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  1. PROGRAMA DE IGUALDAD DE ACCESO PARA PUERTO RICO: Recursos de...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    registro del usuario, una cuota de suscripcin, o algn otro tipo de cuota para tener acceso a artculos en texto completo. Importar Citaciones a un Programa de...

  2. ORISE Resources: Puerto Rico Equal Access Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Puerto Rico Equal Access Program: Programa de Igualdad de Acceso para Puerto Rico: Recursos de Informacin del VIHSIDA de la Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina Workbook The Oak...

  3. PROGRAMA DE IGUALDAD DE ACCESO PARA PUERTO RICO: Recursos de Información del VIH/SIDA de la National Library of Medicine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Para buscar una publicación, use Journals Database (una base de datos de publicaciones)--y le permitirá buscar por el tema, título/abreviación de la publicación, el número ISSN, o buscar usando términos del tema  Para formar una estrategia con términos de MeSH, use la base de datos MeSH Database- -el vocabulario Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) es controlado por la NLM y proporciona una forma consistente de recuperar información que por lo contrario pueden tener diferentes términos

  4. Puerto Rico- Green Energy Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July 2010, Puerto Rico enacted two important laws aimed at accelerating Puerto Rico's adaptation of renewable energy and to reduce the island's reliance on fossil fuels. This is especially...

  5. Other: Universidad de Puerto Rico - Carribean Affordable Solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Universidad de Puerto Rico - Carribean Affordable Solar House Citation Details Title: Universidad de Puerto Rico - Carribean Affordable Solar House

  6. Puerto Rico - Renewable Energy Equipment Certification | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Puerto Rico Program Type Equipment Certification Summary Certification of Photovoltaic Equipment EAA specifies that PV equipment must meet UL 1703 requirements, and...

  7. Center for Energy and Environmental Research, Puerto Rico, Sites...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Center for Energy and Environmental Research, Puerto Rico, Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Center for Energy and Environmental Research, Puerto Rico, Sites....

  8. Fermilab Today | University of Puerto Rico - Mayaguez Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Puerto Rico - Mayaguez HOME TOWN: Mayaguez, Puerto Rico MASCOT: Tarzan the Bulldog SCHOOL COLOR: Green PARTICLE PHYSICS COLLABORATIONS: CMS COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE:...

  9. Puerto Rico- Economic Development Incentives for Renewables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2008 Economic Incentives for the Development of Puerto Rico Act (EIA) provides a wide array of tax credits and incentives that enable local and foreign companies dedicated to certain business...

  10. Puerto Rico- Solar and Wind Contractor Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, the Energy Affairs Administration (EAA) of Puerto Rico adopted regulations for the certification of photovoltaic (PV) systems and installers in response to the passing of Act No....

  11. Puerto Rico- Excise Tax Exemption for Farmers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Puerto Rico, "bona fide farmers" are exempted from paying all types of excises for equipment, articles and objects whose operation depend solely on solar, wind, hydro or any other type of power,...

  12. Puerto Rico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tons NA 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 0 Cubic Meters (cu m) 144 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 0 Barrels (bbl) 134 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring Puerto Rico...

  13. Puerto Rico Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the Middle School Coach page. Puerto Rico Region Middle School Regional Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Middle School...

  14. Puerto Rico Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    for your school's state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the High School Coach page. Puerto Rico Region High School Regional Puerto Rico Puerto Rico...

  15. University of Puerto Rico (Universidad de Puerto Rico) | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Puerto Rico (Universidad de Puerto Rico) Spotlights Home DOE Applauds UPR Science and Technical Programs UPR Mayagüez High Energy Physics Group The High Energy Physics Group is currently working in the experiment Compact Muon Solenoid at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland. The group is funded by the U.S. DOE Office of Science. Portico of the Mayaguez Campus The University of Puerto Rico has the largest and most

  16. Puerto Rico- Building Energy Code with Mandatory Solar Water Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009, the Governor of Puerto Rico provided assurance that Puerto Rico would update its building energy codes as part of the state's application for State Energy Program funds from the American...

  17. Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for a feasibility study of m0treAlables on several brownfield sites. The EPA defines a brownfield as 'a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.' All of the brownfields in this study are landfill sites. Citizens of Puerto Rico, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Puerto Rico, which are particularly well suited for solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed-tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed-tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. All of the landfills in Puerto Rico were screened according to these criteria in order to determine the sites with the greatest potential. Eight landfills were chosen for site visits based on the screening criteria and location. Because of time constraints and the fact that Puerto Rico is a relatively large island, the eight landfills for this visit were all located in the eastern half of the island. The findings from this report can be applied to landfills in the western half of the island. The economics of a potential PV system on landfills in Puerto Rico depend greatly on the cost of electricity. Currently, PREPA has an average electric rate of $0.119/kWh. Based on past electric rate increases in Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean, this rate could increase to $0.15/kWh or higher in a relatively short amount of time. In the coming years, increasing electrical rates and increased necessity for clean power will continue to improve the feasibility of implementing solar PV systems at these sites.

