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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Tassajara Creek restoration project: Continued riparian habitat monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dublin Comprehensive Stream Restoration Program. Tompkins,Berkeley LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams December

Trinh, Michelle; Percelay, Julie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

THE CRESCENT BYPASS: A RIPARIAN RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE KINGS RIVER (FRESNO COUNTY)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CRESCENT BYPASS: A RIPARIAN RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE KINGS RIVER (FRESNO COUNTY)1 Jonathan A-24, 1988; Davis, California. 2 Staff Biologist and Environmental Division Chief, respectively, Kings River Conservation District, Fresno, Calif. Abstract: The Kings River Conservation District planted over 1200 plants

Standiford, Richard B.

3

Evaluation of Tree Seedling Mortality and Protective Strategies in Riparian Forest Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of stream and river restoration projects throughout the United States; these receive an average of $1 of restora- tion objectives, only 10% of stream and river restoration projects include effectivenessEvaluation of Tree Seedling Mortality and Protective Strategies in Riparian Forest Restoration

Vermont, University of

4

RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1 Nancy Reichard2 1 Presented Resources. Redwood Community Action Agency. Eureka, Calif. Abstract: Protecting riparian habitat from livestock grazing on private land is a complex task that requires paying attention to sociological

Standiford, Richard B.

5

AN ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC APPROACH FOR ANALYZING THE COSTS AND BENEm5 OF RIPARIAN REsTORATION PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

require an approach that addresses the mutualistic nature of these relation ships. The restoration and sustainability of the Verde River ecosystem is not an ecological or eco nomic problem-it is an integrated

6

The effectiveness of riparian restoration for improving instream fish habitat in four hardwood-dominated California streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of riparian and stream restoration in the Western Unitedeval- uation of stream restoration. Restoration EcologyPess. 2002. A review of stream restoration techniques and a

Opperman, Jeff J; Merenlender, A M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2010 Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Collaboration Case Study #12;Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Corrie Knapp Prepared for the Colorado Forest Restoration

8

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

Dodds, Walter

9

Evaluation of Riparian Restoration to Enhance Anadromous Fish Habitat along a Napa County Stream  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Salmonid Stream Restoration Manual. Part XI:2003. Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (Napa County rangeland stream restoration project designed to

Gaber, Christine O.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

An analysis of the nutrient removal capacity of agriculturally impacted vs. restored riparian wetlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the consequences of agriculture on streams, solute addition experiments were performed on four streams: a cranberry bog, two restored cranberry bogs, and a natural riparian ecosystem. The results of the experiment storage, the cranberry bog showed very little, and the restored streams exhibited an improvement

Vallino, Joseph J.

11

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

US Army Corps of Engineers

12

Post Project Analysis of a Restored Reach of Redwood Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benchmark  for  stream  restoration  projects  (Dunne  &  the  stream  inventory  two  restoration  projects  have  production  stream.  Two  restoration  projects  have  

Docto, Mia; Corvillon, Daniela Pena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Wasco Riparian Buffer Project, Annual Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Deschutes River Sub-basin Summary, March 2, 2001. This project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 20 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 800 acres covering an estimated 36 miles of anadromous fish streams. During this second year of implementation, 17 buffer contracts were established on 173,462 ft. of stream (25.9 miles). Acreage included in the buffers totaled 891.6 acres. Average buffer width was 112 ft. on each side of the stream. Cumulative totals through the first two project years are 26 buffers on 36.6 stream miles covering 1,283.6 acres. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs will be borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve (CRP) and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs (CREP). The lease period of each contract may vary from 10 to 15 years. During this year, the average lease period was 14.9 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $1,421,268 compared with $55,504 in BPA contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. Cumulative contract value for the first two years is $1,919,451 compared to $103,329 cost to BPA. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop conservation plans required for riparian buffer systems to help keep pace with a growing backlog of potential buffer projects. This project meets a critical need in the lower Deschutes and lower John Day River basins and complements the Riparian Buffer project approved for Fifteenmile watershed, Project No. 2001-021-00 begun in fiscal year 2001. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion and benefits the mid-Columbia ESU of steelhead.

Graves, Ron

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fifteenmile Creek Riparian Buffers Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteenmile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. During this second year of the project, 11 buffer contracts were implemented on 10.9 miles of stream. Buffer widths averaged 132 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.6 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $666,121 compared with $71,115 in Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. In addition, specific outreach efforts targeting the orchard areas of the county began to bear fruit with orchardists sign-ups as the project year ended. Progress this second year of project includes only work accomplished in the Fifteenmile subbasin. A similar but separate effort to implement buffers in the Columbia Plateau Province was initiated during the year under project number 2002-019-00. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion.

Graves, Ron

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Martin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration Owner’s Manual: FinalMartin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration in project documents,important component of stream restoration projects to assess

Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Effect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt-dominated watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restoration activities often seek to directly modify stream channel and riparian zone surface and subsurface: Cookhouse Meadow stream restoration project, 2004). Recently, bio- technical restoration techniquesEffect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt

Kotchen, Matthew J.

17

ARBORETUM RESTORATION PROJECT April 3rd, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARBORETUM RESTORATION PROJECT April 3rd, 2013 Prepared by Students of Field Methods in Hydrology .......................................................................................................25 4.2 Procedures............................................................................................................................40 5.1 Procedures

Pasternack, Gregory B.

18

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach) ACRES: 1.5 acres riparian habitat; 0.3 miles of stream channel-modified, straightened, and downcut channel; relocate the farm road and fences paralleling the stream to provide

US Army Corps of Engineers

19

A long-term post-project evaluation of an urban stream restoration project (Baxter Creek, El Cerrito, California)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1995. Evaluating stream restoration projects. Environmentalof a small, urban stream restoration project in northernhistory of urban stream restoration. Aquatic Conservation:

Purcell, Alison

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tassajara Creek restoration project: Continued riparian habitat monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to survive and were self sustaining on the available waterto survive and were self sustaining. We conclude that theproject reach and is self-sustaining. The three reaches of

Trinh, Michelle; Percelay, Julie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water QualityManagement for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration Program (SJRRP) has recognized the potential importance of real-time monitoring and management to the success of the San Joaquin River (SJR) restoration endeavor. The first step to realizing making real-time management a reality on the middle San Joaquin River between Friant Dam and the Merced River will be the installation and operation of a network of permanent telemetered gauging stations that will allow optimization of reservoir releases made specifically for fish water temperature management. Given the limited reservoir storage volume available to the SJJRP, this functionality will allow the development of an adaptive management program, similar in concept to the VAMP though with different objectives. The virtue of this approach is that as management of the middle SJR becomes more routine, additional sensors can be added to the sensor network, initially deployed, to continue to improve conditions for anadromous fish.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Lower Red River Meadow Restoration Project : Biennial Report 1996-97.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Red River has been straightened and the riparian vegetation corridor eliminated in several reaches within the watershed. The river responded by incision resulting in over-steepened banks, increased sedimentation, elevated water temperatures, depressed groundwater levels, reduced floodplain function, and degraded fish habitat. The Lower Red River Meadow Restoration Project is a multi-phase ecosystem enhancement effort that restores natural physical and biological processes and functions to stabilize the stream channel and establish high quality habitats for fish and wildlife. A natural channel restoration philosophy guides the design and on the ground activities, allowing the channel to evolve into a state of dynamic equilibrium. Two years of planning, two years of restoration in Phases I and II, and one year post-restoration monitoring are complete. By excavating new bends and reconnecting historic meanders, Phase I and II channel realignment increased channel length by 3,060 feet, decreased channel gradient by 25 percent, and increased sinuosity from 1.7 to 2.3. Cross-sectional shapes and point bars were modified to maintain deep pool habitat at low flow and to reconnect the meadow floodplain. Improved soil moisture conditions will help sustain the 31,500 native riparian plantings reestablished within these two phases. Overall, short-term restoration performance was successful. Analyses of long-term parameters document either post-restoration baseline conditions or early stages of evolution toward desired conditions. An adaptive management strategy has helped to improve restoration designs, methods, and monitoring. Lessons learned are being transferred to a variety of audiences to advance the knowledge of ecological restoration and wise management of watersheds.

LRK Communications; Wildlife Habitat Institute; Pocket Water, Inc.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water Quality Management for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report. Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR RiparianReal-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian HabitatPaper Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Restoration projects within urban systems frequently encounter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designers to the use of models to predict the discharge associated with bankfull water surface elevation calculated for a given storm event can vary considerably by the use of modeling alone. It is much moreAbstract Restoration projects within urban systems frequently encounter various complexities

Curran, Joanna C.

25

Stream quality among active and restoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream quality among active and restoring river-based cranberry bogs Project By: Holly Engel and restoration. In this project, I assessed the quality and health of the streams in these bogs in comparison of Massachusetts has purchased several flow-through bogs and has been working to restore these stream and riparian

Vallino, Joseph J.

26

Riparian Buffer Project : Annual Report for the Period April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteen mile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. In the first year of implementation, 26 buffer contracts were established on 25-26 miles of stream. This nearly doubled the annual goal. Buffer widths averaged 83 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.5 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $1,491,235 compared with $64,756 in BPA contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. More than half of the contracts this year have been done in the Hood and Fifteen mile sub-basins with additional contracts in adjacent sub-basins.

Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana Joy Merino & Christiane, such as wetland loss, influence CWPPRA project selection for funding. We found that the program was selecting cost- effective projects overall. Cost efficacy varied significantly by restoration project type, with barrier

28

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

29

Baxter Creek Gateway Park: assessment of an urban stream restoration project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Small Urban Stream Restoration Project in Northernfor: LA 227- Restoration of Rivers and Streams Instructor:restoration project was constructed with aspects of stream

Goodman, Judd; Lunde, Kevin B; Zaro, Theresa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Redwood Creek, Marin County 2010 Monitoring Study of a Salmonid Habitat Stream Restoration Project: Seven-­?Year Post-­?Project Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salmonid  Habitat  Stream  Restoration  Project:   Seven-­?227  |  Stream  and  River  Restoration   Term  Project  |  in  the  Stream  and   River   Restoration  class  

Crockett, Richard; Cundy, Fiona; Hanley, Colin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Impact of Restoration Practices on Mycorrhizal Inoculum Potential in a Semi-Arid Riparian Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and improving soil stability (Stutz et al. 2009). Mechanical disturbance of soil has been found to reduce INTRODUCTION Mycorrhizae are soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with plant roots. Mycorrhizal fungi mycorrhizal inoculum in soils (Celik et al. 2011; Li et al. 2007). To examine the impact of restoration

Hall, Sharon J.

32

New Strategies for Implementing Locally Integrated Stream Restoration Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 New Strategies for Implementing Locally Integrated Stream Restoration Projects Cheryl de Boer opportunities for improvements and alterations at different areas of the stream. Based on an existing framework acknowledgment and consequently, river restoration projects have commenced that are for a large portion in fact

Twente, Universiteit

33

Hangman Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this Annual Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration Project is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation project than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting projects. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration Project are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration Project can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this annual funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the Project's public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this Project; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this Project. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an

Coeur d'Alene Tribe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Post-Project Performance Assessment of a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lower Codornices Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lowerof a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lowerof a Multi-Phase Urban Stream Restoration Project on Lower

Docto, Mia; Hoffman, Johanna; Walls, Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the prescribed means for providing direct input to the US Department of Energy Headquarters regarding the status, accomplishments, strategy, and issues of the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. The project mission, organizational interfaces, and operational history of the Hanford Site are provided. Remediation strategies are analyzed in detail. The document includes a status of Richland Environmental Restoration project activities and accomplishments, and it presents current cost summaries, schedules, and technical baselines.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

MARSH LAKE, APPLETON, MINNESOTA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a dike to restore connectivity to an abandoned fish rearing pond adjacent to the dam. · Installing gated recreation features, including shoreline fishing access, picnic facilities, canoe access and a pedestrian

US Army Corps of Engineers

37

Post-Project Assessment of the 2003 Cerrito Creek Restoration and Recommendations for Additional Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that in the future, stream restoration projects installrecommend that future stream restoration projects considerrestoration, while in the six years since the entire stream

Adlong, Michelle; Cook, Michael; Kennedy, Matthew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Rock Weirs as Tools for Stabilization in Restoration Projects: An appraisal and comparison of two stream restoration projects in Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rosgen, D. 1992. Stream Restoration Plan for Wildcat Creek.investment in stream restoration in the U.S. exceeds $2comparison of two stream restoration projects in Northern

Ball, Dave; Maendly, Romain; Poindexter, Cristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hangman Restoration Project : Annual Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this project during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The project is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this project is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation activities are conducted in the headwaters of the system and are expected to prove beneficial to the natural functions of the entire Hangman Watershed. The following is the FY2001 annual report of Project activities and is submitted as partial fulfillment of Operation and Maintenance Task 2.a. The Objectives and Tasks for this first year were designed to position this Project for a long-term habitat restoration effort. As such, efforts were largely directed at information gathering and project orientation. The major task for this first year was development of a Habitat Prioritization Plan (attached) to guide implementation efforts by selecting areas that will be of greatest benefit to the native ecology. Completion of the first year tasks has positioned the project to move forward with implementing restoration activities using the latest information to accomplish the greatest possible results. The Project will be looking to implement on-the-ground protection and restoration efforts in the coming fiscal year using the data and information gathered in the last fiscal year. Continually refining our understanding of the natural watershed functions and fish and wildlife habitats within the Project Area will result in an increase in the efficiency of project implementation. Research and data gathering efforts will remain a strong emphasis in the coming fiscal year, as it will throughout the life of this Project.

Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

counties. The project includes reef designs to be constructed at various depths. The deep water "nearshore and limestone layers with spacers between the layers, in less than 20 feet deep water and within 950 feetPhase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas NOAA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a substantial impact to the economy. During the past several years the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement project has been collecting data pertaining to fish entraining out of the lake through Grand Coulee Dam. During 1996 and 1997 the lake was deeply drawn down to accommodate the limited available water during a drought year and for the highly unusual draw-down of Lake Roosevelt during the critical Northwest power shortage. The goal of the project is to enhance the resident rainbow trout fishery in Lake Roosevelt lost as a result of the unusual operation of Grand Coulee dam during the drought/power shortage.

LeCaire, Richard

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993, Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers (Moser et al. 2002), thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin (Moser and Close in press). Adult Pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River (Close and Jackson 2001). In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River (Close 1999). To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2002.

Close, David; Aronsuu, Kimmo; Jackson, Aaron

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Early post-restoration re-vegetation performance and critical social and institutional factors in a landowner-involved restoration project on lower Wooden Valley Creek, Napa County, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micheli. “Forum: Evaluating Stream Restoration Projects. ”adaptive management of small stream restoration projects.Current efforts in stream restoration emphasize the

Levy, Morgan; Post, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

Barton, Christopher

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

47

Project ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia River Basin ~ Response to ISRP/RME Proposal Review Comments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Synder et al. 2002). The shifting habitat mosaic is controlled by the coupled relationship between flowProject ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia. 1. The ISRP cited a need to "provide better evidence of the linkages of changes in flow regimes

48

Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project : FY 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Moses Lake Project consists of 3 phases. Phase 1 is the assessment of all currently available physical and biological information, the collection of baseline biological data, the formulation of testable hypotheses, and the development of a detailed study plan to test the hypotheses. Phase 2 is dedicated to the implementation of the study plan including data collection, hypotheses testing, and the formulation of a management plan. Phase 3 of the project is the implementation of the management plan, monitoring and evaluation of the implemented recommendations. The project intends to restore the failed recreational fishery for panfish species (black crappie, bluegill and yellow perch) in Moses Lake as off site mitigation for lost recreational fishing opportunities for anadromous species in the upper Columbia River. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1 investigations and presents the study plan directed at initiating Phase 2 of the project. Phase 1of the project culminates with the formulation of testable hypotheses directed at investigating possible limiting factors to the production of panfish in Moses Lake. The limiting factors to be investigated will include water quality, habitat quantity and quality, food limitations, competition, recruitment, predation, over harvest, environmental requirements, and the physical and chemical limitations of the system in relation to the fishes.

None given

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

50

John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity in woodlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity and conservation planning process relates to biodiversity outcomes in complex metropolitan landscapes. Chicago, restoration and management of biodiversity on 360,000 acres of open space in the greater Chicago metropolitan

Illinois at Chicago, University of

52

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hangman Restoration Project Year-End Report FY2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the main goals of FY2008 from which the Work Elements were derived. The goals and products are listed by heading and the associated work elements are referenced in the text. A list of the FY2008 Work Elements is included as Appendix A. FY2008 witnessed the completion of the hntkwipn Management Plan and the first substantive efforts to restore the important habitats encompassed by the mitigation properties in the Upper Hangman Watershed. Native grasses were planted and germination was evaluated. Also, drain tiles that greatly altered the hydrologic function of the Sheep and Hangman Creek Flood Plains were removed and/or disrupted. Preparation for future restoration efforts were also made in FY2008. Designs were produced for the realignment of Sheep Creek and the decommissioning of seven drainage ditches within hntkwipn. A prioritization plan was drafted that greatly expands the area of focus for restoring native fish population in Hangman Creek.

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Department of Natural Resources.

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

54

Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration programs at DOE facilities. An integral part of this mission involves the safe and cost-effective environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. For over 40 years the Hanford Site supported United States national defense programs, largely through the production of nuclear materials. One legacy of historical Hanford Site operations is a significant waste inventory of radioactive and/or regulated chemical materials. Releases of these materials have, in some cases, contaminated the Hanford Site environment. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for protecting human health and the environment from potential Hanford Site environmental hazards by identifying, assessing, and mitigating risks posed by contaminated sites.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

[Email response for project 35057 -Habitat Condition and Restoration Potential of Columbia River Flood Plains: A Critical, Missing Element of Fisheries Recovery Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Response: We agree that social and economic considerations should be part of our prioritization process a need for a social/economic analysis of options on flood plains being considered for restoration riparian habitat condition) but will now also include analysis of social and economic constraints

56

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post-restoration conditions at both the Kandoll and Vera study areas.

Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Central and South Florida Project, Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-related resource needs of the region, including water supply and flood protection. The recommended project. Scientists have established that a mosaic of uplands, freshwater marsh, deep water sloughs, and estuarine significantly declined in remaining natural system areas due to water management projects and practices

US Army Corps of Engineers

59

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Preplanning guidance document for groundwater restoration. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is intended to present decision makers on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project with a strategy for evaluating the need for and accomplishing groundwater restoration at those UMTRA Project sites that will require restoration as specified in Subpart B of 40 CFR 192. A synopsis of the Uranium Mill Tailings Restoration Control Act (UMTRCA) and a discussion of the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater cleanup standards in 40 CFR 192 are provided to define the regulatory basis of groundwater cleanup. Once the EPA groundwater standards are finalized, this document may be revised, depending on the changes in the final standards. A procedure for determining the need for groundwater restoration is outlined and a cost-effective strategy for selecting, designing, implementing, and evaluating appropriate restoration procedures is presented. The determination of the need for groundwater restoration is based on the EPA groundwater cleanup standards and must be compatible with and complementary to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Therefore, this document describes a programmatic approach for compliance with the NEPA process.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizon oil spill, benthic secondary productivity and salt marsh habitats along Florida's Panhandle Research Reserve Office Complex and Nature Center in Eastpoint. The area has been the location of previous,605. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Natural Resource Damage Assessment Florida: Living Shoreline Projects FOR MORE

62

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999-2000. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this project. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin.

Close, David A.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Protocols for Monitoring Habitat Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protocols for monitoring salmon habitat restoration projects are essential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental efforts in the Columbia River estuary. This manual provides state-of-the science data collection and analysis methods for landscape features, water quality, and fish species composition, among others.

Roegner, G. Curtis; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Johnson, Gary E.

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be constructed at various depths. The deep water "nearshore reefs" would have a single, prefabricated modular, in less than 20 feet deep water and within 950 feet of shore. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Natural ResourcePhase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas

65

EA-1974: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft EA: Public Comment Period Ends 01/28/15Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed restoration of a tidal marsh in the Columbia River Estuary, near Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon. The project website is https://www.bpa.gov/goto/WallooskeeYoungs.

66

LANDSCAPE PERCEPTION IN FLUVIAL ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECTS: CONTRIBUTIONS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LANDSCAPE PERCEPTION IN FLUVIAL ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECTS: CONTRIBUTIONS AND PERSPECTIVES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LANDSCAPE EUROPEAN CONVENTION Cottet Marylise*, Rivière-Honegger Anne, Piégay Hervé.cottet@univ-lyon3.fr Introduction The European Landscape Convention instituted, at the beginning of the 2000s, a new

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

The Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Project performance study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy commissioned Independent Project Analysis, Inc. (IPA) to perform this Project Performance Study to provide a quantitative analysis determining how well EM develops and executes environmental remediation and waste management projects. The approach consisted of collecting detailed data on a sample of 65 completed and ongoing EM projects conducted since 1984. These data were then compared with key project characteristics and outcomes from 233 environmental remediation projects (excluding EM) in IPA`s Environmental Remediation Database and 951 projects In IPA`s Capital Projects Database. The study establishes the standing of the EM system relative to other organizations, and suggests areas and opportunities for improvement.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Environmental Restoration Definitions  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Environmental

70

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1996 through 1999. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this project. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin. Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of Pacific lampreys from tribal members within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation was useful in gaining baseline life history information. Tribal members described harvesting two types of lampreys from spring through fall, the short brown type and the long dark type. Lamprey spawning distribution was from the mouth to the headwaters in the Umatilla River. Larval lampreys were observed in the mud and sand areas of the river. Tribal members observed major declines in lampreys within the Columbia River basin. Larval Pacific lampreys were distributed throughout the John Day River basin. Larval distribution in the other subbasins was patchy and limited to the lower reaches of the streams. Larval densities were highly variable in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, as opposed to the Main stem John Day River. Larval lengths varied little in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, but were highly variable in the Main stem John Day River. Larval abundance decreased as we moved upstream in the Columbia and Snake rivers. In addition, we found strong evidence for lack of larval recruitment as distance increased from the mouth of the Columbia River. We identified clinical indicators of stress in adult Pacific lampreys. Plasma glucose became elevated soon after acute stress and remained elevated for one week. Plasma lactate also became elevated by 30 minutes; however, it decreased to resting levels by one hour after application of the stressor. Muscle lactate was shown to have an inverse relationship with glucose. Muscle lactate levels decreased by 4 hours and remained depressed for two days. Plasma chloride ions decreased by one hour, then returned to resting levels by 8 hours, decreased again at 24 hours, and then recovered by 48 hours. The steroid cortisol was not found in the plasma of Pacific lampreys. Our study suggests plasma glucose, lactate, chloride ions, and muscle lactate can be used as clinical indicators of stress in Pacific lampreys.

Close, David A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stream restoration activities. Recommend NOOA fund. 11. Scaling-Up Native Oyster Will restore 4 acresEstuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council Ranked Proposal Recommendation May 13, 2011 Project Name Description 1. Riverside Ranch Restoration Will restore 356 acres of estuarine

US Army Corps of Engineers

74

Lessons and Experiences from a Stream Restoration Project in the Piedmont of North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report documenting stream restoration and enhancement isInc. is participating in a stream restoration study with theof North Carolina. Stream restoration in North Carolina is

Barrett, Thomas; Hajnos, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Monitoring channel change at the Sausal Creek Restoration Project, Oakland, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams Class (Professors LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams Class (Professors LA 227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams Class- Fall

Grantham, Ted; Tollefson, Kate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Recommendations for computer modeling codes to support the UMTRA groundwater restoration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the US. The surface restoration phase, which includes containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, has a specific termination date and is nearing completion. Therefore, attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase, which began in 1991. Regulated constituents in groundwater whose concentrations or activities exceed maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or background levels at one or more sites include, but are not limited to, uranium, selenium, arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, gross alpha, radium-226 and radium-228. The purpose of this report is to recommend computer codes that can be used to assist the UMTRA groundwater restoration effort. The report includes a survey of applicable codes in each of the following areas: (1) groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling codes, (2) hydrogeochemical modeling codes, (3) pump and treat optimization codes, and (4) decision support tools. Following the survey of the applicable codes, specific codes that can best meet the needs of the UMTRA groundwater restoration program in each of the four areas are recommended.

Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY TO ASSIST FEDERAL FOREST MONITORING AND RESTORATION PROJECTS IN THE SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hyperspectral imagery and the corresponding ability to conduct analysis below the pixel level have tremendous potential to aid in landcover monitoring. During large ecosystem restoration projects, being able to monitor ...

Wamser, William Kyle

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

NAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay and Tolay Creek Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of estuarine habitat comprised of deep and shallow water habitat, mudflats, salt marsh, and wetlandNAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Sears Point, the proposed project site, consists of approximately 960 acres of diked

US Army Corps of Engineers

79

The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Status Report II 2000-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report. Post restoration monitoring will continue through 2005. A final report to the Mitigation Bank Review Team will be submitted in mid-2006.

Barton, Christopher

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Rock Weirs as Tools for Stabilization in Restoration Projects: An appraisal and comparison of two stream restoration projects in Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corps of Engineers). 1995. Permit Number 19613S92. USACE Sanof Engineers Section 404 (1995) permit for the restoration

Ball, Dave; Maendly, Romain; Poindexter, Cristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Project quarterly technical report, April--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report describes the technical status of activities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Each activity is identified by an activity data sheet number, a brief title describing the activity or the technical area where the activity is located, and the name of the project leader. The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) portion of the facility operating permit requires the submission of a technical progress report on a quarterly basis. This report, submitted to fulfill the permit`s requirement, summarizes the work performed and the results of sampling and analysis in the ER Project. Suspect waste found include: Radionuclides, high explosives, metals, solvents and organics. The data provided in this report have not been validated. These data are considered ``reviewed data.``

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

Tillman, Jack B.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Summary of operations and performance of the Murdock site restoration project in 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater and surface water restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Murdock, Nebraska, during the third full year of system operation, from January 1 through December 31, 2008. Performance in June 2005 through December 2007 was reported previously (Argonne 2007, 2008). In the Murdock project, several innovative technologies are being used to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town, as well as from water naturally discharged to the surface at the headwaters of a small creek (a tributary to Pawnee Creek) north of the town (Figure 1.1). The restoration activities at Murdock are being conducted by the CCC/USDA as a non-time-critical removal action under the regulatory authority and supervision of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the restoration effort and facilities during this review period. Included in this report are the results of all sampling and monitoring activities performed in accord with the EPA-approved Monitoring Plan for this site (Argonne 2006), as well as additional investigative activities conducted during the review period. The annual performance reports for the Murdock project assemble information that will become part of the five-year review and evaluation of the remediation effort. This review will occur in 2010. This document presents overviews of the treatment facilities (Section 2) and site operations and activities (Section 3), then describes the groundwater, surface water, vegetation, and atmospheric monitoring results (Section 4) and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 5). Section 6 summarizes the current period of operation. A gallery of photographs of the Murdock project is in Appendix A.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado A Users Guide: Colorado Natural Heritage Program 254 General Services Bldg. Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado: User Guide to the Classification Project. Colorado Natural

85

Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1994--FY 2001. Environmental Restoration Program, September 1993 Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project. FY 1994--FY 2001 is the third in a series of documents that report current estimates of the waste volumes expected to be generated as a result of Environmental Restoration activities at Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), sites. Considered in the scope of this document are volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of remedial action and decontamination and decommissioning activities taking place at these sites. Sites contributing to the total estimates make up the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the off-site contaminated areas adjacent to the Oak Ridge facilities (collectively referred to as the Oak Ridge Reservation Off-Site area). Estimates are available for the entire fife of all waste generating activities. This document summarizes waste estimates forecasted for the 8-year period of FY 1994-FY 2001. Updates with varying degrees of change are expected throughout the refinement of restoration strategies currently in progress at each of the sites. Waste forecast data are relatively fluid, and this document represents remediation plans only as reported through September 1993.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Restore McComas Meadows; Meadow Creek Watershed, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed are coordinated and cost shared with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, planting trees in riparian areas within the meadow and its tributaries, prioritizing culverts for replacement to accommodate fish passage, and decommissioning roads to reduce sediment input. During this contract period work was completed on two culvert replacement projects; Doe Creek and a tributary to Meadow Creek. Additionally construction was also completed for the ditch restoration project within McComas Meadows. Monitoring for project effectiveness and trends in watershed conditions was also completed. Road decommissioning monitoring, as well as stream temperature, sediment, and discharge were completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

Connolly, Patrick J.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Phase 2 Rebaseline Report for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project W-314, (97-D-402) Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations is a multi-year, multiphase project established to upgrade selected 200 East and West Area Tank Farms to support the long-term mission of waste storage, retrieval, and transfer for vitrification. Key drivers for these upgrades include the planned timetable for transfer of waste to the privatized vitrification facility, regulatory compliance requirements (i.e., Washington State and Federal Regulations), and the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The previous baseline scope for Project W-314 was established based upon tank farm system assessments performed five to six years ago and was reflected in the previous baseline cost estimate, the Accelerated Replanning Estimate, completed in July 1997. The Accelerated Replanning Estimate splits the project into two phases: Phase 1 provides upgrades necessary to assure reliable waste retrieval and transfer to the anticipated vitrification plant. Phase 2 provides upgrades to selected primary and annulus tank farm ventilation systems that are required for compliant waste transfer, as well as other compliance-based upgrades to existing River Protection Project (WP) facilities and systems. The Accelerated Replanning Estimate provided the basis for Baseline Change Request TWR 97-066, which identified Phases 1 and 2 as $95 million and $206.5 million, respectively. Following completion of the Accelerated Replanning Estimate, several changes occurred that prompted a decision to rebaseline Phase 1, and subsequently Phase 2. Paramount among these was the delay in the Privatization schedule (90% case), lessons learned (in the year since the Accelerated Planning Report had been completed), and the adoption of an alternate waste transfer system route. The rebaselined cost of phase 1, $157 million, was substantially higher than the Accelerated Replanning Estimate for a number of reasons more thoroughly discussed in the Phase 1 Rebaseline Report, HNF-3781, January 1999. Since the July 1997 Accelerated Replanning Estimate there have also been changes to the tank farm authorization basis and Programmatic needs. For example, Tank Farm Operations has been installing new Continuous Air Monitors (CAMS) and liquid level measuring devices in order to achieve desired monitoring improvements years earlier than provided by Phase 2. In summary, the decision to rebaseline Phase 2 was prompted by: (1) the shifting of selected Phase 2 scope to Phase 1 during the Phase 1 rebaselining, (2) changes in the authorization basis, (3) programmatic needs, and (4) the dated nature of the existing scope definition. Figure 1.1 presents a summary of the key changes born the previous baseline and their collective impact on the cost of Phase 2.

LENTSCH, J.W.

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Gilliam County Riparian Buffers; 2003-2004 Annual Reports.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest appears to be at an all-time high for riparian conservation programs in Gilliam County. With the recently added Herbaceous Buffer and the already established CREP program interest is booming. However, more and more people are turning towards the herbaceous buffer because of expense. The riparian forest buffer is becoming too expensive. Even with the excellent cost share and incentives landowners are having trouble with Farm Service Agency's payment limitation. Because of this payment limitation landowners are not receiving their full rental and incentive payments, usually in year one. This has cooled the installation of riparian forest buffers and peaked interest in the CP-29 (Herbaceous Buffer for Wildlife). Either way, riparian lands are being enhanced and water quality is being improved. Year three should be very similar to the accomplishments of year 2. There has already been several projects proposed that may or may not be approved during year 3. I am currently working on three projects that are all over 2.5 miles long on each side and total anywhere from 60 to 250 acres in size. Along with these three projects there at least seven small projects being proposed. Four of those projects are riparian forest buffers and the remaining are herbaceous buffers.

Coiner, Josh (Gilliam Soil and Water Conservation District, Condon, OR)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Restoration With Reference: Rediscovering Cerrito Creek in Blake Garden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Small Urban Stream Restoration Project in Northernin combining in-stream restoration with water collection toProject LA 227 – Restoration of River and Streams University

Ludy, Jessica; Podolak, Kristen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Framework for Risk Analysis for Ecological Restoration Projects in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a framework for incorporating risk analysis into the six-step planning process for ecosystem restoration projects. This report is part of a larger research and development effort to develop procedures and guidelines for risk analysis in USACE ecosystem restoration planning. The focus is on risk analysis: identifying the range of possible outcomes from alternative ecosystem restoration actions, assessing the potential for achieving the desired outcome, characterizing the likelihood of adverse consequences, and communicating these findings to stakeholders and decision makers. This framework document makes simplifying assumptions to allow a focus on incorporating risk information in the planning and decision-making process. A conceptual model of the site and landscape is advocated as a central organizing structure within the six-step process for ecosystem restoration project planning. This is responsive to USACE directives that restoration projects be conceived in a systems context using an ecosystem and/or watershed approach. The conceptual model delineates the empirical quantities to be addressed in risk analysis and modeling. Although the planning process is described in six distinct steps, in practice these steps are iterative and often carried out simultaneously. Risk analysis within this context has the same character. The approach for incorporating risk analysis into the planning process provides direction intended to help the planner: • Identify the levels of uncertainty that are acceptable, at the start of the planning process. • Use conceptual and numerical models to communicate the planning team’s understanding of the ecosystem to others, and reduce the risk of mis-specifying the system. • Consider the uncertainty associated with the variables chosen to measure project effects. • Use alternative designs to manage identified uncertainty. • Use risk information to eliminate alternatives with unacceptable risk from consideration. • Incorporate risk analysis into the USACE four criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, completeness, and acceptability. • Use an alternative’s irreducible uncertainty as an attribute to be considered along with other attributes in the comparison of alternative plans. • Use risk information in the final plan selection process. There are three other efforts associated with this framework document, which offer information and guidance for incorporating risk analysis into cost-estimation, and biological and hydrologic modeling.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Hofseth, Keith

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forum: Evaluating Stream Restoration Projects. EnvironmentalR. Ladson. 2005. Stream restoration in urban catchmentsECONOMICS OF LID COMPARED TO IN- STREAM RESTORATION

Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

6. Implement projects to restore injured NOAA trustresources and associated services.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of coastal contamination and ensuring that the environment is protected and restored. Protecting visible, such as oiled shorelines, dead wildlife, closed fisher- ies, and lost recreation. Others- ration Program (DARRP) collaborates with other agen- cies, industry, and citizens to protect coastal

94

Tank farm restoration and safe operation, Project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from customer guidance. Included are incorporation of the recommendations from HNF-2500, agreements regarding interfaces with Project W-211, and assumption of scope previously assigned to Project W-454.

Gilbert, J.L.

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

95

100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by the plant over a 17-day exposure period. The 90Sr in the exuded honeydew during this period amounted to 1.17 ± 0.28% of this total label. The honeydew would eventually be deposited into the soil at the base of the plant, but the activity would be so dispersed as to be undetectable. Moth larvae will consume 90Sr contaminated leaves but retain very little of the label (~0.02%) and only that contained in their digestive tracts. As the moths pupated and became adults, they contained no detectable amounts of 90Sr. Over the 10-day exposure period, ~4% of the phytoextracted 90Sr was lost from the plant as moth feces. However, like the honeydew, feces dispersed into the soil were undetectable. As the plant diminishes the content of 90Sr in the soil, the activity of the label in the leaves and new stems would also diminish. The results of these studies indicate that the risk for detectable transfer of 90Sr from willow trees growing in the contaminated soil along the 100-N shoreline through the food chain of herbivorous insects would be very slight to non-existent

Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration : Annual Report, January 2008 - March 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period 2008-2009, there were 2 contracts with BPA. One (38539) was dealing with the restoration work for 2007 and the other (26198) was an extension on the 2006 contract including the NEPA for Dam removal on the old channel of the Sandy River. For contract 38539, the Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration project continued its focus on riparian hardwood reforestation with less emphasis on wetlands restoration. Emphasis was placed on Sundial Island again due to the potential removal of the dike and the loss of access in the near future. AshCreek Forest Management was able to leverage additional funding from grants to help finance the restoration effort; this required a mid year revision of work funded by BPA. The revised work not only continued the maintenance of restored hardwood forests, but was aimed to commence the restoration of the Columbia River Banks, an area all along the Columbia River. This would be the final restoration for Sundial Island. The grant funding would help achieve this. Thus by 2011, all major work will have been completed on Sundial Island and the need for access with vehicles would no longer be required. The restored forests continued to show excellent growth and development towards true riparian gallery forests. Final inter-planting was commenced, and will continue through 2010 before the area is considered fully restored. No new wetland work was completed. The wetlands were filled by pumping in early summer to augment the water levels but due to better rainfall, no new fuel was required to augment existing. Monitoring results continued to show very good growth of the trees and the restoration at large was performing beyond expectations. Weed problems continue to be the most difficult issue. The $100,000 from BPA planned for forest restoration in 2008, was augmented by $25,000 from USFS, $120,000 from OR150 grant, $18,000 from LCREP, and the COE continued to add $250,000 for their portion. Summary of the use of these funds are displayed in Table 1 (page 5). Work on the restoration of the original Sandy River channel (dam removal, contract 26198) continued slowly. The draft EA was completed and sent out for review. The COE has decided to finish the NEPA with the intent to complete the project.

