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Sample records for rider monarch tree

  1. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS ...

  2. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS ...

  3. SunRider Solar LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Product: Arizona-based solar services company providing turnkey solar installations. References: SunRider Solar LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  4. Why cogeneration developers should support cogeneration deferral riders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiewak, S.

    1987-04-01

    The author argues that excess capacity can increase retail rates, but deferral riders which allow utilities to offer lower rates to customers who might otherwise turn to cogeneration would optimize existing generating capacity. The author notes that encouraging cogeneration is only one goal of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, while efficient use of powerplant capability is of equal importance. There will still be opportunities for cogenerators under the Cogeneration Deferral Tariff if they are patient because the concept of the tariff is to defer, not preclude cogeneration.

  5. L3:VUQ.VVDA.P2-2.03 William Rider SNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 William Rider SNL Completed: 3/28/11 CASL-U-2011-0060-000 1 SAND2010-234P Unlimited Release December 2010 Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification Workflow in CASL William J. Rider Computational Shock and MultiPhysics Department James R. Kamm and V. Gregory Weirs Optimization and Uncertainty Quantification Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 Dan G. Cacui Department of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC

  6. L3:VUQ.VVDA.P2-2.05 William Rider SNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 William Rider SNL Completed: 7/31/11 CASL-U-2011-0192-000 Solution V erification f or G TRF---CFD 1 Solution V erification A pplied t o D rekar and Fuego Calculations using of Grid---to---Rod---Fretting (GTRF) William J. Rider Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque With c ontributions b y WEC (CASL AMA): R. L u, A . M andour, F uego/Sierra (CASL VRI/SNL): D . T urner, S . R odriguez, R . B ond, R . S ummers D rekar ( CASL, T HM/SNL): P . Weber (UNM student), T . S mith, J. Shadid, R. P

  7. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  8. Cascadia Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  9. Green marketing, renewables, and free riders: increasing customer demand for a public good

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.

    1997-09-01

    Retail electricity competition will allow customers to select their own power suppliers and some customers will make purchase decisions based, in part, on their concern for the environment. Green power marketing targets these customers under the assumption that they will pay a premium for ``green`` energy products such as renewable power generation. But renewable energy is not a traditional product because it supplies public goods; for example, a customer supporting renewable energy is unable to capture the environmental benefits that their investment provides to non-participating customers. As with all public goods, there is a risk that few customers will purchase ``green`` power and that many will instead ``free ride`` on others` participation. By free riding, an individual is able to enjoy the benefits of the public good while avoiding payment. This report reviews current green power marketing activities in the electric industry, introduces the extensive academic literature on public goods, free riders, and collective action problems, and explores in detail the implications of this literature for the green marketing of renewable energy. Specifically, the authors highlight the implications of the public goods literature for green power product design and marketing communications strategies. They emphasize four mechanisms that marketers can use to increase customer demand for renewable energy. Though the public goods literature can also contribute insights into the potential rationale for renewable energy policies, they leave most of these implications for future work (see Appendix A for a possible research agenda).

  10. Microsoft Word - Advanced Solution Verification of CFD Solutions for LES of GTRF_Rider_August23.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VUQ.VVDA.P4.03 Jim Stewart SNL Completed: 8/31/2012 CASL-U-2012-0132-000 Advanced Solution Verification of CFD Solutions for LES o f R elevance t o GTRF Estimates. William J. Rider and James R. Kamm Sandia N ational L aboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 August 31, 2012 SAND 2 012---7199P Summary The purpose of this work is to d emonstrate advanced solution verification (i.e., numerical error estimation) techniques on computational fluid dynamics simulations of interest to CASL. The specific case

  11. EA-1800: DOE’s Proposed Financial Assistance to Illinois for the Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project, Lenox Township, Warren County, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided Federal funding to the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) under the State Energy Program (SEP). DCEO is seeking to provide $5 million of its SEP funds to Monarch Wind Power (MWP), who would use these funds for the design, permitting, and construction of 12, 1.6-megawatt wind turbines, for a combined generation capacity of 19.2 megawatts.

  12. Distributed Contour Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther H.

    2014-03-31

    Topological techniques provide robust tools for data analysis. They are used, for example, for feature extraction, for data de-noising, and for comparison of data sets. This chapter concerns contour trees, a topological descriptor that records the connectivity of the isosurfaces of scalar functions. These trees are fundamental to analysis and visualization of physical phenomena modeled by real-valued measurements. We study the parallel analysis of contour trees. After describing a particular representation of a contour tree, called local{global representation, we illustrate how di#11;erent problems that rely on contour trees can be solved in parallel with minimal communication.

  13. Leavenworth Tree Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Join HERO for our annual Leavenworth Tree Lighting Ceremony & Shopping SATURDAY DECEMBER 12, 2015 Leavenworth Christmas Lighting Festival Visitors return year after year for some...

  14. ARM - Tree Rings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PastTree Rings Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Tree Rings Tree rings are formed on an annual basis. They are caused by a more rapid growth in the spring followed by slower growth the rest of the year. Using a tree ring borer you can examine these rings and glean the following

  15. Lazy decision trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, J.H.; Yun, Yeogirl; Kohavi, R.

    1996-12-31

    Lazy learning algorithms, exemplified by nearest-neighbor algorithms, do not induce a concise hypothesis from a given training set; the inductive process is delayed until a test instance is given. Algorithms for constructing decision trees, such as C4.5, ID3, and CART create a single {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} decision tree during the training phase, and this tree is then used to classify test instances. The tests at the nodes of the constructed tree are good on average, but there may be better tests for classifying a specific instance. We propose a lazy decision tree algorithm-LazyDT-that conceptually constructs the {open_quotes}best{close_quote} decision tree for each test instance. In practice, only a path needs to be constructed, and a caching scheme makes the algorithm fast. The algorithm is robust with respect to missing values without resorting to the complicated methods usually seen in induction of decision trees. Experiments on real and artificial problems are presented.

  16. Phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Tom L

    2008-01-01

    Genetic data is often used to infer evolutionary relationships among a collection of viruses, bacteria, animal or plant species, or other operational taxonomic units (OTU). A phylogenetic tree depicts such relationships and provides a visual representation of the estimated branching order of the OTUs. Tree estimation is unique for several reasons, including: the types of data used to represent each OTU; the use ofprobabilistic nucleotide substitution models; the inference goals involving both tree topology and branch length, and the huge number of possible trees for a given sample of a very modest number of OTUs, which implies that fmding the best tree(s) to describe the genetic data for each OTU is computationally demanding. Bioinformatics is too large a field to review here. We focus on that aspect of bioinformatics that includes study of similarities in genetic data from multiple OTUs. Although research questions are diverse, a common underlying challenge is to estimate the evolutionary history of the OTUs. Therefore, this paper reviews the role of phylogenetic tree estimation in bioinformatics, available methods and software, and identifies areas for additional research and development.

  17. Generalized constructive tree weights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivasseau, Vincent E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org; Tanasa, Adrian E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org

    2014-04-15

    The Loop Vertex Expansion (LVE) is a quantum field theory (QFT) method which explicitly computes the Borel sum of Feynman perturbation series. This LVE relies in a crucial way on symmetric tree weights which define a measure on the set of spanning trees of any connected graph. In this paper we generalize this method by defining new tree weights. They depend on the choice of a partition of a set of vertices of the graph, and when the partition is non-trivial, they are no longer symmetric under permutation of vertices. Nevertheless we prove they have the required positivity property to lead to a convergent LVE; in fact we formulate this positivity property precisely for the first time. Our generalized tree weights are inspired by the Brydges-Battle-Federbush work on cluster expansions and could be particularly suited to the computation of connected functions in QFT. Several concrete examples are explicitly given.

  18. Trees Water People | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trees Water People Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trees, Water & People Place: Fort Collins, Colorado Zip: 80524 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Trees, Water & People develops...

  19. MPI File Tree Walk

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-04-30

    MPI-FTW is a scalable MPI based software application that navigates a directory tree by dynamically allocating processes to navigate sub-directories found. Upon completion, MPI-FTW provides statistics on the number of directories found, files found, and time to complete. Inaddition, commands can be executed at each directory level.

  20. Building up rhetorical structure trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcu, D.

    1996-12-31

    I use the distinction between the nuclei and the satellites that pertain to discourse relations to introduce a compositionality criterion for discourse trees. I provide a first-order formalization of rhetorical structure trees and, on its basis, I derive an algorithm that constructs all the valid rhetorical trees that can be associated with a given discourse.

  1. Distributed Merge Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther

    2013-01-08

    Improved simulations and sensors are producing datasets whose increasing complexity exhausts our ability to visualize and comprehend them directly. To cope with this problem, we can detect and extract significant features in the data and use them as the basis for subsequent analysis. Topological methods are valuable in this context because they provide robust and general feature definitions. As the growth of serial computational power has stalled, data analysis is becoming increasingly dependent on massively parallel machines. To satisfy the computational demand created by complex datasets, algorithms need to effectively utilize these computer architectures. The main strength of topological methods, their emphasis on global information, turns into an obstacle during parallelization. We present two approaches to alleviate this problem. We develop a distributed representation of the merge tree that avoids computing the global tree on a single processor and lets us parallelize subsequent queries. To account for the increasing number of cores per processor, we develop a new data structure that lets us take advantage of multiple shared-memory cores to parallelize the work on a single node. Finally, we present experiments that illustrate the strengths of our approach as well as help identify future challenges.

  2. Subsea tree cap well choke system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bednar, J.M.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes an apparatus useful in subsea well completions requiring a subsea choke. It comprises: a wellhead connector; a tree flow passage; a tree annulus passage; a tree cap; a choke; and a production line.

  3. Birch Tree Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Birch Tree Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Birch Tree Capital Place: Framingham, Massachusetts Zip: 1701 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Financial advisory service with...

  4. CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.usccrctopicsurban-forestsctcc Cost: Free Language: English References: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator1 Overview "The CUFR Tree Carbon...

  5. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" Climate change will challenge tall trees like ...

  6. Plane Tree Capital LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plane Tree Capital LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Plane Tree Capital LLP Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: W1J 8DY Sector: Carbon Product: London-based investment...

  7. Power Tree Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tree Corp Place: Boca Raton, Florida Zip: 33487 Product: Florida-based flywheel power storage systems maker. References: Power Tree Corp1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  8. Tank waste remediation system architecture tree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECK, L.G.

    1999-05-13

    The TWRS Architecture Tree presented in this document is a hierarchical breakdown to support the TWRS systems engineering analysis of the TWRS physical system, including facilities, hardware and software. The purpose for this systems engineering architecture tree is to describe and communicate the system's selected and existing architecture, to provide a common structure to improve the integration of work and resulting products, and to provide a framework as a basis for TWRS Specification Tree development.

  9. Creating ensembles of decision trees through sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick

    2005-08-30

    A system for decision tree ensembles that includes a module to read the data, a module to sort the data, a module to evaluate a potential split of the data according to some criterion using a random sample of the data, a module to split the data, and a module to combine multiple decision trees in ensembles. The decision tree method is based on statistical sampling techniques and includes the steps of reading the data; sorting the data; evaluating a potential split according to some criterion using a random sample of the data, splitting the data, and combining multiple decision trees in ensembles.

  10. Persimmon Tree Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Product: Persimmon is a private equity fund established in 2008 to invest in renewable energy firms. References: Persimmon Tree Capital1 This article is a...

  11. Big Tree Climate Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Big Tree Climate Fund Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80307 Sector: Carbon Product: Finances clean energy and carbon reduction projects through customers who buy RECs and VERs...

  12. Horizontal subsea trees allow frequent deepwater workovers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenek, M.; Hall, G.; Sheng, W.Z.

    1995-05-01

    Horizontal subsea wellheads have found application in the Liuhua oil field in the South China Sea. These trees allow installation and retrieval of downhole equipment through the tree without having to disturb the tree or its external connections to flow lines, service lines, or control umbilicals. This access to the well is important because the Liuhua wells will be produced with electrical submersible pumps (ESPs), which may have relatively short intervals between maintenance, leading to frequent well work. The wells will be completed subsea in about 300 m of water. The large bore, horizontal trees allow all downhole equipment to be pulled without removal of the subsea tree. This wellhead configuration also provides well control and vertical access to downhole equipment through a conventional marine drilling riser and subsea blowout preventer (BOP), eliminating the need for costly specialized completion risers. Another benefit of the horizontal tree is its extremely compact profile with a low number of valves for well control. Valve size and spacing are decoupled from the size and bore spacing of the tubing hanger. The tree`s low profile geometry reduces costs of manufacturing the tree and framework and optimize load transfer to the wellhead.

  13. Method of altering lignin in trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKay, J.; O`Malley, D.; Whetten, R.; Sederoff, R.

    1998-10-20

    Methods of providing and breeding trees having more easily extractable lignin due to the presence of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (Cad) null gene are presented. 16 figs.

  14. Method of altering lignin in trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKay, John; O'Malley, David; Whetten, Ross; Sederoff, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Methods of providing and breeding trees having more easily extractable lignin due to the presence of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (Cad) null gene are presented.

  15. Combined methods reveal how water moves in trees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April Combined methods reveal how water moves in trees Combined methods reveal how water moves in trees Water use by trees is a key part of the hydrological process linking soil ...

  16. Pine Tree Fitchburg Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name Pine Tree Fitchburg Biomass Facility Facility Pine Tree Fitchburg Sector Biomass Owner Suez Renewable Energy NA Location Westminster, Massachusetts Coordinates...

  17. Pine Tree Bethlehem Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name Pine Tree Bethlehem Biomass Facility Facility Pine Tree Bethlehem Sector Biomass Owner Suez Renewable Energy NA Location Bethlehem, New Hampshire Coordinates...

  18. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" June 7, 2015 Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" A well-known scientific principle ...

  19. Water trees to beat drought and global warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water trees to beat drought and global warming Community Connections: Your link to news ... Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues submit Water trees to beat ...

  20. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2014-06-25

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  1. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2012-09-10

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  2. factsheet - trees and power lines - July 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trees and power lines July 2008 This summer, BPA maintenance crews are inspecting and clearing high-growing vegetation from all 8,500- miles (15,000 circuit miles) of our...

  3. Parallel object-oriented decision tree system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath; Chandrika , Cantu-Paz; Erick

    2006-02-28

    A data mining decision tree system that uncovers patterns, associations, anomalies, and other statistically significant structures in data by reading and displaying data files, extracting relevant features for each of the objects, and using a method of recognizing patterns among the objects based upon object features through a decision tree that reads the data, sorts the data if necessary, determines the best manner to split the data into subsets according to some criterion, and splits the data.

  4. Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have found that drought and heat-induced tree mortality is accelerating in many forest biomes as a consequence of a warming climate in their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change. May 19, 2015 Nathan McDowell examines an old, large tree, which could be impacted by future droughts. Nathan McDowell examines an old, large tree,

  5. Forward estimation for game-tree search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Weixiong

    1996-12-31

    It is known that bounds on the minimax values of nodes in a game tree can be used to reduce the computational complexity of minimax search for two-player games. We describe a very simple method to estimate bounds on the minimax values of interior nodes of a game tree, and use the bounds to improve minimax search. The new algorithm, called forward estimation, does not require additional domain knowledge other than a static node evaluation function, and has small constant overhead per node expansion. We also propose a variation of forward estimation, which provides a tradeoff between computational complexity and decision quality. Our experimental results show that forward estimation outperforms alpha-beta pruning on random game trees and the game of Othello.

  6. Creating Ensembles of Decision Trees Through Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath,C; Cantu-Paz, E

    2001-07-26

    Recent work in classification indicates that significant improvements in accuracy can be obtained by growing an ensemble of classifiers and having them vote for the most popular class. This paper focuses on ensembles of decision trees that are created with a randomized procedure based on sampling. Randomization can be introduced by using random samples of the training data (as in bagging or boosting) and running a conventional tree-building algorithm, or by randomizing the induction algorithm itself. The objective of this paper is to describe the first experiences with a novel randomized tree induction method that uses a sub-sample of instances at a node to determine the split. The empirical results show that ensembles generated using this approach yield results that are competitive in accuracy and superior in computational cost to boosting and bagging.

  7. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  8. Scientists say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest Scientists say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest In a troubling ...

  9. Tree Oils India Ltd TOIL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tree Oils India Ltd TOIL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tree Oils India Ltd (TOIL) Place: Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 502 226 Product: Andhra Pradesh-based firm engaged in the...

