

A methodology for assessing the risk in transporting radioactive materials and the results of the initial application of the methodology to shipment of plutonium by truck are presented. (LK)

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk Assessment Form (This is an active document and must be maintained) Materials Science and section will then be removed, the cutting blade demounted and the cutting bowl cleaned. SECTION 1

Cambridge, University of

270

IMPROVING TOOLS AND METHODS FOR ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT AT PETROLEUM-CONTAMINATED SITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Nancy Comstock and Kathy Stirling, Project Managers). The project is intended to provide risk assessment environmental benefit analysis. In that study a group of scientists and engineers comprised of Exxon, NOAA

271

Property Damage Risk Assessment Scoping Study: for South Texas Project Electric Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS), EPRI assessed the financial risks of on-site property damage from component failures and accidents and the effectiveness of available insurance in mitigating such risks. This report quantifies the risks of nuclear and nonnuclear accidents and the resulting property damage incurred. The report is a companion document to EPRI's Nuclear Property Insurance Study (TR-108061), which discusses five options for alternate insurance co...

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

Employing the EPRI Vista Program for Test Burn Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drive to use fuel switching as a means to meet more stringent SO2 and NOX emissions requirements has in many cases led to both a reduction in power station efficiency and a poorer net plant heat rate (NPHR) at the power station, as well as significant reductions in operating margins and increases in the risk of unit derates. One excellent method to manage or mitigate this risk is a comprehensive test burn for fuels under consideration. The objectives of this technical report are to demonstrate how th...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

273

Novel Threat-risk Index Using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Human Reliability Analysis - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

In support of a national need to improve the current state-of-the-art in alerting decision makers to the risk of terrorist attack, a quantitative approach employing scientific and engineering concepts to develop a threat-risk index was undertaken at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result of this effort, a set of models has been successfully integrated into a single comprehensive model known as Quantitative Threat-Risk Index Model (QTRIM), with the capability of computing a quantitative threat-risk index on a system level, as well as for the major components of the system. Such a threat-risk index could provide a quantitative variant or basis for either prioritizing security upgrades or updating the current qualitative national color-coded terrorist threat alert.

George A. Beitel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Behavioral Probabilistic Risk Assessment Framework for Managing Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Deployments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deployment of a deep-diving long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is a complex operation that requires the use of a risk-informed decision-making process. Operational risk assessment is heavily dependent on expert subjective judgment. ...

Mario Brito; Gwyn Griffiths; James Ferguson; David Hopkin; Richard Mills; Richard Pederson; Erin MacNeil

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of Bolted Storage Casks: Quantification and Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved dry storage of spent fuel, dry casks stored at U.S. sites have increased significantly in number since the 1980s. This project, a spent fuel cask probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), was designed to obtain insights related to the risks associated with the dry storage of spent fuel.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of Bolted Storage Casks: Updated Quantification and Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 1980s, when the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved dry storage of spent fuel, dry casks stored at U.S. sites have increased significantly in number. This report and its predecessor — a spent fuel cask probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) (EPRI report 1002877) — are designed to provide insights related to the risks associated with dry storage of spent fuel.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of Risk Assessment System for Coal-Bed Methane Underbalanced Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As there are a lot of factors with complexity and uncertainty, the process of coal-bed methane under balanced drilling has great risk. In order to overcome the one-sidedness and limitation caused by single evaluation method, the combined evaluation model ... Keywords: coal-bed methane, underbalanced drilling, combined evaluation model, risk assessment system

Xiujuan Yang; Qingyang Wen; Xiangzhen Yan; Yan Xia

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Results of the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve Oil Leak Risk Assessment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated multiple, long-term environmental oil-contamination risk scenarios that could result from the potential leakage of UP to 1.5 million barrels of crude oil entombed in the Weeks Island SPR mine following site decommissioning and abandonment, and up to 100 years thereafter. This risk assessment also provides continuity with similar risk evaluations performed earlier and documented in the 1995 DOE Environmental Assessment for Decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility (EA). This current study was requested by the DOE to help them determine if their previous Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), in the EA, is still valid or needs to be rescinded. Based on the calculated environmental risk results (in terms of clean-up and remediation expenses) presented in this risk assessment, including the calculated average likelihoods of oil release and potential oil-leakage volumes, none of the evaluated risk events would appear to satisfy the definition of significant environmental impact in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) terminology. The DOE may combine these current results with their earlier evaluations and interpretations in the 1995 EA in order to assess whether the existing FONSI is still accurate, acceptable, and valid. However, from a risk evaluation standpoint, the assessment of impacts appears to be the same whether only 10,000 to 30,000 barrels of crude oil (as considered in the 1995 EA), or up to 1.5 million barrels of oil (as considered herein) are abandoned in the Weeks Island SPR facility.

Molecke, M.A.; Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Linn, J.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

1 INTRODUCTION Probabilistic risk (or safety) assessments (PRA) pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability analyses. Finally, a case study in- volving a nuclear reactor is presented in Section 3. Dynamic for managing risks linked to engineering systems, notably in nuclear power plants, aerospace, and chemical of dynamic reliability was established under the name of Con- tinuous Event Tree (CET) theory, (Devooght

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

280

Hanford Tank Farm interim storage phase probabilistic risk assessment outline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series examining the risks for the high level waste (HLW) storage facilities at the Hanford Site. The first phase of the HTF PSA effort addressed risks from Tank 101-SY, only. Tank 101-SY was selected as the initial focus of the PSA because of its propensity to periodically release (burp) a mixture of flammable and toxic gases. This report expands the evaluation of Tank 101-SY to all 177 storage tanks. The 177 tanks are arranged into 18 farms and contain the HLW accumulated over 50 years of weapons material production work. A centerpiece of the remediation activity is the effort toward developing a permanent method for disposing of the HLW tank`s highly radioactive contents. One approach to risk based prioritization is to perform a PSA for the whole HLW tank farm complex to identify the highest risk tanks so that remediation planners and managers will have a more rational basis for allocating limited funds to the more critical areas. Section 3 presents the qualitative identification of generic initiators that could threaten to produce releases from one or more tanks. In section 4 a detailed accident sequence model is developed for each initiating event group. Section 5 defines the release categories to which the scenarios are assigned in the accident sequence model and presents analyses of the airborne and liquid source terms resulting from different release scenarios. The conditional consequences measured by worker or public exposure to radionuclides or hazardous chemicals and economic costs of cleanup and repair are analyzed in section 6. The results from all the previous sections are integrated to produce unconditional risk curves in frequency of exceedance format.

Not Available

1994-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

282

Transmission Grid Operation Risk Assessment Using Advanced Sensor Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This New York State Energy Research and Development Authority/Electric Power Research Institute (NYSERDA/EPRI) cost-share project was initiated in late 2010 and is scheduled to be completed in December 2013. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a concept (Concept) to use asset condition information to possibly enable system operators to predict system risk level. This report documents the resulting Concept developed by the EPRI project team. The report is prepared in fulfillment of...

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

SQA Directives and Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SQA Directives and Guidance SQA Directives and Guidance SQA Directives and Guidance DOE O 414.1D, Quality Assurance DOE G 414.1-4, Software Guide for use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance DOE Order O 414.1D, Quality Assurance, includes Attachment 4 addressing SQA requirements for nuclear safety applications at DOE nuclear facilities. The DOE O 414.1D was issued April 25, 2011. This Order and its associated Guide for safety software, DOE G 414.1-4, Safety Software Guide for use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements. The Order identifies 10 software quality work activities that are to be performed using the graded approach specified in the Order. These 10 work activities are: (1) software project management, (2) software risk

284

Emergency Management Concepts, Existing Guidance, and Changes | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management Concepts, Existing Guidance, and Changes Emergency Management Concepts, Existing Guidance, and Changes Emergency Management Concepts, Existing Guidance, and Changes Wednesday, September 19 Presenter: David Freshwater, Emergency Management Specialist, Office of Emergency Management, National Nuclear Security Administration Topics Covered: Emergency Management is last line of defense - have to consider when safety controls fail Longstanding consideration and analysis of "beyond design basis" Since 1991, Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments have analyzed a spectrum of events â—¦ Low consequence/High probability â—¦ High consequence/Low probability Have not had a "firm" upper bound Emergency Management Concepts, Existing Guidance, and Changes More Documents & Publications Summary of Emergency Management Results from Pilot Evaluations

285

A Small-Area Study of Environmental Risk Assessment of Outdoor Falls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Falls in public places are an issue of great health concern especially for the elderly. Falls among the elderly is also a major health burden in many countries. This study describes a spatial approach to assess environmental causes of outdoor falls using ... Keywords: Environmental risk assessment, GIS, Outdoor falls, Small-area study, Spatial clustering

Poh-Chin Lai; Wing-Cheung Wong; Chien-Tat Low; Martin Wong; Ming-Houng Chan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens C to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

Conclusions of the Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rationale for the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Program and its results and applications have been examined in the previous 13 articles of this special issue. This paper summarizes the results and discusses its successes and lessons learned. The robust data from the Capstone DU Aerosol Study have provided a sound basis for assessing the inhalation exposure to DU aerosols and the dose and risk to personnel in combat vehicles at the time of perforation and to those entering immediately after perforation. The Human Health Risk Assessment provided a technically sound process for evaluating chemical and radiological doses and risks from DU aerosol exposure using well-accepted biokinetic and dosimetric models innovatively applied. An independent review of the study process and results is summarized, and recommendations for possible avenues of future study by the authors and by other major reviews of DU health hazards are provided.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

DOE Issues Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency Issues Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency Violations DOE Issues Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency Violations May 7, 2010 - 12:50pm Addthis Today, the Department of Energy issued Guidance on the Imposition of Civil Penalties for Violations of EPCA Standards and Certification Obligations. As explained in the Guidance, the Department's penalty policy is intended to advance three goals: (1) to deter future violations; (2) to ensure consistency and equity in the assessment of penalties; and (3) to encourage complete and timely resolution of any instances of non-compliance. The Department also sets forth its basic approach to the imposition of penalties for violations of DOE's standards and certification requirements. A complete version of the Guidance is available here.