Dobson, Robin [USDA Forest Service, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

18 years of restoration on Codornices Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding for river and stream restoration  projects because 227 Rivers and Streams Restoration  Chris Fullmer  Abstract of river and  stream restoration projects.   Codornices 

Fullmer, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Configuration Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Configuration Management Plan for Project W-314 describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementation of applicable configuration management practices described in HNF-0842, Volume 111, Section 3.1, ''Configuration Management Implementation''. This plan is tailored specifically for use by Project W-314.

MCGREW, D.L.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Risk Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Risk Management Plan for Project W-314 describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementation of applicable risk management practices described in HNF-0842, Volume IV, Section 2.6, ''Risk Management''. This plan is tailored specifically for use by Project W-314.

MCGREW, D.L.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

100

Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are proposing six recreational use projects in Bay County. As a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill Access along Florida's Gulf Coast: City of Mexico Beach Marina project would remove and replace eighteen surface and increasing the width at the existing Mexico Beach Canal Park boat ramp in the City of Mexico

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Restoration of areas disturbed by site studies for a mined commercial radioactive waste repository: The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was undertaken to environmentally characterize a portion of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State as a potential host for the nation's first mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Studies were terminated by Congress in 1987. Between 1976 and 1987, 72 areas located across the Hanford Site were disturbed by the BWIP. These areas include borehole pads, a large Exploratory Shaft Facility, and the Near Surface Test Facility. Most boreholes were cleared of vegetation, leveled, and stabilized with a thick layer of compacted pit-run gravel and sand. The Near Surface Test Facility consists of three mined adits, a rock-spoils bench, and numerous support facilities. Restoration began in 1988 with the objective of returning sites to pre-existing conditions using native species. The Hanford Site retains some of the last remnants of the shrub-steppe ecosystem in Washington. The primary constraints to restoring native vegetation at Hanford are low precipitation and the presence of cheatgrass, an extremely capable alien competitor. 5 figs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Biehert, R.W.; Newell, R.L.; Page, T.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Ecological Restoration for Community Benefit: People and Landscapes in Northern California, 1840-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Stream Restoration. ” Restoration Ecology 3,Robertson. “Privatizing stream restoration in the US. ”Moran, Sharon. “Stream Restoration Projects: A Critical

Diekmann, Lucy Ontario

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Restoring Vision through “Project Prakash”: The Opportunities for Merging Science and Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

“So how does this help society?” is a question we are often asked as scientists. The lack of immediate and tangible results cannot be held against a scientific project but statements of future promise in broad and inchoate ...

Sinha, Pawan

104

NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) is accepting applications for up to $2.1 million to develop community capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial assistance to diverse local partnership for wetland, riparian, forest and coastal habitat restoration, urban wildlife conservation, stormwater management as well as outreach, education and stewardship.

105

A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER ­ RIO, and restoration efforts. Cochiti Dam was constructed on the main stem of the Rio Grande in 1973 for flood control minnow. Recent restoration strategies include removal of non-native riparian vegetation, mechanical

Julien, Pierre Y.

106

Post-restoration evaluation of two urban streams in Austin, Texas, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the threat of stream erosion to real estate and infrastructure, the City of Austin began restoring unstable channel reaches through the placement of rock armor on the banks, construction of rock grade controls, and planting of riparian vegetation. Since...

Meier, Megan Driskill

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Codornices Creek Corridor: Land Use Regulation, Creek Restoration, and their Impacts on the Residents’ Perceptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two East Bay Urban Stream Restoration Projects: Codornicesfunding for river and stream restoration projects, becausepreservation, and restoration of urban streams and their

Stokenberga, Aiga; Sen, Arijit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Environmental assessment of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of the Lockheed Martin Company. SNL/NM is located on land controlled by DOE within the boundaries of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The major responsibilities of SNL/NM are the support of national security and energy projects. This report provides an environmental assessment of proposed remedial action activities at the solid waste management units at SNL/NM. A risk assessment of health hazards is also discussed.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Norfolk Southern boxcar blocking/bracing plan for the mixed waste disposal initiative project. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs will dispose of mixed waste no longer deemed useful. This project is one of the initial activities used to help meet this goal. The project will transport the {approximately}46,000 drums of existing stabilized mixed waste located at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and presently stored in the K-31 and K-33 buildings to an off-site commercially licensed and permitted mixed waste disposal facility. Shipping and disposal of all {approximately}46,000 pond waste drums ({approximately}1,000,000 ft{sup 3} or 55,000 tons) is scheduled to occur over a period of {approximately}5--10 years. The first shipment of stabilized pond waste should transpire some time during the second quarter of FY 1994. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., proposes to line each of the Norfolk Southem boxcars with a prefabricated, white, 15-mm low-density polyethylene (LDPE) liner material. To avoid damaging the bottom of the polyethylene floor liner, a minimum .5 in. plywood will be nailed to the boxcars` nailable metal floor. At the end of the Mixed Waste Disposal Initiative (MWDI) Project workers at the Envirocare facility will dismantle and dispose of all the polyethylene liner and plywood materials. Envirocare of Utah, Inc., located in Clive, Utah, will perform a health physic survey and chemically and radiologically decontaminate, if necessary, each of the rail boxcars prior to them being released back to Energy Systems. Energy Systems will also perform a health physic survey and chemically and radiologically decontaminate, if necessary, each of the rail boxcars prior to them being released back to Norfolk Southem Railroad.

Seigler, R.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration A paperSurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands, University oftools in the context of treatment wetlands, and if designed

Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Waste generation forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1995-FY 2002, September 1994 revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive waste-forecasting task was initiated in FY 1991 to provide a consistent, documented estimate of the volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) Environmental Restoration (ER) OR-1 Project activities. Continual changes in the scope and schedules for remedial action (RA) and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities have required that an integrated data base system be developed that can be easily revised to keep pace with changes and provide appropriate tabular and graphical output. The output can then be analyzed and used to drive planning assumptions for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The results of this forecasting effort and a description of the data base developed to support it are provided herein. The initial waste-generation forecast results were compiled in November 1991. Since the initial forecast report, the forecast data have been revised annually. This report reflects revisions as of September 1994.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2006-November 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the third year of system operation, from December 1, 2006, until November 30, 2007. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation and provides some comparisons with system performance in previous years. The performance of the groundwater restoration systems at Utica in earlier years was summarized in greater detail previously (Argonne 2005, 2006).

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Restoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the first-ever comprehensive database of more than 37,000 stream and restoration projects nationwideRestoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila Maryland has the largest number of river restoration projects restoration and conservation. On a sweltering July afternoon, an assortment of men and women clad in T

Palmer, Margaret A.

114

Issues related to uncertainty in projections of hazardous and mixed waste volumes in the U.S. Department of Energy`s environmental restoration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projected volumes of contaminated media and debris at US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental restoration sites that are potentially subject to the hazardous waste provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act are needed to support programmatic planning. Such projections have been gathered in various surveys conducted under DOE`s environmental restoration and waste management programs. It is expected that reducing uncertainty in the projections through review of existing site data and process knowledge and through further site characterization will result in substantially lowered projections. If promulgated, the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Hazardous Waste Identification Rule would result in potentially even greater reductions in the projections when site conditions are reviewed under the provisions of the new rule. Reducing uncertainty in projections under current and future waste identification rules may be necessary to support effective remediation planning. Further characterization efforts that may be conducted should be designed to limit uncertainty in identifying volumes of wastes to the extent needed to support alternative selection and to minimize costs of remediation.

Picel, K.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Environmental Restoration Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -DepartmentNovember 1, 2010December 1,

116

Summary of first-year operations and performance of the Utica Aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands Restoration Project in October 2004-November 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the initial period of system operation, from October 29, 2004, until November 31, 2005. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the first year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

117

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2005-November 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the second year of system operation, from December 1, 2005, until November 31, 2006. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

118

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2007-November 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fourth year of system operation, from December 1, 2007, until November 30, 2008. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3). The report then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated maintenance, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2008-November 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fifth year of system operation, from December 1, 2008, until November 30, 2009. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecological indicators of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. non-native species, such as house

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Restoration Potential of a Mining-Impacted Urban Stream: Horseshoe Branch of Lion Creek, Oakland, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the bay. The urban stream restoration movement that arose inecological value. Few stream restoration projects in the Bayon- campus lake and stream restoration activities. An active

Hackenjos, Bethany; Woelfle-Erskine, Cleo; Wood, Jacob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2005 included: (1) Four new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 7.55 miles of stream with 9.1 miles of new riparian fence (2) Fence removal 1.7 miles of barbed wire. (3) Completed three spring developments (repair work on two BLM springs on Cottonwood Creek (Dayville), 1 solar on Rock Creek/ Collins property). (4) Dredge tail leveling completed on 0.9 miles of the Middle Fork of the John Day River (5) Cut, hauled and placed 30 junipers on Indian Creek/Kuhl property for bank stability. (6) Collected and planted 1500 willow cuttings on Mountain Creek/Jones property. (7) Conducted steelhead redd counts on Lake Cr./Hoover property and Cottonwood Cr./Mascall properties (8) Seeded 200 lbs of native grass seed on projects where the sites were disturbed by fence construction activities. (9) Maintenance of all active project fences (72.74 miles), watergaps (60), spring developments (30) were checked and repairs performed. (10) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Program in 1984 we have installed 156.06 miles of riparian fence on leased property protecting 88.34 miles of anadromous fish bearing stream. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects from 1996-2001, where the landowner received the materials, built and maintained the project we have a total of 230.92 miles of fence protecting 144.7 miles of stream and 3285 acres of riparian habitat.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Delano, Kenneth H. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Site Restoration Technology Program Office; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

EA-2006: Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing a programmatic EA for actions recommended by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. Activities under this program could include full reconnection of tidal influence through breaching dikes and levees; partial reconnection of tidal influence through culverts, bridges, and tidegates; enhancement of the quantity and quality of tidal channels; removal of invasive species; and restoration of riparian habitat conditions, such as planting native vegetation.

127

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife] [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

RIPARIAN COMMUNITIES OF THE SIERRA NEVADA AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites from Fresno County north to Plumas County to analyze effects of existing hydropower projects on riparian communities. They also conducted an intensive field study in the upper Kings River basin, Fresno County. Taylor and Davilla (1985,1986) conducted intensive studies in Madera and Fresno Counties

Standiford, Richard B.

133

Oregon's Restoration Economy Restoring watersheds is a starting point for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 20 25 30 Restoration: Labor-intensive Restoration: Average Transportation Infrastructure Energy activity in communities around Oregon, today and into the future. "As the restoration economy blossoms in natural assets for the benefit of communities and salmon Oxbow Mine Tailings Restoration Project, Middle

134

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Validation procedures used in the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is (1) to document the data validation process developed for the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP); (2) to offer members of other project teams and potential data users the benefit of the experience gained in the BSCP in the area of developing project-specific data validation criteria and procedures based on best available guidance and technical information; and (3) to provide input and guidance to the efforts under way within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to develop standard operating procedures to streamline and optimize the analytical laboratory data validation process for general use by making it more technically rigorous, consistent, and cost effective. Lessons learned from the BSCP are also provided to meet this end (Sect. 1.3).

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

Palmer, Margaret A.

138

3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is difficult to design effective stream and channel restoration measures, or evaluate project performance expansion of efforts in and expenditures for stream restoration. Increasingly, resto- ration efforts focus39 3. Hydrogeomorphic Variability and River Restoration D. R. MONTGOMERY1 AND S. M. BOLTON2

Montgomery, David R.

139

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 415: Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR), Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 415, Project 57 No. 1 Plutonium Dispersion (NTTR). CAU 415 is located on Range 4808A of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) and consists of one corrective action site: NAFR-23-02, Pu Contaminated Soil. The CAU 415 site consists of the atmospheric release of radiological contaminants to surface soil from the Project 57 safety experiment conducted in 1957. The safety experiment released plutonium (Pu), uranium (U), and americium (Am) to the surface soil over an area of approximately 1.9 square miles. This area is currently fenced and posted as a radiological contamination area. Vehicles and debris contaminated by the experiment were subsequently buried in a disposal trench within the surface-contaminated, fenced area and are assumed to have released radiological contamination to subsurface soils. Potential source materials in the form of pole-mounted electrical transformers were also identified at the site and will be removed as part of closure activities.

Matthews, Patrick; Burmeister, Mark

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Robertson, Shawn W.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Piloting A Monitoring Program For CCC LWD Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Micheli. "Evaluating Stream Restoration Projects."In Salmonid Stream Habitat Restoration Manual, Volume 1, byCalifornia." In Salmon Stream Habitat Restoration Manual, by

Atherton, Shanna; Zhu, Bingyao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Multifunctional Riverscapes: Stream restoration, Capability Brown's water features, and artificial whitewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.of a small, urban stream restoration project in northern

Podolak, Kristen Nichole

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Multifunctional Riverscapes: Stream restoration, Capability Brown’s water features, and artificial whitewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.and challenges for stream restoration in the United States.of a small, urban stream restoration project in northern

Podolak, Kristen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

FORMATION OF THE ARIZONA RIPARIAN COUNCIL: AN EXAMPLE OF LASTING PUBLIC INTEREST IN RIPARIAN RESOURCES1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Center for Environmental Studies, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.; present address second author. These conferences result in a short term exchange of ideas and a proceed- ings that is useful to those working, or degradation of those riparian areas would increase. It is estimated that only 10 to 15 percent of the lower

Standiford, Richard B.

148

Stream Temperature Response to Three Riparian Vegetation Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Stream temperature response to three distinct riparian conditions were then modeled: open, in vegetation loss can increase other processes that play a role in heat exchange between the atmosphere local near-stream air mass transfer (18). Recent research on the effects of riparian vegetation

Selker, John

149

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado 80523 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife, Wetlands Program 6060 Broadway Denver, Colorado 80203

150

Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient of cranberry farming on streams. These restoration projects vary in their intensity from low restoration streams with varying degrees of restoration intensity to determine if increased restoration intensity more

Vallino, Joseph J.

151

Two Decades of River Restoration in California: What Can We Learn?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoration Science Synthe- sis (NRRSS), we developed a summary database of 4,023 stream restoration projectsTwo Decades of River Restoration in California: What Can We Learn? G. M. Kondolf,1 S. Anderson,2 for design, monitoring, and reporting restoration projects, and that although moni- toring is far more

Merenlender, Adina

152

Restoration Tax Abatement (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Restoration Tax Abatement (RTA) Program provides five-year property tax abatement for the expansion, restoration, improvement, and development of existing commercial structures and owner-occupied...

153

ERB and Northern European FRIEND Project 5 Conference, Demnovsk dolina, Slovakia, 2002 Evaluation of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a distributed hydrology model to support restoration efforts in small watersheds with limited data: from to assist in decision making. Distributed hydrologic modeling in geographic information systems (GIS) has scale, or they require excessive calibration, or they are not based on the dominant hydrologic processes

Walter, M.Todd

154

Energy Analysis of the Texas Capitol Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the methodology and results of a detailed energy analysis of the Texas Capitol Restoration. The purpose of this analysis was two-fold: 1) to determine the projected energy cost savings of a series of design alternatives...

Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.; Reddy, S. N.

155

From Elevated Freeway to Linear Park: Land Price Impacts of Seoul, Korea's CGC Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this $313 million stream-restoration project, calling it “ademolition and stream restoration was US$313 million. Figurewas demolished and the stream restoration/linear park

Kang, Chang Deok; Cervero, Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

157

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Requirements Verification Report AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System for Project W-314 Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Requirements Verification Report (RVR) for Project W-314 ''AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System'' package provides documented verification of design compliance to all the applicable Project Development Specification (PDS) requirements. Additional PDS requirements verification will be performed during the project's procurement, construction, and testing phases, and the RVR will be updated to reflect this information as appropriate.

MCGREW, D.L.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

160

Ecohydrologic Effects of Stream Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. E. Wise. 2003. Stream Restoration: A Natural ChannelDesign Handbook. NC Stream Restoration Institute, NC Statethe Hydrological Effects of Stream Restoration in a Montane

Mount, Jeffrey F; Hammersmark, Christopher T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

most stream restoration projects, lack pre-restoration data and clearly defined goals, making et al., 2005; Bernhardt et al., 2005). Biotic recovery in response to stream restoration can be rapidPRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration in Fossil Creek

LeRoy, Carri J.

162

River restoration, habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity: a failure of theory or practice?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heterogeneity (HH) promotes restoration of biodiversity. This paradigm is reflected in stream restoration in streams that were not in need of restoration. 3. We found habitat and macroinvertebrate data for 78 independent stream or river restoration projects described by 18 different author groups in which invertebrate

Palmer, Margaret A.