  18. BONUS, Puerto Rico, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    information about the Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS) reactor located northwest of Rincn, Puerto Rico. The site is...

  19. Puerto Rico Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    projects, from solar power to wind. Through these investments, Puerto Rico's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and ...

  20. Puerto Rico`s EcoElectrica LNG/power project marks a project financing first

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammers, R.; Taylor, S.

    1998-02-23

    On Dec. 15, 1997, Enron International and Kenetech Energy Services achieved financial close on the $670 million EcoElectrica liquefied natural gas terminal and cogeneration project proposed for Puerto Rico. The project involves construction of a liquefied natural gas terminal, cogeneration plant, and desalination unit on the southern coast of Puerto Rico, in the Penuelas/Guayanilla area. EcoElectrica will include a 500-mw, combined-cycle cogeneration power plant fueled mainly by LNG imported from the 400 MMcfd Atlantic LNG project on the island of Trinidad. Achieving financial close on a project of this size is always a time-consuming matter and one with a number of challenges. These challenges were increased by the unique nature of both the project and its financing--no project financing had ever before been completed that combined an LNG terminal and power plant. The paper discusses the project, financing details and challenges, key investment considerations, and integrated project prospects.

  1. Puerto Rico- Tax Deduction for Solar Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rico offers a 30% tax deduction (up to $1,500) for expenses incurred in the purchase and installation of solar equipment to heat water for residential use. "Solar equipment" is defined as ...

  2. Puerto Rico- Green Energy Fund Tier I Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With funding from Puerto Rico's Green Energy Fund, Tier I rebates are available for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems up to and including 100 kW in capacity on a first-come, first-served basis. ...

  3. Puerto Rico - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Profile Territory Profile and Energy Estimates Change State/Territory Choose a U.S. State or Territory United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rio Rico Fire District Turns Grease Into Biodiesel on Delicious Rank

  5. EIS-0511: Aguirre Offshore GasPort Project, Puerto Rico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FERC prepared an EIS with 10 cooperating agencies, including DOE, for the proposed Aguirre Offshore GasPort Project. The proposal would include construction and operation of a marine LNG-receiving facility about 1 mile outside of Jobos Bay, near the towns of Salinas and Guayama, Puerto Rico, and a 4-mile subsea pipeline connecting to the Aguirre Plant in Salinas.

  6. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

    1999-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

  7. The Absent House: The Ecological House of Puerto Rico

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Vega Alta, PR The Absent House takes advantage of the benevolent climate of the humid tropics of Puerto Rico to play with the ambiguity of interior and exterior spaces. Main spaces include: a kitchenette and master bathroom suite; a guest tower with a bedroom, bathroom, and small library; an open, public pavilion for cooking, dining, and porch activities; a bathroom for visitors; an infrastructure pavilion for electricity and water consumption management; and an organic garden. The Patio of the Sun and the Stars, the most important s

  8. Puerto Rico- Property Tax Exemption for Solar and Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rico provides a property tax exemption for all "solar powered material, equipment or accessory and renewable energy collection, storage, generation, distribution, and application equipment."...

  9. Viva Energía! Energy Department Partners with the University of Puerto Rico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As one of the leading research institutions in Puerto Rico, the University of Puerto Rico has the largest and most diverse academic offerings on the Carribean island. And now -- thanks to funding from the Recovery Act -- the university is undertaking several energy conservation and renewable energy projects that will reduce the school's energy costs by $230,000 a year.

  10. RFA-14-0001- In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc./Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 29, 2014, OHA approved a distribution plan submitted by the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico) to use approximately $1.2 million of petroleum overcharge funds held in escrow by the...

  11. WINDExchange: Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands 50-Meter Wind Resource

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Map Maps & Data Printable Version Bookmark and Share Land-Based Utility-Scale Maps Potential Capacity Maps Offshore Wind Maps Community-Scale Maps Residential-Scale Maps Installed Capacity Maps Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands 50-Meter Wind Resource Map Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands wind resource map. Click on the image to view a larger version. Enlarge image This Puerto Rico wind map and the U.S. Virgin Islands wind map shows the wind resource at 50 meters. Download a printable

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Puerto Rico (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - a U.S. territory located about 60 miles east of the Dominican Republic and directly west of the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  13. Puerto Rico State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The Puerto Rico State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Puerto Rico. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Puerto Rico. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Puerto Rico.