289

DOE Issues Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency Violations DOE Issues Guidance on Civil Penalties for EPCA Energy Efficiency Violations May 7, 2010 - 12:50pm Addthis Today, the Department of Energy issued Guidance on the Imposition of Civil Penalties for Violations of EPCA Standards and Certification Obligations. As explained in the Guidance, the Department's penalty policy is intended to advance three goals: (1) to deter future violations; (2) to ensure consistency and equity in the assessment of penalties; and (3) to encourage complete and timely resolution of any instances of non-compliance. The Department also sets forth its basic approach to the imposition of penalties for violations of DOE's standards and certification requirements. A complete version of the Guidance is available here.

290

Army Guidance for UESCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of 11 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil 071400AUG2008 ARMY STRONG Army Policy Guidance for Utility Energy Services Contracts presented at The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 5 MAY 2009 by Randy Smidt Headquarters Dept of Army, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management 2 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil 071400AUG2008 ARMY STRONG Overview of Army UESC Program & Draft Policy Guidance * Army UESC Program * Draft Policy Guidance o Organizations, responsibilities & relationships o Procedures o Management & Execution o Resource Requirements o Reporting Requirements o Case Studies 3 of 11 Randy Smidt / DAIM-ODF-E / (703) 601-1564 (DSN 329) / SmidtRF@conus.army.mil

291

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

Lebrun, Philippe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Longitudinal Load and Cascading Failure Risk Assessment (CASE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an easy, accurate, and economical method to assess the cascading potential of a transmission line. Using this method, utilities can quickly identify lines or line sections that have a high potential to cascade and, therefore, a reduced level of reliability.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

294

Guide for Assessing Relicensing Risk for Hydropower Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly two-thirds of hydropower projects relicensed between 1987 and 1991 lost both generating capacity and total annual energy; only one-tenth of relicensed projects showed any increase. This guide provides an overview of changes in relicensing and offers self-assessment guidelines for those utilities that are about to relicense their projects.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Risk Assessment Methodology Based on the NISTIR 7628 Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earlier work describes computational models of critical infrastructure that allow an analyst to estimate the security of a system in terms of the impact of loss per stakeholder resulting from security breakdowns. Here, we consider how to identify, monitor and estimate risk impact and probability for different smart grid stakeholders. Our constructive method leverages currently available standards and defined failure scenarios. We utilize the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Interagency or Internal Reports (NISTIR) 7628 as a basis to apply Cyberspace Security Econometrics system (CSES) for comparing design principles and courses of action in making security-related decisions.

Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Hauser, Katie R [ORNL; Lantz, Margaret W [ORNL; Mili, Ali [New Jersey Insitute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

defining early what contractors should accomplish < establishing contracts ahead of time < minimizing cost while maintaining quality by * maximizing competition and use of incentives * using past performance information in awarding work * managing the NEPA process as a project This guidance provides: < model statements of work < information on contract types and incentives < direction on effective NEPA contract management by the NEPA Document Manager < a system for measuring NEPA process costs < NEPA contractor evaluation procedures < details on the DOE NEPA Web site U.S. Department of Energy, Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance, December 1996 NEPA CONTRACTING REFORM GUIDANCE Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

297

Waste management project's alternatives: A risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the RBMCA the evaluation criteria are based on the quantitative risk analysis of the project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preference to the multi-criteria against the one-criterion evaluation process is discussed. - Abstract: This paper examines the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives through a quantitative risk analysis. Cost benefit analysis is a widely used method, in which the investments are mainly assessed through the calculation of their evaluation indicators, namely benefit/cost (B/C) ratios, as well as the quantification of their financial, technical, environmental and social risks. Herein, a novel approach in the form of risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) is introduced, which can be used by decision makers, in order to select the optimum alternative of a waste management project. Specifically, decision makers use multiple criteria, which are based on the cumulative probability distribution functions of the alternatives' B/C ratios. The RBMCA system is used for the evaluation of a waste incineration project's alternatives, where the correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is analyzed and useful conclusions are discussed.

Karmperis, Athanasios C., E-mail: athkarmp@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Sotirchos, Anastasios, E-mail: anasot@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Aravossis, Konstantinos, E-mail: arvis@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

QA in Design Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Design Guidance QA in Design Guidance This Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) guidance document is approved for use by all DOE EM organizational units and...

299

Regulatory guidance document  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Derivation of a chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for use in the assessment of risk from chronic exposure to ethylene glycol: Application of international programme for chemical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The International Programme for Chemical Safety (IPCS) has developed a set of guidelines ('the Guidance') for the establishment of Chemical-Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAFs) for in the assessment of toxicity risk to the human population as a result of chemical exposure. The development of case studies is encouraged in the Guidance document and comments on them have been encouraged by the IPCS. One provision in the Guidance is for the determination of CSAFs based on human data. We present a case study of the use of the Guidance for the determination of the CSAF for ethylene glycol (EG) primarily utilizing clinically obtained data. The most relevant endpoint for this analysis was deemed to be acute renal injury. These data were applied based on an assessment of the known pharmaco/toxico-kinetic properties of EG. Because of the lack of both bioaccumulation of EG and reports of chronic or progressive renal injury from EG, it was concluded that the most appropriate model of chronic exposure is one of repeated acute episodes. The most relevant exposure metric was determined to be plasma glycolate concentration. Based on a prospective human study of EG-poisoned patients, the NOAEL for glycolate was found to be 10.1 mM. This value is similar to that obtained from animal data. The application of the Guidelines to this data resulted in a CSAF of 10.24, corresponding to a daily EG dose of 43.7 mg/kg/day. In 2000, Health Canada (HC) produced an animal data-based analysis of the maximum tolerated dose of EG. The results of our analysis are compared with those of HC, and the strengths and weaknesses of these two data types related to EG are discussed.

Palmer, Robert B. [University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262 (United States)]. E-mail: RPalmer@Toxicologyassoc.com; Brent, Jeffrey [University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Risk management & organizational uncertainty implications for the assessment of high consequence organizations  

SciTech Connect

Post hoc analyses have demonstrated clearly that macro-system, organizational processes have played important roles in such major catastrophes as Three Mile Island, Bhopal, Exxon Valdez, Chernobyl, and Piper Alpha. How can managers of such high-consequence organizations as nuclear power plants and nuclear explosives handling facilities be sure that similar macro-system processes are not operating in their plants? To date, macro-system effects have not been integrated into risk assessments. Part of the reason for not using macro-system analyses to assess risk may be the impression that standard organizational measurement tools do not provide hard data that can be managed effectively. In this paper, I argue that organizational dimensions, like those in ISO 9000, can be quantified and integrated into standard risk assessments.

Bennett, C.T.

1995-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

ANDROS: A code for Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANDROS (Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection) is a computer code written to compute doses and health effects from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. ANDROS has been designed as an integral part of the CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System). ANDROS reads air concentrations and environmental concentrations of radionuclides to produce tables of specified doses and health effects to selected organs via selected pathways (e.g., ingestion or air immersion). The calculation may be done for an individual at a specific location or for the population of the whole assessment grid. The user may request tables of specific effects for every assessment grid location. Along with the radionuclide concentrations, the code requires radionuclide decay data, dose and risk factors, and location-specific data, all of which are available within the CRRIS. This document is a user manual for ANDROS and presents the methodology used in this code.

Begovich, C.L.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Program on Technology Innovation: Cumulative Risk Assessment of Urban Air Toxics: Pilot Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative risk modeling for estimating the burden of exposure to urban air toxics requires consideration of a range of factors influencing population health. These factors include multiple toxic compounds, a variety of pollutant sources, background levels of air pollutants, and non-chemical stressors not historically considered in regulatory risk assessments. To date, quantitative methods to account for all these factors remain sporadic and relatively untested. However, the United States ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Technical Basis and Benchmarking of the Crud Deposition Risk Assessment Model (CORAL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. To facilitate improved management of any crud-related fuel performance risk, EPRI has developed the Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL (CORAL). CORAL incorporates a modified version of the Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors ...

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tank Waste Remediation System decisions and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission is to store, treat, and immobilize the highly radioactive Hanford Site tank wastes and encapsulated cesium and strontium materials in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost effective manner. Additionally, the TWRS conducts, as part of this mission, resolution of safety issues associated with the wastes within the 177 underground radioactive waste tanks. Systems engineering principles are being applied to determine the functions and establish requirements necessary for accomplishing the TWRS mission (DOE 1994 draft). This systematic evaluation of the TWRS program has identified key decisions that must be executed to establish mission scope, determine requirements, or select a technical solution for accomplishing identified functions and requirements. Key decisions identified through the systematic evaluation of the TWRS mission are presented in this document. Potential alternative solutions to each decision are discussed. After-discussion and evaluation of each decision with effected stakeholder groups, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will select a solution from the identified alternatives for implementation. In order to proceed with the development and execution of the tank waste remediation program, the DOE has adopted a planning basis for several of these decisions, until a formal basis is established. The planning bases adopted by the DOE is continuing to be discussed with stakeholder groups to establish consensus for proceeding with proposed actions. Technical and programmatic risks associated with the planning basis adopted by the DOE are discussed.

