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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

U. S. rig count drops below 600, a post-1940 low  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the Baker Hughes Inc. count of active U.S. rotary rigs as of June 12 fell to less than 600 the first time since that tally began in 1940. The previous modern record low was set at 610 the previous week. Baker Hughes reported about 1,400 rigs idle in the U.S. last week. Using a different criteria, the Smith International count of U.S. active rigs fell seven units to 653 the week ended June 12, compared with a count of 910 the previous year. Baker Hughes predecessor Hughes Tool Co. began keeping monthly records of active U.S. rigs in January 1940. The lowest monthly count that year was 857. It changed to a weekly count in January 1949. The milestone was met wit calls for relief for the U.S. upstream sector from industry and government officials in Washington.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

34th annual reed rotary rig census  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that the number of rigs active according to the 1986 census is 1052, which represents a decline of 1573 rigs from 1985 figures. This 60 percent decrease is the largest decline of active rigs in the 34-year history of the census. The 1986 census takers found 3993 rigs are available with the capacity to drill deeper than 3000 ft. The count has thus declined by 416 rigs (9 percent) from the 1985 total of 4409. Rig availability declined for the fourth consecutive year following nine straight years of fleet expansion (1974-1982). During the past four years, 1651 rigs have been removed from the drilling fleet representing a 29 percent decline from the record high number of rigs available in 1982. The 1986 decline in the available U.S. fleet is considerably less than what many industry observers had been anticipating. A larger decrease in the rig fleet has not been realized for a number of reasons.

Hutchinson, D.L.; Pastusek, P.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

36th annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect

For the sixth straight year, the number of rigs available in the U.S. declined. Five hundred and seventy-nine rotary rigs dropped out of drilling industry competition during the past 12 months as attrition forced rig supply closer toward balance with demand. Significant highlights of this year's census are: The U.S. rig fleet now stands at 2,752 drilling rigs, a 17.4% reduction from the census count in 1987. This is the largest percentage decline and the third largest absolute decline in available rigs in census history; The 1988 census active count was 1,532 rigs, up 10% over 1987; The 1988 census utilization rate was 55.7%, up from the 41.7% reported last year and a 110% improvement over the all-time low of 26.3% in 1986; Every region in the country reported a reduction in total available rigs. Each region also reported an increase in the active ring count with the exception of Ark-La-Tex; California had the highest utilization rate in the census (63.9%), and all regions reported a utilization rate greater than 50% with the exception of Ark-La-Tex, which reported a 45.5% rate; The number of rig owners declined 12% from 691 to 608. The decline in available rigs would have been greater, but owners brought back 226 rigs that had been dropped from previous census tabulations.

Fitts, R.L.; Crowhurst, M.E. (Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (US))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

42nd Annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect

The eleven-year trend of attrition in the US rig fleet slowed significantly this year as only 12 rigs, or less than 1%, left the available fleet. The number of rotary rigs available for drilling in the US now stands at 1,841. but for the 42-year history of the Reed Tool Co. Rotary Rig Census, the 1973 available rig count of 1,767 remains the record low for yet another year. The count of rigs active during the 45-day census period also declined since last year's census. The active count was down 4.5% to 1,221 from 1,279 in 1993. As a consequence, rig utilization fell to 66.3% in 1994, from 69.0% last year. Notably, a strong shift to gas from oil drilling has occurred. Of the 1,221 rigs active in the census period, 540 were drilling for gas on the last well vs. 356 drilling for oil. Compared to last year, this is an increase in gas drilling of 29% and a decrease in oil drilling 22%. (Rigs targeting both oil and gas totaled 325 in 1994.)

Stokes, T.A.; Rodriquez, M.R. (Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Rig activity; 1989 was the worst year on record  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the quantity of oil rotary rigs running in the United States during 1989. Rotary rigs running in 1989 averaged 870, down 7.1% from 1988 and arguably the worst performance since anyone bothered to count. A quick check into dusty historical records reveals that in 1942 the rotary rig count averaged 761 (this was the result of a deliberate government policy of scaling back drilling). However, the number is misleading, because in the early 1940s cable-tool rigs were around 40% to 45% of the total operating at any given time.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Rig Efficiency Paper  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

"active" annual rig count which is an imprecise and subjective task. Baker Hughes, 5 Smith, 6 ReedHycalog (Now NOV), 7 Schlumberger, 8 and IADC 9 publicly report the number of...

7

Total Gamma Count Rate Analysis Method for Nondestructive Assay Characterization  

SciTech Connect

A new approach to nondestructively characterize waste for disposal, based on total gamma response, has been developed at the Idaho Cleanup Project by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC and Idaho State University, and is called the total gamma count rate analysis method. The total gamma count rate analysis method measures gamma interactions that produce energetic electrons or positrons in a detector. Based on previous experience with waste assays, the radionuclide content of the waste container is then determined. This approach potentially can yield minimum detection limits of less than 10 nCi/g. The importance of this method is twofold. First, determination of transuranic activity can be made for waste containers that are below the traditional minimum detection limits. Second, waste above 10 nCi/g and below 100 nCi/g can be identified, and a potential path for disposal resolved.

Cecilia R. Hoffman; Yale D. Harker

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

39th annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on cutbacks in U.S. exploration and development drilling during the first half of 1991 which squeezed most of the optimism out of the drilling industry. Just how rough the year has been is underscored by the results of this year's rig census. The number of rotary rigs available for U.S. drilling declined by only 69 units (3%) during the past 12 months. But despite those withdrawals from competition, only 66% of the remaining rigs were working at the time the census was taken. Results of the 1991 census contrasted sharply with the stability and optimism that seemed apparent a year ago when 72% of the available rig fleet met the census definition of active. At that time, the mini-boom in horizontal drilling coupled with tax-credit- driven gas drilling led to a relatively high rig utilization rate and suggested that rig supply and demand might be close to an economically acceptable balance. However, it quickly became apparent in early 1991 that industry optimism was unjustified. Horizontal drilling began to drop and the lowest natural gas prices in 12 years triggered rapid declines in gas drilling. Although oil prices have been relatively stable and above $18 per bbl since January 1989, most major operators have concluded that a better return on investment can be had outside the U.S. and have drastically cut their domestic drilling budgets. These factors, combined with softened energy demand from the worldwide recession, further slowed U.S. drilling. The long awaited balance between rig supply and demand has seemingly slipped away. The 1991 Reed rig census describes an industry facing several more rough years. Details of this year's census include: The available U.S. fleet now stands at 2,251 rigs, down by 69 from the 2,320-unit total in 1990, and the lowest since 1976. Rigs meeting the census definition of active numbered 1,485, down 192 (11.4%) from the 1,677 active rigs counted a year earlier.

Crowhurst, M.E.; Fitts, R.L. (Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12-i Chapter 12 Rigging Hardware CHAPTER 12 RIGGING HARDWARE This chapter provides requirements for rigging accessories used in hoisting and rigging - shackles, eyebolts, eye nuts, links, rings, swivels, wire-rope clips, turnbuckles, rigging hooks, and load-indicating devices and implements the requirements of ANSI/ASME B30.26, "Rigging Hardware" (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 12.1 GENERAL..................................................................................................................................12-1 12.1.1 Good and Bad Rigging Practices ...................................................................................12-1 12.2 RIGGING HOOKS.....................................................................................................................12-5

10

Hoisting & Rigging Fundamentals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hoisting and Rigging Hoisting and Rigging Fundamentals for Riaaers and ODerators Pendant Control - Components TR244C, Rev. 5 December 2002 TR244C Rev . 5 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii HOISTING AND RIGGING OBJECTIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WIRE ROPE SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SYNTHETIC WEBBING SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I O CHAINSLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 METAL MESH SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 SPREADER BEAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 RIGGING HARDWARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

  Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices...

12

Rig activity; 1991 is now the worst year on record  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that U.S. rotary oil well drilling rig activity reached year-end levels above 1,100 rigs and averaged over 1,000 in 1990, the first increase since 1984. In 1991, however, operating rigs dropped once again, this time to an all time recorded low and once again, most forecasters erred on the high side. Rotary rigs running in 1991 averaged 862.8, a 14.4% drop below the 1990 activity level of 1007.8 rigs. The rig count, began at 1,068 in January, but fell steadily for the remainder of the year. A brief upturn at mid-year failed to hold up and the year-end increases in drilling we had come to expect since 1986 never materialized.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Electricity on the rig; part I -- electric applications on drilling and workover rigs  

SciTech Connect

This article points out that not only have electric motors replaced diesel engines and mechanical transmissions, but solid-state equipment is rapidly taking the place of rotary equipment in variable speed drivers and control systems. The SCR (silicon controlled rectifier) type of speed control has replaced other types by a large margin of acceptance on drilling rigs and has begun to be used on workover and service rigs. In most cases, electrical power is generated at the rig site with diesel-AC generators. On mechanically driven rigs, single diesel-generator sets operate to supply power for lighting and electrical motor loads. When high levels of power are required, such as on SCR-powered rigs, multiple generators are operated in electrical-parallel and each contributes to the total power required.

McNair, W.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Chapter 10 - RIGGING HARDWARE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASME, DOERL-92-36 and the Rigging Hardware manufacturers' requirements. It is the responsibility of the user of this manual to implement all of the requirements from listed...

15

International land rig locator  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical specifications, ratings, locations, and status are listed for each of the 5,000 contract rotary drilling rigs operated by the more than 700 independent drilling contractors throughout the Free World.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

International land rig locator  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical specifications, ratings, locations, and status are listed for each of the 5,000 contract rotary drilling rigs operated by more than 700 independent drilling contractors throughout the Free World.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1090-2011 DOE-STD-1090-2011 September 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1090-2007 August 2007 DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. INCH-POUND INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1090-2011 iii Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hoisting and Rigging Standard is intended to be used by supervisors, line managers, safety personnel, equipment operators, riggers and other personnel responsible for the safety of hoisting and rigging operations at DOE sites. It may be used as either contract document or as a best practices guide at the site's or program office's discretion. The standard invokes applicable OSHA and national consensus standards but also delineates

18

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13-i CHAPTER 13 LOAD HOOKS This chapter provides safety standards for the inspection, testing, and maintenance of load hooks installed on cranes or hoists and implements the requirements of ASME B30.10, Chapter 10-1, "Hooks." See Chapter 12, "Rigging Accessories," for rigging hook requirements (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 13.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.1 Marking......................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.2 Attachments ...............................................................................................................13-1

19

Design of a bicycle rig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design of a bicycle (bike) rig was conducted. This bike rig is designed to be used for aerodynamics measurement testing of bicycles, cyclists and cycling related items in a wind tunnel. This paper discusses the design ...

Racz, Rastislav

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology  

SciTech Connect

The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of time is divided among the remaining four functions of rig up/rig down, logging, lay down bottomhole assembly, and pick up bottomhole assembly. Observations made during all phases of CT rig operation at each of the project well installations have verified a number of characteristics of the technology that represent advantages that can produce significant savings of 25-35 percent per well. Attributes of the CT rig performance include: (1) Excellent hole quality with hole deviation amounting to 1-2 degrees; (2) Reduced need for auxiliary equipment; (3) Efficient rig mobilization requiring only four trailers; (4) Capability of ''Zero Discharge'' operation; (5) Improved safety; and, (6) Measurement while drilling capability. In addition, commercial cost data indicates that the CT rig reduces drilling costs by 25 to 35% compared to conventional drilling technology. Widespread commercial use of the Microhole Coiled Tubing technology in the United States for onshore Lower-48 drilling has the potential of achieving substantially positive impacts in terms of savings to the industry and resource expansion. Successfully commercialized Microhole CT Rig Technology is projected to achieve cumulative savings in Lower-48 onshore drilling expenditures of approximately 6.8 billion dollars by 2025. The reduced cost of CT microhole drilling is projected to enable the development of gas resources that would not have been economic with conventional methods. Because of the reduced cost of drilling achieved with CT rig technology, it is estimated that an additional 22 Tcf of gas resource will become economic to develop. In the future, the Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig represents an important platform for the continued improvement of drilling that draws on a new generation of various technologies to achieve goals of improved drilling cost and reduced impact to the environment.

Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

New depths with mobile rig  

SciTech Connect

Magee-Poole Drilling Company, a drilling contractor operating out of the south Texas drilling center of Alice, claims it operates the largest mobile drilling rig in the world. That is, it's the only wheel mounted portable rig that drills to 16,000 feet with 4 1/2-inch drill pipe - at least 3000 feet deeper than the previous mobile drilling rig ratings. The unit is designated the Ingersoll-Rand 1500 Series. What's more significant, according to co-owner Don Magee, is that the rig's portability gets the rotary table turning to the right sooner; it drills more footage per year. It rigs up in 1 1/2 days versus 3 to 4 days for a conventional skid type rig normally used at these depths. The unit's compact arrangement, with more components combined into single loads, makes possible its higher mobility. A conventional skid rig might require 25 to 30 truckloads to move the rig components, mud system, fuel and water tank, houses for utilities, storage and crew change, generators, and drill pipe. The new rig moves in anywhere from four to nine loads less. Further, the rig components weigh less without sacrificing durability.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

44. Annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect

Reed Tool Company`s 44th annual rotary rig census found a spirit of increased optimism in the US oil and gas drilling industry. Rig utilization rose to 77% this year, the highest since the boom times of 15 years ago. A combination of a higher number of active rigs and another decline in available units to a historical low, led to this higher-than-average utilization rate. The paper discusses results from the survey.

Stokes, T.A.; Rodriguez, M.R. [Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging

24

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging

25

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-i 1-i CHAPTER 11 WIRE ROPE AND SLINGS This chapter provides requirements for the fabrication and use of wire rope and slings used in hoisting and rigging and implements the requirements of ASME B30.9, Slings (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). . 11.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................11-1 11.2 WIRE ROPE ............................................................................................................................11-4 11.2.1 Wire-Rope Lays .........................................................................................................11-4 11.2.2 Wire-Rope Cores .......................................................................................................11-4

26

Comparing rig power transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

Installed power on drilling rigs has increased steadily since the inception of rotary drilling technology as a result of technical advances and the need to penetrate deeper horizons. Higher power levels for the pumps, rotary table and drawworks are also required for drilling deep wells within an economically reasonable period. Power initially available on a rig had been about 35 kW on average, whereas power values on modern rigs drilling ultra-deep wells are on the order of several thousand kW. The installed power values on modern drilling rigs, subdivided with respect to depth range, are shown. After safety, economic factors are of paramount importance to rig operators. Among these, which include low acquisition cost, long service life and ease of maintenance, a particularly decisive factor is high efficiency.

Gutsche, W.; Noevig, T.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 BELOW-THE-HOOK LIFTING DEVICES 14-i This chapter provides the requirements for below-the-hook lifting devices used in hoisting and rigging, such as spreader bars, lifting yokes, and lift fixtures. This section implements the requirements of ASME B30.20, "Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices" (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10,000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials are governed by ANSI N14.6 ["Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 Pounds (4,500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials."] 14.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................14-1

28

Focus on rotary drill rigs  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the drill rig, focusing on the rotary drill rigs. There are two principal drilling methods - rotary and percussion. In certain situations, percussion drilling is the most practical method, but for most applications, rotary drilling using the rotary-tricone bit with either steel-toothed cones or carbide inserts, is the common and accepted drilling technique. There are four principal reasons for a rotary drill rig: to provide power to the rotary-tricone bit; to provide air to clean the hole; to provide a life-support system for the rotary-tricone bits; and, to provide a stable and efficient platform from which to drill the hole.