  10. Category of trees in representation theory of quantum algebras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskaliuk, N. M.; Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2013-10-15

    New applications of categorical methods are connected with new additional structures on categories. One of such structures in representation theory of quantum algebras, the category of Kuznetsov-Smorodinsky-Vilenkin-Smirnov (KSVS) trees, is constructed, whose objects are finite rooted KSVS trees and morphisms generated by the transition from a KSVS tree to another one.

  11. ValUQWorkflowInCASL-RiderFinal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in predictive simulation and modeling. VVUQ is complex and necessarily hierarchical in nature. The particular characteristics of VVUQ elements depend upon where the VVUQ activity...

  12. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  13. Converting urban tree maintenance residue to energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphey, W.K.; Massey, J.G.; Sumrall, A.

    1980-01-01

    Three methods of utilizing urban wood waste collected by a tree maintenance firm in Houston, Texas (handling 30,000 ton waste/year) are examined: (a) hauling to a remote landfill; (b) chipping and hauling to a (local) power plant and converting to electricity; and (c) chipping and selling to an outside firm for use as boiler fuel. Breakdown of costs are given for each method in monetary and energy terms. Method (b) was the cheapest, producing a net energy gain (870 million Btu/day), but the firm chose method (c), since it realized a direct monetary return.

  14. Adaptive Dynamic Event Tree in RAVEN code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur

    2014-11-01

    RAVEN is a software tool that is focused on performing statistical analysis of stochastic dynamic systems. RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other applications (system codes). Among the several capabilities currently present in RAVEN, there are five different sampling strategies: Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Grid, Adaptive and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampling methodologies. The scope of this paper is to present a new sampling approach, currently under definition and implementation: an evolution of the DET me

  15. NREL Provides PV Holiday Lights for Christmas Tree

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Provides PV Holiday Lights for Christmas Tree For more information contact: George Douglas (303) 275-4096 Golden, Colo., December 2, 1997 -- National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) engineers are showing off the power of photovoltaics in Washington, D.C. again this holiday season. They have installed an 8-kilowatt solar array on the Ellipse just south of the White House to help power lights on the National Christmas Tree. The tree lighting ceremony on Dec. 4 begins Washington's 1997 Pageant

  16. Green Tree, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tree, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4117358, -80.0456097 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  17. Water trees to beat drought and global warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water trees to beat drought and global warming Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Water trees to beat drought and global warming Large trees are at risk in Northern New Mexico. May 2, 2016 Drought combined with global warming is a major threat to our trees in Northern New Mexico-and around the world-says LANL ecologist Nate McDowell. Drought combined with global warming is

  18. Joshua Tree, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joshua Tree, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.134728, -116.3130661 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  19. Cherry Tree, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tree, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7414755, -94.6432774 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  20. Lone Tree, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tree, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.5360997, -104.8963682 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  1. Searching game trees under memory constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Bagchi, A.

    1996-12-31

    The best-first game-tree search algorithm SSS* has greater pruning power than the depth-first algorithm Alpha-Beta. Yet it is seldom used in practice because it is slow in execution and requires substantial memory. Variants of SSS* have been proposed in recent years that overcome some, but not all, of its limitations. The recursive controlled-memory best-first search scheme MemSSS* described here is a new derivative of SSS* that compares favourably with Alpha-Beta in respect of all three major performance measures, namely, pruning power, running time and memory needs. MemSSS* improves upon an earlier controlled-memory algorithm IterSSS* which has most of the desired properties but is slow in execution.

  2. Widespread Discordance of Gene Trees with Species Tree inDrosophila: Evidence for Incomplete Lineage Sorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Moses, Alan M.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-28

    The phylogenetic relationship of the now fully sequencedspecies Drosophila erecta and D. yakuba with respect to the D.melanogaster species complex has been a subject of controversy. All threepossible groupings of the species have been reported in the past, thoughrecent multi-gene studies suggest that D. erecta and D. yakuba are sisterspecies. Using the whole genomes of each of these species as well as thefour other fully sequenced species in the subgenus Sophophora, we set outto investigate the placement of D. erecta and D. yakuba in the D.melanogaster species group and to understand the cause of the pastincongruence. Though we find that the phylogeny grouping D. erecta and D.yakuba together is the best supported, we also find widespreadincongruence in nucleotide and amino acid substitutions, insertions anddeletions, and gene trees. The time inferred to span the two keyspeciation events is short enough that under the coalescent model, theincongruence could be the result of incomplete lineage sorting.Consistent with the lineage-sorting hypothesis, substitutions supportingthe same tree were spatially clustered. Support for the different treeswas found to be linked to recombination such that adjacent genes supportthe same tree most often in regions of low recombination andsubstitutions supporting the same tree are most enriched roughly on thesame scale as linkage disequilibrium, also consistent with lineagesorting. The incongruence was found to be statistically significant androbust to model and species choice. No systematic biases were found. Weconclude that phylogenetic incongruence in the D. melanogaster speciescomplex is the result, at least in part, of incomplete lineage sorting.Incomplete lineage sorting will likely cause phylogenetic incongruence inmany comparative genomics datasets. Methods to infer the correct speciestree, the history of every base in the genome, and comparative methodsthat control for and/or utilize this information will be

  3. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" Climate change will challenge tall trees like California's redwoods. June 7, 2015 Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" Climate change will challenge tall trees like California's redwoods Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming" A well-known scientific principle describing how water

  4. Microsoft Word - Appendix M_ContingencyTrees.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    M Groundwater Operable Unit Contingency Trees U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page M-3 Figure M-1. Validation and Statistical Evaluation Scheme Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S0079000 July 2005 Page M-4 Figure M-2. Decision Tree for Objective 1 Data U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page M-5 Figure M-3. Decision Tree for Objective 2 Data Weldon

  5. Fault Tree Reliability Analysis and Design-for-reliability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-05

    WinR provides a fault tree analysis capability for performing systems reliability and design-for-reliability analyses. The package includes capabilities for sensitivity and uncertainity analysis, field failure data analysis, and optimization.

  6. Using Boosted Decision Trees to Separate Signal and Background...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    analysis. It is found that the use of 1000 trees, with 100 values tested for each variable at each node, and 50 events required for a node to continue separating give the...

  7. 2-D image segmentation using minimum spanning trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for partitioning a gray-level image into connected homogeneous regions. The novelty of this algorithm lies in the fact that by constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of a gray-level image, it reduces a region partitioning problem to a minimum spanning tree partitioning problem, and hence reduces the computational complexity of the region partitioning problem. The tree-partitioning algorithm, in essence, partitions a minimum spanning tree into subtrees, representing different homogeneous regions, by minimizing the sum of variations of gray levels over all subtrees under the constraints that each subtree should have at least a specified number of nodes, and two adjacent subtrees should have significantly different average gray-levels. Two (faster) heuristic implementations are also given for large-scale region partitioning problems. Test results have shown that the segmentation results are satisfactory and insensitive to noise.

  8. Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that describes the flow of liquid through a porous medium, which is how trees take in water. They found that tall plants with low hydraulic conductance and high leaf area are...

  9. Turning Leftover Trees into Biogasoline | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turning Leftover Trees into Biogasoline Turning Leftover Trees into Biogasoline June 7, 2010 - 11:00am Addthis Researchers at Virginia Tech are working to show how biogasoline could potentially be created in existing petroleum refineries, instead of at new biorefineries as shown here. | File illustration Researchers at Virginia Tech are working to show how biogasoline could potentially be created in existing petroleum refineries, instead of at new biorefineries as shown here. | File illustration

  10. Analyzing genetic tree sheds new light on disease outbreaks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analyzing genetic tree sheds new light on disease outbreaks Analyzing genetic tree sheds new light on disease outbreaks The team used computational phylogenetic analysis to examine how strains of HIV, both in computer modeling and compared with real-life case studies, would be transmitted. February 25, 2016 Using computational techniques, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are working to more clearly understand how diseases such as HIV are spread. In this image, arrows indicate actual

  11. Quantification and Visualization of Variation in Anatomical Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amenta, Nina; Datar, Manasi; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruihne, Marleen; Feragen, Aasa; Ge, Xiaoyin; Holst Pedersen, Jesper; Howard, Marylesa; Owen, Megan; Petersen, Jens; Shi, Jie; Xu, Qiuping

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents two approaches to quantifying and visualizing variation in datasets of trees. The first approach localizes subtrees in which significant population differences are found through hypothesis testing and sparse classifiers on subtree features. The second approach visualizes the global metric structure of datasets through low-distortion embedding into hyperbolic planes in the style of multidimensional scaling. A case study is made on a dataset of airway trees in relation to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

  12. Microcomputer applications of, and modifications to, the modular fault trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, T.L.; Graves, N.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1994-10-01

    The LaSalle Probabilistic Risk Assessment was the first major application of the modular logic fault trees after the IREP program. In the process of performing the analysis, many errors were discovered in the fault tree modules that led to difficulties in combining the modules to form the final system fault trees. These errors are corrected in the revised modules listed in this report. In addition, the application of the modules in terms of editing them and forming them into the system fault trees was inefficient. Originally, the editing had to be done line by line and no error checking was performed by the computer. This led to many typos and other logic errors in the construction of the modular fault tree files. Two programs were written to help alleviate this problem: (1) MODEDIT - This program allows an operator to retrieve a file for editing, edit the file for the plant specific application, perform some general error checking while the file is being modified, and store the file for later use, and (2) INDEX - This program checks that the modules that are supposed to form one fault tree all link up appropriately before the files are,loaded onto the mainframe computer. Lastly, the modules were not designed for relay type logic common in BWR designs but for solid state type logic. Some additional modules were defined for modeling relay logic, and an explanation and example of their use are included in this report.

  13. Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrack, A.G.

    1999-06-22

    The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

  14. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

  15. Iowa Shade Trees Bring Energy Bills Down, Beauty Up

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008, flooding and tornados tore across Iowa, devastating communities and natural landscapes across the state. More than 30 percent of the trees in Parkersburg, a small town hit hard by the tornado, were displaced and destroyed. Thanks to one local non-profit and Recovery Act funds, volunteers are "re-greening" the community.

  16. Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Pinnow, Kurt W.; Wallenfelt, Brian P.

    2010-08-24

    Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

  17. Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, P.

    1980-01-01

    Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid and arid regions are reviewed. This review is divided into sections according to the following general use categories: fuels; human food; livestock food; to increase yields of crops grown beneath their canopies;and control of desertification. (MHR)

  18. Deep water X-mas tree standardization -- Interchangeability approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula, M.T.R.; Paulo, C.A.S.; Moreira, C.C.

    1995-12-31

    Aiming the rationalization of subsea operations to turn the production of oil and gas more economical and reliable, standardization of subsea equipment interfaces is a tool that can play a very important role. Continuing the program initiated some years ago, Petrobras is now harvesting the results from the first efforts. Diverless guidelineless subsea Christmas trees from four different suppliers have already been manufactured in accordance to the standardized specification. Tests performed this year in Macae (Campos Basin onshore base), in Brazil, confirmed the interchangeability among subsea Christmas trees, tubing hangers, adapter bases and flowline hubs of different manufacturers. This interchangeability, associated with the use of proven techniques, results in operational flexibility, savings in rig time and reduction in production losses during workovers. By now, 33 complete sets of subsea Christmas trees have already been delivered and successfully tested. Other 28 sets are still being manufactured by the four local suppliers. For the next five years, more than a hundred of these trees will be required for the exploration of the new discoveries. This paper describes the standardized equipment, the role of the operator in an integrated way of working with the manufacturers on the standardization activities, the importance of a frank information flow through the involved companies and how a simple manufacturing philosophy, with the use of construction jigs, has proved to work satisfactorily.

  19. Dynamic Event Tree advancements and control logic improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The RAVEN code has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory since 2012. Its main goal is to create a multi-purpose platform for the deploying of all the capabilities needed for Probabilistic Risk Assessment, uncertainty quantification, data mining analysis and optimization studies. RAVEN is currently equipped with three different sampling categories: Forward samplers (Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Stratified, Grid Sampler, Factorials, etc.), Adaptive Samplers (Limit Surface search, Adaptive Polynomial Chaos, etc.) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) samplers (Deterministic and Adaptive Dynamic Event Trees). The main subject of this document is to report the activities that have been done in order to: start the migration of the RAVEN/RELAP-7 control logic system into MOOSE, and develop advanced dynamic sampling capabilities based on the Dynamic Event Tree approach. In order to provide to all MOOSE-based applications a control logic capability, in this Fiscal Year an initial migration activity has been initiated, moving the control logic system, designed for RELAP-7 by the RAVEN team, into the MOOSE framework. In this document, a brief explanation of what has been done is going to be reported. The second and most important subject of this report is about the development of a Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampler named “Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (HDET) and its Adaptive variant “Adaptive Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (AHDET). As other authors have already reported, among the different types of uncertainties, it is possible to discern two principle types: aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. The classical Dynamic Event Tree is in charge of treating the first class (aleatory) uncertainties; the dependence of the probabilistic risk assessment and analysis on the epistemic uncertainties are treated by an initial Monte Carlo sampling (MCDET). From each Monte Carlo sample, a DET analysis is run (in total, N trees). The Monte Carlo employs a pre-sampling of the

  20. Optimized Uncertainty Quantification Algorithm Within a Dynamic Event Tree Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Nielsen; Akira Tokuhiro; Robert Hiromoto

    2014-06-01

    Methods for developing Phenomenological Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) for nuclear power plants have been a useful tool in providing insight into modelling aspects that are important to safety. These methods have involved expert knowledge with regards to reactor plant transients and thermal-hydraulic codes to identify are of highest importance. Quantified PIRT provides for rigorous method for quantifying the phenomena that can have the greatest impact. The transients that are evaluated and the timing of those events are typically developed in collaboration with the Probabilistic Risk Analysis. Though quite effective in evaluating risk, traditional PRA methods lack the capability to evaluate complex dynamic systems where end states may vary as a function of transition time from physical state to physical state . Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems. A limitation of DPRA is its potential for state or combinatorial explosion that grows as a function of the number of components; as well as, the sampling of transition times from state-to-state of the entire system. This paper presents a method for performing QPIRT within a dynamic event tree framework such that timing events which result in the highest probabilities of failure are captured and a QPIRT is performed simultaneously while performing a discrete dynamic event tree evaluation. The resulting simulation results in a formal QPIRT for each end state. The use of dynamic event trees results in state explosion as the number of possible component states increases. This paper utilizes a branch and bound algorithm to optimize the solution of the dynamic event trees. The paper summarizes the methods used to implement the branch-and-bound algorithm in solving the discrete dynamic event trees.

  1. Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ecosystem Living trees soak up greenhouse gas and store it for a long time in their woody tissues, but dying trees release it-a carbon sink becomes a carbon source. Morever,...

  2. THE RESILIENCE OF UPLAND-OAK FOREST CANOPY TREES TO CHRONIC AND ACUTE PRECIPITATION MANIPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Paul J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Todd Jr, Donald E; Auge, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Implications of chronic ( 33 percent) and acute (-100 percent) precipitation change were evaluated for trees of upland-oak forests of the eastern United States. Chronic manipulations have been conducted since 1993, and acute manipulations of dominant canopy trees (Quercus prinus; Liriodendron tulipifera) were initiated in 2003. Through 12 years of chronic manipulations tree growth remained unaffected by natural or induced rainfall deficits even though severe drought conditions dramatically reduced canopy function in some years. The resilience of canopy trees to chronic-change was the result of a disconnect between tree growth phenology and late-season drought occurrence. Acute precipitation exclusion from the largest canopy trees also produced limited growth reductions from 2003 through 2005. Elimination of lateral root water sources for the acute treatment trees, via trenching midway through the 2004 growing-season, forced the conclusion that deep rooting was a key mechanism for large-tree resilience to severe drought.

  3. Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Blair D; Weerapurage, Dinesh P; Groer, Christopher S

    2012-06-01

    Although many $\\cal{NP}$-hard graph optimization problems can be solved in polynomial time on graphs of bounded tree-width, the adoption of these techniques into mainstream scientific computation has been limited due to the high memory requirements of the necessary dynamic programming tables and excessive runtimes of sequential implementations. This work addresses both challenges by proposing a set of new parallel algorithms for all steps of a tree decomposition-based approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem. A hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation includes a highly scalable parallel dynamic programming algorithm leveraging the MADNESS task-based runtime, and computational results demonstrate scaling. This work enables a significant expansion of the scale of graphs on which exact solutions to maximum weighted independent set can be obtained, and forms a framework for solving additional graph optimization problems with similar techniques.