Johnson, M.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Qualitative risk assessment of subsurface barriers in applications supporting retrieval of SST waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief, qualitative assessment of risks associated with the potential use of impermeable surface barriers installed around and beneath Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) to support the retrieval of wastes from those tanks. These risks are compared to qualitative assessment of costs and risks associated with a case in which barriers are not used. A quantitative assessment of costs and risks associated with these two cases will be prepared and documented in a companion report. The companion report will compare quantitatively the costs and risks of several retrieval options with varying parameters, such as effectiveness of retrieval, effectiveness of subsurface barriers, and the use of surface barriers. For ease of comparison of qualitative risks, a case in which impermeable subsurface barriers are used in conjunction with another technology to remove tank waste is referred, to in this report as the Barrier Case. A case in which waste removal technologies are used without employing a subsurface barrier is referred to as the No Barrier Case. The technologies associated with each case are described in the following sections.

Treat, R.L. [ENSERCH Environmental Corp. (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An overview of the risk uncertainty assessment process for the Cassini space mission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cassini spacecraft is a deep space probe whose mission is to explore the planet Saturn and its moons. Since the spacecraft`s electrical requirements will be supplied by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), the spacecraft designers and mission planners must assure that potential accidents involving the spacecraft do not pose significant human risk. The Cassini risk analysis team is seeking to perform a quantitative uncertainty analysis as a part of the overall mission risk assessment program. This paper describes the uncertainty analysis methodology to be used for the Cassini mission and compares it to the methods that were originally developed for evaluation of commercial nuclear power reactors.

Wyss, G.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Risk Assessment and Systems Modeling Dept.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.

Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances . The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment.

Liolios, T E

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

N reactor level III probabilistic risk assessment using NUREG-1150 methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that in the late 1980s, a level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was performed for the N Reactor, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford site in Washington State. The PRA objectives were to assess the risks to the public and to the Hanford on-site workers posed by the operation of the N Reactor, to compare those risks to proposed DOE nuclear safety guidelines, and to identify risk-reduction changes to the plant. State-of-the-art methodology was employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study of five commercial nuclear power plants. The structure of the probabilistic models allowed complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin hypercube sampling techniques were used to develop uncertainty distribution for the risks associated with postulated core damage events initiated by fire, seismic, and internal events as well as the overall combined risk. The risk results show that the N Reactor meets the proposed DOE nuclear safety guidelines and compares favorably to the commercial nuclear power plants considered in the NUREG-1150 analysis.

Wang, O.S.; Coles, G.A.; Kelly, J.E.; Powers, T.B.; Rainey, T.E.; Zentner, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US)); Wyss, G.D.; Kunsman, D.M.; Miller, L.A.; Wheeler, T.A.; Sprung, J.L.; Camp, A.L. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (US))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Use-Exposure Relationships of Pesticides for Aquatic Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field-scale environmental models have been widely used in aquatic exposure assessments of pesticides. Those models usually require a large set of input parameters and separate simulations for each pesticide in evaluation. In this study, a simple use-exposure relationship is developed based on regression analysis of stochastic simulation results generated from the Pesticide Root-Zone Model (PRZM). The developed mathematical relationship estimates edge-of-field peak concentrations of pesticides from aerobic soil metabolism half-life (AERO), organic carbon-normalized soil sorption coefficient (KOC), and application rate (RATE). In a case study of California crop scenarios, the relationships explained 90– 95 % of the variances in the peak concentrations of dissolved pesticides as predicted by PRZM simulations for a 30-year period. KOC was identified as the governing parameter in determining the relative magnitudes of pesticide exposures in a given crop scenario. The results of model application also indicated that the effects of chemical fate processes such as partitioning and degradation on pesticide exposure were similar among crop scenarios, while the cross-scenario variations were mainly associated with the landscape characteristics, such as organic carbon contents and curve numbers. With a minimum set of input data, the use-exposure relationships proposed in this study could be used in screening procedures for potential water quality impacts from the off-site movement of pesticides.

Yuzhou Luo; Frank Spurlock; Xin Deng; Sheryl Gill; Kean Goh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Adaptive Sampling Algorithms for Probabilistic Risk Assessment of Nuclear Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear simulations are often computationally expensive, time-consuming, and high-dimensional with respect to the number of input parameters. Thus exploring the space of all possible simulation outcomes is infeasible using finite computing resources. During simulation-based probabilistic risk analysis, it is important to discover the relationship between a potentially large number of input parameters and the output of a simulation using as few simulation trials as possible. This is a typical context for performing adaptive sampling where a few observations are obtained from the simulation, a surrogate model is built to represent the simulation space, and new samples are selected based on the model constructed. The surrogate model is then updated based on the simulation results of the sampled points. In this way, we attempt to gain the most information possible with a small number of carefully selected sampled points, limiting the number of expensive trials needed to understand features of the simulation space. We analyze the specific use case of identifying the limit surface, i.e., the boundaries in the simulation space between system failure and system success. In this study, we explore several techniques for adaptively sampling the parameter space in order to reconstruct the limit surface. We focus on several adaptive sampling schemes. First, we seek to learn a global model of the entire simulation space using prediction models or neighborhood graphs and extract the limit surface as an iso-surface of the global model. Second, we estimate the limit surface by sampling in the neighborhood of the current estimate based on topological segmentations obtained locally. Our techniques draw inspirations from topological structure known as the Morse-Smale complex. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of using a global prediction model versus local topological view of the simulation space, comparing several different strategies for adaptive sampling in both contexts. One of the most interesting models we propose attempt to marry the two by obtaining a coarse global representation using prediction models, and a detailed local representation based on topology. Our methods are validated on several analytical test functions as well as a small nuclear simulation dataset modeled after a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor.

Diego Mandelli; Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Guidance on Inherently Governmental Functions | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inherently Governmental Functions Guidance on Inherently Governmental Functions Federal law prohibits contractors from performing "inherently governmental functions." This guidance...

319

The uses and benefits of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has proven to be an important tool in the safety assessment of nuclear reactors throughout the world. Decision making with regard to many safety issues has been facilitated by both general insights from and direct application of this technology. Key uses of PRA are discussed and some examples of successful applications are cited. The benefits and limitations of PRA are also discussed as well as the broader outlook for applications of PRA. 9 refs.

Bari, R.A.; Speis, T.P. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS 40 CFR Part 1500 Executive Office of the President Council on Environmental Quality 722 Jackson Place, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 July 22, 1983 Memorandum For: Heads of Federal Agencies From: A. Alan Hill, Chairman Re: Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) were issued on November 29, 1978. These regulations became effective for, and binding upon, most federal agencies on July 30, 1979, and for all remaining federal agencies on November 30, 1979. As part of the Council's NEPA oversight responsibilities it solicited through an August 14,

323

EPAct 2005 Metering Guidance Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPAct 2005 Metering Guidance EPAct 2005 Metering Guidance Overview Dave Hunt Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Section 103 Requirements * What to meter - Building electric usage - All buildings * How to meter - Standard meters - Advanced meters * When - by 10/1/2012 FEMP's Response * Metering guidance document * Agency planning workshops * Metering training course * Metering Best Practices Guide (FY 2007) Important Dates * August 3, 2006 - agency plans due * As determined by individual agencies - site metering plans * October 1, 2012 - compliance deadline Issues * Funding * Practicability * EPAct time-based rate schedule * Agency policies/guidance Potential Roles for Utilities * Guidance/updates on time-based pricing * Metering services * Finance installations * Other? Useful Documents

324

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

325

Use of limited data to construct Bayesian networks for probabilistic risk assessment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is a fundamental part of safety/quality assurance for nuclear power and nuclear weapons. Traditional PRA very effectively models complex hardware system risks using binary probabilistic models. However, traditional PRA models are not flexible enough to accommodate non-binary soft-causal factors, such as digital instrumentation&control, passive components, aging, common cause failure, and human errors. Bayesian Networks offer the opportunity to incorporate these risks into the PRA framework. This report describes the results of an early career LDRD project titled %E2%80%9CUse of Limited Data to Construct Bayesian Networks for Probabilistic Risk Assessment%E2%80%9D. The goal of the work was to establish the capability to develop Bayesian Networks from sparse data, and to demonstrate this capability by producing a data-informed Bayesian Network for use in Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) as part of nuclear power plant Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). This report summarizes the research goal and major products of the research.

Groth, Katrina M.; Swiler, Laura Painton

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A VIKOR technique based on DEMATEL and ANP for information security risk control assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As companies and organizations have grown to rely on their computer systems and networks, the issue of information security management has become more significant. To maintain their competitiveness, enterprises should safeguard their information and ... Keywords: Analytic network process (ANP), DEMATEL, Information security, Multiple criteria decision making (MCDM), Risk control assessment, VIKOR

Yu-Ping Ou Yang; How-Ming Shieh; Gwo-Hshiung Tzeng

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

2-D Numerical Multimedia Environmental Analysis System (NMEAS) for pollution and risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All pollution issues involve potential impacts on the surrounding interconnected air, water, and soil (i.e., multimedia) environment. Effectively addressing a wide range of multimedia pollution problems is of crucial importance to major socioeconomic ... Keywords: Air emission, Environmental multimedia modeling, Fate of contaminants, Leachate, Numerical analysis, Pollution, Risk assessment, Spill of contaminants

Jing Yuan; Maria Elektorowicz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Case Based System for Oil and Gas Well Design with Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case base system for a complex problem like oil field design needs to be richer than the usual case based reasoning system. Genesis, the system described in this paper contains large heterogeneous cases with metalevel knowledge. A multi-level indexing ... Keywords: case based systems, information extraction, knowledge sharing, oil well design, risk assessment

Simon Kravis; Rosemary Irrgang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

330

Research Summary Assessing and communicating animal disease risks for countryside users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initially on Lyme disease, an infection caused by a spiral bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi that is found in a number of wild animal hosts and which can be transferred to humans by infected ticks. Lyme disease in Lyme disease resulting from changes in environmental factors mdevelop appropriate risk assessment