Schivley, G.P. Jr.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electricity on the rig. Part 3 - New electric rig technology  

SciTech Connect

The use of an SCR-controlled power system on an offshore drilling rig has lead to an increased acceptance of high technology equipment. Such equipment increases drilling productivity, reduces maintenance, and improves reliability. Most new rigs now have AC squirrel cage motors, brushless AC generators, silicon controlled rectifiers, DC motors, and swtichgear and motor starters. Several opportunities for cost reductions in SCR systems, such as improving the power factor, are studied in this paper.

McNair, W.L.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Solar stirling engine rig tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A description of a prototype four-cylinder Stirli ng engine construction with the heat receiver of the concentrated solar radiant flux and with a swashplate drive is given. The rig tests have been carried out ...

I. A. Tursunbaev; E. P. Orda; A. I. Lezhebokov; A. P. Korobkov…

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Earth drill rig  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an earth drill rig wherein an upwardly and downwardly moving drill-string-turning rotary table is rotated by a kelly bar connected at its lower end to a vertical drive shaft, the kelly bar being journalled for rotation in and fixed against axial movement with respect to a drill frame assembly and the rotary table being mounted for axial movement on and along the drill frame assembly. The drill frame assembly is pivotally mounted on a vehicle on a substantially horizontal axis for pivoting between an upright position and a substantially horizontal position for transportation. The improvement described here comprises the drill frame assembly pivot axis positioned below the lower end of the kelly bar and above the upper end of the vertical drive shaft, and a universal coupling connecting the lower end of the kelly bar and the vertical drive shaft the universal coupling comprising universal joints at opposite ends of an elongated slip joint connector and connected there-by for relative axial movement but driving coupling between the universal joints. The universal joints lie generally on a circle of which the drill frame assembly pivot axis is the center. The drill frame assembly can be moved between the upright and the substantially horizontal positions without disconnecting the kelly bar from the vertical drive shaft, the kelly bar being revolvable by the drive shaft through substantially the entire range of movement of the drill frame assembly.

Rassieur, C.L.

1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

Drill rig hook  

SciTech Connect

A hook for suspending a pipe string or other load in a well rig, including a tubular outer body supported by a first connector structure which is attachable to a suspending line, a tubular inner body which supports a second connector structure preferably taking the form of a hook, with the inner body being received within the outer body and being yieldingly urged upwardly relative thereto by a resilient unit or assembly located within the inner body, and with a structure within the inner body bearing upwardly against and supporting the resilient assembly and attached to the first connector structure. A cam mechanism between the inner and outer bodies automatically cams the inner body to a predetermined rotary position upon upward movement, with a locking device or devices serving to retain the inner body in fixed rotary position and/or to lock the camming mechanism in a fixed position in a manner determining the rotary setting to which the inner body returns upon upward movement. The mentioned first and/or second connectors may each consist of two parts receivable within one of the tubular bodies and held in operative connecting engagement therewith by a spacer between the two parts. A link suporting member may be formed separately from the load suporting hook, to be detachable therefrom for a repair or replacement.

Zimmermann, A.

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-2004 9-2004 12-i Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories CHAPTER 12 RIGGING ACCESSORIES This chapter provides requirements for rigging accessories used in hoisting and rigging - shackles, eyebolts, rings, wire-rope clips, turnbuckles, rigging hooks, and load-indicating devices. 12.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................12-1 12.1.1 Inspections .................................................................................................................12-1 12.1.2 Testing .....................................................................................................................12-3 12.1.3 Good and Bad Rigging Practices ...............................................................................12-3

34

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

35

45th annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect

Since 1983, Reed Tool Co.`s annual rotary rig census has reported 14 consecutive annual reductions in the U.S. rig fleet. This year, the downward trend has reversed and more rigs have been added to the available fleet than have left. Robust drilling activity has also spurred higher rig utilization in 1997. Utilization climbed to 86.9% this year, more than ten percentage points higher than a year ago and the highest since 1981. Data and trends are discussed.

Stokes, T.A.; Rodriguez, M.R. [Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hoisting and Rigging Technical Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hoisting and Rigging Technical Advisory Committee serves as an advisory body to the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) by providing support to their policy efforts aimed at ensuring the safe performance of hoisting and rigging activities at DOE facilities and in the review and resolution of identified generic hoisting and rigging safety issues.

37

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

38

Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory May 16, 2005 SSRL-HRLP-000-R0 Page 1 of 3 General Information Lift Plan Document # Plan prepared by: Describe the load or items to be lifted: Could the load, if dropped, release hazardous materials or radioactivity? No Yes (describe) Is the load irreplaceable or would it be very costly to replace if damaged? No Yes (describe) Brief description of lift activities (specify if rolling or flipping involved) Equipment Information Equipment ID: Equipment custodian: Rated capacity: Operator capacity : Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE) Steel-toed shoes Required for all personnel involved with lift activity to protect from crushing of feet/toes

39

Risk analysis of jackup rigs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing attention has been focussed in the North Sea and elsewhere on the quantification of the risks of working in a hazardous enviroment: the offshore world. The perception of risk with respect to mobile rigs has often been vague and uninformed. This paper attempts to put the risks with respect to jackup rigs into perspective by quantifying them and comparing them to other risks. This paper contains a few risk comparisons with fixed platforms, semi-submersibles, and drillships. Historical casualties are used in an example to show how a change intended to make an operation safer, may result in the opposite effect. Examining risks from losses due to environmental overload, the conclusion is reached that jackups are very safe structures: there appears to be no jackup, in the timeframe examined, that has been lost because of a deficiency in the calculation methods currently in use by knowledgeable experts.

B.P.M. Sharples; W.T. Bennett Jr; J.C. Trickey

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

42

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

43

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

44

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

45

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

46

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

47

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

48

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

49

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

50

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

51

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

52

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

53

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

54

40th annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that declines characterize the 1992 rig census-in the number of available drilling rigs, in the number of active rigs, in rig utilization rate, in the number of rig owners and in industry optimism. The number of rotary rigs available for U.S. drilling fell by 255 units (11.3%) during the past 12 months, an attrition rate almost four times greater than in 1991. But despite the high attrition, only 59.7% of remaining rigs were working during the time the census was taken. Results of the 1992 census bring emphasis to an industry trend that became apparent in early 1991. The major oil companies, and many independents, continued their exodus form the U.S., and the remaining independents, which were hurt by low natural gas prices and unfavorable tax treatment of intangible drilling costs, were not able to pick u the drilling slack. Consequently, the past year has been disastrous for many U.S. drilling contractors, and the outlook for this industry segment remains bleak.

Fitts, R.L.; Stokes, T.A. (Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Four rigs refurbished for West Africa drilling  

SciTech Connect

In April and May 1990, Shell Petroleum Development Co. of Nigeria Ltd. awarded Noble Drilling West Africa Inc. four separate contracts to drill oil and gas wells in the inland waterways of Nigeria. The contracted rigs included a shallow water jack up, the NN-1, and three posted barges, the Gene Rosser, the Chuck Syring, and the Lewis Dugger. The jack up was built in 1978, and the three posted barges are 1980s vintage. Three of the rigs have been idle for a number of years. The Shell Nigeria contracts required major modifications to the rigs before putting them into international service. Noble replaced or refurbished all major pieces of equipment in the drilling, power, and service systems on the rigs. Rig crews serviced all other equipment. A significant amount of general service piping and electrical wiring was replaced. Each rig also required additional motor control centers to support the new drilling and mud processing equipment. Alfa-Laval waste-heat water desalination plants and new sewage treatment units were installed on all four rigs. Because of the tidal variances and high silt conditions expected in the African waterways, all engine cooling systems were converted from heat exchangers to radiators. Rotary tables were made common on all rigs at 37 1/2 in. Noble had all traveling equipment completely inspected and modified as necessary. Strict attention was paid to certification and documentation of all equipment. Safety upgrades conformed to both Shell and Noble standards. Fire and gas detection systems were installed throughout each rig. Water and foam deluge systems were installed in the wellhead areas, and new foam systems and monitors were installed on the helldecks.

Not Available

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 CONSTRUCTION HOISTING AND RIGGING EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 15-i Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements This chapter outlines the requirements for the safe use of hoisting and rigging equipment on construction projects at DOE installations. 15.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................15-1 15.2 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS.........................................................................................15-2 15.2.1 Qualified Operators of Mobile Cranes.......................................................................15-2 15.2.2 Qualified Operators of Forklift Trucks ......................................................................15-3

57

Group Based Rigging of Realistically Feathered Wings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for feather interpenetration resulting from movement from extended to folded wing poses [Hiebert 3 et al. 2006]. The rigging method developed for this thesis provides a single rig and control solution for animation that includes both outstretched... be highly detailed and as anatomically accurate as a mythical creature can be. A big challenge to this was the look and actions of the feathers [Hiebert et al. 2006]. The feathers on the gryphons (coverts, and body feathers) were generated procedurally...

Howard, Heather Vernette

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

58

Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For 35 years, MD Cowan has built drilling rigs, developing a market for its Super Single® rig for use in the nation's oil and gas fields. Now the Odessa-based company is branching out into alternative energy.

59

Oil-spill aftermath hampers rig research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Mexico, scientists say that they have been struggling to gain access to the region's rigs and drill ships, hampering their research. Marine scientists have long been allowed to install ... ships, hampering their research. Marine scientists have long been allowed to install instruments on offshore structures. The equipment can deliver vital data that would not be practical to gather ...

Melissa Gaskill

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

60

DOE-STD-1090-99; DOE Standard Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TS TS INCH-POUND DOE-STD-1090-99 March 1999 Superseding DOE-STD-1090-96 September 1996 DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual) Summary of Changes as of March 1999

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 CONSTRUCTION HOISTING AND RIGGING EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 15-i This chapter outlines the requirements for the safe use of hoisting and rigging equipment on construction projects at DOE installations. 15.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................15-1 15.2 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS.........................................................................................15-2 15.2.1 Qualified Operators of Mobile Cranes.......................................................................15-2 15.2.2 Qualified Operators of Forklift Trucks ......................................................................15-3 15.2.3 Qualified Riggers .......................................................................................................15-4

62

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 LOAD HOOKS 13-i Chapter 13 Load Hooks This chapter provides safety standards for the inspection, testing, and maintenance of load hooks installed on cranes or hoists and implements the requirements of ASME B30.10, Chapter 10-1, "Hooks." See Chapter 12, "Rigging Accessories," for rigging hook requirements. 13.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.1 Marking......................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.2 Attachments ...............................................................................................................13-1

63

La Belle: rigging in the days of the spritsail topmast, a reconstruction of a seventeenth-century ship's rig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LA BELLE: RIGGING IN THE DAYS OF THE SPRITSAIL TOPMAST, A RECONSTRUCTION OF A SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY SHIP’S RIG A Thesis by CATHARINE LEIGH INBODY CORDER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS December 2007 Major Subject: Anthropology LA BELLE: RIGGING IN THE DAYS OF THE SPRITSAIL TOPMAST, A RECONSTRUCTION OF A SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY SHIP’S RIG A...

Corder, Catharine Leigh Inbody

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

La Belle: Rigging in the days of the spritsail topmast, a reconstruction of a seventeenth-century ship's rig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

La Belle’s rigging assemblage has provided a rare and valuable source of knowledge of 17th-century rigging in general and in particular, French and small-ship rigging characteristics. With over 400 individual items including nearly 160 wood and iron...

Corder, Catharine Leigh Inbody

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Determination of Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Total Neutron count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument  

SciTech Connect

Inspired by approach of Bignan and Martin-Didier (ESARDA 1991) we introduce novel (instrument independent) approach based on multiplication and passive neutron. Based on simulations of SFL-1 the accuracy of determination of {sup tot}Pu content with new approach is {approx}1.3-1.5%. Method applicable for DDA instrument, since it can measure both multiplication and passive neutron count rate. Comparison of pro's & con's of measuring/determining of {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} and {sup tot}Pu suggests a potential for enhanced diversion detection sensitivity.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Rigs to reefs: a petroleum industry perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, by implementing an ocean dumping program in conjunction with a rigs-to-reefs program, and through the development of new technology and methods to reduce transportation costs. Zn addition, the overall cost to industry participation can be reduced through... Environmental Enhancement and Fishing in the Seas (REEFS)" Task Force. This task force was comprised of representatives of federal and state government agencies, the oil and ocean industries, and the commercial and recreational fishing communities. Secretary...

Dubose, William Perry

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Open Rigging Through XML: Character Setup Utilizing Metadata and Node Based Editing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manager. . . . . 22 7 The Rig Manager interface for an empty scene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 8 The Rig Manager interface and “Rig Edit Mode” label on the viewport after clicking the “Create Rig” button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 9 The Rig... and replace them with code that performs the desired actions. For example, the node-based interface can be used to replace the task of authoring rig 6 definition files in a text editor so that the user never needs to learn the rig definition format. 7 3...

Kelly, Logan Scott

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Surveillance Guide - CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING AND RIGGING HOISTING AND RIGGING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to examine hoisting and rigging operations to ensure that safe equipment and work practices are being used. The surveillance includes verification that hoisting and rigging work is performed in accordance with DOE requirements and best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management For Doe Federal And Contractor Employees 2.2 DOE-RL-92-36, Hanford Site Hoisting and Rigging Manual NOTE The DOE Hoisting and Rigging Manual should be used as the primary reference for this surveillance. 1 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement the RL Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual (FRAM) item No. 2504. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

69

MHK Technologies/Ocean Energy Rig | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rig Rig < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Energy Rig.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Energy Rig is a hybrid concept harnessing tidal stream with increased velocity from venturi system wave and wind power The rig also uses solar panels to power computers and warning lights Other unique features include a water ballasting system with automatic self levelling and wave ramps to maximize FreeFlow 69 s new wave power device It is envisaged that the Ocean Energy Rig would be assembled and maintained in dry docks and would be towed out into position before being semi submerged and anchored for operation Power output of the production model would be at least 10MW

70

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the 5-year average. The total rig count was 1,769, up 12 from a year ago.The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 335 as of February 28, which represents a decline of 7 rigs from...

71

C:\Documents and Settings\jhr\My Documents\C_drive\RIGS\users 2013\rigs_usersApril2013.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23 23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) User's Guide Version 2013 For Report Year 2012 Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy April 2013 Form EIA-23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) User's Guide April 2013 EIA-23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) User's Guide Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hardware / Software Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Installing the RIGS Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Installation Error Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Using the EIA-23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Initial Data Import from Last Year's RIGS Submission File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The RIGS Main Menu Screen.

72

Development of a portable grain mass flow sensor test rig  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A portable grain mass flow sensor test rig was built to measure the accuracy of a mass flow sensor with dual use in the field as well as in the lab. Concurrently, a synchronization method was developed that employs GPS timing data to synchronize the ... Keywords: Mass flow sensor, Test rig, Yield monitor accuracy, Yield monitor error

M. Loghavi; R. Ehsani; R. Reeder

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

HURRICANE PREDICTION, OIL RIGS, AND INSURANCE: KATRINA, RITA, AND BEYOND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on meteorological and oceanographic design specifications for offshore structures such as oil rigs. Dr. Forristall spent over 30 years as an offshore research engineer and advisor for Shell Oil, both nationallyHURRICANE PREDICTION, OIL RIGS, AND INSURANCE: KATRINA, RITA, AND BEYOND LUNCHEON BRIEFING

74

CRAD, Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan CRAD, Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging equipment on a scheduled basis, certifying that safe operations are in

75

Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

Dan Davis

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hoisting & Rigging ISMS Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in the

77

Hoisting & Rigging ISMS Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in the

78

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS 5-i Chapter 5 Hostile Environments This chapter describes provisions for hoisting and rigging operations in hostile work environments. 5.1 GENERAL ................................................................................................................................5-1 5.2 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN ......................................................................................5-2 5.2.1 Marking and Posting ....................................................................................................5-2 5.2.2 Inspection and Testing .................................................................................................5-2 EXHIBIT I Hostile Environment Plan ............................................................................................5-3

79

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11-i Chapter 11 11-i Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings CHAPTER 11 WIRE ROPE AND SLINGS This chapter provides requirements for the fabrication and use of wire rope and slings used in hoisting and rigging. 11.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................11-1 11.2 WIRE ROPE ............................................................................................................................11-4 11.2.1 Wire-Rope Lays.........................................................................................................11-4 11.2.2 Wire-Rope Cores .......................................................................................................11-4 11.2.3 Wire Rope for General Purposes

80

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS 5-i Chapter 5 Hostile Environments This chapter describes provisions for hoisting and rigging operations in hostile work environments. 5.1 GENERAL................................................................................................................................5-1 5.2 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN ......................................................................................5-2 5.2.1 Marking and Posting ....................................................................................................5-2 5.2.2 Inspection and Testing .................................................................................................5-2 EXHIBIT I Hostile Environment Plan ............................................................................................5-3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) Released: April 16, 2013 Background The Form EIA-23L, "Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, " is used to collect data on reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are used to develop national and regional estimates of proved reserves of domestic crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids, and to facilitate national energy policy decisions. Reporting on the Form EIA-23L is mandatory. Reserves Information Gathering System The Form EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS), provides respondents with an efficient and effective means for filing the form using a personal computer (PC). Hardware / Software Requirements The minimum hardware requirements needed to install and use RIGS are:

82

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are

83

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on a scheduled basis, certifying that safe operations are in compliance with good conduct of operations. DOE-STD-1090-2001 HoistingRiggingPlan.doc More Documents &...