  4. Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought Large trees-key climate influencers-die first in drought A team of researchers studied forests worldwide, ranging from semi-arid woodlands to tropic rainforests, to determine how a tree's size impacts its response to drought. September 29, 2015 Large trees suffer more than small trees during and after droughts, and while theories had suggested this should be a globally consistent pattern, a new study confirms the concept with a worldwide

  5. Efficient VLSI networks for parallel processing based on orthogonal trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nath, D.; Maheshwari, S.N.; Bhatt, P.C.P.

    1983-06-01

    Two interconnection networks for parallel processing, namely the orthogonal trees network and the orthogonal tree cycles (OTN and OTC) are discussed. Both networks are suitable for VLSI implementation and have been analysed using Thompson's model of VLSI. While the OTN and OTC have time performances similar to fast networks such as the perfect shuffle network (PSN), the cube connected cycles (CCC), etc., they have substantially better area* time/sup 2/ performances for a number of matrix and graph problems. For instance, the connected components and a minimal spanning tree of an undirected n-vertex graph can be found in 0(log/sup 4/ n) time on the OTC with an area* time/sup 2/ performance of 0(n/sup 2/ log/sup 8/ n) and 0(n/sup 2/ log/sup 9/ n) respectively. This is asymptotically much better than the performances of the CCC, PSN and MESH. The OTC and OTN can be looked upon as general purpose parallel processors since a number of other problems such as sorting and DFT can be solved on them with an area* time/sup 2/ performance matching that of other networks. Finally, programming the OTN and OTC is simple and they are also amenable to pipelining a series of problems. 33 references.

  6. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  7. Unsupervised individual tree crown detection in high-resolution satellite imagery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Skurikhin, Alexei N.; McDowell, Nate G.; Middleton, Richard S.

    2016-01-26

    Rapidly and accurately detecting individual tree crowns in satellite imagery is a critical need for monitoring and characterizing forest resources. We present a two-stage semiautomated approach for detecting individual tree crowns using high spatial resolution (0.6 m) satellite imagery. First, active contours are used to recognize tree canopy areas in a normalized difference vegetation index image. Given the image areas corresponding to tree canopies, we then identify individual tree crowns as local extrema points in the Laplacian of Gaussian scale-space pyramid. The approach simultaneously detects tree crown centers and estimates tree crown sizes, parameters critical to multiple ecosystem models. Asmore » a demonstration, we used a ground validated, 0.6 m resolution QuickBird image of a sparse forest site. The two-stage approach produced a tree count estimate with an accuracy of 78% for a naturally regenerating forest with irregularly spaced trees, a success rate equivalent to or better than existing approaches. In addition, our approach detects tree canopy areas and individual tree crowns in an unsupervised manner and helps identify overlapping crowns. Furthermore, the method also demonstrates significant potential for further improvement.« less

  8. Characterizing quasiconvex functions in terms of the Kronrod's tree of a function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorob'ev, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    As an application of Kronrod's construction of the tree of a function to convex analysis, a characterization of quasiconvex functions is obtained. Namely, a function is quasiconvex if and only if the associated function defined on the tree of the original function is quasiconvex. A new proof of one of the existence lemmas in Kronrod's construction of the tree of a function (the original proof of which turned out to be incorrect) is given. Bibliography: 4 titles. (paper)

  9. Using histograms to introduce randomization in the generation of ensembles of decision trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick; Littau, David

    2005-02-22

    A system for decision tree ensembles that includes a module to read the data, a module to create a histogram, a module to evaluate a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, a module to select a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, a module to split the data, and a module to combine multiple decision trees in ensembles. The decision tree method includes the steps of reading the data; creating a histogram; evaluating a potential split according to some criterion using the histogram, selecting a split point randomly in an interval around the best split, splitting the data, and combining multiple decision trees in ensembles.

  10. Possible bias in tree-ring time series due to mortality (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; TREE RINGS; TIME-SERIES ANALYSIS; AIR POLLUTION; ...

  11. Comet Riders--Nuclear nomads to the stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr. ); Buden, D. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the potential role of an evolutionary family of advanced space nuclear power systems (solid core reactor, gas core reactor, and thermonulcear fusion systems) in the detailed exploration of Solar System comets and in the use of interstellar comes to support migratory journeys to the stars by both human beings and their smart robot systems. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. MHK Technologies/Wave Rider | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    into electricity Electricity is generated via small turbines powered by hydraulic circuits which captures the energy of the wave and converts it into high pressure hydraulic...

  13. RAVEN. Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  14. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-13

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, longterm free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwoodmore » species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.« less

  15. RAVEN: Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

    2013-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  16. Radiation densitometry in tree-ring analysis: a review and procedure manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.L.; Taylor, F.G.; Doyle, T.W.; Foster, B.E.; Cooper, C.; West, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    An x-ray densitometry of wood facility is being established by the Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge Natioanl Laboratory (ORNL). The objective is to apply tree-ring data to determine whether or not there is a fertilizer effect on tree growth from increased atmospheric carbon dioxide since the beginning of the industrial era. Intra-ring width and density data, including ring-mass will be detemined from tree-ring samples collected from sites located throughout the United States and Canada. This report is designed as a guide to assist ORNL scientists in building the x-ray densitometry system. The history and development of x-ray densitometry in tree-ring research is examined and x-ray densitometry is compared with other techniques. Relative wood and tree characteristics are described as are environmental and genetic factors affecting tree growth responses. Methods in x-ray densitometry are examined in detail and the techniques used at four operating laboratories are described. Some ways that dendrochronology has been applied in dating, in wood quality, and environmental studies are presented, and a number of tree-ring studies in Canada are described. An annotated bibliography of radiation densitometry in tree-ring analysis and related subjects is included.

  17. New design of a guidelineless horizontal tree for deepwater ESP wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olijnik, L.A.; Vigesa, S.; Paula, M.T.R.; Figueiredo, M.W. de; Rutherford, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the new design of a horizontal tree for deepwater installation, as a key piece of equipment for application of a Electrical Submersible Pump in Subsea Wells. The production from subsea wells equipped with ESPs is a reality since October/94 with the first installation in Campos Basin. The horizontal tree adds simplicity to workover operations expected to be two to three times more frequency when compared to natural flow or gas lifted wells. The design and fabrication of the deepwater horizontal tree is a result of a Technological Cooperation Agreement. The design incorporates new solutions, mainly in diverless guidelineless connection of power cables and flowlines using the vertical connection system. The guidelineless horizontal subsea tree is fully prepared to be integrated on the new manifolds being designed for the Brazilian deepwater oilfields. The applications of the horizontal trees in subsea ESP wells reduce intervention cost, increasing economical attractiveness and scenarios for the applications of this new boosting technology.

  18. Creating ensembles of oblique decision trees with evolutionary algorithms and sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantu-Paz, Erick; Kamath, Chandrika

    2006-06-13

    A decision tree system that is part of a parallel object-oriented pattern recognition system, which in turn is part of an object oriented data mining system. A decision tree process includes the step of reading the data. If necessary, the data is sorted. A potential split of the data is evaluated according to some criterion. An initial split of the data is determined. The final split of the data is determined using evolutionary algorithms and statistical sampling techniques. The data is split. Multiple decision trees are combined in ensembles.

  19. Scientists say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the U.S. Southwest Climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest Scientists say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest In a troubling new study says a warming climate could trigger a "massive" dieoff of coniferous trees in the U.S. southwest sometime this century. December 24, 2015 Dying conifers, particularly ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana) in California's Sequoia National Park,

  20. Evaluating multimedia chemical persistence: Classification and regression tree analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.H.; McKone, T.E.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    2000-04-01

    For the thousands of chemicals continuously released into the environment, it is desirable to make prospective assessments of those likely to be persistent. Widely distributed persistent chemicals are impossible to remove from the environment and remediation by natural processes may take decades, which is problematic if adverse health or ecological effects are discovered after prolonged release into the environment. A tiered approach using a classification scheme and a multimedia model for determining persistence is presented. Using specific criteria for persistence, a classification tree is developed to classify a chemical as persistent or nonpersistent based on the chemical properties. In this approach, the classification is derived from the results of a standardized unit world multimedia model. Thus, the classifications are more robust for multimedia pollutants than classifications using a single medium half-life. The method can be readily implemented and provides insight without requiring extensive and often unavailable data. This method can be used to classify chemicals when only a few properties are known and can be used to direct further data collection. Case studies are presented to demonstrate the advantages of the approach.

  1. Practical Twistor Spinoffs: On-Shell Tree and Loop Recursion Relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC

    2005-07-12

    I briefly review how on-shell recursion relations, whose development was stimulated by recent twistor-space approaches, have been applied to compute tree and one-loop amplitudes in QCD.

  2. Reduction of Transient Particulate Matter Spikes with Decision Tree Based Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Using a non-parametric decision tree to measure transient PM could correctly identify 94% of high opacity spikes and used to take targeted action to reduce PM without affecting NOx.

  3. The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab March 26, 2015 The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide By the end of the century, the...

  4. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-05-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature inmore » the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. Lastly, these results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.« less

  5. Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Species, Flight, and Attack on Living Eastern Cottonwood Trees.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Coyle; D.C. Booth: M.S. Wallace

    2005-12-01

    ABSTRACT In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon onoharaensum (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Pseudopityophthorus minutissimus (Zimmermann), Xyleborus atratus Eichhoff, and Xyleborus impressus Eichhoff]) were collected in South Carolina for the ????rst time. Of four tree species in the plantation, eastern cottonwood, Populus deltoides Bartram, was the only one attacked, with nearly 40% of the trees sustaining ambrosia beetle damage. Clone ST66 sustained more damage than clone S7C15. ST66 trees receiving fertilization were attacked more frequently than trees receiving irrigation, irrigation_fertilization, or controls, although the number of S7C15 trees attacked did not differ among treatments. The study location is near major shipping ports; our results demonstrate the necessity for intensive monitoring programs to determine the arrival, spread, ecology, and impact of exotic scolytids.

  6. λ-augmented tree for robust data collection in Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamto, Joseph; Qian, Lijun; Li, Wei; Han, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, tree multicast configuration of smart meters (SMs) can maintain the connectivity and meet the latency requirements for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). However, such topology is extremely weak as any single failure suffices to break its connectivity. On the other hand, the impact of a SM node failure can be more or less significant: a noncut SM node will have a limited local impact compared to a cut SM node that will break the network connectivity. In this work, we design a highly connected tree with a set of backup links to minimize the weakness of tree topology of SMs. A topology repair scheme is proposed to address the impact of a SM node failure on the connectivity of the augmented tree network. It relies on a loop detection scheme to define the criticality of a SM node and specifically targets cut SM node by selecting backup parent SM to cover its children. Detailed algorithms to create such AMI tree and related theoretical and complexity analysis are provided with insightful simulation results: sufficient redundancy is provided to alleviate data loss at the cost of signaling overhead. It is however observed that biconnected tree provides the best compromise between the two entities.

  7. Multielemental analysis of tree rings: temporal accumulation patterns and relationships with air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baes, C.F. III; McLaughlin, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Short-leaf pine (Pinus echinata) tree rings collected in East Tennessee showed steadily increasing concentrations of Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ti, and Zn over the past 20 to 25 years. In part, these increasing concentrations result from recent declines in tree growth rate, but when corrected for variations in growth rate, annual accumulations of many of these metals in xylem tissue has increased in recent years. The largest concentration increases with time were observed in rings from trees downwind of the 1200 MW(e) generating Kingston steam plant, which burns 4 x 10/sup 9/ kg coal per year. Trace metals concentrations in cambial tissues were found to be as high as ten times those in the most recently formed xylem, and concentrations of Al, Cd, Mn, and Zn are near levels that have been associated with toxic effects when found in above-ground tissues of herbaceous plants. In trees sampled in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) there was a period of suppressed growth and increased iron concentration in rings formed between 1863 and 1912. During this time period 88 km upwind, smelting of iron and copper sulfide ores was occurring at the Copper Basin (Copperhill), near Ducktown, Tennessee. Associated with this smelting were large uncontrolled releases of SO/sub 2/ which killed all vegetation within 20 km of the Copper Basin. The patterns of growth suppression and iron accumulation observed in the GSMNP trees correspond remarkably well to the initiation of smelting operations in 1854, maximum uncontrolled SO/sub 2/ emissions in 1895, and the reduction in SO/sub 2/ emissions mandated by the US Supreme Court in 1908. This historical pattern and the widespread occurrence of similar patterns of growth suppression and increased iron concentrations in tree rings since the late 1950s provide strong inferential evidence of tree response to SO/sub 2/ deposition. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  8. λ-augmented tree for robust data collection in Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kamto, Joseph; Qian, Lijun; Li, Wei; Han, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, tree multicast configuration of smart meters (SMs) can maintain the connectivity and meet the latency requirements for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). However, such topology is extremely weak as any single failure suffices to break its connectivity. On the other hand, the impact of a SM node failure can be more or less significant: a noncut SM node will have a limited local impact compared to a cut SM node that will break the network connectivity. In this work, we design a highly connected tree with a set of backup links to minimize the weakness of treemore » topology of SMs. A topology repair scheme is proposed to address the impact of a SM node failure on the connectivity of the augmented tree network. It relies on a loop detection scheme to define the criticality of a SM node and specifically targets cut SM node by selecting backup parent SM to cover its children. Detailed algorithms to create such AMI tree and related theoretical and complexity analysis are provided with insightful simulation results: sufficient redundancy is provided to alleviate data loss at the cost of signaling overhead. It is however observed that biconnected tree provides the best compromise between the two entities.« less

  9. Burlap bands as a sampling technique for green anoles (Anolis carolinensis) and other reptiles commonly found on tree boles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the use and successfulness of using burlap bands on tree boles as a sampling technique for green anoles.

  10. Use of decision tree analysis and Monte Carlo simulation for downhole material selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T.; Cavassi, P.; Lazzari, L.; Pezzotta, L.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes how corrosion engineers can use the decision tree analysis in order to evaluate and select the best materials for the compilation of a new oil field, characterized by high CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S content. The method has been based on the decision tree analysis and the Monte Carlo simulation to obtain the probability distribution of some events to occur (for instance, number of workovers, corrosion inhibitor efficiency, coating damage rate). The corrosion study leads to four different technical solutions, showing different risk and reliability: carbon steel with corrosion allowance and inhibitor injection, coated tubing, and two corrosion resistant alloys, a superduplex stainless steel and a superaustenitic stainless steel. The cost comparison has been carried out by using the Expected Monetary Value criterion applied to the Life Cycle Cost evaluation. The paper presents and discusses the decision tree and the results of simulations.

  11. Post-event human decision errors: operator action tree/time reliability correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, R E; Fragola, J; Wreathall, J

    1982-11-01

    This report documents an interim framework for the quantification of the probability of errors of decision on the part of nuclear power plant operators after the initiation of an accident. The framework can easily be incorporated into an event tree/fault tree analysis. The method presented consists of a structure called the operator action tree and a time reliability correlation which assumes the time available for making a decision to be the dominating factor in situations requiring cognitive human response. This limited approach decreases the magnitude and complexity of the decision modeling task. Specifically, in the past, some human performance models have attempted prediction by trying to emulate sequences of human actions, or by identifying and modeling the information processing approach applicable to the task. The model developed here is directed at describing the statistical performance of a representative group of hypothetical individuals responding to generalized situations.

  12. Research frontiers in drought-induced tree mortality: Crossing scales and disciplines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartmann, Henrik; Adams, Henry D.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Jansen, Steven; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.

    2015-01-12

    Sudden and widespread forest die-back and die-off (e.g., Huang & Anderegg, 2012) and increased mortality rates (e.g., Peng et al., 2011) in many forest ecosystems across the globe have been linked to drought and elevated temperatures (Allen et al., 2010, Fig. 1). Furthermore, these observations have caused a focus on the physiological mechanisms of drought-induced tree mortality (e.g. McDowell et al., 2008) and many studies, both observational and manipulative, have been carried out to explain tree death during drought from a physiological perspective.

  13. EVENT TREE ANALYSIS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: A CASE HISTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R

    2009-05-25

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), a Department of Energy (DOE) installation in west-central South Carolina there is a unique geologic stratum that exists at depth that has the potential to cause surface settlement resulting from a seismic event. In the past the particular stratum in question has been remediated via pressure grouting, however the benefits of remediation have always been debatable. Recently the SRS has attempted to frame the issue in terms of risk via an event tree or logic tree analysis. This paper describes that analysis, including the input data required.