163

Risk-based Prioritization of Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects in the National Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program at the Chalk River Laboratory - 13564  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chalk River Laboratory (CRL), located in Ontario Canada, has a large number of remediation projects currently in the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), including hundreds of facility decommissioning projects and over one hundred environmental remediation projects, all to be executed over the next 70 years. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) utilized WorleyParsons to prioritize the NLLP projects at the CRL through a risk-based prioritization and ranking process, using the WorleyParsons Sequencing Unit Prioritization and Estimating Risk Model (SUPERmodel). The prioritization project made use of the SUPERmodel which has been previously used for other large-scale site prioritization and sequencing of facilities at nuclear laboratories in the United States. The process included development and vetting of risk parameter matrices as well as confirmation/validation of project risks. Detailed sensitivity studies were also conducted to understand the impacts that risk parameter weighting and scoring had on prioritization. The repeatable prioritization process yielded an objective, risk-based and technically defendable process for prioritization that gained concurrence from all stakeholders, including Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) who is responsible for the oversight of the NLLP. (authors)

Nelson, Jerel G.; Kruzic, Michael [WorleyParsons, Mississauga, ON, L4W 4H2 (United States)] [WorleyParsons, Mississauga, ON, L4W 4H2 (United States); Castillo, Carlos [WorleyParsons, Las Vegas, NV 89128 (United States)] [WorleyParsons, Las Vegas, NV 89128 (United States); Pavey, Todd [WorleyParsons, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)] [WorleyParsons, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Alexan, Tamer [WorleyParsons, Burnaby, BC, V5C 6S7 (United States)] [WorleyParsons, Burnaby, BC, V5C 6S7 (United States); Bainbridge, Ian [Atomic Energy Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division) [Environmental Science Division

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

Stream Restoration Databases and Case Studies: A Guide to Information Resources and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream Restoration Databases and Case Studies: A Guide to Information Resources and Their Utility, and case studies of stream and river restoration projects. These resources include a wide range, web-based databases of stream restoration projects. In this process, more data sources were discovered

Allan, David

166

Assessing the Feasibility of Creek Daylighting in San Francisco, Part I: A Synthesis of Lessons Learned from Existing Urban Daylighting Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evaluation of an urban stream restoration project (Baxtercan be equated with stream restoration is debatable. Someprofound form of stream restoration, recreating a surface

Smith, Brooke Ray

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

NONE

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Soils in the Riparian Incorporating Soil Dynamics into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposits or upland slope wash · Soil particle size reflect the energy (velocity) of depositionalSoils in the Riparian Complex Incorporating Soil Dynamics into Ecological Site Descriptions Kenneth F. Scheffe, SSS August 16, 2007 #12;Water Changes Everything · Water is the trump card over soils

169

The Protection of Riparian Areas: New Approaches for New Times?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the nation. There is no lack of water here, unless you try to establish a city where no city should be. (1The Protection of Riparian Areas: New Approaches for New Times? Denise D. Fort "Water, water, water....There is no shortage of water in the desert but exactly the right amount, a perfect ratio

170

Position Paper: A Riparian Policy for Changing Times1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as a public land managing agency, is responding to this growing public awareness of the riparian ecosystems the begin ning, Forest Service management has evolved to meet changing needs, concerns, and values, and new, if needed; stay in tune with public sentiment on managing these lands; and make sure we were moving

171

Position Paper: Protection and Management of Riparian Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for all their life requirements, but many more are dependent on the riparian system for some critical element of their life cycle such as 344 #12;food, cover, or breeding habitat. Numerous other species changes and water resource development activities are jeopardizing these valuable environments. Current

172

Update on the aquifer/wetlands restoration project at Utica, Nebraska, with recommendations for remapping of the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992-1993, Argonne National Laboratory investigated potential carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be linked to the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at Utica, Nebraska. These initial studies identified carbon tetrachloride in a plume of contaminated groundwater, extending approximately 3,500 ft southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, within a shallow upper aquifer that had been used previously as a municipal water source by the town (Figure 1.1). A deeper aquifer used as the current municipal water source was found to be free of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Although the shallow aquifer was no longer being used as a source of drinking water at Utica, additional studies indicated that the carbon tetrachloride could pose an unacceptable health threat to potential future residents who might install private wells along the expected downgradient migration pathway of the plume. On the basis of these findings, corrective action was recommended to decrease the carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the upper aquifer to acceptable levels (Argonne 1993a,b, 1995). Initial discussions with the Utica village board indicated that any restoration strategies involving nonbeneficial discharge of treated groundwater in the immediate vicinity of Utica would be unacceptable to the town. To address this concern, the CCC/USDA and Argonne, in cooperation with multiple federal and state regulatory and environmental agencies (Table 1.1) proposed a treatment strategy for the Utica groundwater employing groundwater extraction coupled with the seasonal use of agricultural spray irrigation equipment to simultaneously (1) remove carbon tetrachloride from the groundwater (by volatilization to the atmosphere) and (2) discharge the treated groundwater to enhance the development of wetlands in the North Lake Basin Wildlife Management Area, just north of the town (Argonne 2000). To develop this treatment approach, additional groundwater sampling was conducted to update the distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater identified in the preliminary studies in 1992-1993. In March 1998, detailed mapping of the carbon tetrachloride plume was performed by using the Argonne cone penetrometer (CPT) vehicle to collect groundwater samples for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 13 locations (PS01-PS09, PS12, PS16, PS17, PS19; Figure 1.2). The samples were collected in vertical profiles through the aquifer, at 10-ft intervals. The results of this 1998 study (Table 1.2) demonstrated that the three-dimensional distribution of carbon tetrachloride in the aquifer is complex, with multiple 'hot spots' occurring in the plume at various depths and distances along its length (Argonne 2000). In October 2002, the CCC/USDA requested that Argonne perform targeted groundwater sampling at Utica to document the migration of the carbon tetrachloride plume since the 1998 sampling event. In February 2003, vertical-profile groundwater sampling for VOCs analyses was conducted at 8 selected locations (PS01, PS04-PS07, PS12, PS19, PS20; Figure 1.2 and Table 1.3). The lateral and vertical configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume, as identified in the 2003 study (Argonne 2003), is illustrated in Figures 1.3-1.7. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing four extraction wells (GWEX 1-GWEX 4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented at Utica, with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies identified in Table 1.1. The principal components of the Utica system (shown in Figure 1.8) are described briefly in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

Norris, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, David C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zemlick, Catherine M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

NAME: Eelgrass Restoration in Puget Sound LOCATION: Puget Sound, WA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area within deltas NON-FEDERAL SPONSOR: Washington Department of Natural Resources PROJECT DESCRIPTION eelgrass restoration, with a focus on identifying sites that could be protected from future anthropogenic, eelgrass restoration in Puget Sound will raise pH levels and protect shellfish. STATUS: Planning and Design

US Army Corps of Engineers

175

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Constraint and Restoring Force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-lived sensor network applications must be able to self-repair and adapt to changing demands. We introduce a new approach for doing so: Constraint and Restoring Force. CRF is a physics-inspired framework for computing ...

Beal, Jacob

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - aesthetic all-ceramic restorations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exponential of river restoration projects throughout the last decade Source: Gelt, Joe - Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, The University of Arizona...

178

The Fun Never Stops--Ten Years of Environmental Restoration Success at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the many contributors to the success of the Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories between 1992 and 2002.

Nimick, F. B.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Predictive Modeling of Transient Storage and Nutrient Uptake: Implications for Stream Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictive Modeling of Transient Storage and Nutrient Uptake: Implications for Stream Restoration of reactive transport modeling for stream restoration purposes: the accuracy of the nutrient spiraling geomorphology and hydraulics influence nu- trient uptake is vital for stream restoration projects that modify

180

QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

Kirby, Carl S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EA-0941: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Assessment EA-0941: Final Environmental Assessment Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the...

182

Environmental Restoration Projects FY10 Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollution Prevention Safety Performance Looking forward: FY11 Goals and Objectives 2 #12;3 FY Planning Plan (Dec) #12;7 ERP Environmental Aspects Radioactive, Hazardous, Mixed & Regulated Industrial Waste or Radioactive Materials Historical/Cultural Resources #12;ERP Work Hazards: OSHA's "Top Ten" Construction Safety

Homes, Christopher C.

183

Kootenai River Habitat Restoration Project 200200200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.98 maf 600 MW Capacity (5 units) Max powerhouse discharge 25 kcfs Ave annual discharge 11.3 kcfs 238 MWa

184

Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1%AU62 & 1993 Paul

185

Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1%AU62 & 1993 PaulCounty,

186

area northeastern arizona: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arizona's Riparian Areas Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: management, riparian ecology, riparian restoration, soils and soil ecology. Recent and...

187

Survey of Critical Biological Resources of Garfield County, Volume II: Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources 1313 plant communities, including wetland and riparian areas. Volume II focuses exclusively on wetland

188

Cooperative management of riparian forest habitats to maintain biological quality and ecosystem integrity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a rare plant survey of state trust land, an inventory and assessment of riparian areas on the trust land of activi- ties including oil and natural gas development, livestock grazing, mining, rights of way, an inventory and assess- ment of riparian areas on the trust land, and the development of a biological

189

The Upper Santa Cruz River: A Case Study for Shifting Riparian Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Upper Santa Cruz River: A Case Study for Shifting Riparian Conditions Amy McCoy Ph.D. Candidate initially proposed to conduct water quality and tree pathology tests directly on the riparian floodplain. As a result, I was unable to take water quality and tree pathology samples from the affected areas and I

Fay, Noah

190

Riparian Zone Land Use in indigenous and Colonist Communities of the Palcazu Basin, Peruvian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the 2003 meeting of the Latin American Studies Association, Dallas, Texas, March 27-29, 2003" #12;Page 2 caused disappearance of many of them in North America and Europe. The extent of degradation of riparian, riparian zones are used principally for traditional agriculture because of the renewable fertility of soils

McClain, Michael

191

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Colorado Natural Heritage Program-8002 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Prepared for: Colorado. We thank the Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife Wetlands Program and Alex

192

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams B.J. D'Arcy*, N. Mc these flows into riparian treatment wetlands for treatment before drainage back into the watercourse at the site is undersized (4950 m2 ) compared to the required wetland area (11,800 m2 ), but accommodating

Heal, Kate

193

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Colorado Natural Heritage Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Colorado Natural Heritage Program 2005 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Prepared for: Colorado photograph: Riverine wetlands dominated by Mountain Willow along Fish Creek, SJNF. Photo taken by Sarah

194

Great Lakes RESTORATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Microcystis, the most common blue-green algae in the Great Lakes, produces the toxin Microcystin. This toxin runoff) into lake watersheds contributes to these blooms. While Lake Erie's Western Basin is best knownGreat Lakes RESTORATION NATIONALOCEAN IC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM E

195

USDA PROGRAMS WETLAND RESTORATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRAM CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM (CSP) COST SHARE PROGRAM WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM Pre-conversion native plant restoration 70% reforestation 30% open/shallow water/otherwise different native plant communities 5% food plots #12;11/2/2011 5 LANDOWNER RESERVED RIGHTS QUIET ENJOYMENT

Gray, Matthew

196

Restoring Native Grasslands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brian Hays, Matthew Wagner, Fred Smeins and R. Neal Wilkins* Native Restoring Grasslands 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Figure 1. Much of the native grassland in Texas has been converted to improved pas- tures (left) or cropland (right...

Hays, K. Brian; Wagner, Matthew; Smeins, Fred; Wilkins, Neal

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dams and barriers, construct fish passage, clean up marine debris, restore coastal wetlands, and remove including design and engineering of habitat restoration projects, on-the-ground restoration work, project. Acquiring damaged habitat is the first step in establishing a pipeline of GLRI-supported restoration

200

A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Watershed,? he said. ?The storm drain markers and road signs are part of the partnership?s ongoing efforts to restore and protect the watershed.? A recently finished project, Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado... projects directed toward carrying out the WPP and restoring the arroyo. In addition to the implementation project, other projects monitor agricul- tural runoff to evaluate effects of implementing best management practices; educate farmers...

Wythe, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Watershed Restoration through Culture-Based Education and Community Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

branched off and traveled to Thames, Canada. Other Oneidas stayed in the homelands. The map in Figure 2 shows the route the Oneidas took. Today there are three Oneida reservations: Oneida, New York; Oneida, Thames in Ontario, Canada; and Oneida... Club. RESTORATION PROJECTS The Duck Creek Fish Passage project involves the removal of two dams on Duck Creek and enhancement of the fish passage barrier at a third dam. This project will enhance the ability of lake fish in Green Bay to access...

Stevens, Margaret Rose

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Restoring the Trinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1,983 miles of major tributaries drain an area of more than 11.5 million acres. Rapid development and changes in land use, however, strain its reservoirs? capacities and threaten its water quality, according to those involved in restoring the river...?s Web site is http://trinityriverbasin. tamu.edu/. ?TRIMS is the first step then we will begin the planning process,? Wilkins said. ?Long-term, we want to provide a means for local stakeholders to make sustainable and measurable contributions...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Potential for N pollution swapping from riparian buffer strips and an instream wetland   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffuse agricultural pollution is a major contributor to poor water quality in many parts of the world. Consequently agri-environment policy promotes the use of riparian buffer strips and/or denitrifying wetlands to ...

Boukelia, Willena Esther

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

O. Olgiati, GRET 2005 Peatland RestorationPeatland Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peat Industry and the Peatland Ecology Research Group (PERG). Researchers from many universities to evaluate restoration success ·How peatland restoration has influenced the way Canadian Peat industry in Canadapeatland management in Canada Capacity to accumulate peat through timeCapacity to accumulate peat through

Laval, Université

207

Restoration Ecology Stable states vs. classic succession  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Wetland restoration goals #12;Wetland restoration goals Restoration of stream meanders ­ majorRestoration Ecology #12;Stable states vs. classic succession #12;Stable states vs. classic succession Beisner et al., 2003 #12;Restoration can be difficult if an ecosystem has moved to a new state

Schweik, Charles M.

208

Successful restoration of plant communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of restoration failure if seed source is incorrect #12;Unexpected results... Penstemon deustus (hot rock miles NEVADA UTAH IDAHOOREGON #12;Plant-focused restoration efforts Disturbed Site Cheatgrass (49%) Rock/Bare Ground (50%) Shrub (0.8%) Native Grass (0.7%) Cattle Dung (0.2%) Undisturbed Site Cheatgrass (0.7%) Rock

Fant, Jeremie

209

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water Quality Management for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 watt regulated solar panel CR10X MSX20R Campbell24 hours a day. A 20 W solar panel has been shown to beavoided the cost of a solar panel and expensive telemetry.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Comprehensive Study of Image Restoration Algorithms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Abstract Comprehensive Study of Image Restoration Algorithms By Lize Zong Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Image restoration is an important part of digital image-processing.… (more)

Zong, Lize

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

EA-1932: Bass Lake Native Fish Restoration, Eureka, Lincoln County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA was initiated to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to help restore native fish populations to the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa. The project has been cancelled.

212

Monitoring and mapping selected riparian habitat along the lower Snake River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies in this document were initiated to establish baseline information on riparian and wetland habitat conditions at the areas studied under the current reservoir operations on the lower Snake River. Two approaches were used to assess habitat at 28 study sites selected on the four pools on the lower Snake River. These areas all contribute significant riparian habitat along the river, and several of these areas are designated habitat management units. At 14 of the 28 sites, we monitored riparian habitat on three dates during the growing season to quantify vegetation abundance and composition along three transects: soil nutrients, moisture, and pH and water level and pH. A second approach involved identifying any differences in the extent and amount of riparian/wetland habitat currently found at the study areas from that previously documented. We used both ground and boat surveys to map and classify the changes in vegetative cover along the shoreline at the 14 monitoring sites and at 14 additional sites along the lower Snake selected to represent various riparian/wetland habitat conditions. Results of these mapping efforts are compared with maps of cover types previously generated using aerial photography taken in 1987.

Downs, J. L; Tiller, B. L [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Witter, M. [Shannon and Wilson, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States). Geotechnical and Environmental Consultants, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mazaika, R. [Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 545549 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects 545 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 545549 (2004) © EGU Riparian forestry management and adult stream insects Robert A. Briers and John H The impacts of coniferous plantation forestry on the biology of upland streams in the UK are firmly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Key words: dam decommissioning, exotic fish removal, invasive species, native fish, stream restoration on stream restoration in the United States in the last decade, yet fewer than 10% of projects monitorR E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species Removal on Recovery

Marks, Jane

216

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

Pace, Michael L.

217

Landscape level planning in alluvial riparian floodplain ecosystems: Using geomorphic modeling to avoid conflicts between human infrastructure and habitat conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group,USDA, http://www.usda.gov/stream restoration. Ward, J.V. ,USDA, 2001. Stream Corridor Restoration: Principles, Process

Larsen, Eric W; Girvetz, E H; Fremier, A K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Benefits of On-Site Management of Environmental Restoration Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) began assessing options under which to conduct the remediation of environmental restoration sites, it became clear that the standard routes for permanent disposal of waste contaminated with hazardous materials would be difficult. Publicly, local citizens' groups resisted the idea of large volumes of hazardous waste being transported through their communities. Regulations for the off-site disposal are complicated due to the nature of the environmental restoration waste, which included elevated tritium levels. Waste generated from environmental restoration at SNL/NM included debris and soils contaminated with a variety of constituents. Operationally, disposal of environmental restoration waste was difficult because of the everchanging types of waste generated during site remediation. As an alternative to standard hazardous waste disposal, SNL/NM proposed and received regulatory approval to construct a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU). By containing the remediation wastes on-site, SNL/NM's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program managed to eliminate transportation concerns from the public, worked with regulatory agencies to develop a safe, permanent disposal, and modified the waste disposal procedures to accommodate operational changes. SNL/NM accomplished the task and saved approximately $200 million over the life of the CAMU project, as compared to off-site disposal options.

Irwin, Michael J. ,P.E.; Wood, Craig, R.E.M.; Kwiecinski, Daniel, P.E.; Alanis, Saul

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Restoring Resiliency: Case Studies from Pacific Northwest Estuarine Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of many ecological restoration projects is to establish an ecosystem with fully developed structure and function that exhibits resistance to and resilience from disturbances. Coastal restoration projects in the Pacific Northwest provide opportunities to understand what is required to restore the resilience of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) populations. Factors influencing resilience observed in three case studies of eelgrass restoration include minimum viable population, adaptations of transplant populations, and natural and anthropogenic disturbances at restoration sites. The evaluation of resiliency depends on selecting appropriate monitoring metrics and the frequency and duration of monitoring. Eelgrass area, cover and shoot density provide useful and reliable metrics for quantifying resilience of restored meadows. Further, five years of monitoring of these metrics provides data that can reasonably predict the long-term viability of a planted plot. Eelgrass appears to be a resilient ecosystem in general, though one that data suggest may exhibit tipping points brought about by compounded environmental conditions outside of its tolerance ranges. Explicit inclusion of resilience in the planning and practice of habitat restoration may reduce uncertainties and improve the performance of restored systems by increasing buffering capacity, nurturing sources of renewal (e.g., seeds and rhizomes), and managing for habitat forming and maintaining processes (e.g., sediment dynamics) at multiple scales.

Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

action project weldon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a number of potentially contaminated areas, including seven unlined lagoons where 3 Action Learning Project Company Application Environmental Management and Restoration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation, nutrient enrichment, and climate change editors: N. Bonada & V. H. Resh / Streams in Mediterranean climate regions: lessons learned from the last

Stella, John C.

222

Climate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along a Mediterranean Basin river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Populus nigra (Salicaceae) In-channel gravel mining Climate change Dynamic fluvial processes strongly controls on soil depth. Climate in the Drôme basin and in the Mediterranean region is trendingClimate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along

Stella, John C.

223

Field Guide to the Wetland and Riparian Plant Associations of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;2 Field Guide to the Wetland and Riparian Plant Associations of Colorado Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources Colorado State University 254 General Services Building 8002. Colorado Natural Areas Program file photo. 2. Slope (1) - iron fen at Chattanooga, San Juan Co. Colorado

224

Botany/Riparian Ecology Jobs Position Title: Biological Technician (Plants) or Biological Technician (General)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field work is done in Idaho, Montana, Eastern Oregon, Eastern Washington, and Northern Nevada will be used to determine the condition of riparian areas. You will learn a variety of sampling techniques to change): Basic housing is provided at a fee of $3/day, automatically subtracted from per diem. You

Lintilhac, Philip M.

225

Oakland -- Strengthening a Neighborhood Through Stream Restoration [Roots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Neighborhood Through Stream Restoration Walter Hoodproject in Oakland uses stream restoration as a tool fore slope restoration uses plant materials to,stabilize stream

Hood, Walter

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

Watson, J.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NAME: Elkhorn Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration: Building Resilience with the Beneficial Reuse of Sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sediment LOCATION: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Monterey County, California ACRES will add sediment to subsided historic marshes in Elkhorn Slough. The marsh will be restored through the placement of sediment from a levee capacity maintenance project along the Pajaro River. The proposed project

US Army Corps of Engineers

228

Ecohydrological Controls and Effects of Rhizome Integration on the Performance of Arundo donax in a Rio Grande Riparian Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study focused on an invasive riparian reed grass, Arundo donax L., a clonal plant of the family Poaceae that is widely distributed in North America. Water availability, including water taken up from the roots locally or transported from...

Kui, Li

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Restoring Regulation: An Assessment of the Regulatory Process for Restoration Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the problem of species extinction, they did not grant thecritically rare species from extinction. 25 Governmentdeclining species and to protect them from extinction as a

Fiala, Shannon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Reuse Wastewater Seepage Management Surface Water Storage Reservoir Removing Barriers to SheetflowThe Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative Frank J. Mazzotti University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center

Mazzotti, Frank

234

EA-1995: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is preparing, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve estuary habitat in Trestle Bay. BPA’s proposed action is to partially fund the proposal.

235

Post Project Analysis of a Restored Reach of Redwood Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is soils developed in unconsolidated parent material withformation  with  unconsolidated  parent   materials  and  

Docto, Mia; Corvillon, Daniela Pena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project Draft Environmental Assessment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark ForkB O N

237

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Amchitka Mud Pit Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores" _ ,' ,:.' :r-2 .

238

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Natfonal Nuclenr Security Adminlstratlon  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores" _ ,' ,:.' :r-2 .Natfonal

239

EA-1974: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop County,  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirant PotomacFinal1935: FinalDraftDraftBOregonPinal

240

EA-1995: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirant PotomacFinal1935:Department ofEA-1988:Plant,| Department of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project I National Nuclear Security Administration  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149 Revision: - Date: 06/15/10 ABENGOANRELu547 New

242

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contains established stands of the nonnative, invasive, emergent plant (Phragmites australis). Two sites. australis would not be successful due to tidal restriction and reestablishing the full tidal range the homogeneous P. australis stands. #12;Submerged Aquatic Vegetation. Twelve sites have been selected in Broad

US Army Corps of Engineers

243

Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images. Ph.D. Thesis Peter Alshede Philipsen LYNGBY 1998 IMM with reconstruction and restoration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images carried out at the Section of Digital contains a short introduction to PET imaging. The second part, chapters 2 to 4, describe the PET scanner

Mosegaard, Klaus

244

Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Castro JM, editors. Stream restoration in dynamic fluvialas part of the stream meander corridor restoration. Naturalwith stream meander corridor restoration and restored flow

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Year One Results of a Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Hydrologic Regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that restored drill cuttings, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, can be safely used in coastal as well as inland wetland restoration projects. Prior to conducting laboratory experiments, composite soil samples of the recycled sediments were analyzed for pH and heavy metal concentrations.

Shaffer, Gary P.; Hester Mark W.; Greene, Michael C.; Childers Gary W.

2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Habitat restoration and sediment transport in rivers Streams and rivers or any bodies of flowing water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Habitat restoration and sediment transport in rivers Streams and rivers or any bodies of flowing water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and deposition, streams and rivers transport and transform important. Current Projects: Fish habitat restoration in rivers: In the past rivers' dynamic nature has been

Barthelat, Francois

248

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cost of the project to labor only. The efficacy of the examples will be assessed through their useProject Year 2012-2013 Project Title Sight-Reading at the Piano Project Team Ken Johansen, Peabody) Faculty Statement The goal of this project is to create a bank of practice exercises that student pianists

Gray, Jeffrey J.

249

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design goals for this project include low cost (less than $30 per paddle) and robustness. The projectProject Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Allison Okamura, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School Project Title Haptic Display of Dynamic Systems Audience 30 to 40 students per year, enrolled

Gray, Jeffrey J.

250

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

251

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern Appalachia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern or degraded but little is known about the success of stream mitigation. This article presents a synthesis of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from

Palmer, Margaret A.

252

Dynamics of wood recruitment in streams of the northeastern US Dana R. Warren a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Large woody debris LWD Riparian forest Wood recruitment Wood dynamics Stream restoration Debris dam restoration efforts often incorporate large wood. In most cases, however, stream restoration projectsDynamics of wood recruitment in streams of the northeastern US Dana R. Warren a, *, Clifford E

Kraft, Clifford E.

253

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Louise Pasternack, Chemistry Department, Krieger School, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project Title Introductory Chemistry Lab Demonstrations Audience an interactive virtual lab manual that will facilitate understanding of the procedures and techniques required

Gray, Jeffrey J.

254

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Maragaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act enacts the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, which is a joint state and federal effort to provide for the conservation of the Everglades region. The plan regulates land and water...

257

Hurricane Response and Restoration | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system. ISER plans, trains, and coordinates year round with all relevant stakeholders so that it can meet our...

258

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2013-2014 Project Title German Online Placement Exam Project Team Deborah Mifflin to increased cost. As well, it lacked listening comprehension, writing and speaking components providing support, we will use Blackboard for this project. The creation will require numerous steps

Gray, Jeffrey J.

259

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that incorporate video taped procedures for student preview. Solution This project will create videos for more to study the procedure and techniques before coming to class. Our previous fellowship project addressedProject Year 2009 Project Title Enhancing Biology Laboratory Preparation through Video

Gray, Jeffrey J.

260

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there is no resource available to view the procedure before class. Solution The purpose of this project is to capture available to view the procedure before class. The purpose #12;of this project is to capture variousProject Year 2007 Project Team Kristina Obom, Faculty, Advanced Academic Programs, Krieger School

Gray, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

US - Former Soviet Union environmental restoration and waste management activities, March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy Agreement was signed between DOE and the Ministry of Atomic Energy for the Russian Federation and provides a mechanism for cooperation in research, development, and safe utilization of nuclear energy. Under the umbrella of this agreement, DOE and the former Ministry of Atomic Power and Industry signed a Memorandum of Cooperation in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management in September 1990. This document discusses the environmental situation, science and technology process, technical projects (separations, contaminant transport, waste treatment, environmental restoration), scientist exchanges, enhanced data transfer, the US-Russia industry partnership (conference, centers), and future actions.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

Lamberti, Gary A.

263

ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assess how ecohydraulic models can predict actual biological responses to stream restoration. As other9 th ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST PREDICTIVE ECOHYDRAULIC MODELS physical restoration, it is still difficult to assess the ecological effects of restoration operations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Project W-314 ax-b valve pit upgrade acceptance for beneficial use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program/Project Title: Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation, Phase I Component/System: SN-630 Transfer Line (AZ-02A to AN-B) September 15, 1997.

Warnick, T.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Annual Report, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this project for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Corps). The purpose of the project is to develop a geospatial, web-accessible database (called “Oncor”) for action effectiveness and related data from monitoring and research efforts for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The intent is for the Oncor database to enable synthesis and evaluation, the results of which can then be applied in subsequent CEERP decision-making. This is the first annual report in what is expected to be a 3- to 4-year project, which commenced on February 14, 2012.

Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Serkowski, John A.

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Gregory Hager, Computer Science, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Alan Chen, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title Robotics is complicated, time-consuming, and costly, making a robot for an introductory-level class is not practical

Gray, Jeffrey J.

267

Project Proposal Project Logistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Proposal · Project Logistics: ­ 2-3 person teams ­ Significant implementation, worth 55 and anticipated cost of copying to/from host memory. IV. Intellectual Challenges - Generally, what makes this computation worthy of a project? - Point to any difficulties you anticipate at present in achieving high

Hall, Mary W.

268

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operators, matrix indexing, vector computations, loops, functions, and plotting graphs, among others basic arithmetic operators, matrix indexing, and vector computations in MATLAB. After creatingProject Year 2011-2012 Project Title Online Tutorial for MATLAB Project Team Eileen Haase, Whiting

Gray, Jeffrey J.

269

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2005 Project Team Krysia Hudson, Faculty, School of Nursing, Undergraduate Instruction for Educational Resources Project Title Enhanced Web-based Learning Environments for Beginning Nursing Students (e.g., demonstrations of procedures or tasks) into the WBL systems, it will be possible to increase

Gray, Jeffrey J.

270

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Michael McCloskey, Cognitive Science/Neuroscience, Krieger of Arts & Sciences Project Title Cognitive Neuropsychology Audience The initial audience to access. The current procedure calls for individual students or researchers to contact the faculty member

Gray, Jeffrey J.

271

Climate change and wetland processes in the Southwest United States: Response of riparian communities to rising CO{sub 2} levels. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current impact of Salt Cedar on the riparian areas of the southwestern US are recognized as being negative. If atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} continue to rise--as seems likely--the results of this study indicate that the Salt Cedar--Cottonwood competitive interaction maybe moved further in the direction of favoring Salt Cedar. Further study confirming these results and elucidating the basis for competitive resource use by Salt Cedar and other riparian species would be prudent.

Anne M. Hoylman; Andrew Peterson; John V.H. Constable; John B. Picone; J. Timothy Ball

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Casillas, Carlos G. (San Jose, CA)

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Ecological Dose Modeling of Aquatic and Riparian Receptors to Strontium-90 with an Emphasis on Radiosensitive Organs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-NR-2 site is the location of elevated releases of strontium-90 to the Columbia River via contaminated groundwater. The resulting dose to aquatic and riparian receptors was evaluated in 2005 (DOE 2009) and compared to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose guidance values. We have conducted additional dose assessments for a broader spectrum of aquatic and riparian organisms using RESRAD Biota and specific exposure scenarios. Because strontium-90 accumulates in bone, we have also modeled the dose to the anterior kidney, a blood-forming and immune system organ that lies close to the spinal column of fish. The resulting dose is primarily attributable to the yttrium-90 progeny of strontium-90 and very little of the dose is associated with the beta emission from strontium-90. All dose modeling results were calculated with an assumption of secular equilibrium between strontium-90 and yttrum-90.

Poston, Ted M.; Traub, Richard J.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method of restoring degraded solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

Staebler, D.L.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Method of restoring degraded solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

"Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid Workshop" Save the Date April 3 and 4 at mohlsen@bnl.gov "The Resilient Smart Grid" to be held at Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, Long Island://www.bnl.gov/maps/. This is the 5th workshop that BNL is hosting on the Smart Grid. This Workshop will build on the previous

Ohta, Shigemi

280

Stream restoration case studies in North Carolina utilizing natural channel design techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA. Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (STREAM RESTORATION CASE STUDIES IN NORTH CAROLINA UTILIZINGand streambanks. Stream restoration options for incised

Harman, William A.; Jennings, Gregory D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of Urban Stream Restoration. Aquatic Conservation:accepted within the stream restoration community. This isBranch). LA227 Restoration of Rivers and Streams. University

Behrends, Nathaniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft EA: Public Comment Period Ends 03/05/2015Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to restore portions of the Kootenai River near the town of Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed project involves installing structures on the river banks, excavating areas in the river to create deeper pools, and developing and enhancing islands that would be planted with native vegetation.

283

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

Gray, Jeffrey J.

284

The effects of riparian alterations on stream food webs Kevin M. Kingsland, Beloit College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alterations made to rivers in order to create cranberry bogs change the plant species composition were collected and the habitat was assessed for an active cranberry bog, a restored cranberry bog cranberry bogs is worth the cost and effort. INTRODUCTION Human alterations of ecosystems alter the physical

Vallino, Joseph J.

285

Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly Secretary Bodman Signs Order to Help Restore Electricity to East Texas More Quickly September 28, 2005 - 10:58am...

286

Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

287

Assessing channel reconfiguration as river restoration bioassessment and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing channel reconfiguration as river restoration ­ bioassessment and disturbance Desiree love - restoration "various techniques used to replicate the hydrological, morphological, and ecological features that have been lost in a stream due to urbanization, farming, or other disturbance

Tullos, Desiree

288

Testing a passive revegetation approach for restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Restoration of coastal plain depressions, a biologically significant and threatened wetland type of the southeastern United States, has received little systematic research. Within the context of an experimental project designed to evaluate several restoration approaches, we tested whether successful revegetation can be achieved by passive methods (recruitment from seed banks or seed dispersal) that allow for wetland ‘‘self-design’’ in response to hydrologic recovery. For 16 forested depressions that historically had been drained and altered, drainage ditches were plugged to reestablish natural ponding regimes, and the successional forest was harvested to open the sites and promote establishment of emergent wetland vegetation. We sampled seed bank and vegetation composition 1 year before restoration and monitored vegetation response for 3 years after. Following forest removal and ditch plugging, the restored wetlands quickly developed a dense cover of herbaceous plant species, of which roughly half were wetland species. Seed banks were a major source of wetland species for early revegetation. However, hydrologic recovery was slowed by a prolonged drought, which allowed nonwetland plant species to establish from seed banks and dispersal or to regrow after site harvest. Some nonwetland species were later suppressed by ponded conditions in the third year, but resprouting woody plants persisted and could alter the future trajectory of revegetation. Some characteristic wetland species were largely absent in the restored sites, indicating that passive methods may not fully replicate the composition of reference systems. Passive revegetation was partially successful, but regional droughts present inherent challenges to restoring depressional wetlands whose hydrologic regimes are strongly controlled by rainfall variability.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Singer, Julian H.; Barton, Christopher D.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project DOE/NV-368 Project Chariot S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores" _ ,' ,:.' :r-2 .

291

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

Caulfield, R.

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Project W-314 sn-630 transfer line az-02a to an-b acceptance for beneficial use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program/Project Title: Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation, Phase I Component/System: SN-630 Transfer Line (AZ-02A to AN-B) September 15, 1997.

Warnick, T.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

Project W-314 sn-634 transfer line a-b to ax-b acceptance for beneficial use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program/Project Title: Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation, Phase I Component/System: SN-630 Transfer Line (AZ-02A to AN-B) September 15, 1997.

Warnick, T.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

Project Accounts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions...

296

How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! ! ! ! How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities Andrew Miano1 Mentor to their natural function. This is known as stream restoration. Unfortunately, ecological concepts can be left out during stream restoration JK$>*!*1!$9:!'LLMN. This is in part due to the fact that ecologists still do

Vallino, Joseph J.

297

Do in-stream restoration structures enhance salmonid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do in-stream restoration structures enhance salmonid abundance? A meta-analysis. Whiteway et al. (2010) Presentation by: Shannon Clarke Rob Johnstone #12;Does Stream Restoration Work? Yes. Now we can go home. #12;Outline · What is a stream? · Why is stream restoration important? · Looking at Whiteway

Hinch, Scott G.

298

Restoration of Soldier Spring: an isolated habitat for native  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the channel and restore aquatic habitat along 450 m of degraded stream. Following treatment, the bed refilled in the stream declined as the degradation worsened, but it rebounded following the restoration treatments. While the stream. New restoration efforts began in 1998 with support from a number of tribal, federal, and school

299

APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED ISSUES Effects of stream restoration and wastewater treatment plant effluent on fish.S.A. Three site types were examined on each stream; two urban (restored and unrestored) and a forested site was not significant. 3. Restored stream sites had significantly higher fish richness and a trend towards greater

Hershey, Anne

300

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for their assistance in arranging the web-based reviews. #12;3 Stream Restoration from stream restoration. Since most restoration is at the reach scale1 Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring

Palmer, Margaret A.

302

Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

Watson, J.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

How can we improve information delivery to support conservation and restoration decisions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis (2005) Stream restoration databases and caseGoodwin P (2007) Stream restoration in the Paci?c Northwest:

Seavy, Nathaniel E.; Howell, Christine A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Application of the Diminishing Returns Concept in the Hydroecologic Restoration of Riverscapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Principles for optimizing the number and placement of ecological restoration actions on rivers and coasts would be useful in project engineering design and program planning. This study demonstrated that the yield of inundated floodplain habitat area from dike breaching conforms to a diminishing returns model. The aggregate effects of establishing hydrologic connections between a tidally influenced main stem river and the floodplain were experimentally examined using a hydrodynamic model. Restoration clusters of size 1, 4, 8, and more, replicated and randomized within the landscape, yielded average wetted floodplain area conforming with an exponential rise to maximum curve2(0.99)r=. Analysis of the average incremental change in floodplain inundation produced per breach showed that opening 25 % of the channels crossing the dike provided the maximum return on investment as measured by wetted area. Midstream breaches yielded 60 % and upstream breaches 2 % of the wetted area produced by downstream breaches. Dike-breach restoration programs therefore can be optimized by strategic determination of the spatial configuration and number of demolitions, though biological factors such as the accessibility of floodplain habitat and total length of channels connected also need to be considered. These findings have implications for cost-benefit analyses in restoration program planning.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, John R.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Coleman, Andre M.