84

Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in the nation's oil and gas fields. Now the Odessa-based company is branching out into alternative energy. The company recently delivered its first Thermal Single rig, a...

85

Basic Rigging Workbook Training and Qualifications Program Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This instructor handbook incorporates the Subject Area's requirements, as well as information from the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hoisting and Rigging Manual and ANSI B30.9. Definitions Asymmetrical load. An object

Ohta, Shigemi

86

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANAGEMENT ASHRAE 62-89, and the much discussed amendments to this document, is changing the way that the commercial building industry conducts business. As Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) becomes a major theme of regulators, it also becomes a major concern... within the building industry, particularly in the commercial building industry. Failure to comply with industry standards can result in law suits and st. penalties. Every design build contractor, commercial architect, design engineer and commercial...

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

88

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

89

Rotating head for rotary drilling rigs  

SciTech Connect

A rotating head is claimed for a rotary drilling rig which is to be secured to the top of a well pipe having an inner rotating portion with an opening therethrough which permits passage of drill pipe, pipe joints, and Kelly tools; the rotating portion has an annular drive rubber formed integrally with the top portion thereof. A rotating head drive bushing having an opening with a cross-sectional shape generally conforming to the cross-section of the Kelly tool to permit only sliding motion therebetween is provided with helical external ridges which produce a disengagable gripping action with the opening in the drive rubber at the top of the rotating portion of the rotating head. The rotating portion has a conventional stripper rubber at the bottom thereof and is mounted with a double roller bearing to provide low friction motion with respect to the fixed portion of the head. The double roller bearing is lubricated with a viscous lubricating material and paddles are provided between the sets of rollers of the double roller bearing for distributing the viscous lubricating material and in particular propel it onto the upper set of bearings; the upper body portion of the rotating head is readily detachable from the lower sleeve portion which is normally welded to the well conductor pipe.

Adams, J.R.

1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES A-1 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines This appendix provides reference guidance in preparing purchase requisitions for hoisting and rigging materials and equipment. Nationally recognized standards and specifications are referenced for listed items. However, caution should be used prior to procurement of special items in order to verify appropriate specification or standard reference and requirements. Some specific requirements listed in this appendix are more restrictive than consensus standard requirements, but are recommended to ensure materials of adequate quality and workmanship are provided. Quality receipt inspections should be provided for all received materials in order to verify compliance of all

91

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A APPENDIX A PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES A-i Appendix A Procurement Guidelines This appendix provides reference guidance in preparing purchase requisitions for hoisting and rigging materials and equipment. Nationally recognized standards and specifications are referenced for listed items. However, caution should be used prior to procurement of special items in order to verify appropriate specification or standard reference and requirements. Some specific requirements listed in this appendix are more restrictive than consensus standard requirements, but are recommended to ensure materials of adequate quality and workmanship are provided. Quality receipt inspections should be provided for all received materials in order to verify compliance of all

92

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS 1-1 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions The following are specialized terms commonly used when discussing hoisting and rigging operations. Many may not be used in this standard, but are included for general information. The terms are arranged in alphabetical order. Illustrations are included for clarity. ABRASION: Surface wear. ACCELERATION STRESS: Additional stress imposed due to increasing load velocity. ALTERNATE LAY: Lay of wire rope in which the strands are alternately regular and lang lay. ANSI: American National Standards Institute. APPOINTED: Assigned specific responsibilities by the employer or the employer's representative. AREA, METALLIC: Sum of the cross- sectional areas of individual wires in a wire rope

93

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS 1-1 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions The following are specialized terms commonly used when discussing hoisting and rigging operations. Many may not be used in this standard, but are included for general information. The terms are arranged in alphabetical order. Illustrations are included for clarity. ABRASION: Surface wear. ACCELERATION STRESS: Additional stress imposed due to increasing load velocity. ALTERNATE LAY: Lay of wire rope in which the strands are alternately regular and lang lay. ANSI: American National Standards Institute. APPOINTED: Assigned specific responsibilities by the employer or the employer's representative. AREA, METALLIC: Sum of the cross- sectional areas of individual wires in a wire rope

94

Counting Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting Bacteria Counting Bacteria Name: Tammy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am working with my daughter on her Science Fair Project. We are testing daily items that we come in contact with to see how many germs and bacteria it has. How can we differentiate between the types of bacteria? How can we decide which one has the most? We are using the growth medium Agar in petri dishes. Where can I find more scientific info as to why this happens so we can write up the project? Replies: These are complex questions. First, the agar medium is used as a solid phase so that one can see colonies formed. These are round mounds of growth because bacteria multiply in all directions, but they cannot normally move in or on a solid phase so they remain at the site of multiplication. Every bacterial cell can multiply into a colony. Thus, the number of colonies is a measure for the number of cells present, if you have taken quantitative samples. If you want to quantitate, you should try to standardize your samples (for example, use 1 ml liquid to wash surfaces, food particles, 1 ml of liquids, etc. and add of this one drop (with a micropipette would be more accurate) per agar plate and let the drop form a tear on the plate. The number of colonies that grow in this tear are a measure for the original number of bacteria present in the drop, because each colony is derived from a single bacterial cell.

95

The Feasibility of Natural Gas as a Fuel Source for Modern Land-Based Drilling Rigs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rigs are still in use today, most modern drilling rigs are electrically powered. Electric drilling rig engines are coupled to electric generators, in what is called a generator set, or genset, which creates electricity that powers electric motors... drilling rigs can be categorized into either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC), depending on the type of electricity the rig generators produce. Electric motors power the draw-works, top drive, mud pumps, and other systems with electricity...

Nunn, Andrew Howard

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Human rigHts advocacy in action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in memoriam 26 2 nonesuch//Autumn 2011 Greencoat 80 Silk is carbon balanced ­ where the carbon intensity has purchased. Carbon balancing by the World Land Trust tackles climate change through projects that both offset 18 Brave new world 22 thought that counts 27 In pictures snapshots 5 taken 29 Regulars Bristol

Bristol, University of

97

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 BELOW-THE-HOOK LIFTING DEVICES 14-i Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices This chapter provides the requirements for below-the-hook lifting devices used in hoisting and rigging, such as spreader bars, lifting yokes, and lift fixtures. This section implements the requirements of ASME B30.20, "Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices." NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10,000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials may be governed by ANSI N14.6 ["Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 Pounds (4,500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials."] 14.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................14-1

98

Workover well control. Part 3. Conventional rigs, snubbing units handle a variety of workover jobs  

SciTech Connect

The conventional rig, the most widely used rig for workovers, performs several common functions: tripping in and out of the hole, rotating the work string, and circulating fluid. Its primary component groups are the derrick, hoisting systems, rotary tools, circulating systems, and tubular goods. Rig sizing depends on the job requirements; the typical workover rig is a small-capacity, single unit used for concentric work. A workover rig's most important feature is its portability; compartmentalizing the rig permits transporting it offshore in packages smaller than 8000 lb and allows small cranes to replace derrick barges for loading operations.

Adams, N.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Professional development of new rig supervisors a must  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that because the number of drilling personnel has dropped dramatically over the last decade, many operators now face a shortage of competent rig supervisors. To be effective, the rig supervisor must develop a knowledge of drilling operations, apply optimization techniques to improve drilling performance, demand safe work practices, and protect the environment. Petroleum engineering degree programs and industry training programs can teach the rig supervisor specific technical and management skills; however, traditionally, the supervisor trainee shadows an experienced company man to learn how to direct a drilling operation. The success of this method depends not only on the skills and learning capabilities of the trainee but also on the trainer's time, motivation, knowledge, and ability to teach the skills necessary to direct drilling activities.

Nordt, D.P. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Stone, M.S. (Marathon Oil Co., Bridgeport, IL (United States))

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Natural Gas for the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green) the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green) JOHN DAVIS: No one has been hit harder by rising fuel prices than America's long-haul commercial truckers. A big rig can easily burn 20,000 gallons of fuel a year, and with diesel prices projected to keep rising, this not only pinches the trucker's bottom line, but that extra cost is passed on to American consumers. Meanwhile, natural gas prices have remained stable and are forecast to stay that way for years to come. Up to now, demand for natural gas as a transportation fuel has been mostly for compressed natural gas used by light and medium-duty vehicles. City buses, refuse haulers, utilities, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Inventory management of steel plates at an oil rig construction company .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Keppel Fels produces make-to-order oil exploration rigs for the global market. Each rig requires close to 6000 metric tons of steel in the course of… (more)

Tan, Chien Yung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Inventory management of steel plates at an oil rig construction company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keppel Fels produces make-to-order oil exploration rigs for the global market. Each rig requires close to 6000 metric tons of steel in the course of its production. Optimal management of this steel is very critical in this ...

Tan, Chien Yung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Doubts swirl around plan to use rigs as reefs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Offshore oil platforms could be allowed to remain in place as artificial habitats for marine life ... oil stops flowing, and to leave the sites as they found them. But the Rigs to Reefs Act of 2003, which is sponsored by Representative David Vitter (Republican, ...

Betsy Mason

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ministers block disposal of oil rigs at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ministers last week ended three years of public controversy about the fate of disused oil rigs in the northeast Atlantic ocean. They decided that most will have to be dismantled ... all environmentalist groups. Oil companies, on the other hand, were disappointed. The UK Offshore Operators Association said the decision to outlaw deep-sea disposal of oil and gas ...

Ehsan Masood

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hoisting and Rigging: Lift Planning and Control for Ordinary Lifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operator Follow specific instructions/procedures for attachment of the rigging gear to the load. Use. Repeat as necessary until the load is evenly balanced. Follow "Conduct of Operator" requirements2 Stop at the work site and follow the plan Assign a designated leader Ensure all personnel involved in the lift

Wechsler, Risa H.

106

Mixed Stream Test Rig Winter FY-2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the data and analysis of the initial testing campaign of the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the test specimen selection, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, and data and analysis of specimens exposed in two environments designed to represent those expected for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE).

Chalres Park; Tedd Lister; Kevin DeWall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Planning and scheduling a fleet of rigs using simulation-optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some of the most important and expensive activities in the oil field development and production phases relate to using rigs. These can be used for drilling wells, or for maintenance activities. As rigs are usually scarce compared to the number of wells ... Keywords: Planning, Rigs, Scheduling, Simulation-optimization

Hugo ViníCius Bassi; VirgíLio Jose Martins Ferreira Filho; Laura Bahiense

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Rigs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Rigs Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Rigs February 8, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - BMI Corporation, a company in South Carolina, in partnership with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has successfully developed a technology that will make semi trucks more fuel efficient with the potential to save millions of gallons of fuel. Utilizing the nation's most powerful computer, BMI Corp designed a SmartTruck UnderTray System, a set of integrated aerodynamic fairings that improve the aerodynamics of 18-wheeler (Class 8) long-haul trucks. If all 1.3 million Class 8 trucks in the U.S. were configured with these components, companies could achieve annual savings of 1.5 billion gallons

109

Rotary torque and rpm indicator for oil well drilling rigs  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the torque applied by the rotary table to the drill string and the rpm of the drill string is provided. An intermediate adapter is positioned between the drill kelly and the rotary table. A strain gauge is attached to the intermediate adapter to measure torsional deformation and provide an indication of rotary torque. Transmission of torque data is accomplished by radio frequency transmission utilizing a transmitter on the intermediate adapter. A receiver is mounted to the side of the drill rig floor to receive and demodulate the torque signal. The intermediate adapter is rotating at the same rate as the drill string. Detection of the revolutions utilizing the changing R.F. Field strength is accomplished at the edge of the drill rig platform or elsewhere with a stationary sensor which doubles as the torque receiver. A highly directional torque transmitter antenna mounted on the adapter is used with the major lobe lying parallel to the rig floor and perpendicular to the pipe. By detecting the envelope of the radio frequency field strength, each rotation is marked by a peak. This enables continuous torque and rpm monitoring.

Chien, L.C.

1981-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

An energy-saving oil drilling rig for recovering potential energy and decreasing motor power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An energy-saving oil drilling rig is researched. A large accumulator is adopted in this rig to store the energy of the motor during the auxiliary time of lifting the drill stem and the potential energy of the drill stem when lowered. The equipped power of this rig decreases remarkably compared with the conventional drilling rig, and this rig can also recover and reuse the potential energy of the drill stem. Therefore, this rig owns remarkable energy-saving effect compared with the conventional drilling rig, and the energy-saving effect of the energy-saving oil drilling rig is also verified by the field tests. The mathematical model of the energy-saving oil drilling rig lowering the drill stem was derived and simulation analysis was conducted. Through simulation the curves of the drill stem lowering velocity and lowering displacement with time were obtained, and some conclusions were reached: (1) the heavier the drill stem lowered, the higher the lowering velocity is, and the shorter the lowering time is; (2) the smaller the displacement of the variable pump-motor, the higher the lowering velocity is, and the shorter the lowering time is.

Lujun Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging, 2/25/2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to examine hoisting and rigging operations to ensure that safe equipment and work practices are being used.  The surveillance includes verification that...

112

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

:  To determine that hoisting and rigging operations areconducted according to “industry best standards” for increasing equipment reliabilitywhile assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being...

113

,,,,,"Rig: TOI Discoverer Enterprise"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Well: OCS-G 32306 002 ST00BP00",,,,"Flow Data" Well: OCS-G 32306 002 ST00BP00",,,,"Flow Data" ,,,,,"Field: Mississippi Canyon 252" ,,,,,"Rig: TOI Discoverer Enterprise" ,,,,,"Choke Manifold",,,,"Rates",,,,,,,,,"Ratio" "Date","Time","Choke A","Choke B","BSW","WHPres","WHTemp","WHDCP","WHDCTemp","Gas Rate","Gas Cum","Uncorrected ","Uncorrected ","Water Rate","Water Cum","Uncorrected ","Uncorrected ","Cumulative Oil ","GOR1","Comments" ,,,,,,,,,,,"Oil Rate","Oil Cum ",,,"Liquid Rate","Liquid Cum","from Cargo "

114

Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

Huttrer, G.W. [Geothermal Management Company, Inc., Frisco, CO (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

count was 1,803 as of March 21, according to data from Baker Hughes Inc. The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 326, which represents a decrease of 18 rigs from the previous...

116

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

count was 1,809 as of March 14, according to data from Baker Hughes Inc. The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 344, which represents a decrease of 1 rig from the previous week...