331

Numerical assessment of flood hazard risk to people and vehicles in flash floods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flash flooding often leads to extremely dangerous and sometimes catastrophic conditions in rivers due to characteristics such as: short timescales, the limited opportunity for issuing warnings, and the frequent high average mortality. Many past extreme ... Keywords: Flash floods, Flood hazard risk, Numerical assessment, People safety, Vehicle safety

Junqiang Xia; Roger A. Falconer; Binliang Lin; Guangming Tan

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas, Cheltenham, United Kingdom), Natural Ana- logues for the Geological Storage of CO2, IEA for assessing the health risks of CO2 leakage from on- shore storage reservoirs. Italian gas seeps have already Italian Gas Seeps. Natural CO2 degassing is most abundant in wes- tern Italy (18­20) (Fig. 1). Here

Haszeldine, Stuart

333

Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system for breast cancer risk assessment and insurance premium assignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an agent-based system for distributed risk assessment of breast cancer development employing fuzzy and probabilistic computing. The proposed fuzzy multi agent system consists of multiple fuzzy agents that benefit from fuzzy ... Keywords: Breast cancer, Fuzzy probability, Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system, Insurance premium, Uncertainty

Farzaneh Tatari; Mohammad-R. Akbarzadeh-T; Ahmad Sabahi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Probabilistic versus possibilistic risk assessment models for optimal service level agreements in grid computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a probabilistic and a possibilistic model for assessing the risk of a service level agreement for a computing task in a cluster/grid environment. These models can also be applied to cloud computing. Using the predictive probabilistic approach ... Keywords: Grid and cloud computing, Predictive possibilities, Predictive probabilities, Service level agreement (SLA)

Christer Carlsson; Robert Fullér

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Baseline Risk Assessment for the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits and Rubble Pit  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a description of the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (BRPs) and Rubble Pit (RP) unit. It also describes the objectives and scope of the baseline risk assessment (BRA).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Probabilistic risk assessment for the construction phases of a bridge construction based on finite element analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To develop a design, engineering, and construction management information sharing system that allow the project participants to effectively share the information throughout the construction life cycle with the support of 3D, design and building information, ... Keywords: Construction phases, Finite element analysis, Improved response surface method, Risk assessment, Virtual construction

Taejun Cho; Tae Soo Kim

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Quantitative application of biodegradation data to environmental risk and exposure assessments  

SciTech Connect

Biodegradation is an important removal mechanism for natural and synthetic organic chemicals released to aquatic, benthic, and terrestrial ecosystems. It results in a decrease in the overall mass or load of chemicals present in the environment and is key in preventing the accumulation and persistence of chemicals in specific environmental compartments. Although biodegradation is an important process for minimizing potential adverse impacts on environmental systems, it has not been traditionally considered in a quantitative fashion in environmental risk assessments. This article outlines an approach and provides simple kinetic criteria for incorporating biodegradation rate data into environmental exposure and risk assessments. The approach is a generic one that relates biodegradation half-lives to chemical residence times in specific environmental compartments. It is broadly applicable to any organic chemical in a range of environmental compartments and has potential use as a technical and regulatory tool to better quantify environmental exposure and risk.

Larson, R.J.; Cowan, C.E. [Procter and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Environmental Science Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Application of risk assessment in upgrading safety and quality of radiochemical operations  

SciTech Connect

A Comprehensive Safety Assessment and Upgrade Program (CSAUP) was commenced by the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve excellence in the safety and quality of its operations and condition of its facilities. In the course of conducting CSAUP, a number of issues of concern were identified. The safety risk of these issues has been assessed, and planned actions were prepared for those issues that require corrective actions or improvement/upgrading. The planned actions were evaluated on consideration for the uniqueness of Chem Tech facilities and operations to determine the risks (high, moderate or low) involved by failure to implement the actions. The risk was defined in terms of the frequency and severity of impact. Priority of categorized actions was based on the urgency of the actions. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Lin, K.H.; Hightower, J.R.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Current Conditions Risk Assessment for the 300-FF-5 Groundwater Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This report updates a baseline risk assessment for the 300 Area prepared in 1994. The update includes consideration of changes in contaminants of interest and in the environment that have occurred during the period of interim remedial action, i.e., 1996 to the present, as well as the sub-regions, for which no initial risk assessments have been conducted. In 1996, a record of decision (ROD) stipulated interim remedial action for groundwater affected by releases from 300 Area sources, as follows: (a) continued monitoring of groundwater that is contaminated above health-based levels to ensure that concentrations continue to decrease, and (b) institutional controls to ensure that groundwater use is restricted to prevent unacceptable exposure to groundwater contamination. In 2000, the groundwater beneath the two outlying sub-regions was added to the operable unit. In 2001, the first 5-year review of the ROD found that the interim remedy and remedial action objectives were still appropriate, although the review called for additional characterization activities. This report includes a current conditions baseline ecological and human health risk assessment using maximum concentrations in the environmental media of the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and downstream conditions at the City of Richland, Washington. The scope for this assessment includes only current measured environmental concentrations and current use scenarios. Future environmental concentrations and future land uses are not considered in this assessment.

Miley, Terri B.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Napier, Bruce A.; Peterson, Robert E.; Becker, James M.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Concerning the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Concerning the Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 Enforcement Guidance Supplement 03-01 Supplemental Guidance Concerning the Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 In October 2000, the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) issued Enforcement Guidance Supplement (EGS) 00-04, "Factual Bases for Issuing Consent Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR 820.23 and Compliance Orders Pursuant to 10 CFR subpart C." That EGS, in part, delineated a set of criteria that OE would use to determine whether to apply its enforcement discretion, in this case through the use of Consent Orders. Those criteria provided both guidance to DOE contractors regarding situations for which the use of

342

Assessment of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by truck  

SciTech Connect

The assessment includes the risks from release of spent fuel materials and radioactive cask cavity cooling water due to transportation accidents. The contribution to the risk of package misclosure and degradation during normal transport was also considered. The results of the risk assessment have been related to a time in the mid-1980's, when it is projected that nuclear plants with an electrical generating capacity of 100 GW will be operating in the U.S. For shipments from reactors to interim storage facilities, it is estimated that a truck carrying spent fuel will be involved in an accident that would not be severe enough to result in a release of spent fuel material about once in 1.1 years. It was estimated that an accident that could result in a small release of radioactive material (primarily contaminated cooling water) would occur once in about 40 years. The frequency of an accident resulting in one or more latent cancer fatalities from release of radioactive materials during a truck shipment of spent fuel to interim storage was estimated to be once in 41,000 years. No accidents were found that would result in acute fatalities from releases of radioactive material. The risk for spent fuel shipments from reactors to reprocessing plants was found to be about 20% less than the risk for shipments to interim storage. Although the average shipment distance for the reprocessing case is larger, the risk is somewhat lower because the shipping routes, on average, are through less populated sections of the country. The total risk from transporting 180-day cooled spent fuel by truck in the reference year is 4.5 x 10/sup -5/ fatalities. An individual in the population at risk would have one chance in 6 x 10/sup 11/ of suffering a latent cancer fatality from a release of radioactive material from a truck carrying spent fuel in the reference year. (DLC)

Elder, H.K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage, School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Guidance Program Guidance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Closeout Guidance on AddThis.com... Closeout Guidance Recovery Act Monitoring & Reporting National Environmental Policy Act

346

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Energy Management Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal

347

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Guidance Program Guidance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on AddThis.com... Closeout Guidance Recovery Act Monitoring & Reporting National Environmental Policy Act

348

A Study of Interactions in the Risk Assessment of Complex Engineering Systems: An Application to Space PSA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk managers are often confronted with the evaluation of operational policies in which two or more system components are simultaneously affected by a change. In these instances, the decision-making process should be informed by the relevance of interactions. ... Keywords: importance measures, interactions, multilinearity, operational decision making, probabilistic safety assessment, risk analysis, safety, sensitivity analysis, system risk

E. Borgonovo; C. L. Smith

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A system dynamics model for the screening-level long-term assessment of human health risks at contaminated sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the design of sustainable and cost-effective management strategies for contaminated sites, decision makers need appropriate tools, i.e. environmental decision support systems to assist them in the planning, assessment, selection and optimisation ... Keywords: Contaminated sites, EDSS, Human health risk assessment, Monitored natural attenuation, Risk-based land management, System dynamics, Uncertainty, Vensim

Ursula S. Mcknight; Michael Finkel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

SUMMARY OF USSD EMERGING ISSUES WHITE PAPER ON DAM SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT: WHAT IS IT? WHO'S USING IT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY OF USSD EMERGING ISSUES WHITE PAPER ON DAM SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT: WHAT IS IT? WHO'S USING White Paper on Dam Safety Risk Assessment. It also includes tables that summarize strengths and references that are summarized in the White Paper, technology transfer and training needs, and research

Bowles, David S.