  14. Elevated CO2 increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen isotope analyses in tree rings across three forest FACE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battipaglia, Giovanna [Second University of Naples; Saurer, Matthias [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Cherubini, Paulo [WSL Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research; Califapietra, Carlo [University of Tuscia; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Cotrufo, M. Francesca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2013-01-01

    Elevated CO2 increases intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) of forests, but the magnitude of this effect and its interaction with climate is still poorly understood. We combined tree ring analysis with isotope measurements at three Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE, POP-EUROFACE, in Italy; Duke FACE in North Carolina and ORNL in Tennessee, USA) sites, to cover the entire life of the trees. We used 13C to assess carbon isotope discrimination ( 13C ci/ca) and changes in WUEi, while direct CO2 effects on stomatal conductance were explored using 18O as a proxy. Across all the sites, elevated CO2 increased 13C-derived WUEi on average by 73% for Liquidambar styraciflua, 77% for Pinus taeda and 75% for Populus sp., but through different ecophysiological mechanisms. Our findings provide a robust means of predicting WUEi responses from a variety of tree species exposed to variable environmental conditions over time, and species-specific relationships that can help modeling elevated CO2 and climate impacts on forest productivity, carbon and water balances.

  15. Modeling the uptake and transpiration of TCE using phreatophytic trees. Master`s Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, D.P.

    1997-12-01

    Phytoremediation is a recent addition to the numerous methods used today to remediate ground water contaminants. It is proving more effective and efficient compared to existing remediation techniques. The use of phreatophytes, or water seeking trees, has great potential for phytoremediation. These trees are fast growing, long lived, grow their roots down to the ground water table, transpire large amounts of water, and are proven to actively remove contaminants from the soil horizon. The purpose of this research is to develop quantitative concepts for understanding the dynamics of TCE uptake and transpiration by phreatophytic trees over a short rotation woody crop time frame. This will he done by constructing a system dynamics model of this process and running it over a wide range of conditions. This research will offer managers a tool to simulate long-term uptake and transpiration of TCE at potential sites. The results of this study indicate that TCE is actively removed from the soil horizon by phreatophytic trees and a significant proportion of this TCE is then transpired. Changes in soil horizon parameters, xylem flow rates, and variables in the uptake equation greatly influence TCE uptake rates as well as transpiration. Also, parameters used in equations representing flows in and out of the leaf greatly influence transpiration. Better understanding of these processes is essential for managers to accurately predict the amount of TCE removed and transpired during potential phytoremediation projects.

  16. Quasi-Optimal Elimination Trees for 2D Grids with Singularities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paszyńska, A.; Paszyński, M.; Jopek, K.; Woźniak, M.; Goik, D.; Gurgul, P.; AbouEisha, H.; Moshkov, M.; Calo, V. M.; Lenharth, A.; et al

    2015-01-01

    We consmore » truct quasi-optimal elimination trees for 2D finite element meshes with singularities. These trees minimize the complexity of the solution of the discrete system. The computational cost estimates of the elimination process model the execution of the multifrontal algorithms in serial and in parallel shared-memory executions. Since the meshes considered are a subspace of all possible mesh partitions, we call these minimizers quasi-optimal. We minimize the cost functionals using dynamic programming. Finding these minimizers is more computationally expensive than solving the original algebraic system. Nevertheless, from the insights provided by the analysis of the dynamic programming minima, we propose a heuristic construction of the elimination trees that has cost O N e log ⁡ N e , where N e is the number of elements in the mesh. We show that this heuristic ordering has similar computational cost to the quasi-optimal elimination trees found with dynamic programming and outperforms state-of-the-art alternatives in our numerical experiments.« less

  17. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aizenman, Michael; Warzel, Simone

    2012-09-15

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  18. Resolving the tips of the tree of life: How much mitochondrialdata doe we need?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonett, Ronald M.; Macey, J. Robert; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Chippindale, Paul T.

    2005-04-29

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences are used extensively to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among recently diverged animals,and have constituted the most widely used markers for species- and generic-level relationships for the last decade or more. However, most studies to date have employed relatively small portions of the mt-genome. In contrast, complete mt-genomes primarily have been used to investigate deep divergences, including several studies of the amount of mt sequence necessary to recover ancient relationships. We sequenced and analyzed 24 complete mt-genomes from a group of salamander species exhibiting divergences typical of those in many species-level studies. We present the first comprehensive investigation of the amount of mt sequence data necessary to consistently recover the mt-genome tree at this level, using parsimony and Bayesian methods. Both methods of phylogenetic analysis revealed extremely similar results. A surprising number of well supported, yet conflicting, relationships were found in trees based on fragments less than {approx}2000 nucleotides (nt), typical of the vast majority of the thousands of mt-based studies published to date. Large amounts of data (11,500+ nt) were necessary to consistently recover the whole mt-genome tree. Some relationships consistently were recovered with fragments of all sizes, but many nodes required the majority of the mt-genome to stabilize, particularly those associated with short internal branches. Although moderate amounts of data (2000-3000 nt) were adequate to recover mt-based relationships for which most nodes were congruent with the whole mt-genome tree, many thousands of nucleotides were necessary to resolve rapid bursts of evolution. Recent advances in genomics are making collection of large amounts of sequence data highly feasible, and our results provide the basis for comparative studies of other closely related groups to optimize mt sequence sampling and phylogenetic resolution at the ''tips

  19. CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

  20. A methodology for generating dynamic accident progression event trees for level-2 PRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakobyan, A.; Denning, R.; Aldemir, T. [Ohio State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, 650 Ackerman Road, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States); Dunagan, S.; Kunsman, D. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Currently, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. A software tool (ADAPT) is described for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. While the software tool could be applied to any systems analysis code, the MELCOR code is used for this illustration. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a pressurized water reactor. (authors)

  1. Non-Gaussianity at tree and one-loop levels from vector field perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela-Toledo, Cesar A.; Rodriguez, Yeinzon; Lyth, David H.

    2009-11-15

    We study the spectrum P{sub {zeta}} and bispectrum B{sub {zeta}} of the primordial curvature perturbation {zeta} when the latter is generated by scalar and vector field perturbations. The tree-level and one-loop contributions from vector field perturbations are worked out considering the possibility that the one-loop contributions may be dominant over the tree-level terms [both (either) in P{sub {zeta}} and (or) in B{sub {zeta}}] and vice versa. The level of non-Gaussianity in the bispectrum, f{sub NL}, is calculated and related to the level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum, g{sub {zeta}}. For very small amounts of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum, the level of non-Gaussianity may be very high, in some cases exceeding the current observational limit.

  2. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  3. Office of Legacy Management Decision Tree for Solar Photovoltaic Projects - 13317

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, John; Butherus, Michael; Barr, Deborah L.

    2013-07-01

    To support consideration of renewable energy power development as a land reuse option, the DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) established a partnership to conduct an assessment of wind and solar renewable energy resources on LM lands. From a solar capacity perspective, the larger sites in the western United States present opportunities for constructing solar photovoltaic (PV) projects. A detailed analysis and preliminary plan was developed for three large sites in New Mexico, assessing the costs, the conceptual layout of a PV system, and the electric utility interconnection process. As a result of the study, a 1,214-hectare (3,000-acre) site near Grants, New Mexico, was chosen for further study. The state incentives, utility connection process, and transmission line capacity were key factors in assessing the feasibility of the project. LM's Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site was also chosen for consideration because the uranium mill tailings disposal cell is on a hillside facing south, transmission lines cross the property, and the community was very supportive of the project. LM worked with the regulators to demonstrate that the disposal cell's long-term performance would not be impacted by the installation of a PV solar system. A number of LM-unique issues were resolved in making the site available for a private party to lease a portion of the site for a solar PV project. A lease was awarded in September 2012. Using a solar decision tree that was developed and launched by the EPA and NREL, LM has modified and expanded the decision tree structure to address the unique aspects and challenges faced by LM on its multiple sites. The LM solar decision tree covers factors such as land ownership, usable acreage, financial viability of the project, stakeholder involvement, and transmission line capacity. As additional sites are transferred to LM in the future, the decision tree will assist in determining whether a solar

  4. Results from intercropping fast-growing trees and food crops at Morogoro, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redhead, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    In Morogoro, Tanzania, agroforestry trials were set up to investigate intercropping with primarily eucalypt species. The climate in the region is very similar to Kolar, Karnataka State, India. Three crops-sorghum, bean and maize-were grown annually under Eucalyptus tereticornis at 2.5 m x 2.5 m for three years with a range of weeding practices. Plots that were intercropped with beans showed best results. Shading by the eucalypts after three years resulted in negligible crop yields in all treatments. Three tree spacings of E. camaldulensis (3 m x 3 m, 4 m x 4 m, and 5 m x 5 m) were combined with the intercropping of beans and maize. Beans gave satisfactory yields at all spacings, but the maize showed significantly depressed yields at 3 m x 3 m at 4 m x 4 m, but was similar to pure maize crop at 5 m x 5 m spacing. Overall the extra revenue from a food crop in the first and second year of tree growth increases the return from the land. The short rotation of fast growing trees depleted the soil of nutrients and, as with other crops, the fertility would have to be maintained by applying fertilizer.

  5. Building Decision Trees for Characteristic Ellipsoid Method to Monitor Power System Transient Behaviors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Jian; Diao, Ruisheng; Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Zhou, Ning; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2010-12-01

    The characteristic ellipsoid is a new method to monitor the dynamics of power systems. Decision trees (DTs) play an important role in applying the characteristic ellipsoid method to system operation and analysis. This paper presents the idea and initial results of building DTs for detecting transient dynamic events using the characteristic ellipsoid method. The objective is to determine fault types, fault locations and clearance time in the system using decision trees based on ellipsoids of system transient responses. The New England 10-machine 39-bus system is used for running dynamic simulations to generate a sufficiently large number of transient events in different system configurations. Comprehensive transient simulations considering three fault types, two fault clearance times and different fault locations were conducted in the study. Bus voltage magnitudes and monitored reactive and active power flows are recorded as the phasor measurements to calculate characteristic ellipsoids whose volume, eccentricity, center and projection of the longest axis are used as indices to build decision trees. The DT performances are tested and compared by considering different sets of PMU locations. The proposed method demonstrates that the characteristic ellipsoid method is a very efficient and promising tool to monitor power system dynamic behaviors.

  6. Effects of Warming on Tree Species’ Recruitment in Deciduous Forests of the Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Clark, James S.; Mohan, Jacqueline

    2015-03-25

    Climate change is restructuring forests of the United States, although the details of this restructuring are currently uncertain. Rising temperatures of 2 to 8oC and associated changes in soil moisture will shift the competitive balance between species that compete for light and water, and so change their abilities to produce seed, germinate, grow, and survive. We have used large-scale experiments to determine the effects of warming on the most sensitive stage of species distributions, i.e., recruitment, in mixed deciduous forests in southern New England and in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Two questions organized our research: (1) Might temperate tree species near the “warm” end of their range in the eastern United States decline in abundance during the coming century due to projected warming? and (2) Might trees near the “cool” end of their range in the eastern United States increase in abundance, or extend their range, during the coming 100 years because of projected warming? To explore these questions, we exposed seedlings to air and soil warming experiments in two eastern deciduous forest sites; one at the Harvard Forest (HF) in central Massachusetts, and the other at the Duke Forest (DF) in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. We focused on tree species common to both Harvard and Duke Forests (such as red, black, and white oaks), those near northern range limits (black oak, flowing dogwood, tulip poplar), and those near southern range limits (yellow birch, sugar maple, Virginia pine). At each site, we planted seeds and seedlings in common gardens established in temperature-controlled, open-top chambers. The experimental design was replicated and fully factorial and involved three temperature regimes (ambient, +3oC and +5oC) and two light regimes (closed forest canopy (low light) and gap conditions (high light)). Measured variables included Winter/Spring responses to temperature and mid-Summer responses to low soil moisture. This research

  7. Tree_Select_Probes, Build_Hybr_Index, and Build_Hybr_Table

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-01

    Tree_Select_Probes: This program is part of a 3 program package that replaces the older probe selection software. The purpose of the package is to generate probes specific for the group of sequences that belong to a given phylogenetic node. This software employs modified proble selection algorithm that improves speed of calculations in comparison with older software. For each node of the input tree, this program selects probes that are positive for all sequences that belongmore » to this node and negative for all that doesn't. For speed it uses probe database created by build_hybr_index program and hybridization table database created by build_hyper_table program. As a result of calculation, the program prints lists for each node from the tree. Input file formats: FASTA for sequences database, internal INDEX for probe database, internal table for hybridization database. Output file format: text file. Build_Hybr_Index: This program is part of a 3 program package that replaces the older probe selection software. The purpose of the package is to generate probles specific for the group of sequences that belong to a given phylogenetic node. This software employs modified probe selection algorithm that improves speed of calculations in comparison with older software. This program creates database of potential probes based on given sequence database, reducing it in the way so it doesn't contain repeats or substrings with meta-nucleotides. Input file format: FASTA. Output file format: itnernal INDEX file. Build_Hybr_Table: This program is part of a 3-program package that replaces the older probe selection software. The purpose of the package is to generate probles specific for the group of sequences that belong to a given phylogenetic node. This software employes modified probe selection algorithm that improves speed of calculations in comparison with older software. For each node of he input tree, this program selects probles that are positive for all sequences that

  8. Simplified containment event tree analysis for the Sequoyah Ice Condenser containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galyean, W.J.; Schroeder, J.A.; Pafford, D.J. )

    1990-12-01

    An evaluation of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) ice condenser containment was performed. In this evaluation, simplified containment event trees (SCETs) were developed that utilized the vast storehouse of information generated by the NRC's Draft NUREG-1150 effort. Specifically, the computer programs and data files produced by the NUREG-1150 analysis of Sequoyah were used to electronically generate SCETs, as opposed to the NUREG-1150 accident progression event trees (APETs). This simplification was performed to allow graphic depiction of the SCETs in typical event tree format, which facilitates their understanding and use. SCETs were developed for five of the seven plant damage state groups (PDSGs) identified by the NUREG-1150 analyses, which includes: both short- and long-term station blackout sequences (SBOs), transients, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), and anticipated transient without scram (ATWS). Steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) and event-V PDSGs were not analyzed because of their containment bypass nature. After being benchmarked with the APETs, in terms of containment failure mode and risk, the SCETs were used to evaluate a number of potential containment modifications. The modifications were examined for their potential to mitigate or prevent containment failure from hydrogen burns or direct impingement on the containment by the core, (both factors identified as significant contributors to risk in the NUREG-1150 Sequoyah analysis). However, because of the relatively low baseline risk postulated for Sequoyah (i.e., 12 person-rems per reactor year), none of the potential modifications appear to be cost effective. 15 refs., 10 figs. , 17 tabs.

  9. p-barp-Annihilation processes in the tree approximation of SU(3) chiral effective theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, V. E.; Kudryavtsev, A. E. Romanov, A. I.; Weinberg, V. M.

    2012-12-15

    The p-barp-annihilation reactions p-barp {yields} {eta}{eta} {eta} and p-barp {yields} {eta}KK-bar at rest are considered in the tree approximation in the framework of SU(3) chiral effective theory at leading order. The calculated branchings are compared with the data. The results for neutral ({eta}{eta}{eta}, K{sup 0}K-bar{sup 0}{sub {eta}}) and charged (K{sup +}K{sup -}{sub {eta}}) channels are essentially different.

  10. Pompano subsea development: Template/manifold, tree and ROV intervention systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckmann, M.M.; Byrd, M.L.; Holt, J.; Riley, J.W.; Snell, C.K.; Tyer, C.; Brewster, D.

    1996-12-31

    BP Exploration`s Pompano Subsea Development, in 1,865 ft of water in the Gulf of Mexico, uses a subsea production system to produce oil to a host platform 4{1/2} miles away. The 10-slot subsea template/manifold supports Through FlowLine (TFL) wells, which are controlled by means of an electrohydraulic control system. All process components of the system are retrievable with ROV intervention. This paper describes the template/manifold system, TFL tree system and ROV intervention systems.

  11. Energy-efficient distributed constructions of miniumum spanning tree for wireless ad-hoc networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V. S. A.; Pandurangan, G.; Khan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) problem is one of the most important and commonly occurring primitive in the design and operation of data and communication networks. While there a redistributed algorithms for the MST problem these require relatively large number of messages and time, and are fairly involved, require synchronization and a lot of book keeping; this makes these algorithms impractical for emerging technologies such as ad hoc and sensor networks. In such networks, a sensor has very limited power, and any algorithm needs to be simple, local and energy efficient for being practical. Motivated by these considerations, we study the performance of a class of simple and local algorithms called Nearest Neighbor Tree (NNT) algorithms for energy-efficient construction of MSTs in a wireless ad hoc setting. These employ a very simple idea to eliminate the work involved in cycle detection in other MST algorithms: each node chooses a distinct rank, and connects to the closest node of higher rank. We consider two variants of the NNT algorithms, obtained by two ways of choosing the ranks: (i) Random NNT, in which each node chooses a rank randomly, and (ii) Directional NNT, in which each node uses directional information for choosing the rank. We show provable bounds on the performance of these algorithms in instances obtained by uniformly distributed points in the unit square. Finally, we perform extensive simulations of our algorithms. We tested our algorithms on both uniformly random distributions of points, and on realistic distributions of points in an urban setting. The cost of the tree found by the NNT algorithms is within a factor of 2 of the MST, but there is more than a ten-fold saving on the energy and about a five fold saving on the number of messages sent. Also, our algorithms are significantly simpler to implement compared to, for instance, the GHS algorithm, which is essentially optimal with regards to the message complexity. Thus, our results

  12. A review for identification of initiating events in event tree development process on nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riyadi, Eko H.