117

Planning and scheduling a fleet of rigs using simulation–optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some of the most important and expensive activities in the oil field development and production phases relate to using rigs. These can be used for drilling wells, or for maintenance activities. As rigs are usually scarce compared to the number of wells requiring service, a schedule of wells to be drilled or repaired must be devised. The objective is to minimize opportunity costs within certain operating constraints. This paper present the first stochastic approach to deals with the problem of planning and scheduling a fleet of offshore oil rigs, where the service time is assumed being uncertain. A simulation–optimization method is used to generate “expected solutions” and performance measures for rigs, as well as statistics about well allocation to rigs. The methodology can be used in two different ways – to schedule an existing fleet of rigs or to scale the size of the fleet – both contemplating the uncertain nature of the problem. The method’s expected results include performance measures for each rig, expected delay for a well to be served, the expected schedule of rigs, and a distribution of the well servicing order. The experiments based on real situations demonstrate the effectiveness of the simulation–optimization approach.

Hugo Vinícius Bassi; Virgílio Jose Martins Ferreira Filho; Laura Bahiense

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Structural Basis of Viral RNA Recognition by RIG-I-Like Receptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

binding surface also abolished RIG-I signaling in cells. In order to compare the RIG-I/RNA interactions with other RLRs, we also determined the dsRNA binding surface of MDA5 CTD by NMR titration studies. MDA5 CTD has a similar binding surface...

Lu, Cheng

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Numerical and experimental determination of neutron characteristics in irradiation rigs operated in LVR-15 research reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......standard single-cell CHOUCA rigs or...dedicated multi-cell rigs. The temperature...reflector and in fuel will be provided...dedicated to material degradation evaluation. IRRADIATION...evaluation of material degradation induced by radiation...averaged over cell) has to be modified...reflects actual fuel burnup distribution......

Michal Koleska; Ladislav Viererbl; Zdena Lahodova; Jaroslav Ernest; Jelena Zmitkova; Milan Marek

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Inspect rigging equipment for material handling before use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Inspect rigging equipment for material handling before use. Rigging Equipment for Material Handling Safety Tip #19 At your job or at the plate, you can't get home on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet. Please refrain from reading the information verbatim

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The design of a test rig for the identification of dynamic coefficients of a high temperature magnetic bearing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a report on the research and Micrographics. development to design a test rig for the identification of the dynamic coefficients of a radial magnetic bearing. The test rig development is intended for dynamic coefficient observation...

Rahtika, I Putu Gede Sopan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

New ultra-deepwater rig with dual rotaries will reduce costs  

SciTech Connect

The Discoverer Enterprise, a next generation, ultra-deepwater drill ship with a dual rotary system, will decrease drilling and completion costs by reducing bottom hole assembly (BHA) and tubular preparation time. Transocean Offshore received a contract from Amoco Corp. to build the ultra-deep floating rig and is scheduled to spud its first well in July 1998. It will generally work in water deeper than 6,000 ft. The rig design involves a new approach that addresses the overall well-construction process and equipment required to decrease significantly deepwater drilling time. The Discoverer is the first ultra-deepwater rig designed specifically for handling subsea completions and extended well tests. The paper discusses increased deepwater rig demand, rig construction costs, drillship design, well construction, development drilling, and cost justification.

Cole, J.C.; Herrmann, R.P.; Scott, R.J. [Transocean Offshore Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shaughnessy, J.M. [Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Job Counting Guidelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Environmental Management Definitions and Guidelines for Counting Monthly and Quarterly EM Recovery Act Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) and Cumulative Head-Count The following updated definitions and guidelines are intended to provide EM Recovery Act sites with information to collect and report timely and accurate full-time equivalent and cumulative head-count data for both monthly and quarterly jobs data calls. These revised guidelines supersede the previous monthly jobs data reporting definitions and guidelines dated February 9, 2010. These revised guidelines remain consistent with OMB guidance issued December 18, 2009 and cover subcontractors and vendors as well as prime

124

Selectively fired, tubing-conveyed perforating guns save rig time  

SciTech Connect

Selective firing of tubing-conveyed perforating (TCP) guns during drill stem tests (DSTs) added flexibility and saved costs for Marathon Oil Co. As an example, in the Garland field in Wyoming, the guns allowed perforating multiple zones in one trip. This saved 1 1/2--2 days/well in rig time and $25,000--30,000/well in electric wire line and DST tool charges. For international offshore operations, savings of $200,000/well appear possible. Savings result not only from perforating multiple zones, but also from arbitrarily setting firing patterns with or without zone isolation. The paper describes the testing of equipment, the design of the guns, firing heads, crossover assembly, pressure isolation sub, control line, and select-fire sub, and applications for the guns.

Snider, P.M. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Bond, P.L. (Halliburton Energy Services, Dallas, TX (United States))

1993-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

Peletier, Reynier

126

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division : To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001

127

Motor Drives of Modern Drilling and Servicing Rigs for Oil and Gas Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a synthetic view on the most recent achievements in the field of drilling and servicing rig drives for oil and gas wells. This field is featuring ... kilowatts and speeds of 150–250 rpm for drilling

Aurelian Iamandei; Gheorghe Miloiu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced seal rig Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies Summary: , rotating turbine research rigs, realistic gas...

129

Analytical and experimental investigations of a labyrinth seal test rig and damper seals for turbomachinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The test rig is also used during the development of a unique damper seal device. The experimental data used to determine the direct damping coefficient of the damper seal device are presented. Results of vibration and pressure measurements that demonstrate...

Shultz, Richard Raymond

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

FLOP Counts for Single-Node Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests These data, obtained using the NERSC Hopper system, are provided for reference. Code MPI Tasks Threads Reference TFLOP Count Benchmark Time (seconds) # of iterations miniFE 144 1 5.05435E+12 130.2 (total program time) miniGhost 96 1 6.55500E+12 76.5 AMG 96 1 1.30418E+12 66.95 18 UMT 96 1 1.30211E+13 416.99 49 SNAP 96 1 5.84246E+11 15.37 3059 miniDFT 40 1 2.32379E+13 153.97 GTC 64 1 6.63670E+13 1839.4 MILC 24 1 1.45971E+13 744.3 CORRECTION (02 August 2013): The values given for the reference counts are FLOPs, not TFLOPs. Last edited: 2013-08-02 09:40:18

131

Diverter/bop system and method for a bottom supported offshore drilling rig  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a system adapted for alternative use as a diverter or a blowout preventer for a bottom supported drilling rig and adapted for positioning beneath a rotary table of the drilling rig, the system comprising: a fluid flow controller having a controller housing with a lower opening and an upper opening and a vertical flow path therebetween and an outlet passage provided in its housing wall, and at least two bases. A method is described for installing a system adapted for alternative connection as a diverter or a blowout preventer for a bottom supported drilling rig positioned beneath a rotary table of the drilling rig after structural casing has been set in a borehole. The method comprises: positioning a first telescoping spool having a lower end and an upper end below the rotary table, the first spool having a first base disposed at its upper end, the first base having a port disposed in its wall; aligning a fluid flow controller having a controller housing wall outlet passage and adapted for alternative use as a diverter or a blowout preventer so that the controller is substantially vertically aligned between a bore of the rotary table above and the structural casing below; and securing the fluid flow controller beneath the drilling rig rotary table.

Roche, J.R.; Alexander, G.G.

1987-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

levels 22.5% below year-ago levels and 16.6% below the 5-year average. The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 356 as of January 24, which represents a decline of 9 rigs from...

133

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to data from Baker Hughes Inc., an increase of 6 from the previous week. The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 318, which represents a decrease of 8 rigs from the previous week...

134

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

below year-ago levels, and 1.2% below the 5-year average. The Baker Hughes natural gas rotary rig count totaled 349 active units as of Friday, June 21, a decline of 4 rigs from...

135

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

levels 48.9% below year-ago levels and 46.2% below the 5-year average. The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 345 as of March 7. This represents an increase of 10 rigs from...

136

Mode localization results and laboratory demonstration techniques with a multi-pendulum rig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Perturbed system mode shapes, analytical, for R' = 0. 015. 16 Table III. Perturbed system mode shapes, analytical, for R' = 0. 04 (K, = 0. 908 N-m/rad, 1, = 0, 532 m). 17 Table IV. Perturbed system mode shapes, analytical, for R' = 0. 15 (K, = 3. 90 N.... Pendulum rig schematic Figure 2. Detail of pendulum rig. Figure 3. Graphical depiction of mode shapes given in Table I. 10 Figure 4. Depiction of perturbed mode shapes given in Table's II, III, and IV for: (a) Rs=0. 015; (b) R =0. 04; and (c) R =0. 15...

Bollich, Robert Kenneth Gerard

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Rigging a horse and rider: simulating the predictable and repetitive movement of the rider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

setup. If an animation piece is only going to have a few shots with a horse and rider, then the trouble of setting up an automated character rig is not practical, but if there are a significant amount of shots with a horse and rider galloping across...

Kuhnel, Jennifer Lynn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

AbstractThe red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) is currently under rig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

653 Abstract­The red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) is currently under rig orous federal and state of annuli in otolith thin sections have been used to age many species of fish, including red snapper. However, the utility of this method for aging red snapper has been questioned by those who dispute both

139

Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2009 Air Products-Entrained Particle Flow Test Rig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2009 Air Products-Entrained Particle Flow Test are causing catalyst plugging. Objectives Air Products requested that a test rig be constructed to entrain the hydrogen reforming facilities and aid Air Products in understanding the plugging problem. Approach

Demirel, Melik C.

140

A Built for Purpose Micro-Hole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)  

SciTech Connect

This report will serve as the final report on the work performed from the contract period October 2005 thru April 2007. The project 'A Built for Purpose Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)' purpose was to upgrade an existing state-of-the-art Coiled Tubing Drilling Rig to a Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) capable of meeting the specifications and tasks of the Department of Energy. The individual tasks outlined to meet the Department of Energy's specifications are: (1) Concept and development of lubricator and tool deployment system; (2) Concept and development of process control and data acquisition; (3) Concept and development of safety and efficiency improvements; and (4) Final unit integration and testing. The end result of the MCTR upgrade has produced a unit capable of meeting the following requirements: (1) Capable of handling 1-inch through 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing (Currently dressed for 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing and capable of running up to 3-1/2-inch coiled tubing); (2) Capable of drilling and casing surface, intermediate, production and liner hole intervals; (3) Capable of drilling with coiled tubing and has all controls and installation piping for a top drive; (4) Rig is capable of running 7-5/8-inch range 2 casing; and (5) Capable of drilling 5,000 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 6,000 ft true measured depth (TMD).

Bart Patton

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

142

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

143

Full Counting Statistics of Stationary Particle Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a general scheme for treating particle beams as many particle systems. This includes the full counting statistics and the requirements of Bose/Fermi symmetry. In the stationary limit, i.e., for longer and longer beams, the total particle number diverges, and a description in Fock space is no longer possible. We therefore extend the formalism to include stationary beams. These beams exhibit a well-defined "local" counting statistics, by which we mean the full counting statistics of all clicks falling into any given finite interval. We treat in detail a model of a source, creating particles in a fixed state, which then evolve under the free time evolution, and we determine the resulting stationary beam in the far field. In comparison to the one-particle picture we obtain a correction due to Bose/Fermi statistics, which depends on the emission rate. We also consider plane waves as stationary many particle states, and determine the distribution of intervals between successive clicks in such a beam.

J. Kiukas; A. Ruschhaupt; R. F. Werner

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

Rigging skeletal perissodactyl and artiodactyl ungulate limbs using analytic inverse kinematic-based solutions for a feature film production environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis is to develop and construct a repeatable, scalable, and portable rigging solution for the skeletal limbs of ungulates, maximizing functionality while streamlining intuitive interface controls for a feature film production...

Telford, William Lawrence, Jr

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

145

A test rig for the identification of rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film bearings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The test bearing articles were considered for cryogenic applications where the actual lubrication medium is liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen. The parameter identification method used an advanced pseudo-random forcing excitation and a technique based...A TEST RIG FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS OF FLUID FILM BEARINGS A Thesis LEWIS MILLER ROBISON III Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Robison, Lewis Miller

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Large scale test rig for flow visualization and leakage measurement of labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number. Heffner (1959) measured the leakage rates of air through stationary true size labyrinth seals with the goal of predicting leakage rates for new seal designs through correlation charts developed from his investigation. Leakage resistance... geometries and land surfaces with the objective of obtaining optimized seal design criteria. The test rig utilized a flat two-dimensional stationary seal with a radial clearance-to-width ratio of approximately 100:1 to reduce wall end effects. Air...

Broussard, Daniel Harold

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Diverter bop system and method for a bottom supported offshore drilling rig  

SciTech Connect

A system and method for installing a fluid flow controller and telescoping spools beneath an offshore bottom supported drilling rig rotary table is disclosed. Upper and lower telescoping spools are provided for initially connecting a Diverter/BOP convertible fluid flow controller between structural casing in the well and a permanent housing beneath the drilling rig rotary table. Clamp means are provided for clamping the rig vent line to an opening in the housing wall of the fluid flow controller during drilling of the borehole through the structural casing in preparation for setting and cementing the conductor casing. In that mode, the system is adapted as a diverter system. After the well is drilled for the conductor casing and the conductor casing is cemented and cut off at its top, a mandrel is fitted at the top of the conductor casing to which the lower end of the lower spool may be connected. The system may be used in this configuration as a diverter system, or after removal of the vent line and connection of a kill line to the housing outlet, the system may be used as a low pressure blowout preventer system.

Roche, J. R.; Alexander, G. G.; Carbaugh, W. L.

1985-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Counting Defective Parking Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppose that $n$ drivers each choose a preferred parking space in a linear car park with $m$ spaces. Each driver goes to the chosen space and parks there if it is free, and otherwise takes the first available space with larger number (if any). If all drivers park successfully, the sequence of choices is called a parking function. In general, if $k$ drivers fail to park, we have a \\emph{defective parking function} of \\emph{defect} $k$. Let $\\cp(n,m,k)$ be the number of such functions. In this paper, we establish a recurrence relation for the numbers $\\cp(n,m,k)$, and express this as an equation for a three-variable generating function. We solve this equation using the kernel method, and extract the coefficients explicitly: it turns out that the cumulative totals are partial sums in Abel's binomial identity. Finally, we compute the asymptotics of $\\cp(n,m,k)$. In particular, for the case $m=n$, if choices are made independently at random, the limiting distribution of the defect (the number of drivers who fail t...

Cameron, Peter J; Prellberg, Thomas; Schweitzer, Pascal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Standardization of 241Am by digital coincidence counting, liquid scintillation counting and defined solid angle counting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclide 241Am decays by alpha emission to 237Np. Most of the decays (84.6 %) populate the excited level of 237Np with energy of 59.54 keV. Digital Coincidence Counting was applied to standardize a solution of 241Am by alpha-gamma coincidence counting with efficiency extrapolation. Electronic discrimination was implemented with a pressurized proportional counter and the results were compared with two other independent techniques: Liquid Scintillation Counting using the logical sum of double coincidences in a TDCR array and Defined Solid Angle Counting taking into account activity inhomogeneity in the active deposit. The results show consistency between the three methods within a limit of a 0.3%. An ampoule of this solution will be sent to the International Reference System (SIR) during 2009. Uncertainties were analysed and compared in detail for the three applied methods.

C. Balpardo; M. E. Capoulat; D. Rodrigues; P. Arenillas

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hanford whole body counting manual  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Counting Bitangents with Stable Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is an elementary introduction to the theory of moduli spaces of curves and maps. As an application to enumerative geometry, we show how to count the number of bitangent lines to a projective plane curve of degree $d$ by doing intersection theory on moduli spaces.