351

Commissioning Guidance for ESPCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.2 7.2 Commissioning Guide Commissioning Guidance for ESPCs INTRODUCTION Federal facility managers are challenged daily with maintaining existing federal building stock that is energy inefficient, requires increasing operations and maintenance (O&M) expenses, and often does not achieve the building occupant comfort needed to maintain worker productivity. Additionally, they are faced with congressionally mandated requirements to reduce energy use and O&M expenses, with little capital funding. The Super ESPC program provides a procurement mechanism to allow agencies to acquire performance-based services to implement energy efficient equipment and systems that reduce energy use and O&M expenses through projects designed, installed, financed, and

352

Policy and Guidance Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis HS-20 Home Mission & Functions » Office of Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance & Environment » Sustainability Support » Environmental Policy & Assistance » Corporate Safety Programs » Analysis Program Contacts What's New? Sustainability Support Environment Corporate Safety Programs Analysis Environment Environmental Policy Environmental Guidance Environmental Reports Environmental Management System Radiation Protection Environmental Compliance Environmental Justice Environmental Training Environmental Tools Search Our Documents Topics & Resources Air Analytical Services Program CERCLA Cultural & Natural Resources DOE Comments on Rulemakings Federal Environmental Laws

353

CEQ Environmental Justice Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JUSTICE JUSTICE Guidance Under the National Environmental Policy Act Council on Environmental Quality Executive Office of the President Old Executive Office Building, Room 360 Washington, D.C. 20502 (202)395-5750 http://www.whitehouse.gov/CEQ/ December 10, 1997 ii Table of Contents I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Executive Order 12898 and the Presidential Memorandum . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 III. Executive Order 12898 and NEPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. NEPA Generally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 B. Principles for Considering Environmental Justice under NEPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1. General Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2. Additional Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

354

The increasing importance of risk assessment and management in environmental decision-making  

SciTech Connect

Because environmental problems are growing and resources for dealing with them are shrinking, the environmental movement is witnessing an evolutionary shift toward greater emphasis on the use of risk assessment and management tools in setting environmental standards, determining levels of cleanup and deciding environmental program funding priorities. This change has important ramifications for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its national laboratories in terms of the costs of weapons facilities cleanup, the types of cleanup technology that will be emphasized and the way the DOE programs will be run. Other Federal agencies responsible for cleanup operations [e.g., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Defense (DOD)] will be similarly affected. This paper defines risk management and risk assessment and explains why these concepts will be of growing importance in the 1990s. It also defines other relevant terms. The paper develops a rationale for why risk assessment and management will be of increasing importance in environmental decision-making in the 1990s and beyond.

Jaksch, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

DOE safety goals comparison using NUREG-1150 PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full-scope Level 3 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) including external events has been performed for N Reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) Category A production reactor. This four-year, multi-million dollar task was a joint effort by Westinghouse Hanford Company, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Technical lead in external events and NUREG-1150 methodology was provided by SNL. SAIC led the effort in the Level 1 analysis for the internally initiated events. Westinghouse Hanford supported the task in many key areas, such as data collection and interpretation, accident progression, system interaction, human factor analyses, expert elicitation, peers review, etc. The main objective of this Level 3 PRA are to assess the risks to the public and onsite workers posed by the operation of N Reactor, to identify modifications to the plant that could reduce the overall risk, and to compare those risks to the proposed DOE and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) quantitative safety goals. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Westinghouse Hanford and SNL for estimating individual health risks, and the comparison of the N Reactor results and DOE quantitative nuclear safety guidelines. This paper is devoted to DOE quantitative safety guidelines interpretation and comparison; the NRC safety objectives are also presented in order to compare N Reactor results to commercial nuclear power plants included in the NUREG-1150 study. 7 refs., 7 tabs.

Wang., O.S.; Zentner, M.D.; Rainey, T.E.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Assessment of the risk of fatal electric shocks inside a substation and in nearby exposed areas  

SciTech Connect

A simulation approach is elaborated for the risk assessment of fatal electric shocks due to touch and step voltages that are caused inside and around substations by ground faults. The approach suggested takes into account specific effects of ground faults, depending on their location, and various exposures encountered in practice. The fibrillation thresholds and human body impedance values are modelled as random functions to match well with the available experimental data. Several typical cases are analyzed for a substation, as an illustration. The approach developed is intended to serve for a realistic analysis of risks implied by grounding system design of a substation surrounded by exposed areas.

Nahman, J.M. (Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Bayesian Inference in Probabilistic Risk Assessment -- The Current State of the Art  

SciTech Connect

Markov chain Monte Carlo approaches to sampling directly from the joint posterior distribution of aleatory model parameters have led to tremendous advances in Bayesian inference capability in a wide variety of fields, including probabilistic risk analysis. The advent of freely available software coupled with inexpensive computing power has catalyzed this advance. This paper examines where the risk assessment community is with respect to implementing modern computational-based Bayesian approaches to inference. Through a series of examples in different topical areas, it introduces salient concepts and illustrates the practical application of Bayesian inference via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to a variety of important problems.

Dana L. Kelly; Curtis L. Smith

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Federal Real Property Council Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Real Property Council Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management December 22, 2004 Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management Table of Contents I. Overview............................................................................. 1 II. Guiding Principles .................................................................... 3 III. Asset Management Plan - Required Components............................... 4 IV. Asset Management Plan - "Shelf Document".................................. 5 V. Inventory Data Elements and Performance Measures Definitions.......... 26 i Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management I. Overview On February 4, 2004, President Bush signed Executive Order 13327, "Federal Real Property

359

Incorporating Equipment Condition Assessment in Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can complement the current fleet of large light-water reactors in the USA for baseload and peak demand power production and process heat applications (e.g., water desalination, shale oil extraction, hydrogen production). The day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M); however, the effect of diverse operating missions and unit modularity on O&M is not fully understood. These costs could potentially be reduced by optimized scheduling, with risk-informed scheduling of maintenance, repair, and replacement of equipment. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a “living” probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant and combine event probabilities with population-based probability of failure (POF) for key components. “Risk monitors” extend the PRA by incorporating the actual and dynamic plant configuration (equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions, etc.) into risk assessment. In fact, PRAs are more integrated into plant management in today’s nuclear power plants than at any other time in the history of nuclear power. However, population-based POF curves are still used to populate fault trees; this approach neglects the time-varying condition of equipment that is relied on during standard and non-standard configurations. Equipment condition monitoring techniques can be used to estimate the component POF. Incorporating this unit-specific estimate of POF in the risk monitor can provide a more accurate estimate of risk in different operating and maintenance configurations. This enhanced risk assessment will be especially important for aSMRs that have advanced component designs, which don’t have an available operating history to draw from, and often use passive design features, which present challenges to PRA. This paper presents the requirements and technical gaps for developing a framework to integrate unit-specific estimates of POF into risk monitors, resulting in enhanced risk monitors that support optimized operation and maintenance of aSMRs.

Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues  

SciTech Connect

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Appendices and Risk Assessment Spreadsheet Version No. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links to related documents referenced within the Engineering Manual: Links to related documents referenced within the Engineering Manual: Appendices and Risk Assessment Spreadsheet Version No. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual 07/10 Overview i Engineering at Fermilab 4 ii Purpose and Scope 5 iii Responsibilities 7 Fermilab Engineering Process 1 Requirements and Specifications 9 2 Engineering Risk Assessment 10 3 Requirements and Specifications Review 17 4 System Design 18 5 Engineering Design Review 21 6 Procurement and Implementation 23 7 Testing and Validation 26 8 Release to Operations 28 9 Final Documentation 29 Closing Thoughts 31 Appendices 33 Table of Contents Overview Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual Page No. Version No. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Engineering Manual

365

Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances. The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment. Operation Allied Force (OAF) has been going on for weeks in Yugoslavia with grave environmental consequences in the neighboring countries. Unfortunately, the sophisticated weapons that are being used carry the spectrum of radiological contamination. Over the past decades there has been a tremendous effort in weapons laboratories to use depleted uranium

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PARTNERSHIP (NRAP) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Grant Bromhal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PARTNERSHIP (NRAP) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Grant Bromhal NATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PARTNERSHIP (NRAP) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Grant Bromhal Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Dzombak, David A PI CMU Acid Gas Interactions w ith Seal Materials under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Nakles, David V CO-PI CMU Small, Mitchell J CO-PI CMU Siriw ardane, Hema J PI WVU Develop Second Generation ROMs for Release and Transport through Seals Mohaghegh, Shahab PI WVU Develop Second Generation ROMs for Reservoir Behavior Mohaghegh, Shahab PI WVU Develop Third Generation ROMs for Reservoir Behavior Siriw ardane, Hema J PI WVU Develop Third Generation ROMs for Release and Transport through Seals Li, Li PI PSU Brunet, Jean-Patrick Researcher PSU Karpyn, Zuleima T PI PSU Cao, Peilin Grad Student PSU Karamalidis, Athanasios PI

367

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

COBRA: A hybrid method for software cost estimation, benchmarking and risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current cost estimation techniques have a number of drawbacks. For example, developing algorithmic models requires extensive past project data. Also, off-the-shelf models have been found to be difficult to calibrate but inaccurate without calibration. Informal approaches based on experienced estimators depend on estimators ’ availability and are not easily repeatable, as well as not being much more accurate than algorithmic techniques. In this paper we present a method for cost estimation that combines aspects of algorithmic and experiential approaches (referred to as COBRA, COst estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment). We find through a case study that cost estimates using COBRA show an average ARE of 0.09, and show that the results are easily usable for benchmarking and risk assessment purposes. 1

Lionel C. Bri; Lionel C. Bri; Khaled El Emam; Khaled El Emam; Frank Bomarius; Frank Bomarius

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

COBRA: A Hybrid Method for Software Cost Estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current cost estimation techniques have a number of drawbacks. For example, developing algorithmic models requires extensive past project data. Also, off-the-shelf models have been found to be difficult to calibrate but inaccurate without calibration. Informal approaches based on experienced estimators depend on estimators' availability and are not easily repeatable, as well as not being much more accurate than algorithmic techniques. In this paper we present a method for cost estimation that combines aspects of algorithmic and experiential approaches (referred to as COBRA, COst estimation, Benchmarking, and Risk Assessment). We find through a case study that cost estimates using COBRA show an average ARE of 0.09, and show that the results are easily usable for benchmarking and risk assessment purposes. 1 Introduction Project and program managers require accurate and reliable cost estimates to allocate and control project resources, and to make realistic bids on external contracts. ...