    2014-09-30

    Initiating event is defined as any event either internal or external to the nuclear power plants (NPPs) that perturbs the steady state operation of the plant, if operating, thereby initiating an abnormal event such as transient or loss of coolant accident (LOCA) within the NPPs. These initiating events trigger sequences of events that challenge plant control and safety systems whose failure could potentially lead to core damage or large early release. Selection for initiating events consists of two steps i.e. first step, definition of possible events, such as by evaluating a comprehensive engineering, and by constructing a top level logic model. Then the second step, grouping of identified initiating event's by the safety function to be performed or combinations of systems responses. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss initiating events identification in event tree development process and to reviews other probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). The identification of initiating events also involves the past operating experience, review of other PSA, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), feedback from system modeling, and master logic diagram (special type of fault tree). By using the method of study for the condition of the traditional US PSA categorization in detail, could be obtained the important initiating events that are categorized into LOCA, transients and external events.

  13. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature McIntosh, Empire, and Golden Delicious apple trees (Malus domestica) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at pH 2.5 in Empire. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in McIntosh. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  14. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature 'McIntosh', 'Empire', and 'Golden Delicious' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and in 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and pH 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at ph 2.5 in 'Empire'. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in 'McIntosh'. The incidence of russetting on 'Golden Delicious' fruits was ameliorated by the presence of rain-exclusion chambers but was not affected by acid rain. With season-long sprays at pH 2.75, there was a slight delay in maturity and lower weight of 'McIntosh' apples. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  15. Rapid response of tree cellulose radiocarbon content to changes in atmospheric /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grootes, P.M.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H.; Leach, D.D.; Stuiver, M.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed radial profile for the /sup 14/C concentration in tree cellulose, covering growth rings for the years 1962-1964, was obtained for a Sitka spruce of the US Pacific Coast using accelerator mass spectrometry. The tree cellulose /sup 14/C closely follows atmospheric /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ concentrations, responding to changes with a delay of not more than a few weeks. The delay in response is mostly due to the addition of between 13 and 28% of biospheric CO/sub 2/ to the canopy-air CO/sub 2/ used by the tree for stem cellulose. Delayed incorporation and the use of stored photosynthate of the previous fall appear less important. 63 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2008-05-19

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age

  17. 2HOT: An Improved Parallel Hashed Oct-Tree N-Body Algorithm for Cosmological Simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Warren, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on improvements made over the past two decades to our adaptive treecode N-body method (HOT). A mathematical and computational approach to the cosmological N-body problem is described, with performance and scalability measured up to 256k (2 18 ) processors. We present error analysis and scientific application results from a series of more than ten 69 billion (4096 3 ) particle cosmological simulations, accounting for 4×10 20 floating point operations. These results include the first simulations using the new constraints on the standard model of cosmology from the Planck satellite. Our simulations set a new standard for accuracymore » and scientific throughput, while meeting or exceeding the computational efficiency of the latest generation of hybrid TreePM N-body methods.« less

  18. Performing a scatterv operation on a hierarchical tree network optimized for collective operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-10-22

    Performing a scatterv operation on a hierarchical tree network optimized for collective operations including receiving, by the scatterv module installed on the node, from a nearest neighbor parent above the node a chunk of data having at least a portion of data for the node; maintaining, by the scatterv module installed on the node, the portion of the data for the node; determining, by the scatterv module installed on the node, whether any portions of the data are for a particular nearest neighbor child below the node or one or more other nodes below the particular nearest neighbor child; and sending, by the scatterv module installed on the node, those portions of data to the nearest neighbor child if any portions of the data are for a particular nearest neighbor child below the node or one or more other nodes below the particular nearest neighbor child.

  19. ADAPT (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) Beta Version 0.9

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-01-07

    The purpose of the ADAPT code is to generate Dynamic Event Trees (DET) using a user specified simulator. ADAPT can utilize any simulation tool which meets a minimal set of requirements. ADAPT is based on the concept of DET which use explicit modeling of the deterministic dynamic processes that take place during a nuclear reactor plant system evolution along with stochastic modeling. When DET are used to model different aspects of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA),more » all accident progression scenarios starting from an initiating event are considered simultaneously. The DET branching occurs at user specified times and/or when an action is required by the system and/or the operator. These outcomes then decide how the dynamic system variables will evolve in time for each DET branch. Since two different outcomes at a DET branching may lead to completely different paths for system evolution, the next branching for these paths may occur not only at different times, but can be based on different branching criteria. The computational infrastructure allows for flexibility in ADAPT to link with different system simulation codes, parallel processing of the scenarios under consideration, on-line scenario management (initiation as well as termination) and user friendly graphical capabilities. The ADAPT system is designed for a distributed computing environment; the scheduler can track multiple concurrent branches simultaneously. The scheduler is modularized so that the DET branching strategy can be modified (e.g. biasing towards the worse case scenario/event). Independent database systems store data from the simulation tasks and the DET structure so that the event tree can be constructed and analyzed later. ADAPT is provided with a user-friendly client which can easily sort through and display the results of an experiment, precluding the need for the user to manually inspect individual simulator runs.« less

  20. Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Carey, Joanna C.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2015-01-13

    Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global CO2 fertilization, longterm free-air CO2 enrichment experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si) in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), and five hardwood species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20 and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.

  1. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii var. densa ) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmore » tree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.« less

  2. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine (Pinus elliottiivar.densa) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmoretree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.less

  3. A Performance Comparison of Tree and Ring Topologies in Distributed System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min Huang

    2005-12-19

    A distributed system is a collection of computers that are connected via a communication network. Distributed systems have become commonplace due to the wide availability of low-cost, high performance computers and network devices. However, the management infrastructure often does not scale well when distributed systems get very large. Some of the considerations in building a distributed system are the choice of the network topology and the method used to construct the distributed system so as to optimize the scalability and reliability of the system, lower the cost of linking nodes together and minimize the message delay in transmission, and simplify system resource management. We have developed a new distributed management system that is able to handle the dynamic increase of system size, detect and recover the unexpected failure of system services, and manage system resources. The topologies used in the system are the tree-structured network and the ring-structured network. This thesis presents the research background, system components, design, implementation, experiment results and the conclusions of our work. The thesis is organized as follows: the research background is presented in chapter 1. Chapter 2 describes the system components, including the different node types and different connection types used in the system. In chapter 3, we describe the message types and message formats in the system. We discuss the system design and implementation in chapter 4. In chapter 5, we present the test environment and results, Finally, we conclude with a summary and describe our future work in chapter 6.

  4. Multifunction Instrument Tree (MIT) Neutron and Gamma Probe Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-08-08

    The multifunction instrument tree (MIT) probe program has been developed to modify existing Liquid Observation Well (LOW) neutron and gamma probes for use in the validation shafts of the two MITs installed in Tank 241-SY-101. One of the program objectives is that the modified MIT probes be completely compatible with the existing LOW van instrumentation and procedures. The major program objective is to produce neutron and gamma scans from Tank 241-SY-101 that would assist in evaluating waste feature structure and elevation. The MIT probe program is described in greater detail in the engineering task plan (HNF-3322). In accordance with the engineering task plan, a test plan (HNF-3595) was written, reduced diameter (allowing insertion into the MIT validation tube) neutron and gamma probes were acquired, an acceptance and operational test procedure (HNF-3838) was written, acceptance and operational testing of the MIT probes was performed, and a report of these test results (HNF-4369) has been issued. A number of neutron and gamma probe scans have been obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs, starting on February 8, 1999, in cooperation with Operations. Now that the MIT probes are fully demonstrated, this document transfers ownership of these probes to Operations, utilizing the final acceptance for beneficial use (ABU) form that follows in Section 3.0.

  5. The roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in phytoremediation and tree-herb interactions in Pb contaminated soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Yurong; Liang, Yan; Han, Xiaozhen; Chiu, Tsan-Yu; Ghosh, Amit; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-02-04

    Understanding the roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in plant interaction is essential for optimizing plant distribution to restore degraded ecosystems. Here, our study investigated the effects of AMF and the presence of legume or grass herbs on phytoremediation with a legume tree, Robinia pseudoacacia, in Pb polluted soil. In monoculture, mycorrhizal dependency of legumes was higher than that of grass, and AMF benefited the plant biomass of legumes but had no effect on grass. Mycorrhizal colonization of plant was enhanced by legume neighbors but inhibited by grass neighbor in co-culture system. N, P, S and Mg concentrations of mycorrhizalmore » legumes were larger than these of non-mycorrhizal legumes. Legume herbs decreased soil pH and thereby increased the Pb concentrations of plants. The neighbor effects of legumes shifted from negative to positive with increasing Pb stress levels, whereas grass provided a negative effect on the growth of legume tree. AMF enhanced the competition but equalized growth of legume-legume under unpolluted and Pb stress conditions, respectively. In conclusion, (1) AMF mediate plant interaction through directly influencing plant biomass, and/or indirectly influencing plant photosynthesis, macronutrient acquisition, (2) legume tree inoculated with AMF and co-planted with legume herbs provides an effective way for Pb phytoremediation.« less

  6. A multifactor analysis of fungal and bacterial community structure of the root microbiome of mature Populus deltoides trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakya, Migun; Gottel, Neil R; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Yang, Zamin; Gunter, Lee E; Labbe, Jessy L; Muchero, Wellington; Bonito, Gregory; Vilgalys, Rytas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Podar, Mircea; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal communities associated with plant roots are central to the host- health, survival and growth. However, a robust understanding of root-microbiome and the factors that drive host associated microbial community structure have remained elusive, especially in mature perennial plants from natural settings. Here, we investigated relationships of bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere and root endosphere of the riparian tree species Populus deltoides, and the influence of soil parameters, environmental properties (host phenotype and aboveground environmental settings), host plant genotype (Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers), season (Spring vs. Fall) and geographic setting (at scales from regional watersheds to local riparian zones) on microbial community structure. Each of the trees sampled displayed unique aspects to it s associated community structure with high numbers of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) specific to an individual trees (bacteria >90%, fungi >60%). Over the diverse conditions surveyed only a small number of OTUs were common to all samples within rhizosphere (35 bacterial and 4 fungal) and endosphere (1 bacterial and 1 fungal) microbiomes. As expected, Proteobacteria and Ascomycota were dominant in root communities (>50%) while other higher-level phylogenetic groups (Chytridiomycota, Acidobacteria) displayed greatly reduced abundance in endosphere compared to the rhizosphere. Variance partitioning partially explained differences in microbiome composition between all sampled roots on the basis of seasonal and soil properties (4% to 23%). While most variation remains unattributed, we observed significant differences in the microbiota between watersheds (Tennessee vs. North Carolina) and seasons (Spring vs. Fall). SSR markers clearly delineated two host populations associated with the samples taken in TN vs. NC, but overall genotypic distances did not have a significant effect on corresponding communities that could be

  7. Reducing computation in an i-vector speaker recognition system using a tree-structured universal background model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McClanahan, Richard; De Leon, Phillip L.

    2014-08-20

    The majority of state-of-the-art speaker recognition systems (SR) utilize speaker models that are derived from an adapted universal background model (UBM) in the form of a Gaussian mixture model (GMM). This is true for GMM supervector systems, joint factor analysis systems, and most recently i-vector systems. In all of the identified systems, the posterior probabilities and sufficient statistics calculations represent a computational bottleneck in both enrollment and testing. We propose a multi-layered hash system, employing a tree-structured GMM–UBM which uses Runnalls’ Gaussian mixture reduction technique, in order to reduce the number of these calculations. Moreover, with this tree-structured hash, wemore » can trade-off reduction in computation with a corresponding degradation of equal error rate (EER). As an example, we also reduce this computation by a factor of 15× while incurring less than 10% relative degradation of EER (or 0.3% absolute EER) when evaluated with NIST 2010 speaker recognition evaluation (SRE) telephone data.« less

  8. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the HorseshoeLake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-11-20

    We investigate spatio-temporal relationships between soilCO2 flux (FCO2), meteorological variables, and topography over a ten-dayperiod (09/12/2006 to 09/21/2006) at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill,Mammoth Mountain, CA. Total CO2 discharge varied from 16 to 52 t d-1,suggesting a decline in CO2 emissions over decadal timescales. Weobserved systematic changes in FCO2 in space and time in association witha weather front with relatively high wind speeds from the west and lowatmospheric pressures. The largest FCO2 changes were observed inrelatively high elevation areas. The variations in FCO2 may be due todynamic coupling of wind-driven airflow through the subsurface and flowof source CO2 at depth. Our results highlight the influence of weatherfronts on volcanic gas flow in the near-surface environment and how thisinfluence can vary spatially within a study area.

  9. A junction-tree based learning algorithm to optimize network wide traffic control: A coordinated multi-agent framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Feng; Aziz, H. M. Abdul; Qian, Xinwu; Ukkusuri, Satish V.

    2015-01-31

    Our study develops a novel reinforcement learning algorithm for the challenging coordinated signal control problem. Traffic signals are modeled as intelligent agents interacting with the stochastic traffic environment. The model is built on the framework of coordinated reinforcement learning. The Junction Tree Algorithm (JTA) based reinforcement learning is proposed to obtain an exact inference of the best joint actions for all the coordinated intersections. Moreover, the algorithm is implemented and tested with a network containing 18 signalized intersections in VISSIM. Finally, our results show that the JTA based algorithm outperforms independent learning (Q-learning), real-time adaptive learning, and fixed timing plans in terms of average delay, number of stops, and vehicular emissions at the network level.

  10. A junction-tree based learning algorithm to optimize network wide traffic control: A coordinated multi-agent framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Feng; Aziz, H. M. Abdul; Qian, Xinwu; Ukkusuri, Satish V.

    2015-01-31

    Our study develops a novel reinforcement learning algorithm for the challenging coordinated signal control problem. Traffic signals are modeled as intelligent agents interacting with the stochastic traffic environment. The model is built on the framework of coordinated reinforcement learning. The Junction Tree Algorithm (JTA) based reinforcement learning is proposed to obtain an exact inference of the best joint actions for all the coordinated intersections. Moreover, the algorithm is implemented and tested with a network containing 18 signalized intersections in VISSIM. Finally, our results show that the JTA based algorithm outperforms independent learning (Q-learning), real-time adaptive learning, and fixed timing plansmore » in terms of average delay, number of stops, and vehicular emissions at the network level.« less

  11. EA-1800: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of its SEP funds to Monarch Wind Power (MWP) for the Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project (MWTP). DOE's Proposed Action is to authorize the expenditure of Federal...

  12. Drought-influenced mortality of tree species with different predawn leaf water dynamics in a decade-long study of a central US forest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, L.; Pallardy, S. G.; Hosman, K. P.; Sun, Y.