David Ayala; Renzo Cavalieri

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Neutron Bombardment of Counting Diamonds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

21 February 1956 research-article Neutron Bombardment of Counting Diamonds A. H...Examination was also made of the effect of neutron bombardment on pulse-height distribution...additional charge traps produced by the neutrons. The layered crystal texture disclosed...

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Factors influencing the incidence rates of injuries and accidents among seafarers and rig workers providing support to the WA offshore oil and gas industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this study was to identify, discuss and make recommendations regarding causal factors associated with injuries and accidents among seafarers and rig workers… (more)

Martinovich, Tony, Dr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas  

SciTech Connect

A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fast Counting of Triangles in Large Real Networks: Algorithms and Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the vast machin- ery of eigenvalue algorithms and fine-tunings. Eigen- values can be easily computed. In this paper, we provide two algorithms, the Eigen- Triangle for counting the total number of triangles in a graph, and the EigenTriangleLocal algorithm that gives the count of triangles that contain a desired

Megalooikonomou, Vasilis

156

Finger-Count & Radial-Stroke Shortcuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finger-Count & Radial-Stroke Shortcuts: Two Techniques for Augmenting Linear Menus on Multi-finger Interaction techniques ·Principles ·Finger-Counting ·Radial-Stroke 5 #12;Finger-Counting ·Express a pair;Radial-Stroke Shortcuts ·Principle ·Radial-stroke · Marking menus [Kurtenbach 91] · Multi-Stroke menus

Bailly, Gilles

157

Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions Mansour Department of Mathematics, Haifa University, Israel #12;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 3 Definitions · A composition = 12 . . . m of n N

Heubach, Silvia

158

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2010 Kenya Water Well Drill Rig Redesign of Engine Drive Train System & Support Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Engine Drive Train System & Support Tower Overview The team was presented with the task of redesigning the engine drive train system and support structure for a water drill rig to be used in Kenya. The original engine drive train system was fabricated by a professional machinist and had many intricate components

Demirel, Melik C.

159

Design and Analysis of a Test Rig for Modeling the Bit/Formation Interface in Petroleum Drilling Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and horizontal wells and measuring the effects of various factors on the stability of perturbations on the system. A test rig concept has been developed to accurately measure the interaction forces and torques between the bit, formation and fluids during drilling...

Wilson, Joshua Kyle

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Colours, luminosity functions and counts of galaxies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......estimate the LF at large redshifts, a way to pro- 1996 RAS, MNRAS 283, 865-872 Colours, LFs and counts ofgalaxies 871 ceed is by carefully evaluating the present-day LF in order to infer from it, and from the observed counts, its evolution as a......

P. Saracco; G. Chincarini; A. Iovino

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Job Counting Guidelines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Recovery Act » Job Counting Guidelines Mission » Recovery Act » Job Counting Guidelines Job Counting Guidelines The following updated definitions and guidelines are intended to provide EM Recovery Act sites with information to collect and report timely and accurate full-time equivalent and cumulative head-count data for both monthly and quarterly jobs data calls. These revised guidelines supersede the previous monthly jobs data reporting definitions and guidelines dated February 9, 2010. These revised guidelines remain consistent with OMB guidance issued December 18, 2009 and cover subcontractors and vendors as well as prime contractors. Job Counting Guidelines More Documents & Publications EA-1548: Finding of No Significant Impact Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Proceedings of the Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric

163

Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

Cai, Jin-Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Low cost crowd counting using audio tones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With mobile devices becoming ubiquitous, collaborative applications have become increasingly pervasive. In these applications, there is a strong need to obtain a count of the number of mobile devices present in an area, ...

Kannan, Pravein Govindan

165

Rack Module Enhancements of Counting Invariants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a modified rack algebra Z[X] for racks X with finite rack rank N. We use representations of Z[X] into rings, known as rack modules, to define enhancements of the rack counting invariant for classical and virtual knots and links. We provide computations and examples to show that the new invariants are strictly stronger than the unenhanced counting invariant and are not determined by the Jones or Alexander polynomials.

Haas, Aaron; Nelson, Sam; Yuen, Jonah; Zhan, Qingcheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

167

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

169

Online Speed Scaling Based on Active Job Count to Minimize Flow plus Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Online Speed Scaling Based on Active Job Count to Minimize Flow plus Energy Tak-Wah Lam Lap-Kei Lee research on online job scheduling has gradually taken speed scaling and energy usage into consideration algorithms that aim at minimizing the total flow time plus energy usage. The results are divided into two

Wong, Prudence W.H.

170

TRAC-PF1/MOD3 calculations of Savannah River Laboratory Rig FA single-annulus heated experiments  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of TRAC-PF1/MOD3 benchmarks of the Rig FA experiments performed at the Savannah River Laboratory to simulate prototypic reactor fuel assembly behavior over a range of fluid conditions typical of the emergency cooling system (ECS) phase of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The primary purpose of this work was to use the SRL Rig FA tests to qualify the TRAC-PF1/MOD3 computer code and models for computing Mark-22 fuel assembly LOCA/ECS power limits. This qualification effort was part of a larger effort undertaken by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy to independently confirm power limits for the Savannah River Site K Reactor. The results of this benchmark effort as discussed in this paper demonstrate that TRAC/PF1/MOD3 coupled with proper modeling is capable of simulating thermal-hydraulic phenomena typical of that encountered in Mark-22 fuel assembly during LOCA/ECS conditions.

Fischer, S.R.; McDaniel, C.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Experimental analysis of control loops with different delay times in the supply air system of a radiator test rig  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The test rig of low-temperature hot-water radiator is a typical multi-input multi-output (MIMO) thermal system with large time delay. Aiming at the control of the supply air temperature and the temperature of the environmental chamber in the test rig, the paper carries out the fuzzy control experiments and PI control experiments based on adjusting the electric heater in the supply air system, in which there are two control loops with various delay time. The experiments researched two types of fuzzy control methods which are the basic fuzzy control (BFC), and the self-organizing rules fuzzy control (SORFC) with zero initial control rules. For the control loop of supply air temperature with short delay time, PI control performs better with fast convergence speed and small overshoot than the BFC and the SORFC. The convergence speed of the BFC method is lower than other two control methods. For the control loop of chamber temperature with long delay time, the SORFC has a satisfied control performance with less overshoot and stable error than the BFC and PI control.

Yongpan Chen; Jili Zhang; Zhen Lu; Tianyi Zhao; Hui Liu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Optical planar waveguide for cell counting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening military medicine disaster medicine and rural healthcare. In this report we present a shallow buried planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood urine or other biofluids.

John LeBlanc; Andrew J. Mueller; Adrian Prinz; Manish J. Butte

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture Minor Tracking Sheet Total Minimum Credits: 26 Minor standing is prerequisite Notes: Required courses in one's major will not count for the minor with one exception: 1 architecture studio course is required for interior architecture majors enrolled in the architecture minor, and this studio

175

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

176

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the same time last year, according to data released by Baker Hughes Inc. The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 337 as of February 14, a decline of 14 below last week and 84...

177

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

levels 31.2% below year-ago levels and 35.3% below the 5-year average. The Baker Hughes rotary rig count totaled 1,860 as of June 6, down 6 units from the previous week. The...

178

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

levels 27.4% below year-ago levels and 31.0% below the 5-year average. The Baker Hughes rotary rig count totaled 1,858 as of June 20, up 4 units from the previous week. The...

179

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

levels 7.2% below year-ago levels and 3.0% below the 5-year average. The natural gas rotary rig count totaled 375 this week, an increase of 8 from the previous week, according...

180

Type A Accident Investigation of the June 21, 2001, Drilling Rig Operator Injury at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, August 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On June 21, 2001, at approximately 9:40 A.M., a construction sub-tier contractor employee (the “Operator”) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) received serious head injuries requiring hospitalization when he was struck by part of the drilling rig (a “tong”) that he was operating.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Hardware-in-the-Loop Test Rig for Designing Near-Earth Aerial Robotics Vefa Narli and Paul Y. Oh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and build- ings. The lack of flight data and performance metrics poses a gap that prevents the analytical is a full-scale diorama of a near-Earth environment like forests. The rig is used to capture metrics adverse weather conditions and obscurants, like fog, rain or dust. A key gap in the knowledge domain

Oh, Paul

182

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

above year-ago levels and 3.0% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count decreased by 43 active units to 1,633 rigs for the week ending January...

183

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

below year-ago levels and 6.8% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count for the week ending October 31 increased by 2 units to 1,929 rigs,...

184

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

below year-ago levels and 9.8% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count for the week ending November 26 fell by 12 units to 1,917 rigs, according...

185

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

below year-ago levels and 6.4% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count for the week ending November 14 increased by 3 units to 1,928 rigs,...

186

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

above year-ago levels and 1.2% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count decreased by 90 active units to 1,543 rigs for the week ending January...

187

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

below year-ago levels and 9.5% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count for the week ending December 5 increased by 3 units to 1,920 rigs,...

188

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

above year-ago levels and 5.5% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count decreased by 74 units to 1,676 rigs for the week ending January 16,...

189

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

above year-ago levels and 2.1% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count decreased by 29 units to 1,811 rigs for the week ending January 2,...

190

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

above year-ago levels and 7.3% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count for the week ending December 12 decreased by 27 units to 1,893 rigs,...

191

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

below year-ago levels and 6.2% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count for the week ending November 7 fell by 4 units to 1,925 rigs, according...

192

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

above year-ago levels and 3.8% below the five-year average for this week. The total U.S. rotary rig count decreased by 61 units to 1,750 rigs for the week ending January 9,...

193

COUNTING WITH IRRATIONAL TILES SCOTT GARRABRANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and rational side lengths. Note that the dark shaded tiles here are bookends, i.e. every tiling of [1 Ã? n] must f(n) is in F1, i.e. equal to fT (n) for all n 1 and some rational set of tiles T as aboveCOUNTING WITH IRRATIONAL TILES SCOTT GARRABRANT AND IGOR PAK Abstract. We introduce and study

Pak, Igor

194

High-rate counting efficiency of VLPC  

SciTech Connect

A simple model is applied to describe dependencies of Visible Light Photon Counter (VLPC) characteristics on temperature and operating voltage. Observed counting efficiency losses at high illumination, improved by operating at higher temperature, are seen to be a consequence of de-biasing within the VLPC structure. A design improvement to minimize internal de-biasing for future VLPC generations is considered. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Hogue, H.H. [Research and Technology Center, Boeing Electronic Systems and Missile Defense, 3370 Miraloma Ave M/S HB17, Anaheim, California 92803 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Galactic structure studies with BATC star counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first results of star counts carried out with the National Astronomical Observatories (NAOC) 60/90 cm Schmidt Telescope in 15 intermediate-band filters from 3000 to 10000 {\\AA} in the BATC survey. We analyze a sample of over 1400 main sequence stars ($14\\le$V$\\le21$), which lie in the field with central coordinates R.A.=$09^h53^m13^s.30$ and DEC=47$^\\circ49^{\\prime}00^{\\prime\\prime}.0$ (J2000). The field of view is 0.95 deg$^{2}$, and the spatial scale was $1\\arcsec.67$. In our model, the distribution of stars perpendicular to the plane of the Galaxy is given by two exponential disks (thin disk plus thick disk) and a de Vaucouleurs halo. Based on star counts, we derive the scale heights of the thin disk to be $320^{+14}_{-15}$ pc and of the thick disk to be $640^{+30}_{-32}$ pc, respectively, with a local density of $7.0\\pm1%$ of the thin disk. We find that the observed counts support an axial ratio of $c/a\\le0.6$ for a de Vaucouleurs $r^{1/4}$ law, implying a more flattened halo. We also derive...

Du, C; Ma, J; Chen, A B C; Yang, Y; Li, J; Wu, H; Jiang, Z; Chen, J; Du, Cuihua; Zhou, Xu; Ma, Jun; Chen, Alfred B-C; Yang, Yanbin; Li, Jiuli; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhaoji; Chen, Jiansheng

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

It's the little things that count | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NPO News Releases It's the little things that count It's the little things that count OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- In just five months, the Jack Case Center at the National Nuclear...

197

Measurement of zero-count probability in photoelectron statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The probability of zero-count P0(T) (as a function of the counting interval T) is one of the most interesting functions characterizing a light field. Experimentally,...

Basano, L; Ottonello, P

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Locate Stations Locate Stations Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on AddThis.com... Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State

199

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

200

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

202

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

204

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

155The Great Gulf Oil Catastrophe of 2010 NASA's Terra satellite flew over the Deepwater Horizon rig's oil spill in the Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rig's oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on Saturday, May 1 and captured the above natural-color image of Mexico. NOAA's estimated release rate of oil spilling into the Gulf is 200,000 gallons per day since/meter 2 ? B) kg/meter 2 ? Problem 4 ­ The density of crude oil is about D=850 kg/m 3 . From your estimate

206

Design and fabrication of a bending rotation fatigue test rig for in situ electrochemical analysis during fatigue testing of NiTi shape memory alloy wires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current investigation proposes a novel method for simultaneous assessment of the electrochemical and structural fatigue properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi SMA) wires. The design and layout of an in situ electrochemical cell in a custom-made bending rotation fatigue (BRF) test rig is presented. This newly designed test rig allows performing a wide spectrum of experiments for studying the influence of fatigue on corrosion and vice versa. This can be achieved by performing ex situ and/or in situ measurements. The versatility of the combined electrochemical/mechanical test rig is demonstrated by studying the electrochemical behavior of NiTi SMA wires in 0.9% NaCl electrolyte under load. The ex situ measurements allow addressing various issues for example the influence of pre-fatigue on the localized corrosion resistance or the influence of hydrogen on fatigue life. Ex situ experiments showed that a pre-fatigued wire is more susceptible to localized corrosion. The synergetic effect can be concluded from the polarization studies and specifically from an in situ study of the open circuit potential (OCP) transients which sensitively react to the elementary repassivation events related to the local failure of the oxide layer. It can also be used as an indicator for identifying the onset of the fatigue failure.

Jenni Kristin Zglinski; Matthias Frotscher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Design and fabrication of a bending rotation fatigue test rig for in situ electrochemical analysis during fatigue testing of NiTi shape memory alloy wires  

SciTech Connect

The current investigation proposes a novel method for simultaneous assessment of the electrochemical and structural fatigue properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi SMA) wires. The design and layout of an in situ electrochemical cell in a custom-made bending rotation fatigue (BRF) test rig is presented. This newly designed test rig allows performing a wide spectrum of experiments for studying the influence of fatigue on corrosion and vice versa. This can be achieved by performing ex situ and/or in situ measurements. The versatility of the combined electrochemical/mechanical test rig is demonstrated by studying the electrochemical behavior of NiTi SMA wires in 0.9% NaCl electrolyte under load. The ex situ measurements allow addressing various issues, for example, the influence of pre-fatigue on the localized corrosion resistance, or the influence of hydrogen on fatigue life. Ex situ experiments showed that a pre-fatigued wire is more susceptible to localized corrosion. The synergetic effect can be concluded from the polarization studies and specifically from an in situ study of the open circuit potential (OCP) transients, which sensitively react to the elementary repassivation events related to the local failure of the oxide layer. It can also be used as an indicator for identifying the onset of the fatigue failure.