Lionel C. Briand; Khaled El Emam; Frank Bomarius

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Assessment of the risk of transporting propane by truck and train  

SciTech Connect

The risk of shipping propane is discussed and the risk assessment methodology is summarized. The risk assessment model has been constructed as a series of separate analysis steps to allow the risk to be readily reevaluated as additional data becomes available or as postulated system characteristics change. The transportation system and accident environment, the responses of the shipping system to forces in transportation accidents, and release sequences are evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a comparison with other reports in this series. Based on the information presented, accidents involving tank truck shipments of propane will be expected to occur at a rate of 320 every year; accidents involving bobtails would be expected at a rate of 250 every year. Train accidents involving propane shipments would be expected to occur at a rate of about 60 every year. A release of any amount of material from propane trucks, under both normal transportation and transport accident conditions, is to be expected at a rate of about 110 per year. Releases from propane rail tank cars would occur about 40 times a year. However, only those releases that occur during a transportation accident or involve a major tank defect will include sufficient propane to present the potential for danger to the public. These significant releases can be expected at the lower rate of about fourteen events per year for truck transport and about one event every two years for rail tank car transport. The estimated number of public fatalities resulting from these significant releases in 1985 is fifteen. About eleven fatalities per year result from tank truck operation, and approximately half a death per year stems from the movement of propane in rail tank cars.

Geffen, C.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Program on Technology Innovation: Comprehensive Risk Assessment Requirements for Passive Safety Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key feature of the forthcoming generation of nuclear power reactors will be reliance on passive safety systems (PSSs)those that rely on natural physical laws and require minimal or no intervention by plant operators. In 2007, preliminary findings summarized the current state of research into tools and methods that are capable of supporting probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) for PSSs. These results and a recommended research plan for addressing the identified issues are presented in the Electric Powe...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Pipe Rupture Frequencies for Internal Flooding Probabilistic Risk Assessments: Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates a 2010 EPRI report (1021086) on piping system failure rates for use in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) involving internal plant flooding and high-energy line breaks (HELBs) and represents the third revision to this pipe failure rate handbook. These failure rate estimates are intended to satisfy requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and American Nuclear Society (ANS) PRA Standard RA-Sa-2009. The estimates also support an EPRI PRA Scope and ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Assessing Cancer Risk of Coal-Fired Power Plant Workers Exposed to PAHs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the relationship between the concentration of urinary 1-OH-Py, 3-OH-BaP and the degree as well as the pathways of human exposure to PAHs, we collected 24-hour air, dietary and urine samples of 60 oven workers in a coal-fired power plant of Central ... Keywords: biomarkers, medium-air and food, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), exposure assessment, cancer risk

Bin Li; Zhaolong Zhang; Haitao Fan; Cheng Zeng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Technical Status, Operating Experience, Risk and Market Assessment of Clean Coal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas fired combustion turbines and combined cycle plants have dominated the recent power generation markets in the United States and in much of Europe. However, concerns over natural gas price spikes have led many power companies to initiate studies and projects on clean coal technologies as a strategic hedge against over-reliance on natural gas alone to provide future power needs. Regulatory policy, site and project related issues, coal type, and risk assessment by the financiers and owners will ...

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

376

Modeling of Digital Instrumentation and Control in Nuclear Power Plant Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) typically models hardware components in terms of their failure probability and the effects that any given component failure has on the system it resides in. Digital systems, which include both hardware and software, bring new modeling challenges: determination of the appropriate level of detail to use in the logic models, and estimation of failure rates for software components. Failure probabilities for hardware are typically based on operating experience with componen...

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Spent Fuel Pool Risk Assessment Integration Framework (Mark I and II BWRs) and Pilot Plant Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the development and pilot application of a generic framework and methodology for conducting a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for spent fuel pools at BWR plants with Mark I or II containment designs. A key aspect of the study is the consideration of potential synergistic relationships between adverse conditions in the reactor and the spent fuel pool.BackgroundUsed nuclear fuel from the operation of nuclear power plants is typically ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

An assessment of mercury emissions and health risks from a coal-fired power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) mandated that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate the need to regulate mercury emissions from electric utilities. In support of this forthcoming regulatory analysis the U.S. DOE, sponsored a risk assessment project at Brookhaven (BNL) to evaluate methylmercury (MeHg) hazards independently. In the US MeHg is the predominant way of exposure to mercury originated in the atmosphere. In the BNL study, health risks to adults resulting from Hg emissions from a hypothetical 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant were estimated using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. This study showed that the effects of emissions of a single power plant may double the background exposures to MeHg resulting from consuming fish obtained from a localized area near the power plant. Even at these more elevated exposure levels, the attributable incidence in mild neurological symptoms was estimated to be quite small, especially when compared with the estimated background incidence in the population. The current paper summarizes the basic conclusions of this assessment and highlights issues dealing with emissions control and environmental transport.

Fthenakis, V.M.; Lipfert, F.; Moskowitz, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Analytical Sciences Div.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Reliability and Risk Significance: For Maintenance and Reliability Professionals at Nuclear Power Plants (Japanese Version)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Japanese version of Report 1007079 explains the connections between the reliability and availability of commercial nuclear power plant components and their risk significance as measured by a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The scope covers the two most common measures of risk significance and how they can be used to inform plant decision makers about risk. It also provides guidance on achieving balance between reliability and availability when performing preventive maintenance (PM) and on est...

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Guidance Systems Division ,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oockec No. 10-0772 Oockec No. 10-0772 22 OCT 1981 Bcndlx CorporaLion ' Guidance Systems Division , ATTN: Mr. Wf 11 la,,, Hnrr,,or Manngar, PlanL Englne0rtny Teterboro, New Jersey 07608 uwm STATES NUCLEAll I-IEOULATOIJY COMMISSION REGION i 631 PARK A"LH"I KIN0 OF PR"ISIA. PCNNIVLVANIA ID40' Gentlemen: Subject: Inspectfon 81-15 _ "-- .,; .z .;; Thts refers to the closeout safety \nspectlon conducted by Ms. M. Campbell of this office on August 27, 1961, of activities formerly authorized by NRC License No. STB-424 and to the c!lscussions of our findings held by f4s. Campbell with yourseif aL Lhe conclusion of the inspection. This closeout inspection. was conducted as part of an NRC effort to ensure that facilities where,llcensed activities were forxrrly conducted meet current NRC criteria for release for

383

Risk-Managed Technical Specifications (RMTS) Guidelines: Technical Update to EPRI Interim Development Report 1002965  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has assessed the role of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the regulation of nuclear power plant technical specifications. This report presents nuclear utilities with one example of a technical framework and associated general guidance for implementation of risk-managed technical specifications (RMTS) as a partial replacement of existing conventional plant technical specifications. This report was prepared by EPRI and the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) f...

2004-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Date: 21 Oct 2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resulted from chemical dissolution of steel is to be put into the centrifuge to collect the precipitates/spillage? No If yes, a more detailed risk assessment is required. Is there likelihood of copious amounts of gas being

Cambridge, University of

385

Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A CO{sub 2} sequestration project is being considered to (1) capture CO{sub 2} emissions from the Consumers Cooperative Refineries Limited at Regina, Saskatchewan and (2) geologically sequester the captured CO{sub 2} locally in a deep saline aquifer. This project is a collaboration of several industrial and governmental organizations, including the Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), SaskEnvironment Go Green Fund, SaskPower, CCRL, Schlumberger Carbon Services, and Enbridge. The project objective is to sequester 600 tonnes CO{sub 2}/day. Injection is planned to start in 2012 or 2013 for a period of 25 years for a total storage of approximately 5.5 million tonnes CO{sub 2}. This report presents an assessment of the leakage risk of the proposed project using a methodology known as the Certification Framework (CF). The CF is used for evaluating CO{sub 2} leakage risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), as well as brine leakage risk owing to displacement and pressurization of brine by the injected CO{sub 2}. We follow the CF methodology by defining the entities (so-called Compartments) that could be impacted by CO{sub 2} leakage, the CO{sub 2} storage region, the potential for leakage along well and fault pathways, and the consequences of such leakage. An understanding of the likelihood and consequences of leakage forms the basis for understanding CO{sub 2} leakage risk, and forms the basis for recommendations of additional data collection and analysis to increase confidence in the risk assessment.

Houseworth, J.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Review of the Oconee-3 probabilistic risk assessment: external events, core damage frequency. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

A review of the Oconee-3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (OPRA) was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating qualitatively and quantitatively (as much as possible) the OPRA assessment of the important sequences that are ''externally'' generated and lead to core damage. The review included a technical assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the OPRA within its stated objective and with the limited information available. Within this scope, BNL performed a detailed reevaluation of the accident sequences generated by internal floods and earthquakes and a less detailed review (in some cases a scoping review) for the accident sequences generated by fires, tornadoes, external floods, and aircraft impact. 12 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.

Hanan, N.A.; Ilberg, D.; Xue, D.; Youngblood, R.; Reed, J.W.; McCann, M.; Talwani, T.; Wreathall, J.; Kurth, P.D.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Guidance & Opinions | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance & Opinions Guidance & Opinions Guidance & Opinions Contractor Relations Guidance on Accessing Contractor and Subcontractor Employment Records Arbitration Guidance for Management and Operating Contractors Guidance on Meetings with Union Officials Political Activity at DOE Facilities and by DOE Contractors Opinion on Contractor Participation in the Federal Hiring Process Guidance on Inherently Governmental Functions Guidance on Electric Vehicle Recharging Stations Safety Regulations Interpretations INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF UNDER 10 C.F.R. PART 820, SUBPART E, EXEMPTION RELIEF, AND NON-COMPLIANT 'DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES' SUBJECT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 830, NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT, SUBPART B, SAFETY BASIS REQUIREMENTS INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD

388

Handicapped Parking Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handicapped Parking Guidance Handicapped Parking Guidance U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters Handicapped Parking Procedures It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE)...