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

305

Russian: United States Environmental Restoration Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Russian - United States Environmental Restoration Workshop, held in Washington, D.C., and Richland, Washington, from April 5 through 18, 1993, was the first extended collaborative information exchange between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Russian scientists at the site level. In addition to the Russian scientists, workshop participants included scientists and staff from DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the US Environmental Training Institute (USETI), universities, and the private sector. The first week (April 5 through 10) of the workshop took place in Washington, D.C., where the Russian and US participants were presented with a US perspective on environmental restoration and remediation issues from representatives in DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second week (April 11 through 18) occurred in Richland, Washington, where the participants were presented with site-specific environmental restoration and remediation issues related to Hanford Site cleanup. This report is a compilation of the presentations, discussions, and experiences shared during the second week of the workshop in Richland, Washington.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Strategic planning for power system restorations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper considers the power system restoration planning problem (PSRPP) for disaster recovery, a fundamental problem faced by all populated areas. PSRPPs are complex stochastic optimization problems that combine resource allocation, warehouse location, and vehicle routing considerations. Furthermore, electrical power systems are complex systems whose behavior can only be determined by physics simulations. Moreover, these problems must be solved under tight runtime constraints to be practical in real-world disaster situations. This work is three fold: (1) it formalizes the specification of PSRPPs; (2) introduces a simple optimization-simulation hybridization necessary for solving PSRPPs; and (3) presents a complete restoration algorithm that utilizes the strengths of mixed integer programming, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search. This paper studied a novel problem in the field of humanitarian logistics, the Power System Restoration Problem (PSRPP). The PSRPP models the strategic planning process for post disaster power system recovery. The paper proposed a multi-stage stochastic hybrid optimization algorithm that yields high quality solutions to real-world benchmarks provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The algorithm uses a variety of technologies, including MIP, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search, to exploit the structure of each individual optimization subproblem. The experimental results on hurricane disaster benchmarks indicate that the algorithm is practical from a computational standpoint and produce significant improvements over existing relief delivery procedures.

Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Hententyck, Pascal [BROWN UNIV.; Coffrin, Carleton [BROWN UNIV.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Salt River (Rio Salado Oeste), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cottonwood/willow, mesquite, and wetland cover types restored throught the project area. Two old gravel pit lakes would also be restored to wetland and riparian complexes. The plan also includes control) of reclaimed effluent from the 23rd Avenue Waste Water Treatment Plant, and by harvesting of storm water

US Army Corps of Engineers

308

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998.

Donley, Christopher; Lockwoood, Jr., Neil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Guidelines, processes and tools for coastal ecosystem restoration, with examples from the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a systematic approach to coastal restoration projects in five phases: planning, implementation, performance assessment, adaptive management, and dissemination of results. Twenty features of the iterative planning process are synthesized. The planning process starts with a vision, a description of the ecosystem and landscape, and goals. A conceptual model and planning objectives are developed, a site is selected using prioritization techniques, and numerical models contribute to preliminary designs as needed. Performance criteria and reference sites are selected and the monitoring program is designed. The monitoring program is emphasized as a tool to assess project performance and identify problems affecting progression toward project goals, in an adaptive management framework. Key approaches to aspects of the monitoring program are reviewed and detailed with project examples. Within the planning process, cost analysis involves budgeting, scheduling, and financing. Finally, documentation is peer reviewed prior to making construction plans and final costing.

Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Adkins, Jeffery E.; Judd, Chaeli; Anderson, Michael G.; Buenau, Kate E.; Borde, Amy B.; Johnson, Gary E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £500,000 Funding Source: Capital Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: October 2010 End Date : April 2011 Occupation Date: n/a For further information contact Project Manager as listed above or the Imperial College

311

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: This project refurbished half of the 5th and 7th floors on the Faculty of Medicine, please visit: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £3,500,000 Funding Source: SRIF III Construction Project Programme: Start

312

UMTRA Project-Level Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program (CR/PIP) is to contribute to the UMTRA Project`s environmental restoration mission by providing the means to achieve and recognize continuous improvements and cost savings. This manual includes program definition, description of UMTRA project organizational responsibilities and interfaces with existing project functions, guidance to contractors, and definition of project-level functions.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Project Management Project Managment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Inspired by agile methods #12;Background · Large-scale software development & IT projects, plagued relations #12;One Agile Approach to Scheduling · The creative nature of game development resist heavy up Problems ­incompatible platforms, 3rd party etc. #12;Is Games Development Similar? · Yes & No

Stephenson, Ben

314

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Engineer's Guide to the Structures of Baltimore Audience Students from the Krieger School of Arts City, interfaced through a course website, the team will integrate descriptions of structural behavior format. Technologies Used HTML/Web Design, MySQL Project Abstract Structural analysis is typically taught

Gray, Jeffrey J.

315

Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ``Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,`` the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Variational Iteration Method for Image Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The famous Perona-Malik (P-M) equation which was at first introduced for image restoration has been solved via various numerical methods. In this paper we will solve it for the first time via applying a new numerical method called the Variational Iteration Method (VIM) and the correspondent approximated solutions will be obtained for the P-M equation with regards to relevant error analysis. Through implementation of our algorithm we will access some effective results which are deserved to be considered as worthy as the other solutions issued by the other methods.

Yahya, Keyvan; Azari, Hossein; Fard, Pouyan Rafiei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public's concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: A state of the art facility, at Hammersmith information visit the Faculty of Medicine web pages http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £60 000 000 Funding Source: SRIF II (Imperial College), GSK, MRC

319

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The refurbishment of the instrumentation equipment. This project encompasses refurbishment work on over 1,150m2 of laboratory space across four, the completed project will allow researchers to expand their work in satellite instrumentation, the fabrication

320

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: In the first phase of the Union Building re.union.ic.ac.uk/marketing/building Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1,400,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan and Imperial College Union reserves Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: August 2006 End Date: March

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Environmental Restoration Program Document Control Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Document Control Plan has been developed to comply with the document control system requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), the Hanford Federal Facility and the ER Program. One of the five components, or summary subprojects, of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program is program management and support, which includes both management systems development and information and data management. Efforts within the management systems development area include the creation of a document control plan. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and established an overall document control system that governs the methods by which all WHC documents are generated, maintained, and disposed of. The ER Program performing organizations within WHC utilize the established WHC document control systems to the maximum extent possible. These systems are discussed in Chapters 3.0 and 4.0 of this plan. In addition, this plan describes the documents that require control within the ER Program and how they will be controlled.

Montgomery, L.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Secondary succession, community assembly and restoration in grasslands and savannas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A final report made to the US Forest Service that addresses savannah restoration research findings from research conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

Foster, Bryan, L.; Aschenbach, Todd

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume I of III Reports A thru E, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the ongoing efforts to document life history strategies of steelhead in the Wind River watershed and to formulate criteria for ranking restoration needs and proposed projects.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Project Controls  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Salmon Subbasin Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 4-1--SALMON SUBBASIN PROJECT INVENTORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salmon Subbasin Assessment May 2004 1 APPENDIX 4-1--SALMON SUBBASIN PROJECT INVENTORY The purpose of the project inventory is to provide a generalized picture of the types of fish and wildlife restoration team participants through the project inventory website or through direct submission. Additional

329

Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public`s concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Adaptive Restoration of Airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To incorporate the georegistration and restoration processes into airborne data processing in support of U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear emergency response task, we developed an adaptive restoration filter for airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM thermal data based on the Wiener filtering theory. Preliminary assessment shows that this filter enhances the detectability of small weak thermal anomalies in AADS1268 thermal images.

D. Yuan; E. Doak; P. Guss; A. Will

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking Steven H. Collins1 walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy

Collins, Steven H.

332

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Slatton, Clint

333

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Watson, Craig A.

334

Semi-Blind Image Restoration via Mumford-Shah Regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-Blind Image Restoration via Mumford-Shah Regularization L. Bar N. Sochen N. Kiryati School. The proposed variational method integrates semi-blind image deconvolution (paramet- ric blur is in the unified treatment of the semi-blind restoration and segmentation problems, the important special case

Sochen, Nir

335

Constrained sinogram restoration for limited-angle Jerry L. Prince  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for further re- search. Subject terms: image reconstruction; computed tomography; regularization; limitedConstrained sinogram restoration for limited-angle tomography Jerry L. Prince The Johns Hopkins-437 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Limited-angle tomography 3. Sinogram restoration

Willsky, Alan S.

336

Assess Plan Restore DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NRDA TRUSTEES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workers. Millions of gallons of oil spill into the Gulf of Mexico. BP agrees to provide $1 billionAssess Plan Restore DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NRDA TRUSTEES Early Restoration, Phase III A guide DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT TRUSTEES OCTOBER 2014 2 On April 20, 2011

337

Innovative Approach for Urban Stream Restoration Undergraduate Thesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovative Approach for Urban Stream Restoration Undergraduate Thesis CHBE 494 Kosta Sainis Thesis of British Columbia campus. This will restore the fish-bearing stream, which once flowed through campus Engineering #12;i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The novelty of this study is the design of a stream which is able

338

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The works cover the refurbishment of floors 4, 5, with `wet' labs for molecular biology, materials characterisation, cell culture and flow studies, and `dry operating theatre. The Bionanotechnology Centre is one of the projects funded from the UK Government's £20

339

Hardwood re-sprout control in hydrologically restored Carolina Bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are isolated depression wetlands located in the upper coastal plain region of the eastern Unites States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches as a result of agricultural conversion. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna species. Previous bay restoration projects have identified woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. Three bays were hydrologically restored on the Savannah River Site, SC, by plugging drainage ditches. Residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays were harvested and the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change was monitored. A foliar herbicide approved for use in wetlands (Habitat® (Isopropylamine salt of Imazapyr)) was applied on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acer rubrum L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.) sprouting. The effectiveness of the foliar herbicide was tested across a hydrologic gradient in an effort to better understand the relationship between depth and duration of flooding, the intensity of hardwood re-sprout pressure, and the need for hardwood management practices such as herbicide application.

Moser, Lee, Justin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Carneros Creek: Assessing restoration implications for a sinuous stream using 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional simulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. et al. A Review of Stream Restoration Techniques and aa restoration strategy for this stream. Furthermore,velocity stream (Facey and Grossman, 1992), restoration

Beagle, Julie; Marzion, Rachael; Matella, Mary

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

EIS-0506: Crooked River Valley Rehabilitation Project, Idaho County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Forest Service, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve fish habitat by restoring stream and floodplain functions, restoring instream fish habitat complexity, and improving water quality along approximately 2 miles of the Crooked River. BPA’s proposed action is to fund the project. Additional information is available at http://www.fs.fed.us/nepa/fs-usda-pop.php/?project=40648.

344

Abstract--Restoration strategies that initiate autogenic succession--byusingrather than by combating naturalprocesses--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pro- cesses essential in the establishment and maintenance of ecological systems. Landscape Dynamics be restored to restoration sites. Landscape dynamics can be directed toward restoration objectives improvement, and nutrient cycling problems; and (4) arrange landscape compo- nents to reduce detrimental

345

Circle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project asks students to decide if a collection of points in space do or do not lie on a ... The project is accessible to linear algebra students who have studied ...

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids restore chloride Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Channel Restoration on Water Velocity, Transient Storage, and Nutrient Uptake... of stream restoration, but little is known of the interplay between hydrogeomorphic features...

347

Canasawacta Creek Project: Chenango County, New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (natural habitat, stream restoration, land use and communityby the Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group,

O’Reilly, Mary; MacEwan, David; Greco, Brandon; Nelson, Debra; Long, George; Rowen, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Automated distribution scheme speeds service restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes an automated distribution scheme that met Lakeland Electric requirements for an automated scheme that would restore power to a major customer in less than 60 seconds. In January 1993, Lakeland Electric and Water (LEW) took on the design and construction of a new 12.47-kV automated distribution system for the Publix Supermarket Industrial complex. The industrial complex in Lakeland, Florida, totals 2 million square feet and houses a dairy processing plant, bakery, produce plant, deli plant, data processing facility for Publix`s entire retail network, purchasing department, as well as several maintenance facilities. The retail chain is LEW`s largest customer with a peak demand of 15.5 MW and a load factor of 81%. Publix`s rapid expansion plan has placed a great deal of pressure on this facility to perform at peak level with no interruptions of product flow. The task at hand was to provide Publix with a state-of-the-art, automated, distribution system built to withstand the inherent weather-related situations in central Florida, lightning and hurricanes.

Atwell, E. [Lakeland Electric and Water, FL (United States)] [Lakeland Electric and Water, FL (United States); Gamvrelis, T. [Harris Canada, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Control Div.] [Harris Canada, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Control Div.; Kearns, D. [S and C Electric Co., Chicago, IL (United States)] [S and C Electric Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Landman, R. [H and L Instruments, North Hampton, NH (United States)] [H and L Instruments, North Hampton, NH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Dictionary construction in sparse methods for image restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sparsity-based methods have achieved very good performance in a wide variety of image restoration problems, including denoising, inpainting, super-resolution, and source separation. These methods are based on the assumption that the image to be reconstructed may be represented as a superposition of a few known components, and the appropriate linear combination of components is estimated by solving an optimization such as Basis Pursuit De-Noising (BPDN). Considering that the K-SVD constructs a dictionary which has been optimised for mean performance over a training set, it is not too surprising that better performance can be achieved by selecting a custom dictionary for each individual block to be reconstructed. The nearest neighbor dictionary construction can be understood geometrically as a method for estimating the local projection into the manifold of image blocks, whereas the K-SVD dictionary makes more sense within a source-coding framework (it is presented as a generalization of the k-means algorithm for constructing a VQ codebook), is therefore, it could be argued, less appropriate in principle, for reconstruction problems. One can, of course, motivate the use of the K-SVD in reconstruction application on practical grounds, avoiding the computational expense of constructing a different dictionary for each block to be denoised. Since the performance of the nearest neighbor dictionary decreases when the dictionary becomes sufficiently large, this method is also superior to the approach of utilizing the entire training set as a dictionary (and this can also be understood within the image block manifold model). In practical terms, the tradeoff is between the computational cost of a nearest neighbor search (which can be achieved very efficiently), or of increased cost at the sparse optimization.

Wohlberg, Brendt [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Testing, expanding and implementing pollution prevention tools for environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pollution Prevention (P2) programs and projects within the DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Programs have been independently developed and implemented at various sites. As a result, unique, innovative solutions used at one site may not be known to other sites, and other sites may continue to duplicate efforts to develop and implement similar solutions. Several DOE Program offices have funded the development of tools to assist ER/D and D P2 projects. To realize the full value of these tools, they need to be evaluated and publicized to field sites. To address these needs and concerns, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL/NM), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) have teamed to pilot test DOE training and tracking tools; transfer common P2 analyses between sites, and evaluate and expand P2 tools and methodologies. The project is supported by FY 98 DOE Pollution Prevention Complex-Wide Project Funds. This paper presents the preliminary results for each of the following project modules: Training, Waste Tracking Pilot, Information Exchange, Evaluate P2 Tools for ER/D and D, Field Test of P2 Tools; and DOE Information Exchange.

Roybal, J.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McInroy, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Watson, J. [GTS Duratek, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mizner, J. [ICF Kaiser, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Biomarkers and predictors of restorative therapy effects after stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hours after acute ischemic stroke. N Engl J Med. 2008; 359(the human brain after stroke. II. Restorative therapies.recovery from ischemic stroke. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2010;

Burke, Erin; Cramer, Steven C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AC03- 76SF00098. The report “Easing the Natural Gas Crisis:Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment ofRestoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

DOE Awards Contract to Restoration Services, Inc. for Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at Portsmouth Site June 25, 2008 - 2:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Restoration Services, Inc. (RSI), has been awarded a...

357

Hanford Site waste management and environmental restoration integration plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Integration Plan'' describes major actions leading to waste disposal and site remediation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide a management tool for use by executives who need to quickly comprehend the waste management and environmental restoration programs. The Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Programs have been divided into missions. Waste Management consists of five missions: double-shell tank (DST) wastes; single-shell tank (SST) wastes (surveillance and interim storage, stabilization, and isolation); encapsulated cesium and strontium; solid wastes; and liquid effluents. Environmental Restoration consists of two missions: past practice units (PPU) (including characterization and assessment of SST wastes) and surplus facilities. For convenience, both aspects of SST wastes are discussed in one place. A general category of supporting activities is also included. 20 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

Merrick, D.L.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Aquifer restoration at in-situ leach uranium mines: evidence for natural restoration processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments with aquifer sediments and leaching solution (lixiviant) from an in-situ leach uranium mine. The data from these laboratory experiments and information on the normal distribution of elements associated with roll-front uranium deposits provide evidence that natural processes can enhance restoration of aquifers affected by leach mining. Our experiments show that the concentration of uranium (U) in solution can decrease at least an order of magnitude (from 50 to less than 5 ppM U) due to reactions between the lixiviant and sediment, and that a uranium solid, possibly amorphous uranium dioxide, (UO/sub 2/), can limit the concentration of uranium in a solution in contact with reduced sediment. The concentrations of As, Se, and Mo in an oxidizing lixiviant should also decrease as a result of redox and precipitation reactions between the solution and sediment. The lixiviant concentrations of major anions (chloride and sulfate) other than carbonate were not affected by short-term (less than one week) contact with the aquifer sediments. This is also true of the total dissolved solids level of the solution. Consequently, we recommend that these solution parameters be used as indicators of an excursion of leaching solution from the leach field. Our experiments have shown that natural aquifer processes can affect the solution concentration of certain constituents. This effect should be considered when guidelines for aquifer restoration are established.

Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.; Bell, N.E.; Martin, W.J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restoration, wildlife and livestock management, and educational and economic resources. #31;e website has contact information for water and land management experts, tips on becoming involved, information on ongoing conservation projects, #25;nancial... plans and determining implementation costs. #31;ese datasets and tools provide baseline support for projects addressing wildlife habitat management and water quality, particularly native grassland and wetland restoration, and bo#26;omland hardwood...

Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Project Construction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule.

363

Magnesium Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

cyberinfrastructure projects and will be augmented by original research in Computer Science and Software Engineering towards the creation of large, distributed, autonomic and...