    2015-05-18

    Using decade-long continuous observations of tree mortality and predawn leaf water potential (ψpd) at the Missouri Ozark AmeriFlux (MOFLUX) site, we studied how the mortality of important tree species varied and how such variations may be predicted. Water stress determined inter-annual variations in tree mortality with a time delay of 1 year or more, which was correlated fairly tightly with a number of quantitative predictors formulated based on ψpd and precipitation regimes. Predictors based on temperature and vapor pressure deficit anomalies worked reasonably well, particularly for moderate droughts. The exceptional drought of the year 2012 drastically increased the mortality ofmore » all species, including drought-tolerant oaks, in the subsequent year. The drought-influenced tree mortality was related to the species position along the spectrum of ψpd regulation capacity with those in either ends of the spectrum being associated with elevated risk of death. Regardless of species and drought intensity, the ψpd of all species recovered rapidly after sufficiently intense rain events in all droughts. This result, together with a lack of immediate leaf and branch desiccation, suggests an absence of catastrophic hydraulic disconnection in the xylem and that tree death was caused by significant but indirect effects. Species differences in the capacity of regulating ψpd and its temporal integral were magnified under moderate drought intensities but diminished towards wet and dry extremes. Severe droughts may overwhelm the capacity of even drought-tolerant species to maintain differential levels of water potential as the soil becomes exhausted of available water in the rooting zone, thus rendering them more susceptible to death if predisposed by other factors such as age.« less

  13. Effects of long-term elevated CO2 treatment on the inner and outer bark chemistry of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, Thomas L.; Labbé, Nicole; So, Chi-Leung; Kim, Keonhee; Reed, Karen G.; Leduc, Daniel J.; Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2015-07-23

    Long-term exposure of sweetgum trees to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations significantly shifted inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) chemical compositions, having implications for both defense and nutrient cycling. Changes in plant tissue chemistry due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have direct implications for tissue resistance to abiotic and biotic stress while living, and soil nutrient cycling when senesced as litter. Although the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on tree foliar chemistry are well documented, the effects on tree bark chemistry are largely unknown. The objective of our study was to determine the effects of a long-term elevated CO2 treatment on the contents of individual elements, extractives, ash, lignin, and polysaccharide sugars of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) bark. Trees were harvested from sweetgum plots equipped with the Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) apparatus, receiving either elevated or ambient CO2 treatments over a 12-year period. Whole bark sections were partitioned into inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) samples before analysis. Moreover, principal component analysis, coupled with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data, was also used to screen for differences. Elevated CO2 reduced the N content (0.42 vs. 0.35 %) and increased the C:N ratio (109 vs. 136 %) of the outer bark. For the inner bark, elevated CO2 increased the Mn content (470 vs. 815 mg kg-1), total extractives (13.0 vs. 15.6 %), and residual ash content (8.1 vs. 10.8 %) as compared to ambient CO2; differences were also observed for some hemicellulosic sugars, but not lignin. Shifts in bark chemistry can affect the success of herbivores and pathogens in living trees, and as litter, bark can affect the biogeochemical cycling of

  14. Effects of long-term elevated CO2 treatment on the inner and outer bark chemistry of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eberhardt, Thomas L.; Labbé, Nicole; So, Chi-Leung; Kim, Keonhee; Reed, Karen G.; Leduc, Daniel J.; Warren, Jeffrey M.

    2015-07-23

    Long-term exposure of sweetgum trees to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations significantly shifted inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) chemical compositions, having implications for both defense and nutrient cycling. Changes in plant tissue chemistry due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations have direct implications for tissue resistance to abiotic and biotic stress while living, and soil nutrient cycling when senesced as litter. Although the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on tree foliar chemistry are well documented, the effects on tree bark chemistry are largely unknown. The objective of our study was to determine the effects of a long-term elevatedmore » CO2 treatment on the contents of individual elements, extractives, ash, lignin, and polysaccharide sugars of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) bark. Trees were harvested from sweetgum plots equipped with the Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) apparatus, receiving either elevated or ambient CO2 treatments over a 12-year period. Whole bark sections were partitioned into inner bark (phloem) and outer bark (rhytidome) samples before analysis. Moreover, principal component analysis, coupled with either Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data, was also used to screen for differences. Elevated CO2 reduced the N content (0.42 vs. 0.35 %) and increased the C:N ratio (109 vs. 136 %) of the outer bark. For the inner bark, elevated CO2 increased the Mn content (470 vs. 815 mg kg-1), total extractives (13.0 vs. 15.6 %), and residual ash content (8.1 vs. 10.8 %) as compared to ambient CO2; differences were also observed for some hemicellulosic sugars, but not lignin. Shifts in bark chemistry can affect the success of herbivores and pathogens in living trees, and as litter, bark can affect the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients within the forest floor. Our results demonstrate that increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations

  15. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garcia-Forner, Nuria; Adams, Henry D.; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D.; Dickman, Lee T.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Powers, Heath; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; et al

    2015-08-08

    Here, relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P.more » edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies.« less

  16. Responses of two semiarid conifer tree species to reduced precipitation and warming reveal new perspectives for stomatal regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Forner, Nuria; Adams, Henry D.; Sevanto, Sanna; Collins, Adam D.; Dickman, Lee T.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Powers, Heath; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Mcdowell, Nate G.

    2015-08-08

    Here, relatively anisohydric species are predicted to be more predisposed to hydraulic failure than relatively isohydric species, as they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins. We subjected co-occurring anisohydric Juniperus monosperma and isohydric Pinus edulis trees to warming, reduced precipitation, or both, and measured their gas exchange and hydraulic responses. We found that reductions in stomatal conductance and assimilation by heat and drought were more frequent during relatively moist periods, but these effects were not exacerbated in the combined heat and drought treatment. Counter to expectations, both species exhibited similar gs temporal dynamics in response to drought. Further, whereas P. edulis exhibited chronic embolism, J. monosperma showed very little embolism due to its conservative stomatal regulation and maintenance of xylem water potential above the embolism entry point. This tight stomatal control and low levels of embolism experienced by juniper refuted the notion that very low water potentials during drought are associated with loose stomatal control and with the hypothesis that anisohydric species are more prone to hydraulic failure than isohydric species. Because direct association of stomatal behaviour with embolism resistance can be misleading, we advocate consideration of stomatal behaviour relative to embolism resistance for classifying species drought response strategies.

  17. Benchmarking for electric utilities, tree trimming benchmarking, service line installation to single family residence, and distribution revenue meter testing and repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, J.

    1994-12-31

    An American Public Power Association (APPA) task force study on benchmarking for electric utilities is presented. Benchmark studies were made of three activities: (1) Tree trimming; (2) Service line installation to single family residence; (3) Distribution revenue meter testing and repair criteria. The results of the study areas are summarized for 15 utilities. The methodologies used for data collection and analysis are discussed. 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Urban trees and light-colored surfaces as a climate change strategy: Results from the US and potential in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Sathaye, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the impact of two strategies in an urban environment for effecting substantial energy savings. They are the use of light colored materials on roofing and other flat surfaces, and the planting of additional trees. The lighter colored roofing materials will reflect more solar heat, resulting in lowered air conditioning costs. The additional trees will provide more shading, thereby increasing comfort, and will act as an aid in dropping the ambient temperature by means of evapotranspiration through the leaf systems. Both of these effects will reduce the direct energy inputs leading to air conditioning loads in an urban setting, and indirectly they will have an impact on urban smog though the lowered ambient temperature. The authors also discuss the applications of these ideas in developing countries, where often building energy costs can consume half of developed electrical capacity, and which tend to be in warmer climates. The density of many major urban areas in developing countries make the use of trees much harder to implement.

  19. Simulation of Canopy CO2/H2O Fluxes for a Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis) Plantation in Central Cambodia: The Effect of the Regular Spacing of Planted Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Mudd, Ryan; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Liu, Wen; Giambelluca, Thomas; Kobayashi, N.; Lim, Tiva Khan; Jomura, Mayuko; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Huang, Maoyi; Chen, Qi; Ziegler, Alan; Yin, Song

    2013-09-10

    We developed a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model applicable to simulating CO2 and H2O fluxes from the canopies of rubber plantations, which are characterized by distinct canopy clumping produced by regular spacing of plantation trees. Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Mll. Arg.) plantations, which are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially change the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with traditional land covers it is replacing. Describing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations via SVAT modeling is therefore essential to understanding the impacts on environmental processes. The regular spacing of plantation trees creates a peculiar canopy structure that is not well represented in most SVAT models, which generally assumes a non-uniform spacing of vegetation. Herein we develop a SVAT model applicable to rubber plantation and an evaluation method for its canopy structure, and examine how the peculiar canopy structure of rubber plantations affects canopy CO2 and H2O exchanges. Model results are compared with measurements collected at a field site in central Cambodia. Our findings suggest that it is crucial to account for intensive canopy clumping in order to reproduce observed rubber plantation fluxes. These results suggest a potentially optimal spacing of rubber trees to produce high productivity and water use efficiency.

  20. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-01-01

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7,more » 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.« less

  1. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-07-28

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7, 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in plant water-use efficiency inferred from tree-ring, eddy covariance and atmospheric observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dekker, Stefan C.; Groenendijk, Margriet; Booth, Ben B. B.; Huntingford, Chris; Cox, Peter M.

    2016-06-28

    Plant water-use efficiency (WUE), which is the ratio of the uptake of carbon dioxide through photosynthesis to the loss of water through transpiration, is a very useful metric of the functioning of the land biosphere. WUE is expected to increase with atmospheric CO2, but to decline with increasing atmospheric evaporative demand – which can arise from increases in near-surface temperature or decreases in relative humidity. We have used Δ13C measurements from tree rings, along with eddy covariance measurements from Fluxnet sites, to estimate the sensitivities of WUE to changes in CO2 and atmospheric humidity deficit. This enables us to reconstructmore » fractional changes in WUE, based on changes in atmospheric climate and CO2, for the entire period of the instrumental global climate record. We estimate that overall WUE increased from 1900 to 2010 by 48 ± 22 %, which is more than double that simulated by the latest Earth System Models. This long-term trend is largely driven by increases in CO2, but significant inter-annual variability and regional differences are evident due to variations in temperature and relative humidity. Here, there are several highly populated regions, such as western Europe and East Asia, where the rate of increase of WUE has declined sharply in the last 2 decades. Our data-based analysis indicates increases in WUE that typically exceed those simulated by Earth System Models – implying that these models are either underestimating increases in photosynthesis or underestimating reductions in transpiration.« less

  3. Measurement of single top quark production in the tau+jets channnel using boosted decision trees at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhiyi; ,

    2009-12-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known matter particle and plays an important role in the Standard Model of particle physics. At hadron colliders, it is possible to produce single top quarks via the weak interaction. This allows a direct measurement of the CKM matrix element V{sub tb} and serves as a window to new physics. The first direct measurement of single top quark production with a tau lepton in the final state (the tau+jets channel) is presented in this thesis. The measurement uses 4.8 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron Run II data in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV acquired by the D0 experiment. After selecting a data sample and building a background model, the data and background model are in good agreement. A multivariate technique, boosted decision trees, is employed in discriminating the small single top quark signal from a large background. The expected sensitivity of the tau+jets channel in the Standard Model is 1.8 standard deviations. Using a Bayesian statistical approach, an upper limit on the cross section of single top quark production in the tau+jets channel is measured as 7.3 pb at 95% confidence level, and the cross section is measured as 3.4{sub -1.8}{sup +2.0} pb. The result of the single top quark production in the tau+jets channel is also combined with those in the electron+jets and muon+jets channels. The expected sensitivity of the electron, muon and tau combined analysis is 4.7 standard deviations, to be compared to 4.5 standard deviations in electron and muon alone. The measured cross section in the three combined final states is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X,tqb + X) = 3.84{sub -0.83}{sup +0.89} pb. A lower limit on |V{sub tb}| is also measured in the three combined final states to be larger than 0.85 at 95% confidence level. These results are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry facility at the University of Washington: current status, and an application to the /sup 14/C profile of a tree ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, G.W.; Grootes, P.M.; Leach, D.D.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Washington Model FN Tandem accelerator (1) is used for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) of /sup 10/Be and /sup 14/C. This paper describes our basic system, our methods for rare-isotope normalization, final ion detection, and sample preparation, and the general problem of adapting an existing accelerator to meet the stringent stability requirements of precision AMS measurements while retaining human and technical compatibility with other users and uses of the accelerator. Recent preliminary data obtained on /sup 14/C in thin sequential sections of a single Sitka spruce tree ring (1963) are presented.

  5. Trees Containing Built-In Pulping Catalysts - Final Report - 08/18/1997 - 08/18/2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pullman, G.; Dimmel, D.; Peter, G.

    2000-08-18

    Several hardwood and softwood trees were analyzed for the presence of anthraquinone-type molecules. Low levels of anthraquinone (AQ) and anthrone components were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and sensitive selected-ion monitoring techniques. Ten out of seventeen hardwood samples examined contained AQ-type components; however, the levels were typically below {approximately}6 ppm. No AQs were observed in the few softwood samples that were examined. The AQs were more concentrated in the heartwood of teak than in the sapwood. The delignification of pine was enhanced by the addition of teak chips ({approximately}0.7% AQ-equivalence content) to the cook, suggesting that endogenous AQs can be released from wood during pulping and can catalyze delignification reactions. Eastern cottonwood contained AQ, methyl AQ, and dimethyl AQ, all useful for wood pulping. This is the first time unsubstituted AQ has been observed in wood extracts. Due to the presence of these pulping catalysts, rapid growth rates in plantation settings, and the ease of genetic transformation, eastern cottonwood is a suitable candidate for genetic engineering studies to enhance AQ content. To achieve effective catalytic pulping activity, poplar and cottonwood, respectively, require {approximately}100 and 1000 times more for pulping catalysts. A strategy to increase AQ concentration in natural wood was developed and is currently being tested. This strategy involves ''turning up'' isochorismate synthase (ICS) through genetic engineering. Isochorismate synthase is the first enzyme in the AQ pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway. In general, the level of enzyme activity at the first branch point or committed step controls the flux through a biosynthetic pathway. To test if the level of ICS regulates AQ biosynthesis in plant tissues, we proposed to over-express this synthase in plant cells. A partial cDNA encoding a putative ICS was available from the random cDNA sequencing

  6. Effect of canopy structure and open-top chamber techniques on micrometeorological parameters and the gradients and transport of water vapor, carbon dioxide and ozone in the canopies of plum trees (`prunus salicina`) in the San Joaquin valley. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Metheny, P.A.; Malkus, P.; Wosnik, K.

    1995-03-15

    Plum trees (Prunus salicina cv. Casselman) were exposed to ozone in open-top chambers (OTC) or chamberless plots, and trace gas concentrations and microenvironmental conditions were monitored within tree canopies inside the outside the OTC. Concentrations of ozone, carbon dioxide and water vapor, leaf and air temperature, light intensity, and wind speed were measured at nine positions in the tree canopies. The objectives were to: (1) map the distribution of microenvironmental parameters within the canopies inside and outside the OTC; (2) determine transport parameters for gas exchange, and (3) calculate ozone flux. Significant vertical and horizontal gradients were observed; gradients were diminished and often inverted inside relative to outside the OTC due to air distribution at the bottom of the OCT. Ozone flux was readily modeled from measures of stomatal conductance, nonstomatal conductance and ozone concentration at the leaf surface.

  7. Method of particle trajectory recognition in particle flows of high particle concentration using a candidate trajectory tree process with variable search areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    2013-03-12

    The application relates to particle trajectory recognition from a Centroid Population comprised of Centroids having an (x, y, t) or (x, y, f) coordinate. The method is applicable to visualization and measurement of particle flow fields of high particle. In one embodiment, the centroids are generated from particle images recorded on camera frames. The application encompasses digital computer systems and distribution mediums implementing the method disclosed and is particularly applicable to recognizing trajectories of particles in particle flows of high particle concentration. The method accomplishes trajectory recognition by forming Candidate Trajectory Trees and repeated searches at varying Search Velocities, such that initial search areas are set to a minimum size in order to recognize only the slowest, least accelerating particles which produce higher local concentrations. When a trajectory is recognized, the centroids in that trajectory are removed from consideration in future searches.

  8. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  9. Photographic%20credit%E2%80%9CArchitect%20of%20the%20Capitol.%E2%80%9D%202010%20LED%20Tree.jpg

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Photographic%20credit%E2%80%9CArchitect%20of%20the%20Capitol.%E2%80%9D%202010%20LED%20Tree

  10. Predictors and mechanisms of the drought-influenced mortality of tree species along the isohydric to anisohydic continuum in a decade-long study of a central US temperate forest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, L.; Pallardy, S. G.; Hosman, K. P.; Sun, Y.

    2015-01-19

    Using decade-long continuous observations of tree mortality and predawn leaf water potential (ψpd) at the Missouri Ozark AmeriFlux (MOFLUX) site, we studied how the mortality of important tree species varied along the isohydric to anisohydric continuum and how such variations may be predicted. Water stress determined inter-annual variations in tree mortality with a time delay of one year or more, which was predicted by predawn leaf water potential integral (PLWPI), mean effective precipitation interval (a time period with no daily precipitation rates exceeding a threshold) with a daily threshold precipitation at 5 mm day-1 (MEPI5), and precipitation variability index (PVI).more » Positive temperature anomaly integral (PTAI) and vapor pressure deficit integral (VPDI) also worked reasonably well, particularly for moderate droughts. The extreme drought of the year 2012 drastically increased the mortality of all species in the subsequent year. Regardless of the degree of isohydry and drought intensity, the ψpd of all species recovered rapidly after sufficiently intense rain events. This, together with a lack of immediate leaf and branch desiccation, suggests that hydraulic disconnection in the xylem was absent even during extreme drought and tree death was caused by significant but indirect effects of drought. We also found that species occupying middle positions along the isohydric to anisohydric continuum suffered less mortality than those at either extremes (i.e. extremely isohydric or extremely anisohydric). Finally, our study suggested that species differences in mortality mechanisms can be overwhelmed and masked in extreme droughts and should be examined in a broad range of drought intensity.« less

  11. ARM - Lesson Plans: Planting Trees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  12. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pangilinan, Monica; /Brown U.