Neelakantan, Lakshman [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Materials, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, 600 036 Chennai (India); Zglinski, Jenni Kristin; Eggeler, Gunther [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Materials, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Frotscher, Matthias [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute for Materials, 44801 Bochum (Germany); CORTRONIK GmbH, 18119 Rostock-Warnemuende (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2012 | Release Date: May 31, 30, 2012 | Release Date: May 31, 2012 | Next Release: June 7, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural Gas Rigs Decline in Key Areas Active natural gas rotary rigs currently total 594, according to the latest weekly data released by Baker Hughes Incorporated. According to Baker Hughes data, natural gas-directed horizontal rigs have driven the decline in total natural gas rigs over the past several months. Horizontal-directed natural gas rig counts have fallen to 411, from levels in the low-600s a year ago. Declines have occurred in key areas of dry shale gas production, particularly in Louisiana, where the Haynesville Shale is located. The number of horizontal natural gas rigs drilling in Louisiana has fallen from

209

Weighted power counting and chiral dimensional regularization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define a modified dimensional-regularization technique that overcomes several difficulties of the ordinary technique, and is specially designed to work efficiently in chiral and parity violating quantum field theories, in arbitrary dimensions greater than 2. When the dimension of spacetime is continued to complex values, spinors, vectors and tensors keep the components they have in the physical dimension, therefore the gamma matrices are the standard ones. Propagators are regularized with the help of evanescent higher-derivative kinetic terms, which are of Majorana type in the case of chiral fermions. If the new terms are organized in a clever way, weighted power counting provides an efficient control on the renormalization of the theory, and allows us to show that the resulting chiral dimensional regularization is consistent to all orders. The new technique considerably simplifies the proofs of properties that hold to all orders, and makes them suitable to be generalized to wider classes of models. Typica...

Anselmi, Damiano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

N. Chandrachani Devi; H. A. Borges; S. Carneiro; J. S. Alcaniz

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

Devi, N Chandrachani; Carneiro, S; Alcaniz, J S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

213

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

214

Estimation and specification tests of count data recreation demand functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the truncated and untruncated Poisson models, suggesting that the negative binomial family of distributions are more appropriate models. The results also demonstrate that using the seemingly unrelated Poisson regression estimator with event count data instead...- parameter distribution with mean and variance of Yi equal to Xt. This distribution can be extended to a count regression model by letting the expected count, E(Y; ) =? X&, to vary according to (II. 2) 4 = exp(q'P), where x; and P are, respectively...

Gomez, Irma Adriana

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Acoustic Method for Fish Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks W.A. Kuperman and Philippedistributed among its 97 tanks to maximize feed-conversionrequires inventory- ing tanks regularly. Currently, this is

Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Acoustic Method for Fish Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements in an echoic tank. ICES Journal of Marineto fish counting in a tank. Journal of the Acousticaland materials of the cylindrical tanks for the experiments.

Roux, Philippe; Conti, Stéphane; Demer, David; Maurer, Benjamin D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

219

"2012 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total" Total" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "3 Phases Renewables","CA","Power Marketer",354,148820,7268.5,4.8840882 "Calpine Power America LLC","CA","Power Marketer",1,1072508,54458,5.0776311 "City of Corona - (CA)","CA","Municipal",859,65933,5749.5,8.720216 "Commerce Energy, Inc.","CA","Power Marketer",23386,596604,37753,6.3279831 "Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","CA","Power Marketer",362,4777373,250287.4,5.2390173

220

"2012 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total" Total" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",16180,399144,41820,10.477422 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor Owned",6976,64788,18175,28.053035 "Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc","AK","Cooperative",7923,73956,42708,57.74785 "Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK","Municipal",30747,1100665,100959.2,9.1725639 "Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc","AK","Cooperative",1871,49580,5293,10.675676

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Weighted power counting and chiral dimensional regularization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define a modified dimensional-regularization technique that overcomes several difficulties of the ordinary technique, and is specially designed to work efficiently in chiral and parity violating quantum field theories, in arbitrary dimensions greater than 2. When the dimension of spacetime is continued to complex values, spinors, vectors and tensors keep the components they have in the physical dimension, therefore the $\\gamma $ matrices are the standard ones. Propagators are regularized with the help of evanescent higher-derivative kinetic terms, which are of the Majorana type in the case of chiral fermions. If the new terms are organized in a clever way, weighted power counting provides an efficient control on the renormalization of the theory, and allows us to show that the resulting chiral dimensional regularization is consistent to all orders. The new technique considerably simplifies the proofs of properties that hold to all orders, and makes them suitable to be generalized to wider classes of models. Typical examples are the renormalizability of chiral gauge theories and the Adler-Bardeen theorem. The difficulty of explicit computations, on the other hand, may increase.

Damiano Anselmi

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

222

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

223

Double Counting in Supply Chain Carbon Footprinting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon footprinting is a tool for firms to determine the total greenhouse gas GHG emissions associated with their supply chain or with a unit of final product or service. Carbon footprinting typically aims to identify where best to invest in emission ... Keywords: carbon footprint, emissions allocation, supply chain, sustainable operations

Felipe Caro; Charles J. Corbett; Tarkan Tan; Rob Zuidwijk

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL Jon Hutchins, Alexander Ihler a probabilistic model for predict- ing the occupancy of a building using networks of people-counting sensors-sensor probabilistic model for building occupancy. Inference for the oc- cupancy model follows in Section 4

Smyth, Padhraic

225

MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL Jon Hutchins, Alexander Ihler a probabilistic model for predict­ ing the occupancy of a building using networks of people­counting sensors­sensor probabilistic model for building occupancy. Inference for the oc­ cupancy model follows in Section 4

Ihler, Alexander

226

DSK: k-mer counting with very low memory usage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......k-mer counting with very low memory usage Guillaume Rizk 1 Dominique Lavenier 2 Rayan...function of the desired memory and disk usage. In Section 3, DSK is used to count all...sequences, k-mer length k, target memory usage M (bits), target disk space D (bits......

Guillaume Rizk; Dominique Lavenier; Rayan Chikhi

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

229

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

230

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

231

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Los Alamos researchers demonstrated improved technical methods capable of directly counting small RNA molecules in pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria. June 17, 2013 Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. The new technique reduced the number of false positives, which improved the accuracy of the count statistics, and it significantly reduced the image processing time. Small molecules of RNA (tens to hundreds of nucleotides in length) play a key regulatory role in bacteria. Due to their small size, directly

232

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 HOISTS 8-i This chapter provides safety standards for inspecting, testing, and operating hoists not permanently mounted on overhead cranes and implements the requirements of ASME B30.11 ("Monorail Systems and Underhung Cranes"), B30.16["Overhead Hoists (Underhung)"], and B30.21 ("Manually Lever Operated Hoists") (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 8.1 GENERAL .................................................................................................................................8-1 8.1.1 Operator Training/Qualification ..................................................................................8-4 8.1.2 Marking........................................................................................................................8-4

234

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 OVERHEAD AND GANTRY CRANES 7-i This chapter specifies operation, inspection, maintenance, and testing requirements for the use of overhead and gantry cranes and implements the requirements of ASME B30.2 ["Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top- Running Bridge, Single or Multiple Girder, Top-Running Trolley Hoist)"], B30.11 ("Monorail Systems and Underhung Cranes"), and B30.17 ["Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top-Running Bridge, Single Girder, Underhung Hoist")] (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 7.1 GENERAL .................................................................................................................................7-1 7.1.1 Operator Training/Qualification

235

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHAPTER 9 MOBILE CRANES 9-i This chapter specifies operation, inspection, maintenance, and testing requirements for the use of mobile cranes and implements the requirements of ASME B30.5 ("Mobile and Locomotive Cranes") (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 9.1 GENERAL .................................................................................................................................9-1 9.1.1 Operator Training/Qualification ..................................................................................9-1 9.1.2 Load Limits..................................................................................................................9-1 9.1.3 Load Rating Chart........................................................................................................9-1

236

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 LIFTING PERSONNEL 4-i Chapter 4 Lifting Personnel This chapter specifies the design and inspection requirements for personnel lift platforms as well as the operational requirements for such platforms and appurtenant hoisting equipment. It implements the requirements of ASME B30.23, Personnel Lifting Systems (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 4.1 GENERAL ................................................................................................................................4-1 4.1.1 Personnel Lifting Evaluation .......................................................................................4-1 4.1.2 Designated Leader .......................................................................................................4-1

237

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1090-2007 Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1090-2007 December 2007 Chapter 4 Provide ASME attribution at introduction to the Table on Contents and on Figures 4-3,4 and Exhibits 1 & 2 Chapter 7 Provide ASME attribution at introduction to the Table on Contents and on Figures 7-1,2,3,4,5 and Table 7-1 Chapter 8 Provide ASME attribution at introduction to the Table on Contents and on Figures 8-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 and Table 8-1 Chapter 9 Provide ASME attribution at introduction to the Table on Contents and on Figures 9-1,2,3,4,5,6 and Table 9-2 Chapter 11 Provide ASME attribution at introduction to the Table on Contents and on Figures 11-10,15 and Tables 11-10,11,14,15,16 Chapter 12 Provide ASME attribution at introduction to the Table on Contents and on

238

rig upgrades2.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T R A P E D O F E N E R G Y E T A T S D E T I N U S O F A M E R I C A E A s the oil and gas industry continues to drill in more remote areas, at deeper depths, and in more...

239

Location Student Fac/Staff Disabled Special OLLI Reserved Electric Carpool Park and Pay 30 Minute Loading Maint/Service State Vehicle Motorcycle Control* S / L** P / T / LD*** Location Total Alumni House 1 1 17 D L P 19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loading Maint/Service State Vehicle Motorcycle Control* S / L** P / T / LD*** Location Total Alumni House = Surface Lot *** P = Permanent, T = Temporary, LD = Leased Structure 5,631 Motorcycle space count is not included in "Total Spaces" count and is an es mate of how many motorcycles can park in each area Surface

de Lijser, Peter

240

Number Counts of GALEX Sources in FUV (1530A) and NUV (2310A) Bands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Number Counts of galaxies in two GALEX bands (FUV: 1530A and NUV: 2310A, both in AB magnitudes) are reported. They provide for the first time in the literature homogeneously calibrated number counts of UV galaxies covering continuously a very wide range of UV magnitude (14 -- 23.8). Both the FUV and NUV counts are inconsistent with a non-evolution model, while they are in good agreement with evolution models (essentially luminosity evolution) derived from the high-z UV luminosity functions of Arnouts et al. (2004). It is found that the contribution from galaxies detected by GALEX to the UV background is 0.68+-0.10 nW m-2 sr-1 at 1530A and 0.99+-0.15 nW m-2 sr-1 at 2310A. These are 66+-9% and 44+-6% of the total contributions of galaxies to the the UV background at 1530A, respectively, as estimated using the evolution models. ...

C. Kevin Xu; Jose Donas; Stephane Arnouts; Ted K. Wyder; Mark Seibert; Jorge Iglesias-Paramo; Jeremy Blaizot; Todd Small; Bruno Milliard; David Schiminovich; D. Christopher Martin; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; R. Michael Rich

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA chips are parallel, accurate, fast, and small. These advantages, however, can only be realized if the fragile biomolecules survive the attachment process intact. Furthermore, biomolecules must be properly oriented to perform their biological function. In other words, the DNA literally must stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment and orientation of DNA on gold surfaces was the goal of recent experiments performed at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 by an international collaboration of scientists.

242

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA chips are parallel, accurate, fast, and small. These advantages, however, can only be realized if the fragile biomolecules survive the attachment process intact. Furthermore, biomolecules must be properly oriented to perform their biological function. In other words, the DNA literally must stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment and orientation of DNA on gold surfaces was the goal of recent experiments performed at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 by an international collaboration of scientists.

243

The Argonne low level14C counting system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A low level14CO2 counting system is described. This system was used to process several thousand CO2 samples derived from atmospheric collections at various altitudes. Special features include counter construction...

J. Gray; S. J. Rymas; L. D. Studebaker…

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Algorithmic issues in queueing systems and combinatorial counting problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) However, these randomized algorithms can never provide proven upper or lower bounds on the number of objects they are counting, but can only give probabilistic estimates. We propose a set of deterministic algorithms ...

Katz-Rogozhnikov, Dmitriy A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Correlated neutron counting for the 21st century  

SciTech Connect

Correlated neutron counting techniques, such as neutron coincidence and multiplicity counting, are widely employed at nuclear fuel cycle facilities for the accountancy of nuclear material such as plutonium. These techniques need to be improved and enhanced to meet the challenges of complex measurement items and future nuclear safeguards applications, for example; the non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel, high counting rate applications, small sample measurements, and Helium-3 replacement. At the same time simulation tools, used for the design of detection systems based on these techniques, are being developed in anticipation of future needs. This seminar will present the theory and current state of the practice of temporally correlated neutron counting. A range of future safeguards applications will then be presented in the context of research projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

247

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

249

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

250

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

251

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

252

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

253

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

254

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

255

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

256

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

257

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

258

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

259

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

260

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

262

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

263

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

264

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

265

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

266

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

267

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

268

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

269

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

270

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

271

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

272

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

273

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

274

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

275

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

276

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

277

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

278

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

279

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

280

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

282

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

283

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

284

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

285

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

286

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

287

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

288

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

289

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

290

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

291

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

292

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

293

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

294

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

295

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

296

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

297

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

298

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

299

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

300

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

302

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

303

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

304

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

305

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

306

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

307

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

308

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

309

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

310

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

311

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

312

EIA - Natural Gas Exploration & Reserves Data and Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natural gas, and lease condensate (annual). Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Rotary rigs in operation, footage drilled, and active well service rig counts (monthly,...

313

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

314

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for counting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensated circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts July 2, 2013 - 5:58pm Addthis (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. Fletcher Honemond Fletcher Honemond

316

Two Million Smart Meters and Counting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Smart Meters and Counting Million Smart Meters and Counting Two Million Smart Meters and Counting August 31, 2010 - 6:02pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Smart meter technology will help families and businesses cut their energy costs by reducing response time for energy disruptions and enabling consumers to better monitor their consumption. The implementation of smart grid technologies could reduce electricity use by more than four percent annually by 2030 -- that would mean consumers around the country would see savings of over $20 billion each year. Secretary Steven Chu visited Battelle headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, today to make a big announcement about our nation's electrical grid: an

317

Happy Earth Day! 39 and Counting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Day! 39 and Counting Day! 39 and Counting Happy Earth Day! 39 and Counting April 22, 2009 - 10:55am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy It was in 1970 that Sen. Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin established "Earth Day" as a teaching opportunity for budding environmentalists. Seems like a long time ago-I was all of six years old and to me, "green" was something Kermit the Frog sang about being. We've come a long way since then. Earth Day is now a national celebration of environmentalism and conservation. A lot of what we in EERE do is directly supporting the ideals and aspirations of Earth Day, and you can see growing support from major corporations, media and academia. It's pretty exciting, and definitely an exciting time to be in the energy field.

318

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts July 2, 2013 - 5:58pm Addthis (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. Fletcher Honemond Fletcher Honemond

319

Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference January 18, 2012 - 5:42pm Addthis Secretary Chu and former Governor of California Arnold Schwarzenegger speak with students at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit. | Photo courtesy of ARPA-E. Secretary Chu and former Governor of California Arnold Schwarzenegger speak with students at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit. | Photo courtesy of ARPA-E. Alexa McClanahan Communications Support Contractor to ARPA-E "The Student Program is a unique opportunity for student energy club leaders throughout the nation to gather, share best practices, and engage with policy makers, entrepreneurs, scientists, and engineers..." Shannon Yee, Student Program Coordinator

320

Power-counting renormalizability of generalized Horava gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an earlier article [arXiv:0902.0590 [hep-th], Phys. Rev D80 (2009) 025011], I discussed the potential benefits of allowing Lorentz symmetry breaking in quantum field theories. In particular I discussed the perturbative power-counting finiteness of the normal-ordered :P(phi)^{z>=d}_{d+1}: scalar quantum field theories, and sketched the implications for Horava's model of quantum gravity. In the current rather brief addendum, I will tidy up some dangling issues and fill out some of the technical details of the argument indicating the power-counting renormalizability of a z>=d variant of Horava gravity in (d+1) dimensions.

Matt Visser

2009-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print Wednesday, 31 May 2006 00:00 DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA chips are parallel, accurate, fast, and small. These advantages, however, can only be realized if the fragile biomolecules survive the attachment process intact. Furthermore, biomolecules must be properly oriented to perform their biological function. In other words, the DNA literally must stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment and orientation of DNA on gold surfaces was the goal of recent experiments performed at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 by an international collaboration of scientists.