364

Project Execution Plan, Rev. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the Life-Cycle Asset Management, DOE Order 430.1A; The Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order 430.1; Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE Order 413.3; the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide, GPG-FM-010; and other applicable Good Practice Guides; and the FY 2001 Integrated Planning, Accountability, and Budgeting System Policy Guidance. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life-cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification o f roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forum Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification Sue L-7900.0000814 Introduction The practice of stream restoration has become widely accepted as an essential component protocols remain for the practice of stream restoration. Given the lack of consistency, many restoration

Curran, Joanna C.

366

The British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hillslopes to stream channels are restored, a also low-level treatment, where only hillslope restoration work a restoration program would be over a 4-8 year period, using 8-16 experimental stream triplets. AppropriateThe British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring

Keeley, Ernest R.

367

Topeka, Kansas, Flood Damage Reduction Project 30 January 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with and approved by the necessary resource agencies. The long-term environmental and cultural consequences of planTopeka, Kansas, Flood Damage Reduction Project 30 January 2009 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood risk management and restores the reliability of the Topeka, Kansas, Levee System located

US Army Corps of Engineers

368

SEFS Proposal Cover Sheet P.I.: Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering Forest Ecology Forest Soils Forest Systems and Bioenergy Restoration Ecology and Environmental Horticulture Social Sciences Sustainable Resource Management Wildlife Science GC-1 Questions: 1. Does items be transported outside the United States in connection with this project?Yes No 10b

Borenstein, Elhanan

369

Pool spacing, channel morphology, and the restoration of tidal forested wetlands of the Columbia River, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal forested wetlands have sustained substantial areal losses, and restoration practitioners lack a description of many ecosystem structures associated with these late-successional systems in which surface water is a significant controlling factor on the flora and fauna. The roles of large woody debris in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have been well described compared to functions in tidal areas. This study documents the role of large wood in forcing channel morphology in Picea-sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated freshwater tidal wetlands in the floodplain of the Columbia River, U.S.A. near the Pacific coast. The average pool spacing documented in channel surveys of three freshwater tidal forested wetlands near Grays Bay were 2.2 ± 1.3, 2.3 ± 1.2, and 2.5 ± 1.5. There were significantly greater numbers of pools on tidal forested wetland channels than on a nearby restoration site. On the basis of pool spacing and the observed sequences of log jams and pools, the tidal forested wetland channels were classified consistent with a forced step-pool class. Tidal systems, with bidirectional flow, have not previously been classified in this way. The classification provides a useful basis for restoration project design and planning in historically forested tidal freshwater areas, particularly in regard to the use of large wood in restoration actions and the development of pool habitats for aquatic species. Significant modifications by beaver on these sites warrant further investigation to explore the interactions between these animals and restoration actions affecting hydraulics and channel structure in tidal areas.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Montgomery, David R.

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Epigraphical Projection and Proximal Tools for Solving Constrained Convex Optimization Problems: Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], satellite image restoration [3, 4], microscopy image deconvolution [5, 6], computed tomography [7], PositronEpigraphical Projection and Proximal Tools for Solving Constrained Convex Optimization Problems projection operator generally does not have a closed form. We circumvent this difficulty by splitting

Boyer, Edmond

372

December 2008 ECoLoGICAL RESToRATIoN 26:4 287 Ecological Restoration Vol. 26, No. 4, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Martin W. Doyle S tream mitigation banking is rapidly becoming a major driver of the stream restoration is becoming a major private-sector source of stream restoration funding, perhaps presaging a major shift to restore or enhance an area of stream habita

Lave, Rebecca

373

Project X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided by Project X would be a cost- effective approach toin Section I and for the cost estimate necessary as part ofby DOE order 413.3b. The cost range required for CD-0 will

Holmes, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Project Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a project manager in the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the DOE-EERE Office of Transportation responsible for a wide variety of highly...

375

Project Title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

376

Energy Security and Restoration Exercise Program/Best Practices and Information Sharing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first year of this cooperative agreement focused on the following elements: curriculum development and presentation, curriculum maintenance, enhancements, and effectiveness, and smart card initiative. During the second year of this grant, with redirection from DOE, the IUOE modified its mission statement under the cooperative agreement. It states: 'The mission of the IUOE is to provide expertise to provide best practices, information sharing, and develop scenarios and conduct exercises ranging in size and complexity from table top to national level to prepare all stakeholders to protect and restore energy infrastructure should an event, terrorist or natural, occur'. The Program developed a number of products under this Cooperative Agreement. These products include: FOSTER (Facility Operations Safety Training Event Response) Curriculum and Training Models, Alternative Energy Supply - Generators Training Module, Liquefied Natural Gas Training Module, Education Program - Distributed Generations, Compendium of Resources and References, Energy Security and Restoration Training Manual, Manual of Situations and Scenarios Developed for Emergency Exercises, Manual of Best Practices/Lessons Learned for Energy Load Management, Training Plan, Strategic Information and Exercise Plan, National Certification Plan Report, and a Smart Card Project Report.

Barbara McCabe; John Kovach

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Critical fermion density for restoring spontaneously broken symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breakdown is affected by the presence of a sea of fermions in the system. When its density exceeds a critical value, the broken symmetry can be restored. We calculate the critical value and discuss the consequences for three different physical systems: First, for the standard model of particle physics, where the spontaneous symmetry breakdown leads nonzero masses of intermediate gauge bosons and fermions. The symmetry restoration will greatly enhance various processes with dramatic consequences for the early universe. Second, for the Gell-Mann--L\\`evy $\\sigma$-model of nuclear physics, where the symmetry breakdown gives rise to the nucleon and meson masses. The symmetry restoration may have important consequences for formation or collapse of stellar cores. Third, for the superconductive phase of condensed-matter, where the BCS condensate at low-temperature may be destroyed by a too large electron density.

Hagen Kleinert; She-Sheng Xue

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OFdegrade wedands crossed by these rights-of-way. Estibfishment and enhancement of low-growing plant communities wotid protect riparian resemes. Solid and Hazardous Waste '...

379

Nahr Beirut : projections on an infrastructural landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A century ago, Nahr Beirut was a riparian river which flowed from a mountainous valley to a coastal plain, the Beirut Peninsula, before entering the Julian Beinart Mediterranean Sea. After being for centuries the distant ...

Frem, Sandra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Repulsive and restoring Casimir forces with left-handed materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate repulsive Casimir force between slabs containing left-handed materials with controllable electromagnetic properties. The sign of Casimir force is determined by the electric and magnetic properties of the materials, and it is shown that the formation of the repulsive force is related to the wave impedances of two slabs. The sign change of the Casimir force as a function of the distance is studied. Special emphasis is put on the restoring Casimir force which may be found to exist between perfectly conducting material and metamaterial slabs. This restoring force is a natural power for the system oscillation in vacuum and also can be used for system stabilization.

Yaping Yang; Ran Zeng; Shutian Liu; Hong Chen; Shiyao Zhu

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

medical and dental centre; shop and café area for students and vacation accommodation centre. The new & Figures: Budget: £51,074,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan Construction Project Programme: Start on Site

384

On-site vs off-site management of environmental restoration waste: A cost effectiveness analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Project is expected to generate relatively large volumes of hazardous waste as a result of cleanup operations. These volumes will exceed the Laboratories existing waste management capacity. This paper presents four options for managing remediation wastes, including three alternatives for on-site waste management utilizing a corrective action management unit (CAMU). Costs are estimated for each of the four options based on current volumetric estimates of hazardous waste. Cost equations are derived for each of the options with the variables being waste volumes, the major unknowns in the analysis. These equations provide a means to update cost estimates as volume estimates change. This approach may be helpful to others facing similar waste management decisions.

Morse, M.A. [Terradigm, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aamodt, P.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cox, W.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 #12;Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of the UBC Project Services web-based project management portal project on campus within Project Services, and with the rest of the UBC community. We began this project by defining

387

Cloudnet Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

Hogan, Robin

388

Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Program 1994 fiscal year work plan. Work breakdown structure 2.0: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site Management System (SMS) guidance requires a Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) to be prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Mission Area and all related programs. This revision is a complete update to cover the FY 1994 time period. This document describes the overall ER Missions Area and provides FYWP appendices for each of the following five program areas: Remedial Action (RA); Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D); Project Management and Support (PM&S); Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M); and Disposal Facilities (DF).

Not Available

1993-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

EA-2003: Sandy River Delta Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assessed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed removal of a dam from the east channel of the Sandy River. The proposal would help fulfill a portion of the 2010-2013 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan to improve estuary habitat for salmon and steelhead species listed under the Endangered Species Act.

390

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Draft annual report for the Cumulative Effects Study for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrology of Deer Creek and its tributaries : a contribution to planning a restoration project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data is not useful in developing a flood frequency curve for Deer Creek because the gauge records discharge from the powerhouse. (

Skrtic, Lana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Configuration Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314 [CANCELLED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W-314 configuration management (CM) plan describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementing CM.

MCGREW, D.L.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Master's project in plant biology Restoration of mineral disturbances in northern/alpine environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as borrow pits for the creation of roads, roadsides and quarries benches, by facilitating pioneers

394

Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

Chapman, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project 1 Finding of No Significant Impact for Final Environmental Assessment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark Fork

396

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - 4.5 Acre Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I koker care

397

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - 4.5 Acre Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I koker care4.5 Acre Site

398

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young - Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I koker care4.5 Acre

399

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young - Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I koker care4.5 AcreYoung -

400

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young - Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I koker care4.5 AcreYoung

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I koker care4.5

402

S M Stoller Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project - Young- Rainey Star Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I koker care4.5Pinellas

403

Defra FCERM Innovation Fund PROJECT SLD2316: RESTORING FLOODPLAIN WOODLAND FOR FLOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

London SW1P 2AL Tel: 020 7238 3000 Fax: 020 7238 6187 www.defra.gov.uk/environ/fcd © Crown copyright of facilitating the establishment of a sizeable area of floodplain woodland (15 ha) to help reduce flood risk results demonstrated that planting woodland at four sites in the River Laver catchment, totalling an area

404

Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress Report, 4.5 Acre January through March 2004  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1%AU62 & 1993

405

Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress Report, Sitewide, January through March 2004  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1%AU62 & 199344 2004 GJ - -

406

DOE/NV-441 Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Rulison Drilling Effluent  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1 Rev. 0I . )) ;i 'Ru\--

407

Nematode Community Analysis for Monitoring Meiofaunal Response to the Bolsa Chica Wetlands Restoration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of three samples at the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve. Eachthe control site in Carpinteria. Nematode identificationsBolsa Chica and one in Carpinteria) indicates that the total

De Ley, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Water Supply Analysis for Restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mexico. Potential water sources include reductions in local agricultural and urban water use through and urban water uses were estimated by two ancillary models. The results provide insights into economically promising water supplies for restoration activities. Quantifying the trade-off between agricultural

Pasternack, Gregory B.

410

c12) United States Patent (54) DATA RESTORE MECHANISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c12) United States Patent Ohr (54) DATA RESTORE MECHANISM (75) Inventor: James Philip Ohr, St. Paul-Perrotta ..... 7111162 4/2004 Tellin et a!. 4/2004 Anna et a!. 8/2004 Foley et a!. 9/2004 Tan et a!. 9/2004 Gagne et a

Shamos, Michael I.

411

Weber's Law and Weberized TV Restoration Jianhong Shen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weber's Law and Weberized TV Restoration Jianhong Shen School of Mathematics University the influence of human vi­ sion psychology. Weber's Law in psychology and psychophysics claims that hu­ man [Physica D, 60:259­268, 1992]. We study the issues of existence and uniqueness for the pro­ posed Weberized

Soatto, Stefano

412

Photochemical Restoration of Visual Responses in Blind Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cating reconstitution of light signaling to brain circuits. AAQ and related photoswitch molecules present light to alter RGC firing in the absence of rods and cones, with the goal of restoring visual function be electronically controlled by an external camera to enable optical stimuli to trigger RGC firing. Retinal implants

Trauner, Dirk

413

Graduate Assistantships in: Forest Tree Breeding and Restoration Genetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(M.S. or Ph.D.) is offered to qualified students seeking training in forest tree breedingGraduate Assistantships in: Forest Tree Breeding and Restoration Genetics A Graduate Assistantship with The Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC). Qualifications: Candidates should have well

414

Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research The value of peat bogs as open habitats may suffice on lowland raised bogs. Damming furrows is ineffective if the peat is severely cracked sundew, Drosera anglica #12;Introduction In their natural state, peat bogs provide unique habitats

415

BLIND ITERATIVE RESTORATION OF IMAGES WITH SPATIALLY-VARYING BLUR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLIND ITERATIVE RESTORATION OF IMAGES WITH SPATIALLY-VARYING BLUR John Bardsley Stuart Jefferies (PSF) by using a combination of methods including sectioning and phase diversity blind deconvolution whose PSFs are correlated and approximately spatially-invariant, and apply iterative blind deconvolution

Bardsley, John

416

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

Mosegaard, Klaus

417

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Alshede Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems,uk,pto,lkh@imm.dtu.dk Abstract In this paper we present a Bayesian method to enhance functional 3D PET images using apriori as a true PET­MR result, and further more show how to obtain the desired information from the MR images. 1

Mosegaard, Klaus

418

Restoration of Native Woodland on Ancient Woodland Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this Practice Guide should be addressed to: HMSO, Licensing Division, St Clements House, 2­16 Colegate, Norwich networks, habitat action plans, landscape ecology, native woodlands, restoration ecology. Printed-natural woodland 3 The ecological effects of plantations on ancient woodland sites 4 Native woodland Habitat Action

419

Early Restoration Plan Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calcasieu Parish Public Library Central Branch 301 W. Claude St. Lake Charles 70605 #12;STATE LIBRARYEarly Restoration Plan Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP AL Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory. Walton 32548 FL Panama City Beach Public Library 125000 Hutchison Blvd Panama City Beach 32407 FL

420

Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

Rey Benayas, José María

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PROJECT REQUEST FORM PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT REQUEST FORM Last Name: Email: PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION UCID:Last Name: Email: Institute if different than Project Holder) First Name: Project Short Name: (50 characters max) (for eFIN view only) Project Title: PROJECT INFORMATION Start Date (MM/DD/YYYY): End Date (MM/DD/YYYY): For Questions or HELP

de Leon, Alex R.

422

ERD UMTRA Project quality assurance program plan, Revision 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the revised Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) dated September, 1995 for the Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). Quality Assurance requirements for the ERD UMTRA Project are based on the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C or applicable sections of 10 CFR 830.120. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the ERD UMTRA Project and its contractors.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Restoration of visual function following optic nerve regeneration in bluegill ~Lepomis macrochirus!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoration of visual function following optic nerve regeneration in bluegill ~Lepomis macrochirus with morphological examination to assess restoration of visual function following optic nerve crush in bluegill ~Lepomis macrochirus! pumpkinseed ~Lepomis gibbosus! hybrid sunfish. Regenerating optic nerve axons

Mensinger, Allen F.

424

A key extensional metamorphic complex reviewed and restored: The Menderes Massif of western Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A key extensional metamorphic complex reviewed and restored: The Menderes Massif of western Turkey of the Menderes Massif in western Turkey, and subsequently a map-view restoration of its Neogene unroofing history

Utrecht, Universiteit

425

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

Merenlender, Adina

426

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

427

Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking An International Resource Center in Support of Restorative Justice Dialogue, Research, and Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking An International Resource Center in Support.624.4923 rjp@umn.edu www.rjp.umn.edu The Energy of Conflict and Conflict Resolution: More Than a Metaphor by Ted Lewis October 2013 In many respects, understanding how the energy of conflict and conflict

Blanchette, Robert A.

428

agricultural pest control: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that remnant riparian habitats and older restoration sites (restoration plan might exacerbate orchard pests in the riparianrestoration site within the Sacramento...

429

Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name: Centre for Assisted Robotic Surgery Number: BESS1002b Project Champion: Professor Guang-Zong Yang of the refurbishment is to renew and expand the laboratory space for Robotic Assisted Surgery at the South Kensington Campus as par to the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery. The overall programme incorpo- rates both core

432

ClinicalTrials.gov Has Been Restored From: NIH-Alert (NIH/OD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ClinicalTrials.gov Has Been Restored From: NIH-Alert (NIH/OD) Sent: Friday, October 04, 2013 12:58 PM To: nih-alert@list.nih.gov Cc: Rockey, Sally (NIH/OD) [E] Subject: Access to ClinicalTrials.gov Restored NIH has restored access to the ClinicalTrials.gov site during the current lapse in government

Eichler, Evan

433

ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROBUST VIDEO RESTORATION BY JOINT SPARSE AND LOW RANK MATRIX APPROXIMATION HUI JI, SIBIN HUANG, ZUOWEI SHEN, AND YUHONG XU Abstract. This paper presents a new video restoration scheme based domain, we formulate the video restoration problem as a joint sparse and low-rank matrix approximation

Shen, Zuowei

434

Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1 and J. David Allan1,2 Abstract Restoration activities intended to improve the condition of streams and rivers are widespread types of activities and their effectiveness. We developed a database of 1,345 stream restoration

Allan, David

435

Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E Of Production Benefits For Salmonid Fishes From Stream Restoration Initiatives by E.R. Keeley1 , P.A. Slaney2 from the literature to assess the effects of stream restoration efforts on densities of salmonid fish

Keeley, Ernest R.

436

Comparing Stream Geomorphology and Channel Habitat along a Stream Restoration Gradient Sam Stewart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing Stream Geomorphology and Channel Habitat along a Stream Restoration Gradient Sam Stewart University #12;Abstract Stream restoration is a growing science due to the realization that the human into a whole reach study. This involved selecting four stream sites that would create a stream restoration

Vallino, Joseph J.

437

Examining food webs and trophic dynamics across a stream restoration intensity gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examining food webs and trophic dynamics across a stream restoration intensity gradient Lena Weiss restoration, food webs, trophic dynamics Abstract: Stream ecosystems provide a plethora of important services in the stream channel itself. While there has been a recent push towards restoring these heavily degraded

Vallino, Joseph J.

438

FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) from a natal stream and is applied as a case study in California's Shasta River. Restoration activitiesFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

Pasternack, Gregory B.

439

A spatial autocorrelative model for targeting stream restoration to benefit sensitive nongame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spatial autocorrelative model for targeting stream restoration to benefit sensitive nongame autoregressive habitat models to simulate the effect of water- shed-scale stream restoration on the distributions.2%­2.8% of Wisconsin streams. Streams with high restoration potential for one or more species generally have high

Vander Zanden, Jake

440

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Idaho Model Watershed Project : Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model Watershed Project was initiated in the fall of 1992 with a grant from Bonneville Power Administration. The objective of this project is to protect, enhance and restore anadromous and resident fish habitat and achieve and maintain a balance between resource protection and resource use on a holistic watershed basis.