    2010-02-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the V{sub tb} element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W{prime}. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30{sub -1.20}{sup +0.98} pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9{sigma} Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0{sigma}, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |V{sub tb}| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |V{sub tb}| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W{prime} using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W{prime} with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W{prime} {yields} t{bar b}, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W{prime}{sub L} with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W{prime}{sub R}) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right

  13. Biochemical and structural characterizations of two Dictyostelium cellobiohydrolases from the amoebozoa kingdom reveal a high level of conservation between distant phylogenetic trees of life

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hobdey, Sarah E.; Knott, Brandon C.; Momeni, Majid Haddad; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Borisova, Anna S.; Podkaminer, Kara K.; VanderWall, Todd A.; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Beckham, Gregg T.; et al

    2016-04-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 7 (GH7) cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) are enzymes often employed in plant cell wall degradation across eukaryotic kingdoms of life, as they provide significant hydrolytic potential in cellulose turnover. To date, many fungal GH7 CBHs have been examined, yet many questions regarding structure-activity relationships in these important natural and commercial enzymes remain. Here, we present the crystal structures and a biochemical analysis of two GH7 CBHs from social amoeba: Dictyostelium discoideum Cel7A (DdiCel7A) and Dictyostelium purpureum Cel7A (DpuCel7A). DdiCel7A and DpuCel7A natively consist of a catalytic domain and do not exhibit a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). The structures of DdiCel7Amore » and DpuCel7A, resolved to 2.1 Å and 2.7 Å, respectively, are homologous to those of other GH7 CBHs with an enclosed active-site tunnel. Two primary differences between the Dictyostelium CBHs and the archetypal model GH7 CBH, Trichoderma reesei Cel7A (TreCel7A), occur near the hydrolytic active site and the product-binding sites. To compare the activities of these enzymes with the activity of TreCel7A, the family 1 TreCel7A CBM and linker were added to the C terminus of each of the Dictyostelium enzymes, creating DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM, which were recombinantly expressed in T. reesei. DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM hydrolyzed Avicel, pretreated corn stover, and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose as efficiently as TreCel7A when hydrolysis was compared at their temperature optima. The Ki of cellobiose was significantly higher for DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM than for TreCel7A: 205, 130, and 29 μM, respectively. Finally, taken together, the present study highlights the remarkable degree of conservation of the activity of these key natural and industrial enzymes across quite distant phylogenetic trees of life.« less

  14. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Two Dictyostelium Cellobiohydrolases from the Amoebozoa Kingdom Reveal a High Level of Conservation Between Distant Phylogenetic Trees of Life

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hobdey, Sarah E.; Knott, Brandon C.; Momeni, Majid Haddad; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Borisova, Anna S.; Podkaminer, Kara K.; VanderWall, Todd A.; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Beckham, Gregg T.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Glycoside Hydrolase Family 7 (GH7) cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) are commonly employed enzymes in plant cell wall degradation across eukaryotic kingdoms of life, as they provide significant hydrolytic potential in cellulose turnover. To date, many fungal GH7 CBHs have been examined, yet many questions remain regarding structure-activity relationships in these important natural and commercial enzymes. Here, we present crystal structures and biochemical analysis of two GH7 CBHs from social amoeba: Dictyostelium discoideum and Dictyostelium purpureum (DdiCel7A and DpuCel7A, respectively). DdiCel7A and DpuCel7A natively consist of a catalytic domain and do not exhibit a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). The structures, resolved to 2.1 Amore » (DdiCel7A), and 2.7 A (DpuCel7A), are homologous to other GH7 CBHs with an enclosed active site tunnel. Two primary differences between the Dictyostelium CBHs and the archetypal model GH7 CBH from Trichoderma reesei Cel7A (TreCel7A) occur near the hydrolytic active site and the product binding sites. To compare the activity of these enzymes with TreCel7A, the Family 1 TreCel7A CBM and linker was added to the C-terminus of the Dictyostelium enzymes, DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM, which were recombinantly expressed in T. reesei. DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM hydrolyze Avicel, pretreated corn stover, and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose as efficiently as TreCel7A when compared at their temperature optima. The Ki of cellobiose is significantly higher for DdiCel7ACBM and DpuCel7ACBM than for TreCel7A: 205, 130, and 29 uM, respectively. Taken together, the present study highlights the remarkable conservation in the activity of these key natural and industrial enzymes across quite distant phylogenetic trees of life.« less

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    riders. Customers must provide all equipment necessary to meet applicable safety, power quality... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State...

  16. Arithmetic functions in torus and tree networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and systems for performing arithmetic functions. In accordance with a first aspect of the invention, methods and apparatus are provided, working in conjunction of software algorithms and hardware implementation of class network routing, to achieve a very significant reduction in the time required for global arithmetic operation on the torus. Therefore, it leads to greater scalability of applications running on large parallel machines. The invention involves three steps in improving the efficiency and accuracy of global operations: (1) Ensuring, when necessary, that all the nodes do the global operation on the data in the same order and so obtain a unique answer, independent of roundoff error; (2) Using the topology of the torus to minimize the number of hops and the bidirectional capabilities of the network to reduce the number of time steps in the data transfer operation to an absolute minimum; and (3) Using class function routing to reduce latency in the data transfer. With the method of this invention, every single element is injected into the network only once and it will be stored and forwarded without any further software overhead. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, methods and systems are provided to efficiently implement global arithmetic operations on a network that supports the global combining operations. The latency of doing such global operations are greatly reduced by using these methods.

  17. Subsurface Microbes Expanding the Tree of Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banfield, Jillian

    2015-05-11

    Jillian Banfield, Ph.D., UC Berkeley Professor and Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division staff scientist and long-time user of the DOE Joint Genome Institute’s resources shares her perspective on how the DOE JGI helps advance her research addressing knowledge gaps related to the roles of subsurface microbial communities in biogeochemical cycling. The video was filmed near the town of Rifle, Colorado at the primary field site for Phase I of the Subsurface Systems Scientific Focus Area 2.0 sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  18. Fault Tree Cut Set System Performance.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-02-21

    Version 00 SIGPI computes the probabilistic performance of complex systems by combining cut set or other binary product data with probability information on each basic event. SIGPI is designed to work with either coherent systems, where the system fails when certain combinations of components fail, or noncoherent systems, where at least one cut set occurs only if at least one component of the system is operating properly. The program can handle conditionally independent components, dependentmore » components, or a combination of component types and has been used to evaluate responses to environmental threats and seismic events. The three data types that can be input are cut set data in disjoint normal form, basic component probabilities for independent basic components, and mean and covariance data for statistically dependent basic components.« less

  19. Pine Tree Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Developer Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Energy Purchaser Los...

  20. Bent Tree Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power and Light Co. Developer Wisconsin Power and Light Co. Location 4 miles North of Albert Lea MN Coordinates 43.78544, -93.452282 Show Map Loading map......

  1. Templates and Examples — Tree Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find custom templates and EERE-specific examples you can use to plan, conduct, and report on your usability and analysis activities. These templates are examples of forms you might use, but you are not required to use them for EERE products.

  2. Makani Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Makani Power Address: 2175 Monarch Street Place: Alameda, California Zip: 94501 Region: Bay Area Sector: Wind energy Product: High-altitude...

  3. Marine Hydroelectric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Marine Hydroelectric Company Address: 24040 Camino Del Avion A 107 Place: Monarch Beach Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year Founded: 1983 Phone...

  4. Union County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carlisle, South Carolina Jonesville, South Carolina Lockhart, South Carolina Monarch Mill, South Carolina Union, South Carolina Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. EA-1800: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1800: Final Environmental Assessment Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided Federal funding...

  6. Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Hawks nesting Bike rider commutes to work at LANL A bobcat walking on LANL property Weather monitoring at LANL...

  7. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to LANL. The transit station near TA-03 has a constant stream of buses picking up and dropping off riders, demonstrating LANL workers' commitment to energy-efficient...

  8. Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UC Campus, Downtown Berkeley BART, and Rockridge BART stations. Shuttles offer free wifi onboard. Riders are asked to adhere to riding instructions. Active shuttle stops are...

  9. Info-Gap Analysis of Truncation Errors in Numerical Simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Info-Gap Analysis of Truncation Errors in Numerical Simulations. Authors: Kamm, James R. ; Witkowski, Walter R. ; Rider, William J. ; Trucano, Timothy Guy ; Ben-Haim, Yakov. ...

  10. Info-Gap Analysis of the Numerical Uncertainty Associated with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Abstract not provided. Authors: Kamm, James R ; Rider, William J. ; Witkowski, Walter R. ; Trucano, Timothy Guy ; Ben-Haim, Yakov Publication Date: 2012-03-01 OSTI Identifier: ...

  11. Info-Gap Analysis of Numerical Truncation Errors. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Info-Gap Analysis of Numerical Truncation Errors. Authors: Kamm, James R. ; Witkowski, Walter R. ; Rider, William J. ; Trucano, Timothy Guy ; Ben-Haim, Yakov. Publication ...

  12. City of Brenham- Net Metering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The ordinance includes a standard form interconnection application and agreement as well as standard riders. Customers must provide all equipment necessary to meet applicable safety, power quality...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ridematching websites can feature rider or driver reviews, payment transfers, fuel savings calculators, and options for finding back-up rides for special circumstances. Some ...

  14. Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Hawks nesting Bike rider commutes to work at LANL A bobcat walking on LANL property Weather monitoring at LANL ...

  15. Seven Trees, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.2860536,"lon":-121.8385638,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  16. Can't See the Forest for the Trees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One thing I’ve been putting off doing is an energy assessment. I don’t know why – my utility company offers them for FREE!

  17. Solar Site Screening Decision Tree | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    redevelopment with solar photovoltaic energy. EPA encourages the development of renewable energy on contaminated lands, landfills and mine sites and this tool explores such sites. ...

  18. Scientific American: "Tall Trees Sucked Dry by Global Warming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" May, 15 2015 - Given the stakes in the sensitive ...

  19. Steal Tree: Low-Overhead Tracing of Work Stealing Schedulers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2013-06-16

    Work stealing is a popular approach to scheduling task-parallel programs. The flexibility inherent in work stealing when dealing with load imbalance results in seemingly irregular computation structures, complicating the study of its runtime behavior. In this paper, we present an approach to efficiently trace async-finish parallel programs scheduled using work stealing. We identify key properties that allow us to trace the execution of tasks with low time and space overheads. We also study the usefulness of the proposed schemes in supporting algorithms for data-race detection and retentive steal- ing presented in the literature. We demonstrate that the perturbation due to tracing is within the variation in the execution time with 99% confidence and the traces are concise, amounting to a few tens of kilobytes per thread in most cases. We also demonstrate that the traces enable significant reductions in the cost of detecting data races and result in low, stable space overheads in supporting retentive stealing for async-finish programs.

  20. Capitol Christmas tree stops in Amarillo | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    April 2016 (12) March 2016 (28) February 2016 (21) January 2016 (21) December 2015 (18) November 2015 (11) October 2015 (15) September 2015 (9) August 2015 (10) July 2015 (8) June ...

  1. Living with trees. Policies for forestry management in Zimbabwe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, E.P.; McNamara, K.

    1993-09-01

    This technical paper provides a broad analysis of forestry policy in Zimbabwe. Some two dozen contributors look at forestry as a provider of livelihood, homes and workplaces, and industrial commodities. The first section of the paper concentrates on the social and macroeconomic goals of forestry in Zimbabwe and on its place in rural agriculture. Contributors examine the issues of land tenure and the culture of common property, the practice of woodland management, and control of and participation in management and policy development. The second section focuses on the status of the forest industry in Zimbabwe and on its capacity to manage and expand existing commercial plantations. The paper explores the main issues the sector faces, including growing concentration of ownership versus the government`s objective of wider participation in the industry. They discuss the effects of trade liberalization on its competitive position, both among other agricultural sectors within Zimbabwe and with competitors outside the country. Included is a color map of Zimbabwe`s woodlands. Many forestry programs worldwide face the issues discussed in this work. It will be of interest to planners, policymakers, teachers, and students of rural development and forestry.

  2. Pine Tree Extension Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Developer Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Energy Purchaser Los...

  3. Using Boosted Decision Trees to Separate Signal and Background...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 892609 Report Number(s): SLAC-TN-06-015 TRN: US0605903 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Stanford Linear...

  4. ArborZ: Photometric Redshifts Using Boosted Decision Trees (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Gerdes, David W. ; Sypniewski, Adam J. ; McKay, Timothy A. ; Hao, Jiangang ; Weis, Matthew R. ; Michigan U. ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Busha, Michael T. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park ...

  5. Waste Management facilities fault tree databank 1995 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnick, W.V.; Wellmaker, K.A.

    1995-08-16

    The Safety Information Management and Analysis Group (SIMA) of the Safety Engineering Department (SED) maintains compilations of incidents that have occurred in the Separations and Process Control, Waste Management, Fuel Fabrication, Tritium and SRTC facilities. This report records the status of the Waste Management (WM) Databank at the end of CY-1994. The WM Databank contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM Databank including the availability, training, sources of data, search options, Quality Assurance, and usage to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

  6. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    One of the best parts of the season - next to presents of course - is the hint of evergreen in the air. Yet the sweet smell doesn't last. It fades into forgotten corners, along ...

  7. DeepStar evaluation of subsea trees and manifold concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, K.G.; Richardson, E.M.; Hey, C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the results of a study performed for the DeepStar Project, CTR A802-2, Concept Study and Investigation of Key Areas of Interest for Subsea Systems in Deepwater. The report documents the results of a study of subsea manifold systems as applied to the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Of particular interest is the development of a range of system level philosophies based on recent and ongoing experience from the operators and vendors.

  8. Lignocellulose Degradation Mechanisms Across the Tree of Life

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cragg, Simon M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Bruce, Neil C.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Distel, Daniel L.; Dupree, Paul; Etxabe, Amaia Green; Goodell, Barry S.; Jellison, Jody; McGeehan, John E.; et al

    2015-11-14

    Organisms use diverse mechanisms involving multiple complementary enzymes, particularly glycoside hydrolases (GHs), to deconstruct lignocellulose. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) produced by bacteria and fungi facilitate deconstruction as does the Fenton chemistry of brown-rot fungi. Lignin depolymerisation is achieved by white-rot fungi and certain bacteria, using peroxidases and laccases. Meta-omics is now revealing the complexity of prokaryotic degradative activity in lignocellulose-rich environments. Protists from termite guts and some oomycetes produce multiple lignocellulolytic enzymes. We found that the Lignocellulose-consuming animals secrete some GHs, but most harbour a diverse enzyme-secreting gut microflora in a mutualism that is particularly complex in termites. Shipworms however,more » house GH-secreting and LPMO-secreting bacteria separate from the site of digestion and the isopod Limnoria relies on endogenous enzymes alone. Moreover, the omics revolution is identifying many novel enzymes and paradigms for biomass deconstruction, but more emphasis on function is required, particularly for enzyme cocktails, in which LPMOs may play an important role.« less

  9. Lignocellulose Degradation Mechanisms Across the Tree of Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cragg, Simon M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Bruce, Neil C.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Distel, Daniel L.; Dupree, Paul; Etxabe, Amaia Green; Goodell, Barry S.; Jellison, Jody; McGeehan, John E.; McQueen-Mason, Simon J.; Schnorr, Kirk; Walton, Paul H.; Watts, Joy E. M.; Zimmer, Martin

    2015-11-14

    Organisms use diverse mechanisms involving multiple complementary enzymes, particularly glycoside hydrolases (GHs), to deconstruct lignocellulose. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) produced by bacteria and fungi facilitate deconstruction as does the Fenton chemistry of brown-rot fungi. Lignin depolymerisation is achieved by white-rot fungi and certain bacteria, using peroxidases and laccases. Meta-omics is now revealing the complexity of prokaryotic degradative activity in lignocellulose-rich environments. Protists from termite guts and some oomycetes produce multiple lignocellulolytic enzymes. We found that the Lignocellulose-consuming animals secrete some GHs, but most harbour a diverse enzyme-secreting gut microflora in a mutualism that is particularly complex in termites. Shipworms however, house GH-secreting and LPMO-secreting bacteria separate from the site of digestion and the isopod Limnoria relies on endogenous enzymes alone. Moreover, the omics revolution is identifying many novel enzymes and paradigms for biomass deconstruction, but more emphasis on function is required, particularly for enzyme cocktails, in which LPMOs may play an important role.