323

Using Bytecode Instruction Counting as Portable CPU Consumption Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Bytecode Instruction Counting as Portable CPU Consumption Metric Walter Binder and Jarle-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland firstname.lastname@epfl.ch Abstract Accounting for the CPU consumption consumption information in order to detect a resource overuse of client components (detection of denial

Binder, Walter

324

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, R.A.

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

325

Counting Defective Parking Functions Peter J Cameron, Daniel Johannsen,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parking function of defect k. Suppose that m cars attempt to park in a linear car park with n spacesCounting Defective Parking Functions Peter J Cameron, Daniel Johannsen, Thomas Prellberg, Pascal each choose a preferred parking space in a linear car park with n spaces. Each driver goes

Prellberg, Thomas

326

Counting Defective Parking Functions Peter J Cameron, Daniel Johannsen,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the corresponding assignments a defective parking function of defect k. Suppose that m cars attempt to parkCounting Defective Parking Functions Peter J Cameron, Daniel Johannsen, Thomas Prellberg, Pascal a preferred parking space in a linear car park with n spaces. Each driver goes to the chosen space and parks

327

Counts of northern elephant seals, Mirounga angustirostris, from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

176 Counts of northern elephant seals, Mirounga angustirostris, from large-format aerial northern elephant seals, Mirounga angustirostris, at rooker- ies in the United States and Mexico elephant seals (Bar- tholomew and Boolootian, 1960; Carlisle andAplin, 1966, 1971; Odell, 1971;Antonelis et

328

Counting Protein Structures by DFS with Dynamic Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with dynamic decomposition for count� ing the solutions of a binary CSP completely. In particular, we use as Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) [2, 4]. Recently, counting solutions of a CSP and related problems. Here, we present a method that is especially tailored for this case. Applied to the CSP formulation

Will, Sebastian

329

Comparison of two methods of counting birds at sea  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to improve techniques for surveying marine birds, the author compares methods for estimating relative abundance and density. Quantitative relationships exist between estimates of relative abundance and density for most marine bird species. Estimates of abundance can be derived from values of density by regression models when the following factors are considered: bird behavior (flying, sitting, and ship-following), duration of the count, and ship speed. The author's data suggest a minimum numerical relationship of 2:1 between estimates of abundance and density for sitting birds and 1:1 for flying birds. Neither method of counting birds at sea eliminates the problem of ship-followers. However, the density method minimizes an inflationary effect caused by ship-followers that is apparent with the abundance estimate, especially when the observer's vessel is associated with fishing activities. Differences in abilities of observers to count birds is a principal, but unavoidable, source of variability with both counting methods. The density method also minimizes this problem by focusing the observer's view in an area with known boundaries. This standardization decreases variability in bird detection due to weather, size and color differences between species, flock sizes, and bird behavior. These factors are not controlled in estimates of abundance.

Powers, K.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Research Demonstration of a Hardware Reference-Counting Heap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hardware self-managing heap memory (RCM) for languages like Lisp, Smalltalk, and Java has been designed, built, tested and benchmarked. On every pointer write from the processor, reference-counting transactions are performed in real time within ... Keywords: Performance, garbage collection, uniprocessor

David S. Wise; Brian Heck; Caleb Hess; Willie Hunt; Eric Ost

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Bicycle and pedestrian counting initiative monitors nonmotorized traffic in Minnesota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bicycle and pedestrian counting initiative monitors nonmotorized traffic in Minnesota transitways of Transportation (MnDOT) to develop guidelines and analyze information collected in bicycle and pedestrian traffic methods for monitoring and assessing bicycle and pedestrian traffic that can be used in both permanent

Minnesota, University of

332

On the nature of the extragalactic number counts in the K-band  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the causes of the different shape of the $K$-band number counts when compared to other bands, analyzing in detail the presence of a change in the slope around $K\\sim17.5$. We present a near-infrared imaging survey, conducted at the 3.5m telescope of the Calar Alto Spanish-German Astronomical Center (CAHA), covering two separated fields centered on the HFDN and the Groth field, with a total combined area of $\\sim0.27$deg$^{2}$ to a depth of $K\\sim19$ ($3\\sigma$,Vega). We derive luminosity functions from the observed $K$-band in the redshift range [0.25-1.25], that are combined with data from the references in multiple bands and redshifts, to build up the $K$-band number count distribution. We find that the overall shape of the number counts can be grouped into three regimes: the classic Euclidean slope regime ($d\\log N/dm\\sim0.6$) at bright magnitudes; a transition regime at intermediate magnitudes, dominated by $M^{\\ast}$ galaxies at the redshift that maximizes the product $\\phi^{\\ast}\\frac{dV_{c}}{d\\Omega}$; and an $\\alpha$ dominated regime at faint magnitudes, where the slope asymptotically approaches -0.4($\\alpha$+1) controlled by post-$M^{\\ast}$ galaxies. The slope of the $K$-band number counts presents an averaged decrement of $\\sim50%$ in the range $15.5

G. Barro; J. Gallego; P. G. Pérez-González; C. Eliche-Moral; M. Balcells; V. Villar; N. Cardiel; D. Cristobal-Hornillos; A. Gil de Paz; R. Gúzman; R. Pelló; M. Prieto; J. Zamorano

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

Laboratory adds a sixth R&D 100 award to its 2009 count  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D 100 awards R&D 100 awards Laboratory adds a sixth R&D 100 award to its 2009 count This year's awards bring the Los Alamos total to 113 since the Laboratory first entered the competition in 1978. November 4, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Communications Office

334

Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. A temperature sensor is attached to an inorganic scintillation detector. The inorganic scintillation detector, due to interaction with

335

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

336

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

337

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

338

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

339

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

340

Synthesis of Reversible Functions Beyond Gate Count and Quantum Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many synthesis approaches for reversible and quantum logic have been proposed so far. However, most of them generate circuits with respect to simple metrics, i.e. gate count or quantum cost. On the other hand, to physically realize reversible and quantum hardware, additional constraints exist. In this paper, we describe cost metrics beyond gate count and quantum cost that should be considered while synthesizing reversible and quantum logic for the respective target technologies. We show that the evaluation of a synthesis approach may differ if additional costs are applied. In addition, a new cost metric, namely Nearest Neighbor Cost (NNC) which is imposed by realistic physical quantum architectures, is considered in detail. We discuss how existing synthesis flows can be extended to generate optimal circuits with respect to NNC while still keeping the quantum cost small.

Robert Wille; Mehdi Saeedi; Rolf Drechsler

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Real-time aqueous tritium monitor using liquid scintillation counting  

SciTech Connect

An ability to continuously monitor low-level tritium releases in aqueous effluents is of particular interest to heavy water facilities such as those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Canadian CANDU reactors. SRS developed a real-time monitoring system based on flow-through liquid scintillation (LS) counting. Sensitivities of 16 pCi/mL and 1 pCi/mL result from five minute and daily averages of counting data respectively. This sensitivity is about 200 times better than similar methods using solid scintillants. The LS system features uncomplicated sample pretreatment, precise of the cocktail and sample water, system features uncomplicated sample pretreatment, precise proportioning of the cocktail and sample water, on-line quench corrections, cocktail consumption as low as 0.15 mL/min, and response to changes in environmental tritium is less than 30 minutes. Field tests demonstrate that conditions necessary for stable analytical results are achieved.

Sigg, R.A.; McCarty, J.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Sanders, M.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Power counting renormalizability of scalar theory in Lifshitz spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse the power counting renormalizability of scalar theory in Lifshitz spacetime in D+2 dimensions. We show the spectral dimension becomes 2+(D/z) (z is the critical exponent) after integrating out the radion field. We comment on the AdS/CFT correspondence, and on how to avoid the Lifshitz singularity by flowing into AdS spacetime in the infrared. We also comment on the quantum gravity in Lifshitz spacetime.

Takayuki Hirayama

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

Power spectrum of the fluctuation of Chebyshev's prime counting function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The one-sided power spectrum of the fluctuation of Chebyshev's weighted prime counting function is numerically estimated based on samples of the fluctuating function of different sizes. The power spectrum is also estimated analytically for large frequency based on Riemann hypothesis and the exact formula for the fluctuating function in terms of all the non-trivial Riemann zeroes. Our analytical estimate is consistent with our numerical estimate of a 1/f^2 power spectrum.

Boon Leong Lan; Shaohen Yong

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Power Counting Regime of Chiral Extrapolation and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite-range regularised (FRR) chiral effective field theory is presented in the context of approximation schemes ubiquitous in modern lattice QCD calculations. Using FRR techniques, the power-counting regime (PCR) of chiral perturbation theory can be estimated. To fourth-order in the expansion at the 1% tolerance level, we find m_\\pi < 180 MeV for the PCR, extending only a small distance beyond the physical pion mass.

Derek B. Leinweber; Anthony W. Thomas; Ross D. Young

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Counting states in the Bousso-Polchinski Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from an exact counting of small and positive cosmological constant states in the Bousso-Polchinski Landscape we recover a well-known approximate formula and a systematic method of improvement by means of the Poisson summation formula. This is a contribution to the special Volume published by the University of Zaragoza in honor of Julio Abad Anto\\~nanzas. En memoria de nuestro amigo, compa\\~nero y maestro Julio.

Cesar Asensio; Antonio Segui

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

Power counting renormalizability of quantum gravity in Lifshitz spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse the power counting renormalizability of the quantum field theory of Einstein or Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D+2 dimensional Lifshitz spacetime. We show the spectral dimension becomes 2+(D/z) at the UV region where z is the critical exponent. Since it is larger than two, the quantum theory of Einstein gravity is not power counting renormalizable. For the pure Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, where Lifshitz spacetime is allowed only when the parameters are fine tuned, it happens that the graviton modes do not propagate and the quantum field theory is accidentally renormalizable when z>=D. Another method is discretizing the radial coordinate which changes the spectral dimension to 1+(D/z) at the UV region. Since our four dimensional spacetime is continuous, the four dimensional Lorentz symmetry is recovered at the low energy and the power counting renormalizability is still kept for z>=D, if the spacetime near the null singularity in Lifshitz spacetime is modified into AdS spacetime and the discrete radial direction is compactified like a brane world scenario. We also comment on the AdS/CFT correspondence.

Takayuki Hirayama

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Does parental age difference affect offspring count in humans? Comment on Fieder and Huber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2007 The Royal Society 23 February 2008 article-commentary Evolutionary biology Does parental age difference affect offspring count in...689-691. ( doi:10.1098/rsbl.2007.0324 ) Does parental age difference affect offspring count in...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

349

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

351

Making Votes Count: How to Hack an Election January 31, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Votes Count: How to Hack an Election January 31, 2004 MAKING VOTES COUNT How to Hack&pagewanted=print&position= (1 of 2)12/22/2004 6:49:30 AM #12;Making Votes Count: How to Hack an Election

Rivest, Ronald L.

352

Automatic fruit recognition and counting from multiple images1 , C.A. Glasbey a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic fruit recognition and counting from multiple images1 Y. Songa , C.A. Glasbey a, , G.e. measuring the observable characteristics of living10 organisms, such as counting the number of fruits and counting fruits from images12 in cluttered greenhouses. The plants are 3-metre high peppers with fruits

Glasbey, Chris

353

Scene-adaptive accurate and fast vertical crowd counting via joint using depth and color information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reliable and real-time crowd counting is one of the most important tasks in intelligent visual surveillance systems. Most previous works only count passing people based on color information. Owing to the restrictions of color information influences themselves ... Keywords: Crowd counting, Multimodal joint multimedia processing, Ordinary depth camera, Real time system, Scene-adaptive scheme

Huiyuan Fu, Huadong Ma, Hongtian Xiao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

355

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.  

SciTech Connect

Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Determination of glomerular filtration rate by external counting methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparing the DTPA to other accepted methods; the results were very favorable for the use of ggmTC-DTPA. Klopper et al. , sa1d mTc-DTPA ". . . rapidly prepared by a kit method, is a useful addition to the list of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used... points. First, the external counting method is suitable as a true means of determining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Second, the method is applicable to cats. To do this, five dogs were injected with ggmTc(Sn)-DTPA. Plasma samples were drawn...

Sartor, Tammy Lee

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Recent developments in position-sensitive neutron counting  

SciTech Connect

Continuing research on advanced methods of thermal neutron detection and position sensing with gas-filled counters was aimed at improving their performance and extending the limits of their applicability. High electron drift velocities obtained from measurements on gas mixtures containing CF/sub 4/ motivated us to evaluate the properties of /sup 3/He-CF/sub 4/ and Ar-CF/sub 4/ mixtures to show that these gases have the potential of improving the count rate capability, spatial resolution, and photon discrimination of neutron PSPCs (position-sensitive proportional counters) and fission counters. In support of the U.S. National Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Facility we developed a large-area (65-cm x 65-cm) PSPC camera. RC position encoding was chosen for simplicity of construction, but since previous experience with this encoding method had been limited to smaller PSPCs (area < 25 cm x 25 cm), the main objective of this development was to show that RC encoding parameters and construction methods could be scaled up for larger area PSPCs. The use of the new counter gas mixtures enabled the development of position-sensitive transmission line fission counters (TLFCs) for neutron flux monitoring and a one-dimensional, curved PSPC for large-angle (130/sup 0/) neutron diffraction experiments. The main objective of these developments was to extend the capabilities of the LC-encoding method by mitigating the effects of interelectrode capacitance, and thereby increase the count rate capability.

Valentine, K.H.; Kopp, M.K.; Guerrant, G.C.; Harter, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Word Pro - S5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Development Indicators Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, 1949-2012 Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, Monthly Active Well Service Rig Count, Monthly Total Wells Drilled by Type, 1949-2010 . 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 Thousand Rigs 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Thousand Wells Dry Wells Crude Oil Wells Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#crude. Sources: Tables 5.1 and 5.2. Crude Oil J FMAMJ J A SOND J FMAMJ J A SOND J FMAMJ J

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Word Pro - S5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Development Figure 5.1 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Development Indicators Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, 1949-2012 Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, Monthly Active Well Service Rig Count, Monthly Total Wells Drilled by Type, 1949-2010 . 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 Thousand Rigs 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Thousand Wells Dry Wells Crude Oil Wells Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#crude. Sources: Tables 5.1 and 5.2.

362

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

363

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

364

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

365

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rig Count Passes 1,000 On June 24, 2011, the Baker Hughes weekly count of rigs actively drilling for oil in the United States was 1,003, marking the first week since the company...

366

Microsoft Word - Alcoa Extension EBT ROD Attachments - 2010-10...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration, August 30, 2010 Figure 2 - Natural Gas Rig Count U.S. Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Count) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 A u g - 0 6 O...

367

Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration, January 14, 2011 Figure 2 - Natural Gas Rig Count U.S. Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Count) 0 400 800 1200 1600 2000 J a n - 0 7 M a r - 0 7 M a y -...

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

369

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

370

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Doubles counting of highly multiplying items in reflective surroundings  

SciTech Connect

When a neutrons are counted from a spontaneously fissile multiplying item in a reflecting environment the temporal behavior of the correlated signal following neutron birth is complex. At early times the signal is dominated by prompt fission events coming from spontaneous fission bursts and also from prompt fast-neutron induced fission events. At later times neutrons 'returning' from the surroundings induce fission and give rise to an additional chain of correlated events. The prompt and returning components probe the fissile and fertile constituents of the item in different ways and it is potentially beneficial to exploit this fact. In this work we look at how the two components can be represented using a linear combination of two simple functions. Fitting of the composite function to the capture time distribution represents one way of quantifying the proportion of each contribution. Another approach however is to use a dual shift register analysis where after each triggering event two coincidence gates are opened, one close to the trigger that responds preferentially to the prompt dynamics and one later in time which is more sensitive to the returning neutron induced events. To decide on the best gate positions and gate widths and also to estimate the counting precision we can use the analytical fit to work out the necessary gate utilization factors which are required in both these calculations. In this work, we develop the approach. Illustrative examples are given using spent Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Pressurized light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies submersed in borated water and counted in a ring of {sup 3}He gas-filled proportional counters. In this case the prompt component is dominated by {sup 244}Cm spontaneous fission and induced fast neutron fission in for example {sup 238}U while the returning low energy neutrons induce fission mainly in the fissile nuclides such as {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu and {sup 235}U. One requirement is to calculate the Random Triggered Interrogation Gate Utilization Factor needed to make a priori precision estimates but not available from Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX.

Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, Melissa A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

374

Refined BPS state counting from Nekrasov's formula and Macdonald functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been argued that the Nekrasov's partition function gives the generating function of refined BPS state counting in the compactification of M theory on local Calabi-Yau spaces. We show that a refined version of the topological vertex we proposed before (hep-th/0502061) is a building block of the Nekrasov's partition function with two equivariant parameters. Compared with another refined topological vertex by Iqbal-Kozcaz-Vafa (hep-th/0701156), our refined vertex is expressed entirely in terms of the specialization of the Macdonald symmetric functions which is related to the equivariant character of the Hilbert scheme of points on C^2. We provide diagrammatic rules for computing the partition function from the web diagrams appearing in geometric engineering of Yang-Mills theory with eight supercharges. Our refined vertex has a simple transformation law under the flop operation of the diagram, which suggests that homological invariants of the Hopf link are related to the Macdonald functions.

Hidetoshi Awata; Hiroaki Kanno

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

375

Combining cosmological constraints from cluster counts and galaxy clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Present and future large scale surveys offer promising probes of cosmology. For example the Dark Energy Survey (DES) is forecast to detect ~300 millions galaxies and thousands clusters up to redshift ~1.3. I here show ongoing work to combine two probes of large scale structure : cluster number counts and galaxy 2-point function (in real or harmonic space). The halo model (coupled to a Halo Occupation Distribution) can be used to model the cross-covariance between these probes, and I introduce a diagrammatic method to compute easily the different terms involved. Furthermore, I compute the joint non-Gaussian likelihood, using the Gram-Charlier series. Then I show how to extend the methods of Bayesian hyperparameters to Poissonian distributions, in a first step to include them in this joint likelihood.

Lacasa, Fabien

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Arrowhead Center: Modeling Energy Market Volatility Report Title: Modeling Energy Market Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in New Mexico 2 2 US Oil Rig Counts and WTI Spot Prices January 2000 to December 2009 7 3 US Natural Gas and Weighted Price Index 8 5 US Oil and Gas Extraction Employment and Rig Counts 8 6 Oil Rig Counts and WTI

Johnson, Eric E.

377

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

378

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

380

Build a Floating Oil Rig  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service developed this teacher's guide about the many energy resources found in, over, and under the ocean. Includes sections on petroleum,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Count data stochastic frontier models, with an application to the patents–R&D relationship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article introduces a new count data stochastic frontier model that researchers can use ... patents awarded to a firm given expenditure on R&D.

Eduardo Fé; Richard Hofler

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

True photo-counting statistics of multiple on-off detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a closed photo-counting formula, including noise counts and a finite quantum efficiency, for photon number resolving detectors based on on-off detectors. It applies to detection schemes such as array detectors and multiplexing setups. The result renders it possible to compare the corresponding measured counting statistics with the true photon number statistics of arbitrary quantum states. The photo-counting formula is applied to the discrimination of photon numbers of Fock states, squeezed states, and odd coherent states. It is illustrated for coherent states that our formula is indispensable for the correct interpretation of quantum effects observed with such devices.

J. Sperling; W. Vogel; G. S. Agarwal

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell

384

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

385

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

386

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

387

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

388

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

389

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

390

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

391

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

392

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

393

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

394

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

395

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

396

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

398

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

405

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

406

SEDS: THE SPITZER EXTENDED DEEP SURVEY. SURVEY DESIGN, PHOTOMETRY, AND DEEP IRAC SOURCE COUNTS  

SciTech Connect

The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg{sup 2} to a depth of 26 AB mag (3{sigma}) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 {+-} 1.0 and 4.4 {+-} 0.8 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Arendt, R. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Barmby, P. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Barro, G.; Faber, S.; Guhathakurta, P. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bell, E. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bouwens, R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Cattaneo, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Croton, D. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218 Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Dave, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dunlop, J. S. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Finlator, K. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, CK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Grogin, N. A., E-mail: mashby@cfa.harvard.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

408

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

409

Whole-body counting in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect

In 1978 the Marshall Islands Radiological Safety Program was organized to perform radiation measurements and assess radiation doses for the people of the Bikini, Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. One of the major field components of this program is whole- body counting (WBC). WBC is used to monitor the quantity of gamma- emitting radionuclides present in individuals. A primary objective of the program was to establish {sup 137}Cesium body contents among the Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik populations. {sup 137}Cs was the only gamma-emitting fission radionuclide detected in the 1,967 persons monitored. {sup 137}Cs body burdens tended to increase with age for both sexes, and were higher in males. The average {sup 137}Cs dose Annual Effective Dose for the three populations was as follows: For Enewetak, the dose was 22{+-}4 {mu}Sv. For Utirik, the dose was 33{+-} 3 {mu}Sv. Since 1985 the Rongelap people have been self-exiled to Mejatto. Biological elimination should have reduced their dose to virtually zero, and the measured dose was 2{+-}2 {mu}Sv. If they had remained on Rongelap Island, the calculated dose would have been 99 {mu}Sv, which is about one-third of the background dose. 7 refs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Sun, L.C.; Clinton, J.; Kaplan, E.; Meinhold, C.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Competitive Carbon Counting: Can Social Networking Sites Make Saving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monitor, allowing users to compare domestic energy consumption with friends on Facebook. Energy monitors consumption are not sustainable [15]. Domestic households alone are responsible for 30% of the UKs total energy consumption [8] and, since 1970, household energy demands have grown by 32% [17]. Rising energy

Cairns, Paul

411

Enhancements of the rack counting invariant via N-reduced dynamical cocycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the notion of N-reduced dynamical cocycles and use these objects to define enhancements of the rack counting invariant for classical and virtual knots and links. We provide examples to show that the new invariants are not determined by the rack counting invariant, the Jones polynomial or the generalized Alexander polynomial.

Crans, Alissa S; Sarkar, Aparna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012 Making Research Count for Patients: A New Day  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012 Making Research Count for Patients: A New Day www.cancerprogressreport.org · www.aacr.org #12;AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012 Making Research Count for Patients: A New Day www.cancerprogressreport.org · www.aacr.org Also published as: American Association for Cancer Research. AACR cancer progress report

Sherman, S. Murray

413

Forecasting a Moving Target: Ensemble Models for ILI Case Count Predictions Prithwish Chakraborty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with official flu estimates. We also compare the prediction accuracy between model-level fusion of differentForecasting a Moving Target: Ensemble Models for ILI Case Count Predictions Prithwish Chakraborty using neighbor- hood embedding to predict flu case counts. Comparing our proposed ensemble method

Ryder, Barbara G.

414

A two-stage model for incidence and prevalence in point-level spatial count data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-stage model for incidence and prevalence in point-level spatial count data Virginia Recta about the underlying data generating process. We utilize a two-stage spatial generalized linear mixed and real data from an ecological field survey. 1 Introduction Spatial count data arise frequently

Haran, Murali

415

Automated Design of Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip under Pin-Count Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-count-constrained biochips. The first design procedure relies on a droplet-trace-based array partitioning scheme-referencing, Lab-on-Chip, Microfluidics, Pin-count constraints 1. INTRODUCTION Microfluidics technology has made great strides in recent years [1-6]. Promising applications of this emerging technology include high

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

416

COUNTING DESCENTS, RISES, AND LEVELS, WITH PRESCRIBED FIRST ELEMENT, IN WORDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COUNTING DESCENTS, RISES, AND LEVELS, WITH PRESCRIBED FIRST ELEMENT, IN WORDS Sergey Kitaev1 the distribution of descents, levels, and rises according to whether the first letter of the descent, rise 0654060 1 #12;2 COUNTING DESCENTS, RISES, AND LEVELS, WITH PRESCRIBED FIRST ELEMENT, IN WORDS Subsequently

Kitaev, Sergey

417

AN EXAMINATION OF BICYCLE COUNTS AND SPEEDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE INSTALLATION OF BIKE LANES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN EXAMINATION OF BICYCLE COUNTS AND SPEEDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE INSTALLATION OF BIKE LANES IN ST An Examination of Bicycle Counts and Speeds Associated with the Installation of Bike Lanes in St. Petersburg It is assumed that installation of bicycle facilities will result in an increase in the number of bicyclists

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

418

The counting of naturally occuring radiocarbon in the form of benzene in a liquid scintillation counter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A counting system is described for C14 dating with a benzene scintillator solution. The single photomultiplier counter used is relatively simple and reliable. Different sizes and forms of the counting solution containers were investigated. A 6 ml cell with a background of 4?0 counts/min and a 45 per cent detection efficiency is recommended for routine C14 dating. A 60 ml cell with a background of 14?6 counts/min and a 45 per cent detection efficiency is capable of dating samples as old as 57,500 years (4 ? statistics, 48 hr counting). The calibration and operation of the counter is discussed. On comparison with standard gas counter methods, it is suggested that routine C14 dating by the benzene method is preferable in those cases where the laboratory personnel are more skilled in chemical manipulations than electronic technique.

C. Leger; M.A. Tamers

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

420

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

422

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

423

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

424

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

425

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

426

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

427

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

433

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

434

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

435

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

436

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

438

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

439

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

440

The 2 to 24 micron source counts from the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present herein galaxy number counts of the nine bands in the 2-24 micron range on the basis of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) surveys. The number counts are derived from NEP-deep and NEP-wide surveys, which cover areas of 0.5 and 5.8 deg2, respectively. To produce reliable number counts, the sources were extracted from recently updated images. Completeness and difference between observed and intrinsic magnitudes were corrected by Monte Carlo simulation. Stellar counts were subtracted by using the stellar fraction estimated from optical data. The resultant source counts are given down to the 80% completeness limit; 0.18, 0.16, 0.10, 0.05, 0.06, 0.10, 0.15, 0.16, and 0.44 mJy in the 2.4, 3.2, 4.1, 7, 9, 11, 15, 18 and 24 um bands, respectively. On the bright side of all bands, the count distribution is flat, consistent with the Euclidean Universe, while on the faint side, the counts deviate, suggesting that the galaxy population of the distant universe is evolving. These results are generally consistent...

Murata, K; Goto, T; Kim, S J; Matsuhara, H; Wada, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Count)" Acquifers Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

442

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)

443

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

444

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

445

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

446

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

447

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

448

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

449

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

450

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

451

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

452

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

453

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

454

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

455

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

456

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

457

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

458

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

459

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

460

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

462

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

463

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

464

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

469

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

470

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

471

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

472

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

473

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

474

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

475

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

476

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,262 1,938 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total

Kay, Mark A.

479

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (?)-Acylfulvene and (?)- Irofulven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report our full account of the enantioselective total synthesis of (?)-acylfulvene (1) and (?)-irofulven (2), which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of the molecular framework of these antitumor ...

Movassaghi, Mohammad

480

A GENUINELY HIGH ORDER TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TVD) schemes solving one-dimensional scalar conservation laws degenerate to first order .... where the total variation is measured by the standard bounded variation ..... interval Ij and into the jump discontinuities at cell interfaces, see [12].

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rig count totaled" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

482

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

483

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

484

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

485

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

486

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

487

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

488

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

489

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

490

Property:Geothermal/ProjectTypeTopic2Count | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProjectTypeTopic2Count ProjectTypeTopic2Count Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/ProjectTypeTopic2Count Property Type Number Description Number of Project Type Topic 2 values. Pages using the property "Geothermal/ProjectTypeTopic2Count" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Air Cooling + 0 + D Directional Drilling Systems + 0 + Drilling Systems + 2 + E EGS Demonstration + 0 + F Fluid Imaging + 2 + Fracture Characterization Technologies + 0 + G Geophysical Exploration Technologies + 0 + Geothermal Analysis + 0 + Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance + 0 + Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources + 0 + H High Temperature Cements + 0 +

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - active drop counting Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: active drop counting Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Titan Recreation-Group Fitness Student Engagement Report Summary: hours of Drop In Fitness classes...

492

Patterns of Ethnic, Linguistic, and Geographic Heterogeneity of Palmar Interdigital Ridge Counts in the Indian Subcontinent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Published data on palmar interdigital ridge counts (a–b, b–c, and c–d) among 57 populations from the Indian subcontinent were analyzed with reference to ethnic, socioeconomic, linguistic, and geographic affiliations of the ...

Reddy, B. Mohan; Demarchi, Dario A.; Bharati, S.; Kumar, Vikrant; Crawford, Michael H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons in a Cold Neutron Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A measurement of the neutron lifetime $\\tau_{n}$ performed by the absolute counting of in-beam neutrons and their decay protons has been completed. Protons confined in a quasi-Penning trap were accelerated onto a silicon detector held at a high potential and counted with nearly unit efficiency. The neutrons were counted by a device with an efficiency inversely proportional to neutron velocity, which cancels the dwell time of the neutron beam in the trap. The result is $\\tau_{n} = (886.6\\pm1.2{\\rm [stat]}\\pm3.2{\\rm [sys]})$ s, which is the most precise measurement of the lifetime using an in-beam method. The systematic uncertainty is dominated by neutron counting, in particular the mass of the deposit and the $^{6}$Li({\\it{n,t}}) cross section. The measurement technique and apparatus, data analysis, and investigation of systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail.

J. S. Nico; M. S. Dewey; D. M. Gilliam; F. E. Wietfeldt; X. Fei; W. M. Snow; G. L. Greene; J. Pauwels; R. Eykens; A. Lamberty; J. Van Gestel; R. D. Scott

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

494

A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hayward, Jason P [ORNL; Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Packaging and qualification of single photon counting avalanche photodiode focal plane arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avalanche Photodiode (APD) photon counting arrays are finding an increasing role in defense applications in laser radar and optical communications. As these system concepts mature, the need for reliable screening, test, ...

Verghese, Simon

496

Apparent Neutron Emissions from Polyethylene Capsules during Neutron Activation and Delayed Neutron Counting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At Imperial College uranium is determined at very low levels in environmental samples by delayed neutron counting. High density polyethylene capsules are used ... transfer system, from the reactor, to the neutron

R. Benzing; N. M. Baghini; B. A. Bennett…

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Toward whole-body optical imaging of rats using single-photon counting fluorescence tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We used single-photon counting (SPC) detection for diffuse fluorescence tomography to image nanomolar (nM) concentrations of reporter dyes through a rat. Detailed phantom data are...

Leblond, Frederic; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Holt, Robert W; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Pogue, Brian W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Automated counting of cell bodies using Nissl stained cross-sectional images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell count is an important metric in neurological research. The loss in numbers of certain cells like neurons has been found to accompany not only the deterioration of important brain functions but disorders like clinical depression as well. Since...

D'Souza, Aswin Cletus

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

499

Automated counting of cell bodies using Nissl stained cross-sectional images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell count is an important metric in neurological research. The loss in numbers of certain cells like neurons has been found to accompany not only the deterioration of important brain functions but disorders like clinical depression as well. Since...

D'Souza, Aswin Cletus

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory | Total Scattering at the Lujan Center Neutron Powder Diffractometer (NPDF) High-Intensity Powder. Shoemaker, et al., Reverse Monte Carlo neutron scattering study of disordered crystalline materials neutron| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments

Magee, Joseph W.