389

Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Regulations Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations This document provides Council on Environmental Quality guidance on several topics: scoping, categorical exclusions, adoption...

390

Security and Cyber Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance Security and Cyber Guidance Appraisal Process Guides Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April 2008 Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide - April...

391

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010 Additional Guidance...

392

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the "RH-TRU 72-B cask") and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Risk time-window specification and its impact on the assessment of medication-related adverse events.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Post-marketing studies using medical administrative databases are often conducted to assess medication-related adverse events (AE). The determination of the risk time-window, defined as the period… (more)

Cournoyer, Daniel.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Information Systems Engineering Guidance (ISEG)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departmental Information Systems Engineering (DISE) Departmental Information Systems Engineering (DISE) Guidance Volume 2 Managing DOE IT Projects March 26, 2002 Revised December 27, 2002 Developed by the Software Quality and Systems Engineering Program Office of the Chief Information Officer Departmental Information Systems Engineering Guidance Title Page Document Series: Departmental Information Systems Engineering (DISE) Guidance Document Name: Volume 2, Managing DOE IT Projects Publication Date: 03/26/03, Revised 12/27/02 Document Owner: Office of the Chief Information Officer Software Quality and Systems Engineering Brenda Coblentz, IM-21, Program Manager Acknowledgement: Wayne Jones, author of the DOE (HQ) IM Project Management Guide, September 1998

397

Assessing the risk from the depleted Uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern due to the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study some worst-case scenaria are assumed in order to assess the risk for Yugoslavia and its neighboring countries. The risk is proved to be negligible for the neighboring countries while for Yugoslavia itself evidence is given that any increase in total long-term cancer mortality will be so low that it will remain undetected. Local radioactive hotspots such as DU weapons fragments and abandoned battle tanks, fortified or contaminated with DU, constitute a post-war hazard which is not studied in this article.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and {sup 137}Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and [sup 137]Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints near an injection well have potential to divert a large percentage of an injected CO{sub 2} stream away from a target coal seam. However, the strata-bound nature of Pottsville fracture systems is a natural factor that mitigates the risk of long-range leakage and surface seepage. Flow models indicate that cross-formational flow in strata-bound joint networks is low and is dissipated by about an order of magnitude at each successive bedding contact. These models help confirm that strata-bound joint networks are self-compartmentalizing and that the thick successions of interbedded shale and sandstone separating the Pottsville coal zones are confining units that protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. DFN models are powerful tools for the simulation and analysis of fracture networks and can play an important role in the assessment of risks associated with carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Importantly, the stochastic nature DFN models dictates that they cannot be used to precisely reproduce reservoir conditions in a specific field area. Rather, these models are most useful for simulating the fundamental geometric and statistical properties of fracture networks. Because the specifics of fracture architecture in a given area can be uncertain, multiple realizations of DFN models and DFN-based flow models can help define variability that may be encountered during field operations. Using this type of approach, modelers can inform the risk assessment process by characterizing the types and variability of fracture architecture that may exist in geologic carbon sinks containing natural fractures.

Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

All NEPA Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance & Requirements » Guidance » All NEPA Guidance Guidance & Requirements » Guidance » All NEPA Guidance All NEPA Guidance Council on Environmental Quality Guidance Final Guidance on Improving the Process for Preparing Efficient and Timely Environmental Reviews Under the National Environmental Policy Act (2012) Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact (2011) Guidance for Federal Departments and Agencies on Establishing, Applying, and Revising Categorical Exclusions under NEPA (2010) Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA (2010) A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA: Having Your Voice Heard (2007) Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis (2005) Memorandum for Federal NEPA Contacts: Emergency Actions and

403

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can provide the United States with a safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The controllable day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operation and maintenance costs. Health and condition assessment coupled with online risk monitors can potentially enhance affordability of aSMRs through optimized operational planning and maintenance scheduling. Currently deployed risk monitors are an extension of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). For complex engineered systems like nuclear power plants, PRA systematically combines event likelihoods and the probability of failure (POF) of key components, so that when combined with the magnitude of possible adverse consequences to determine risk. Traditional PRA uses population-based POF information to estimate the average plant risk over time. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a PRA that reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant; this model is updated periodically, typically once a year. Risk monitors expand on living PRA by incorporating changes in the day-by-day plant operation and configuration (e.g., changes in equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions). However, population-based POF (or population- and time-based POF) is still used to populate fault trees. Health monitoring techniques can be used to establish condition indicators and monitoring capabilities that indicate the component-specific POF at a desired point in time (or over a desired period), which can then be incorporated in the risk monitor to provide a more accurate estimate of the plant risk in different configurations. This is particularly important for active systems, structures, and components (SSCs) proposed for use in aSMR designs. These SSCs may differ significantly from those used in the operating fleet of light-water reactors (or even in LWR-based SMR designs). Additionally, the operating characteristics of aSMRs can present significantly different requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

DOE Standard, Department of Energy Standard for Control and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE STD-xxxx-xx DOE STD-xxxx-xx December 2010 DOE STANDARD DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENTS IN DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY APPLICATIONS FOR INTERIM USE AND COMMENT U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This draft, December 2010, prepared by the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance, has not been approved and is subject to modification. Project No. SAFT-0132 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE AREA SAFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-xxxx-xx i TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE Foreword ........................................................................................................................................... i

408

DOE Standard, Department of Energy Standard for Control and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE STD-xxxx-xx DOE STD-xxxx-xx December 2010 DOE STANDARD DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENTS IN DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY APPLICATIONS FOR INTERIM USE AND COMMENT U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This draft, December 2010, prepared by the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance, has not been approved and is subject to modification. Project No. SAFT-0132 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE AREA SAFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-xxxx-xx i TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE Foreword ........................................................................................................................................... i

409

Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance April 15, 2010 EISA SECTION 432 - Benchmarking of Federal Facilities (42 U.S.C. 8253 Subsection (f), Use of Energy and Water Efficiency...

410

Measuring the maturity of a technology : guidance on assigning a TRL.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance on how to assign a technology readiness level (TRL). The method proposed assists in assigning TRLs through a series of questions that focus on a set of unambiguous maturation metrics. This method is slightly biased towards the environment and approach to technology maturation at Sandia National Laboratories where customers and suppliers are in very close proximity to one another, allowing for supplier-customer interactions at a very early stage in technology development. The hope is that this report can serve as a practical guide to anyone trying to understand the maturity of a specific technology. Risk is reduced in system acquisition by selecting mature technologies for inclusion in system development. TRLs are used to assess the maturity of evolving technologies and therefore become part of an overall risk reduction strategy in system development.

Mitchell, John Anthony

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. The C of C states: ''...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, ''Operating Procedures,'' of the application.'' It further states: ''...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, ''Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR {section} 71.11, ''Deliberate Misconduct.'' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARP. This document is available on the Internet at: ttp://www.ws/library/t2omi/t2omi.htm. Users are responsible for ensuring they are using the current revision and change notices. Sites may prepare their own document using the word-for-word steps in th is document, in sequence, including Notes and cautions. Site specific information may be included as necessary. The document, and revisions, must then be submitted to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval. A copy of the approval letter from CBFO shall be available for audit purposes. Users may develop site-specific procedures addressing preoperational activities, quality assurance (QA), hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used with the instructions contained in this document. Users may recommend changes to this document by submitting their recommendations (in writing) to the WIPP M&O Contractor RH Packaging Maintenance Engineer for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by ALL users. Before first use and every 12 months after, user sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance. They will also be audited within one year from the effective date of revisions to this document.

Washington TRU Solutions, LLC

2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans  

SciTech Connect

This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Selected Guidance & Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selected Guidance & Requirements Selected Guidance & Requirements Selected Guidance & Requirements This page contains the most requested NEPA guidance and requirement documents and those most often recommended by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance. Documents are listed by agency, in reverse chronological order. More extensive collections of documents are available on the individual pages for Guidance and Requirements pages. Requirements - Statutes National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 Clean Air Act, Section 309 Guidance - Council on Environmental Quality NEPA at 19: A Primer on an "Old" Law with Solutions to New Problems 40 Most Asked Questions Concerning CEQ's NEPA Regulations Guidance - Department of Energy DOE, NEPA, and You

414

Guidance & Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance & Requirements Guidance & Requirements Guidance & Requirements The Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance provides guidance and requirement documents to the NEPA community to ensure that the Department's proposed actions comply with the letter and spirit of the National Environmental Policy Act, and to assist the interested public in reviewing NEPA documents. Guidance Guidance documents from the Council on Environmental Quality, Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, and other federal agencies applicable to NEPA proposed actions. Requirements A collection of statutes, Council on Environmental Quality regulations, Department of Energy regulations, and Executive Orders applicable to NEPA proposed actions. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report A collection of guidance, case studies, analyses, references, litigation

415

A framework for evaluating innovative statistical and risk assessment tools to solve environment restoration problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site face complex issues due to history of varied past contaminant disposal practices. Data collection and analysis required for site characterization, pathway modeling, and remediation selection decisions must deal with inherent uncertainties and unique problems associated with the restoration. A framework for working through the statistical aspects of the site characterization and remediation selection problems is needed. This framework would facilitate the selection of appropriate statistical tools for solving unique aspects of the environmental restoration problem. This paper presents a framework for selecting appropriate statistical and risk assessment methods. The following points will be made: (1) pathway modelers and risk assessors often recognize that ``some type`` of statistical methods are required but don`t work with statisticians on tools development in the early planning phases of the project; (2) statistical tools selection and development are problem-specific and often site-specific, further indicating a need for up-front involvement of statisticians; and (3) the right tool, applied in the right way can minimize sampling costs, get as much information as possible out of the data that does exist, provide consistency and defensibility for the results, and given structure and quantitative measures to decision risks and uncertainties.