  10. RAVEN: Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. ...

  11. CX-001912: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Monarch Warren County Turbine ProjectCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 03/17/2010Location(s): Warren County, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. CX-002661: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Monarch Warren County Turbine ProjectCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 03/17/2010Location(s): Warren County, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. EA-1800: Notice of Availability of the Finding of No Significant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Availability of the Finding of No Significant Impact Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Finding of No...

  14. The Y-12 Times, a newsletter for employees and friends of the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catch up with Y-12 retiree Jack Rider Page 8 Alpha 3 gets a makeover B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and ...

  15. SeaVolt Technologies formerly Sea Power Associates | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The company's Wave Rider system, which is still in prototype stages, uses buoys and hydraulic pumps to convert the movement of ocean waves into electricity. References: SeaVolt...

  16. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Armstrong, Ivan Basso, Jan Ullrich, and the other remaining riders in the Tour de France climbed LAlpe dHuez, one of the most difficult climbs in all of cycling. Consumers...

  17. TCAT to Receive Ithaca's First 'Cutting-Edge' Fuel Cell Bus ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TCAT to Receive Ithaca's First 'Cutting-Edge' Fuel Cell Bus September 6th, 2013 By Kerry Close Within two years, TCAT riders may be able to make their commute on a "clean,...

  18. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Another off-site shuttle provides express service to and from the Rockridge BART station ... All riders are required to show ID when boarding off-site buses. Acceptable ID's are: LBNL ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hedge, P.J. (1) Lee, Pauline (1) Liu Milan (1) Moore, G. (1) Pasternak, Moshe P. (1) ... P.A. ; Rider, S.H. ; Hedge, P.J. ; Moore, G. ; Prichard, C. ; Sheer, D. ; Solomon, ...

  20. ETA-HIAC01 - Control, Close-out and Storage of Documentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-HIAC01 Revision 0 2 2004 Electric ... Appendix A - Document Close-outRetention Rider 10 Procedure ETA-HIAC01 Revision 0 3 ...

  1. ETA-NAC001 - Control, Close-out and Storage of Documentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-NAC001 Revision 0 2 2001 Electric ... Appendix A - Document Close-outRetention Rider 8 Procedure ETA-NAC001 Revision 0 3 ...

  2. ETA-HAC01 - Control, Close-out and Storage of Documentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-HAC01 Revision 0 2 2004 Electric ... Appendix A - Document Close-outRetention Rider 10 Procedure ETA-HAC01 Revision 0 3 ...

  3. ETA-UAC01 - Control, Close-out and Storage of Documentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-UAC01 Revision 0 2 2001 Electric ... Appendix A - Document Close-outRetention Rider 10 Procedure ETA-UAC01 Revision 0 3 2001 ...

  4. Ridefinders Application

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    23 (05-92) Ridefinders Application Please submit this application to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Employee Transportation Coordinator, Room 7A-156, Forrestal. U.S. Department of Energy Privacy Act Statement Check all transportation options which interest you: Carpool: Driver Share Driving Rider Vanpool: Driver Share Driving Rider Do you wish to meet your pool in your neighborhood? No (If no, see Alternate Pickup Locations below.) Yes Participation in the Federal Facility Ridesharing

  5. Risk-Informed Design of Seismic Isolation Systems for Nuclear Facilities |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    23 (05-92) Ridefinders Application Please submit this application to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Employee Transportation Coordinator, Room 7A-156, Forrestal. U.S. Department of Energy Privacy Act Statement Check all transportation options which interest you: Carpool: Driver Share Driving Rider Vanpool: Driver Share Driving Rider Do you wish to meet your pool in your neighborhood? No (If no, see Alternate Pickup Locations below.) Yes Participation in the Federal Facility Ridesharing

  6. Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    23 (05-92) Ridefinders Application Please submit this application to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Employee Transportation Coordinator, Room 7A-156, Forrestal. U.S. Department of Energy Privacy Act Statement Check all transportation options which interest you: Carpool: Driver Share Driving Rider Vanpool: Driver Share Driving Rider Do you wish to meet your pool in your neighborhood? No (If no, see Alternate Pickup Locations below.) Yes Participation in the Federal Facility Ridesharing

  7. Extending Performance and Evaluating Risks of PV Systems Failure Using a Fault Tree and Event Tree Approach: Analysis of the Possible Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colli A.

    2012-06-03

    Performance and reliability of photovoltaic (PV) systems are important issues in the overall evaluation of a PV plant and its components. While performance is connected to the amount of energy produced by the PV installation in the working environmental conditions, reliability impacts the availability of the system to produce the expected amount of energy. In both cases, the evaluation should be done considering information and data coming from indoor as well as outdoor tests. In this paper a way of re-thinking performance, giving it a probabilistic connotation, and connecting the two concepts of performance and reliability is proposed. The paper follows a theoretical approach and discusses the way to obtaining such information, facing benefits and problems. The proposed probabilistic performance accounts for the probability of the system to function correctly, thus passing through the complementary evaluation of the probability of system malfunctions and consequences. Scenarios have to be identified where the system is not functioning properly or at all. They are expected to be combined in a probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) based approach, providing not only the required probability, but also being capable of giving a prioritization of the risks and the most dominant scenario associated to a specific situation. This approach can offer the possibility to highlight the most critical parts of a PV system, as well as providing support in design activities identifying weak connections.

  8. A study of astrometric distortions due to "tree rings" in CCD...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sources and the intensity variations in flat field images that result from these doping imperfections are similar to those previously observed in Dark Energy Camera CCDs, giving ...

  9. Compilation of Failure Data and Fault Tree Analysis for Geothermal Energy Conversion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, F.L., Jr.; Zimmerman, D.E.

    1990-11-01

    The failure data for geothermal energy conversion facilities collected to date are compiled and tabled. These facilities have not accumulated sufficient production history to reliably estimated component failure rates. In addition, the improvements made in drilling technology in recent years may have made less pertinent the accumulation of data on well failures.

  10. Measuring the Distance between Merge Trees (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View ...

  11. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. ); Medford, G.T. )

    1990-06-01

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

  12. Photo of the Week: Sequencing the Genome of the Poplar Tree ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -- and working to develop specific strains of poplars for various applications, like biofuel production. In 2006, researchers at the Energy Departments Joint Genome...

  13. A study of astrometric distortions due to "tree rings" in CCD...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    variations in flat field images that result from these doping imperfections are ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 79 ASTRONOMY AND ...

  14. Method for predicting dry mechanical properties from wet wood and standing trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meglen, Robert R.; Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-08-12

    A method for determining the dry mechanical strength for a green wood comprising: illuminating a surface of the wood to be determined with light between 350-2,500 nm, the wood having a green moisture content; analyzing the surface using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data, and using a multivariate analysis to predict the dry mechanical strength of green wood when dry by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data obtained from a reference wood having a green moisture content, the second spectral data correlated with a known mechanical strength analytical result obtained from a reference wood when dried and having a dry moisture content.

  15. Cooling our communities: A guidebook on tree planting and light-colored surfacing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Davis, S.; Huang, J.; Dorsano, S.; Winnett, S.

    1992-01-01

    This book is a practical guide that presents the current state of knowledge on potential environmental and economic benefits of strategic landscaping and altering surface colors in our communities. The guidebook, reviews the causes, magnitude, and impacts of increased urban warming, then focuses on actions by citizens and communities that can be undertaken to improve the quality of our homes and towns in cost-effective ways.

  16. Possible bias in tree-ring time series due to mortality (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Find in Google Scholar Find in Google Scholar Search WorldCat Search WorldCat to find libraries that may hold this journal Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these ...

  17. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2013-08-01

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles, or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  18. Measurement of sin(2beta) in Tree-dominated B^0-Decays and Ambiguity Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacker, Heiko

    2007-03-05

    The most recent results from the B-factories on the time-dependent CP asymmetries measured in B{sup 0}-decays mediated by b {yields} c{bar c}s quark-transitions are reviewed. The Standard Model interpretation of the results in terms of the parameter sin 2{beta} leads to a four-fold ambiguity on the unitarity triangle {beta} which can be reduced to a two-fold ambiguity by measuring the sign of the parameter cos 2{beta}. The results on cos 2{beta} obtained so far are reviewed.

  19. Measuring the Distance between Merge Trees (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  20. Topics in N = 1 supergravity in four dimensions and superstring effective field theories beyond tree-level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saririan, K.

    1997-05-01

    In this thesis, the author presents some works in the direction of studying quantum effects in locally supersymmetric effective field theories that appear in the low energy limit of superstring theory. After reviewing the Kaehler covariant formulation of supergravity, he shows the calculation of the divergent one-loop contribution to the effective boson Lagrangian for supergravity, including the Yang-Mills sector and the helicity-odd operators that arise from integration over fermion fields. The only restriction is on the Yang-Mills kinetic energy normalization function, which is taken diagonal in gauge indices, as in models obtained from superstrings. He then presents the full result for the divergent one-loop contribution to the effective boson Lagrangian for supergravity coupled to chiral and Yang-Mills supermultiplets. He also considers the specific case of dilaton couplings in effective supergravity Lagrangians from superstrings, for which the one-loop result is considerably simplified. He studies gaugino condensation in the presence of an intermediate mass scale in the hidden sector. S-duality is imposed as an approximate symmetry of the effective supergravity theory. Furthermore, the author includes in the Kaehler potential the renormalization of the gauge coupling and the one-loop threshold corrections at the intermediate scale. It is shown that confinement is indeed achieved. Furthermore, a new running behavior of the dilaton arises which he attributes to S-duality. He also discusses the effects of the intermediate scale, and possible phenomenological implications of this model.

  1. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and R- BCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain themore » flow rate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon valida- tion of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the \\all-or-nothing" phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Lastly, we demonstrated the new methodology for simulating blood flow in ves- sels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis model.« less

  2. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and RBCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain the flowmorerate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon validation of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the all-or-nothing phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of the new methodology in simulations of blood flow in vessels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis modeless

  3. Pyrolysis of Woody Residue Feedstocks: Upgrading of Bio-Oils from Mountain-Pine-Beetle-Killed Trees and Hog Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacher, Alan H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Preto, Fernando; Iisa, Kristiina

    2014-12-01

    Liquid transportation fuel blend-stocks were produced by pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of woody residue biomass. Mountain pine beetle killed wood and hog fuel from a saw mill were pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed reactor and subsequently upgraded to hydrocarbons in a continuous fixed bed hydrotreater. Upgrading was performed by catalytic hydrotreatment in a two-stage bed at 170°C and 405°C with a per bed LHSV between 0.17 and 0.19. The overall yields from biomass to upgraded fuel were similar for both feeds: 24-25% despite the differences in bio-oil (intermediate) mass yield. Pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was 61% from MPBK wood, and subsequent upgrading of the bio-oil gave an average mass yield of 41% to liquid fuel blend stocks. Hydrogen was consumed at an average of 0.042g/g of bio-oil fed, with final oxygen content in the product fuel ranging from 0.31% to 1.58% over the course of the test. Comparatively for hog fuel, pyrolysis bio-oil mass yield was lower at 54% due to inorganics in the biomass, but subsequent upgrading of that bio-oil had an average mass yield of 45% to liquid fuel, resulting in a similar final mass yield to fuel compared to the cleaner MPBK wood. Hydrogen consumption for the hog fuel upgrading averaged 0.041 g/g of bio-oil fed, and the final oxygen content of the product fuel ranged from 0.09% to 2.4% over the run. While it was confirmed that inorganic laded biomass yields less bio-oil, this work demonstrated that the resultant bio-oil can be upgraded to hydrocarbons at a higher yield than bio-oil from clean wood. Thus the final hydrocarbon yield from clean or residue biomass pyrolysis/upgrading was similar.

  4. Some fundamental aspects of fault-tree and digraph-matrix relationships for a systems-interaction evaluation procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alesso, H.P.

    1982-02-28

    Recent events, such as Three Mile Island-2, Brown's Ferry-3, and Crystal River-3, have demonstrated that complex accidents can occur as a result of dependent (common-cause/mode) failures. These events are now being called Systems Interactions. A procedure for the identification and evaluation of Systems Interactions is being developed by the NRC. Several national laboratories and utilities have contributed preliminary procedures. As a result, there are several important views of the Systems Interaction problem. This report reviews some fundamental mathematical background of both fault-oriented and success-oriented risk analyses in order to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each. In addition, it outlines several fault-oriented/dependency analysis approaches and several success-oriented/digraph-matrix approaches. The objective is to obtain a broad perspective of present options for solving the Systems Interaction problem.

  5. A study of astrometric distortions due to “tree rings” in CCD sensors using LSST Photon Simulator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beamer, Benjamin; Nomerotski, Andrei; Tsybychev, Dmitri

    2015-05-22

    Imperfections in the production process of thick CCDs lead to circularly symmetric dopant concentration variations, which in turn produce electric fields transverse to the surface of the fully depleted CCD that displace the photogenerated charges. We use PhoSim, a Monte Carlo photon simulator, to explore and examine the likely impacts these dopant concentration variations will have on astrometric measurements in LSST. The scale and behavior of both the astrometric shifts imparted to point sources and the intensity variations in flat field images that result from these doping imperfections are similar to those previously observed in Dark Energy Camera CCDs, givingmore » initial confirmation of PhoSim's model for these effects. In addition, the organized shape distortions were observed as a result of the symmetric nature of these dopant variations, causing nominally round sources to be imparted with a measurable ellipticity either aligned with or transverse to the radial direction of this dopant variation pattern.« less

  6. EECBG Success Story: Bike Sharing in Texas: San Antonio Rolls Out Program Aimed at Energy Efficiency and Public Health

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the first bike sharing system in Texas, San Antonio’s B-Cycle addresses two top concerns in the city: providing opportunities to improve personal health and giving active transportation choices to residents and visitors. Riders are empowered to see how they are making a difference in the community. Learn more.

  7. VOLUME I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3, 2016 VIA OVERNIGHT MAIL CARRIER Mr. John D. Woolery President and Project Manager Portsmouth and Paducah DUF 6 Project BWXT Conversion Services, LLC 1020 Monarch Street Suite 300 Lexington, Kentucky 40513 WEA-2016-03 Dear Mr. Woolery: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the March 25, 2015, potassium hydroxide (KOH) injury event at the Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Plant. The DOE Office of Enterprise Assessments'

  8. VIA OVERNIGHT MAIL CARRIER Mr. John D. Woolery President and Project Manager

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13, 2016 VIA OVERNIGHT MAIL CARRIER Mr. John D. Woolery President and Project Manager Portsmouth and Paducah DUF 6 Project BWXT Conversion Services, LLC 1020 Monarch Street Suite 300 Lexington, Kentucky 40513 WEA-2016-03 Dear Mr. Woolery: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the March 25, 2015, potassium hydroxide (KOH) injury event at the Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Plant. The DOE Office of Enterprise Assessments'

  9. New mammography screen/film combinations: Imaging characteristics and radiation dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Zheutlin, J.; Gornbein, J.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Five types of film (Kodak OM, Kodak OM-SO177, Konica CM, Dupont Microvision, and Fuji MiMa) exposed in combination with seven different intensifying screens (Min R, Min R Medium, Siemens Orthox MA, Kyokka HR Mammo Fine, Agfa Gevaert Detail S (old and new), and Konica Monarch) were processed for either 90 sec (at 33.3{degrees}C) or 3 min (at 35.0 degrees C). The films imaged a Computerized Imaging Reference System phantom with additional detail test objects placed on its surface to produce four groups of objects with which to evaluate resolution and contrast. For objects that tested resolution, the Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was statistically significantly superior; for objects that tested contrast, the Konica Monarch screen was statistically significantly superior. Extended processing did not affect Dupont and Kodak OM film as much as it affected the other films. It did affect contrast for the other films tested. The mean glandular doses from gridless exposures ranged from 32 to 80 mrad (0.32-0.80 mGy) over all film/screen/processing combinations for a 4.5-cm-thick test object. Several new film/screen combinations can provide images superior to the Kodak Min R/OM combination at a reduced radiation dose. The Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was found statistically superior in radiographic resolution of mammographic test objects and the Konica Monarch screen was found to be superior in defining contrast.

  10. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trees has a far worse impact on the ecosystem and climate's health, especially due to ... Tree death greatly affects atmosphere and ecosystem Living trees soak up greenhouse gas ...