Bradbury, Allen; Slavin, Katie

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

442

Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Functional approach for pairing in finite systems: How to define restoration of broken symmetries in Energy Density Functional theory ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Multi-Reference Energy Density Functional (MR-EDF) approach (also called configuration mixing or Generator Coordinate Method), that is commonly used to treat pairing in finite nuclei and project onto particle number, is re-analyzed. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the MR-EDF energy can be interpreted as a functional of the one-body density matrix of the projected state with good particle number. Based on this observation, we propose a new approach, called Symmetry-Conserving EDF (SC-EDF), where the breaking and restoration of symmetry are accounted for simultaneously. We show, that such an approach is free from pathologies recently observed in MR-EDF and can be used with a large flexibility on the density dependence of the functional.

Guillaume Hupin; Denis Lacroix; Michael Bender

2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) program: An introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet introduces the reader to the mission and functions of a major new unit within the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The Secretary of Energy established EM in November 1989, implementing a central purpose of DOE's first annual Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, which had appeared three months earlier. The contents of this booklet, and their arrangement, reflect the annual update of the Five-Year Plan. The Five-Year Plan supports DOE's strategy for meeting its 30-year compliance and cleanup goal. This strategy involves: focusing DOE's activities on eliminating or reducing known or recognized potential risks to worker and public health and the environment, containing or isolating, removing, or detoxifying onsite and offsite contamination, and developing technology to achieve DOE's environmental goals.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The Ecohydrological Implications of a Restored Rangeland in Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lateral vegetative spread, natural regen- eration, plant traits, restoration, seed bank, standing veg- etation, wetland, Wicken Fen. Introduction In Britain, as in other parts of Europe, fen meadow and lowland wet grassland habitats have declined... under a range of biophysical conditions (for example dif- ferent hydroperiods) was addressed through identifying species functional traits. Species were classified to C-S-R and Regen- eration Strategy types according to Grime et al. (2007...

Haley, Patrick 1989-

2012-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

446

Information management architecture for an integrated computing environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 3, Interim technical architecture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This third volume of the Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program--the Interim Technical Architecture (TA) (referred to throughout the remainder of this document as the ER TA)--represents a key milestone in establishing a coordinated information management environment in which information initiatives can be pursued with the confidence that redundancy and inconsistencies will be held to a minimum. This architecture is intended to be used as a reference by anyone whose responsibilities include the acquisition or development of information technology for use by the ER Program. The interim ER TA provides technical guidance at three levels. At the highest level, the technical architecture provides an overall computing philosophy or direction. At this level, the guidance does not address specific technologies or products but addresses more general concepts, such as the use of open systems, modular architectures, graphical user interfaces, and architecture-based development. At the next level, the technical architecture provides specific information technology recommendations regarding a wide variety of specific technologies. These technologies include computing hardware, operating systems, communications software, database management software, application development software, and personal productivity software, among others. These recommendations range from the adoption of specific industry or Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) standards to the specification of individual products. At the third level, the architecture provides guidance regarding implementation strategies for the recommended technologies that can be applied to individual projects and to the ER Program as a whole.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hallmark Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThis road map isofAOnOctoberProject

449

PROJECT SUMMARY  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergyHistoryWATER-ENERGYofPROJECT

450

Custom Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FY 2013 FYCurtailment DateCustom-Projects

451

Project Gnome  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16Hamada winsProgress ReportProject CostEnergy

452

Evaluation Project 4492  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09-12-2011 NNSA-B-10-0336 Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to remove Environmental Restoration (ER) Site 50, Old Centrifuge Site (East of TA-II). ...

453

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

454

Project Management Practices  

Energy Savers [EERE]

on the DOE Project Management web page. 1.2 INTENDED USE Federal Project Directors, Contracting Officers, Contracting Officer's Technical Representatives, Integrated Project Team...

455

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS Revised - May 2013 Agricultural Research Center Washington State University #12;Table of Contents THE PROJECT SYSTEM, AN INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 5 DEVELOPING AN ARC PROJECT

Collins, Gary S.

456

Particle-Number Projection and the Density Functional Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the Density Functional Theory for superconductors, we study the restoration of the particle number symmetry by means of the projection technique. Conceptual problems are outlined and numerical difficulties are discussed. Both are related to the fact that neither the many-body Hamiltonian nor the wave function of the system appear explicitly in the Density Functional Theory. Similar obstacles are encountered in self-consistent theories utilizing density-dependent effective interactions.

J. Dobaczewski; M. V. Stoitsov; W. Nazarewicz; P. -G. Reinhard

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

USING EXISTING AGRICULTURAL INFRASTRUCTURE FOR RESTORATION PRACTICES: FACTORS INFLUENCING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milczarek and Matthew Grabau who are responsible for opening the doors to my research project. I thank all

Papuga, Shirley A.

458

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs

459

Project Management Lessons Learned  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and aids the federal project directors and integrated project teams in the execution of projects.

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

Windy Gap Firming Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Windy Gap Firming Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOEEIS-0370 (cooperating agency) Western's proposed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Perspectives on Project Finance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Perspectives on Project Finance John May, Managing Partner, Stern Brothers & Co.

462

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan 6 PPPL Laboratory Director S.Prager Deputy Director.Gentile Centerstack Dsgn & Fab J. Chrzanowski NSTX Upgrade Project Manager R. Strykowsky Deputy and Construction Manager E. Perry Project Controls S. Langish NSTXCenterstack Manager L. Dudek NSTXNeutral Beam Manager T

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

463

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSTX Upgrade Project Project Execution Plan Appendix 1 - WBS Dictionary 25 Appendix 1 - NSTX Upgrade Project Work Breakdown Structure This Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) organizes and defines the scope of the NSTX Upgrade using the WBS as established by the original NSTX project and modified

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

464

CIMI PROJECT LONG TERM THEMATIC PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thematic projects (3 months) on specific topics in mathematics, computer science and their interactionsCIMI PROJECT LONG TERM THEMATIC PROJECT This document aims at providing guidance on the format to be used when submitting a scientific project to CIMI Executive Committee. CIMI will support long term

Ledoux, Michel

465

Livingston Solar Canopy Project The Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 high efficiency solar panels on canopy structures over two major surface parking areasLivingston Solar Canopy Project The Project: This project entails the installation of more than 40. In conjunction with the existing 1.4 megawatt solar energy facility on this campus, this project will generate

Delgado, Mauricio

466

Information Visualization Graduate Project (Group Project)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Visualization Fall 2011 Graduate Project (Group Project) (100 points total) Handed out:59PM Research Article due by online submission on Sunday, December 11, 2011, 11:59PM Project Demo due last week of classes The idea of the project is to take the knowledge and background that you

Rusu, Adrian

467

Project Title Project Sponsor (funding agency)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and procedures applicable to the above project; and we confirm that the PI is eligible to apply in accordance Project Title Project Sponsor (funding agency) Declaration of Principal Investigator (PI) I certify that: I agree that my participation in the project must be in accordance with all

Saskatchewan, University of

468

Chopwell Wood Health Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chopwell Wood Health Project An innovative project of school visits and General Practitioner. The project took place at Chopwell Wood a 360 hectare mixed woodland managed by the Forestry Commission to carry on being involved in the project. Next stage of the project Although the project leader has now

469

Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Chapter 3, paragraph 2). The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1992, through November 8, 1993. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Sustainability Project Fund Application Form Requirements Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Project Fund Application Form Requirements Project Title: Budget Requested: Applicant/Project Leader: Faculty/Department: Email: Daytime Phone: Project Team: (Please include. Project Overview Project summary: · Provide a brief background, describing the project, objectives

Volesky, Bohumil

475

Economics in Criticality and Restoration of Energy Infrastructures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economists, systems analysts, engineers, regulatory specialists, and other experts were assembled from academia, the national laboratories, and the energy industry to discuss present restoration practices (many have already been defined to the level of operational protocols) in the sectors of the energy infrastructure as well as other infrastructures, to identify whether economics, a discipline concerned with the allocation of scarce resources, is explicitly or implicitly a part of restoration strategies, and if there are novel economic techniques and solution methods that could be used help encourage the restoration of energy services more quickly than present practices or to restore service more efficiently from an economic perspective. AcknowledgementsDevelopment of this work into a coherent product with a useful message has occurred thanks to the thoughtful support of several individuals:Kenneth Friedman, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance, provided the impetus for the work, as well as several suggestions and reminders of direction along the way. Funding from DOE/OEA was critical to the completion of this effort.Arnold Baker, Chief Economist, Sandia National Laboratories, and James Peerenboom, Director, Infrastructure Assurance Center, Argonne National Laboratory, provided valuable contacts that helped to populate the authoring team with the proper mix of economists, engineers, and systems and regulatory specialists to meet the objectives of the work.Several individuals provided valuable review of the document at various stages of completion, and provided suggestions that were valuable to the editing process. This list of reviewers includes Jeffrey Roark, Economist, Tennessee Valley Authority; James R. Dalrymple, Manager of Transmission System Services and Transmission/Power Supply, Tennessee Valley Authority; William Mampre, Vice President, EN Engineering; Kevin Degenstein, EN Engineering; and Patrick Wilgang, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance.With many authors, creating a document with a single voice is a difficult task. Louise Maffitt, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Engineering Research and Applications at New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology (on contract to Sandia National Laboratories) served a vital role in the development of this document by taking the unedited material (in structured format) and refining the basic language so as to make the flow of the document as close to a single voice as one could hope for. Louise's work made the job of reducing the content to a readable length an easier process. Additional editorial suggestions from the authors themselves, particularly from Sam Flaim, Steve Folga, and Doug Gotham, expedited this process.

Boyd, Gale A.; Flaim, Silvio J.; Folga, Stephen M.; Gotham, Douglas J.; McLamore, Michael R.; Novak, Mary H.; Roop, Joe M.; Rossmann, Charles G.; Shamsuddin, Shabbir A.; Zeichner, Lee M.; Stamber, Kevin L.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

AWARD FEE DETERMINATION SCORECARD Contractor: Restoration Services, Inc.  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdf ASGovLtr.pdf-OPAMGuidance forAUDITSafetyRestoration

477

EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration’s proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

478

SolarPower Restoration Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to:Information Silver PeakSystemsSolarLabSolarPower Restoration

479

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Environmental Restoration | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management FAQS Job Task AnalysesRestoration FAQS

480

Summary of field operations Tijeras Arroyo Well TJA-2. Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a basic data report for field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of Tijeras Arroyo well TJA-2. This test/monitoring well was installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project.

Foutz, W.L. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCord, J.P. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "riparian restoration project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Demonstration Dock Designed to Benefit Eelgrass Habitat Restoration (Washington)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The derelict Thomas Oil Dock on state tidelands in Port Townsend, Washington, was redesigned for the Northwest Maritime Center by a committee including marine scientists, architects, engineers, educators, regulators, and user groups. The committee's objectives were to create a ''demonstration dock'' using the best-available technologies and design features to restore nearshore habitat functions, particularly for threatened fisheries resources, while accommodating the unique requirements of the educational facility to house vessels ranging from historic tall ships to sea kayaks. A key nearshore habitat restoration goal was to reduce fragmentation of eelgrass where shade from the existing dock inhibited growth, by improving conditions with a new dock design and transplanting eelgrass to connect existing patches. Ecological conditions were evaluated through diver surveys; mapping existing eelgrass, macroalgae, and substrates; and review of controlling factors. Data on the attenuation an d diffusion of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) was collected and evaluated relative to eelgrass light requirements. Potential shade impacts of existing and alternative dock designs and materials were modeled. Key design features to improve habitat functions included the installation of reflective material under the dock to increase the incidence of PAR at the substrate level, reduction in the number of piles and associated shade impacts through the use of steel piles instead of wood, increase in the length of the trestle to 286 to move the greatest area of overwater structure beyond the range of eelgrass, and the use of grating in strategic locations to reduce the potential of a light/dark barrier to fish passage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Gayaldo, Perry F.; Curtis, Craig A.; Court, Brian L.; Pierce, David M.; Robison, David S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

modes are nearly completely restored after ther-mal treatment. Similarly, electronic transitions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modes are nearly completely restored after ther- mal treatment. Similarly, electronic transitions, 338 (2003). 13. D. Chattopadhyay, I. Galeska, F. Papadimitrakopoulos, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 3370

Stüwe, Jogy

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous salmon restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Creek Watershed Restoration Juneau, Alaska Duck Creek is a small, anadromous fish stream located... Sediment removal from channel Wetlands revegetation NOAA...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - atraumatic restorative treatment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest Research Agency of the UK Forestry Commission Collection: Renewable Energy 37 Stream Restoration Databases and Case Studies: A Guide to Information Resources and...

487

Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Project Sponsor Professor Peter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Sponsor Professor Peter McGearoge Project Director Nicki Matthew Audit / Quality Mazars Architect IT ServicesProcess Owners Build Team Lead Nicki Matthew Project Manager ­ Unit4 Joe Cairney Student Lifecycle Project Board InfrastructureDBA's TBC TBC TBC Process 1 Process 2 Project Sponsor ­ Unit

Levi, Ran

489

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg Project Manager, Head of Personnel Development Phone +49 6131 39-20634 Dr. Jana Leipold Project Staff, Personnel Development Consultant Phone +49 6131 39-25433 Antje Swietlik Project Staff Phone +49 6131 39-20140 Project Office JGU Leadership Forum Universitatis 3, Room 00

Kaus, Boris

490

Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

491

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

Perkins, Richard A.

492

CS348 Project 1 Oracle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS348 Project 1 Oracle Project Due Date: 2/12/2009 You are going to use Oracle to design a simple; if nothing else, mark each query with its number. Turnin You may turn in the project for grading using the procedure described below. Run the following shell command (see 'man turnin' for details): turnin -c cs348

Elmagarmid, Ahmed K.

493

Project Name Project Number Tagging Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Name Project Number Primary Tagging Type Secondary Tagging Type Fish Species Tagging/ Secondary Legal Driver (BiOp, MOA, Accord, etc.) Tagging Purpose Funded Entity Tagging Location Retrieval CWT Recovery Project 2010-036-00 CWT PIT Chinook, coho retrieval, analysis, address PSMFC sampling

494

Eelgrass Enhancement and Restoration in the Lower Columbia River Estuary, Period of Performance: Feb 2008-Sep 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to enhance distribution of eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the Columbia River Estuary to serve as refuge and feeding habitat for juvenile salmon, Dungeness crab, and other fish and wildlife. We strongly suspected that limited eelgrass seed dispersal has resulted in the present distribution of eelgrass meadows, and that there are other suitable places for eelgrass to survive and form functional meadows. Funded as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's call for Innovative Projects, we initiated a multistage study in 2008 that combined modeling, remote sensing, and field experimentation to: (1) Spatially predict habitat quality for eelgrass; (2) Conduct experimental plantings; and (3) Evaluate restoration potential. Baseline in-situ measurements and remote satellite observations were acquired for locations in the Lower Columbia River Estuary (LCRE) to determine ambient habitat conditions. These were used to create a habitat site-selection model, using data on salinity, temperature, current velocity, light availability, wave energy, and desiccation to predict the suitability of nearshore areas for eelgrass. Based on this model and observations in the field, five sites that contained no eelgrass but appeared to have suitable environmental conditions were transplanted with eelgrass in June 2008 to test the appropriateness of these sites for eelgrass growth. We returned one year after the initial planting to monitor the success rate of the transplants. During the year after transplanting, we carried out a concurrent study on crab distribution inside and outside eelgrass meadows to study crab usage of the habitat. One year after the initial transplant, two sites, one in Baker Bay and one in Young's Bay, had good survival or expansion rates with healthy eelgrass. Two sites had poor survival rates, and one site had a total loss of the transplanted eelgrass. For submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) restoration projects, these are reasonable success results and represent a small net gain in eelgrass in the LCRE. Crabs used both the eelgrass and unvegetated substrate, though in neither were there great abundance of the young-of-the-year crabs. During the field assessment of 12 potential transplant sites, divers discovered one site in southern Young's Bay that contained a previously undocumented eelgrass bed. This integrated project developed the first predictive maps of sites suitable for eelgrass and other SAV in the lower estuary. In addition, techniques developed for this project to assess light levels in existing and potential submerged habitats have great potential to be used in other regions for nearshore and coastal monitoring of SAV. Based on these preliminary results, we conclude that eelgrass distribution could likely be expanded in the estuary, though additional information on current eelgrass locations, usage by species of interest, and monitoring of current conditions would help develop a baseline and verify benefit. Our recommendations for future studies include: (1) Site Monitoring. Continued monitoring of restoration sites along with physical metrics of light, temperature and salinity within beds. Continued monitoring will both assist managers in understanding the longevity and expansion rate of planted sites and inform practical guidance on the minimum planted eelgrass required to develop a resilient meadow. (2) Natural bed documentation and monitoring. Document current eelgrass habitat conditions in the Columbia River by mapping eelgrass and other SAV species and monitoring physical metrics in natural beds. This will assist by better defining the factors that control the annual and spatial variation in eelgrass in the estuary, and thus lead to improved management. Improved information on conditions will help refine a habitat suitability model that can more accurately predict where eelgrass can be restored or areas under duress. (3) Monitor Species Use. Expanded monitoring of Dungeness crab and salmon use and benefit from eelgrass in the estuary to evaluate how

Judd, C.; Thom, R; Borde, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

495

A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

project.m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function project(u,w) %last updated 5/9/94 %PROJECT Projecting vector U onto vector W orthogonally. Vectors % U and W can be either a pair of 2D or 3D ...

497

Super Projects (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A 2004 amendment to the state constitution authorizes the state to attract super projects by issuing bonds to fund a project’s infrastructure, limited to 5% of the net general revenues during the...

498

Project Selection - Record Keeping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-H members have many project areas to choose from, depending on where they live. Members should consult with their parents and 4-H leaders when choosing a project. This publication outlines project considerations....

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

499

REGENERATIVE STORMWATER CONVEYANCE (RSC) AS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO SUSTAINABLE STORMWATER PLANNING ON LINEAR PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique of using stream restoration techniques to create auses elements of stream restoration, riffle grade control

Berg, Joe; Underwood, Keith

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z