Hassig, N.L.; Gilbert, R.O.; Pulsipher, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A framework for evaluating innovative statistical and risk assessment tools to solve environment restoration problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site face complex issues due to history of varied past contaminant disposal practices. Data collection and analysis required for site characterization, pathway modeling, and remediation selection decisions must deal with inherent uncertainties and unique problems associated with the restoration. A framework for working through the statistical aspects of the site characterization and remediation selection problems is needed. This framework would facilitate the selection of appropriate statistical tools for solving unique aspects of the environmental restoration problem. This paper presents a framework for selecting appropriate statistical and risk assessment methods. The following points will be made: (1) pathway modelers and risk assessors often recognize that some type'' of statistical methods are required but don't work with statisticians on tools development in the early planning phases of the project; (2) statistical tools selection and development are problem-specific and often site-specific, further indicating a need for up-front involvement of statisticians; and (3) the right tool, applied in the right way can minimize sampling costs, get as much information as possible out of the data that does exist, provide consistency and defensibility for the results, and given structure and quantitative measures to decision risks and uncertainties.

Hassig, N.L.; Gilbert, R.O.; Pulsipher, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4  

SciTech Connect

In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected.

Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

418

Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988  

SciTech Connect

This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

1988-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

Kelsey, Chris R., E-mail: kelse003@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horwitz, Mitchell E. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cellular Therapy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Folz, Rodney J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Disorders Medicine, University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY (United States); Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cellular Therapy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Volume 2, Guidance  

SciTech Connect

This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in Vol. 1 of this Standard. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While Vol. 1 is generally applicable in that requirements there apply to a wide range of fusion facilities, this volume is concerned mainly with large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This volume is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "risk assessment guidance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Incorporating uncertainties into risk assessment with an application to the exploratory studies facilities at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology that incorporates variability and reducible sources of uncertainty into the probabilistic and consequence components of risk was developed. The method was applied to the north tunnel of the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. In this assessment, variability and reducible sources of uncertainty were characterized and propagated through the risk assessment models using a Monte Carlo based software package. The results were then manipulated into risk curves at the 5% and 95% confidence levels for both the variability and overall uncertainty analyses, thus distinguishing between variability and reducible sources of uncertainty. In the Yucca Mountain application, the designation of the north tunnel as an item important to public safety, as defined by 10 CFR 60, was determined. Specifically, the annual frequency of a rock fall breaching a waste package causing an off-site dose of 500 mrem (5x10{sup -3} Sv) was calculated. The annual frequency, taking variability into account, ranged from 1.9x10{sup -9} per year at the 5% confidence level to 2.5x10{sup -9} per year at the 95% confidence level. The frequency range after including all uncertainty was 9.5x10{sup -10} to 1.8x10{sup -8} per year. The maximum observable frequency, at the 100% confidence level, was 4.9x10{sup -8} per year. This is below the 10{sup -6} per year frequency criteria of 10 CFR 60. Therefore, based on this work, the north tunnel does not fall under the items important to public safety designation for the event studied.

Fathauer, P.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. States.  

SciTech Connect

Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts from responses to climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.

Reinert, Rhonda K.; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Robinson, David B.; Backus, George A.; Fogelman, William; Cutler, Laura; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick; Finely, Ray; Siirola, John; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Mitchiner, John Lovorn; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Strickland, James Hassler; Weddington, Anna Neila; Warren, Drake E.; Taylor, Mark A.; Loose, Verne W.; Richards, Elizabeth H.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Horschel, Daniel S.; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Snyder, Lillian Annabelle; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reno, Marissa Devan; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Baker, Arnold Barry; Adams, Brian M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. states.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts of climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.

Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Reinert, Rhonda K.; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Use of hazard assessments to achieve risk reduction in the USDOE Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship Demonstration Project SS-21, better known as the ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex has dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The entire Seamless Safety design and development process is verified by a concurrent hazard assessment (HA). The primary purpose of the SS-21 Demonstration Project HA was to demonstrate the feasibility of performing concurrent HAs as part of an engineering design and development effort and then to evaluate the use of the HA to provide an indication in the risk reduction or gain in safety achieved. To accomplish this objective, HAs were performed on both baseline (i.e., old) and new (i.e. SS-21) B61-0 Center Case Section disassembly processes. These HAs were used to support the identification and documentation of weapon- and process-specific hazards and safety-critical operating steps. Both HAs focused on identifying accidents that had the potential for worker injury, public health effects, facility damage, toxic gas release, and dispersal of radioactive materials. A comparison of the baseline and SS-21 process risks provided a semi-quantitative estimate of the risk reduction gained via the Seamless Safety process.

Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Bott, T.; Eisenhawer, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DeYoung, L.; Hockert, J. [Odgen Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

NONE

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Climate uncertainty and implications for U.S. state-level risk assessment through 2050.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decisions for climate policy will need to take place in advance of climate science resolving all relevant uncertainties. Further, if the concern of policy is to reduce risk, then the best-estimate of climate change impacts may not be so important as the currently understood uncertainty associated with realizable conditions having high consequence. This study focuses on one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change - precipitation - to understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and the near-term justification for interventions to mitigate the course of climate change. We show that the mean risk of damage to the economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of one trillion dollars over the next 40 years, with employment impacts of nearly 7 million labor-years. At a 1% exceedance-probability, the impact is over twice the mean-risk value. Impacts at the level of individual U.S. states are then typically in the multiple tens of billions dollar range with employment losses exceeding hundreds of thousands of labor-years. We used results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) climate-model ensemble as the referent for climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, mapped the simulated weather hydrologically to the county level for determining the physical consequence to economic activity at the state level, and then performed a detailed, seventy-industry, analysis of economic impact among the interacting lower-48 states. We determined industry GDP and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effect on personal income, and the consequences for the U.S. trade balance.

Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

National Environmental Policy Act guidance: A model process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ``Model National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process`` includes: References to regulations, guidance documents, and plans; training programs; procedures; and computer databases. Legislative Acts and reference documents from Congress, US Department of Energy, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company provide the bases for conducting NEPA at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) NEPA / Permitting Department, the Contractor Environmental Organization (CEO) is responsible for developing and maintaining LITCO NEPA and permitting policies, guidance, and procedures. The CEO develops procedures to conduct environmental evaluations based on NEPA, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations, and DOE guidance. This procedure includes preparation or support of environmental checklists, categorical exclusion determinations, environmental assessment determinations, environmental assessments, and environmental impact statements. In addition, the CEO uses this information to train personnel conducting environmental evaluations at the INEL. Streamlining these procedures fosters efficient use of resources, quality documents, and better decisions on proposed actions.

Angle, B.M.; Lockhart, V.A.T.; Sema, B.; Tuott, L.C.; Irving, J.S.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), World Bank Climate Smart Planning Platform Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.mca4climate.info/ Program Start: 2011 Cost: Free Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Screenshot References: MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning[1]

431

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) guidance for developers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the consideration of environmental issues in the planning, design, deployment and decommissioning of test devices and to summarise the results of this process in an Environmental...

432

Petroleum Hydrocarbon Vapour Intrusion Assessment: Australian Guidance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © CRC CARE Pty Ltd, 2013 This book is copyright. Except as permitted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Commonwealth) and subsequent amendments, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or otherwise, without the specific written permission of the copyright owner.

Jackie Wright; Greg Davis; Csiro L; Sophie Wood; Marc Salmon; Cavvanba Consulting; Peter Nadebaum; Prashant Srivastava; Crc Care; Ravi Naidu; Crc Care

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bayesian Networks and Geographical Information Systems for Environmental Risk Assessment for Oil and Gas Site Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a Bayesian Network (BN) model to produce environmental risk maps for oil and gas site developments and to demonstrate the model’s scalability from a point to a collection of points. To reach this objective, a benchmark BN model was formulated as a “proof of concept” using Aquifers, Ecoregions and Land Use / Land Cover maps as local and independent input variables. This model was then used to evaluate the probabilistic geographical distribution of the Environmental Sensibility of Oil and Gas (O&G) developments for a given study area. A Risk index associated with the development of O&G operation activities based on the spatial environmental sensibility was also mapped. To facilitate the Risk assessment, these input variables (maps) were discretized into three hazard levels: high, moderate and low. A Geographical Information System (GIS) platform was used (ESRI ArcMap 10), to gather, modify and display the data for the analysis. Once the variables were defined and the hazard data was included on feature classes (layer shapefile format), Python 2.6 software was used as the computational platform to calculate the probabilistic state of all the Bayesian Network’s variables. This allowed to define Risk scenarios both on prognostic and diagnostic analysis and to measure the impact of changes or interventions in terms of uncertainty. The resulting Python – ESRI ArcMap computational script was called “BN+GIS, which populated maps describing the spatial variability of the states of the Environmental Sensibility and of the corresponding Risk index. The latter in particular, represents a tool for decision makers to choose the most suitable location for placing a drilling rig, since it integrates three fundamental environmental variables. Also, results show that is possible to back propagate the information from the Environmental Sensibility to define the inherent triggering scenarios (hazard variables). A case of study is presented to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology on a specific geographical setting. The Barnett Shale was chosen as a benchmark study area because sufficient information on this region was available, and the importance that it holds on the latest developments of unconventional plays in the country. The main contribution of this work relies in combining Bayesian Networks and GIS to define environmental Risk scenarios that can facilitate decision-making for O&G stakeholders such as land owners, industry operators, regulators and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), before and during the development of a given site.

Varela Gonzalez, Patricia Ysolda

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z