  14. Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands Wind Resource Map at 50 meters

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % 19-JUN-2007 1.1.1 U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands - 50 m Wind Power Mayaguez 20 0 20 40 60 80 100 Kilometers 20 0 20 40 60 Miles Ponce San Juan Charlotte Amalie Cruz Bay PUERTO RICO VIRGIN ISLANDS Wind Power Class 1 2 3 4 5 Resource Potential Poor Marginal Fair Good Excellent Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 0 - 200 200 - 300 300 - 400 400 - 500 500 - 600 2 Wind Speed at 50 m m/s 0.0 - 5.9

  15. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-03-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on brownfield sites in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. All of the assessed sites are landfills. The sites were assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.119/kWh and incentives offered by Puerto Rico and by the serving utility, PREPA. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  16. Feasibility Study of Solar Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico (Second Study)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a solar photovoltaics (PV) system on landfill sites in Puerto Rico. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed tilt). The report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. According to the site production calculations, the most cost-effective system in terms of return on investment is the thin-film fixed-tilt technology. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system. The landfills and sites considered in this report were all determined feasible areas in which to implement solar PV systems.

  17. Methane flux from mangrove sediments along the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotomayor, D.; Corredor, J.E.; Morell, J.M. )

    1994-03-01

    Although the sediments of coastal marine mangrove forests have been considered a minor source of atmospheric methane, these estimate have been based on sparse data from similar areas. We have gathered evidence that shows that external nutrient and freshwater loading in mangrove sediments may have a significant effect on methane flux. Experiments were performed to examine methane fluxes from anaerobic sediments in a mangrove forest subjected to secondary sewage effluents on the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico. Emission rates were measured in situ using a static chamber technique, and subsequent laboratory analysis of samples was by gas chromatography using a flame ionization detector. Results indicate that methane flux rates were lowest at the landward fringe nearest to the effluent discharge, higher in the seaward fringe occupied by red mangroves, and highest in the transition zone between black and red mangrove communities, with average values of 4 mg CH[sub 4] m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1], 42 mg CH[sub 4] m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1], and 82 mg CH[sub 4] m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1], respectively. Overall mean values show these sediments may emit as much as 40 times more methane than unimpacted pristine areas. Pneumatophores of Aviciennia germinans have been found to serve as conduits to the atmosphere for this gas. Fluctuating water level overlying the mangrove sediment is an important environmental factor controlling seasonal and interannual CH[sub 4] flux variations. Environmental controls such as freshwater inputs and increased nutrient loading influence in situ methane emissions from these environments. 34 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Probing the deep critical zone beneath the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, Heather; Brantley, S. L.; Scatena, Fred; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Blum, Alex; Schulz, M; Jimenez, M; White, Art; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that weathering processes occurring in the subsurface produce the majority of silicate weathering products discharged to the world s oceans, thereby exerting a primary control on global temperature via the well-known positive feedback between silicate weathering and CO2. In addition, chemical and physical weathering processes deep within the critical zone create aquifers and control groundwater chemistry, watershed geometry and regolith formation rates. Despite this, most weathering studies are restricted to the shallow critical zone (e.g., soils, outcrops). Here we investigate the chemical weathering, fracturing and geomorphology of the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico, from two boreholes drilled to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth, from which continuous core samples were taken. Corestones exposed aboveground were also sampled. Weathered rinds developed on exposed corestones and along fracture surfaces on subsurface rocks slough off of exposed corestones once rinds attain a thickness up to ~1 cm, preventing the corestones from rounding due to diffusion limitation. Such corestones at the land surface are assumed to be what remains after exhumation of similar, fractured bedrock pieces that were observed in the drilled cores between thick layers of regolith. Some of these subsurface corestones are massive and others are highly fractured, whereas aboveground corestones are generally massive with little to no apparent fracturing. Subsurface corestones are larger and less fractured in the borehole drilled on a road where it crosses a ridge compared to the borehole drilled where the road crosses the stream channel. Both borehole profiles indicate that the weathering zone extends to well below the stream channel in this upland catchment; hence weathering depth is not controlled by the stream level within the catchment and not all of the water in the watershed is discharged to the stream.

  19. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration … Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 OAS-RA-13-27 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 15, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Examination Report on

  20. Puerto Rico- Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customer-generators seeking to interconnect first submit a standardized "Evaluation Request" to PREPA to determine whether or not the system will qualify for the "Simple Interconnection Process...

  1. Hawaii and Puerto Rico

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hawaii a nd P uerto R ico Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief Hawaii a nd P uerto R ico a re t he l argest U .S. i slands i n p opulation, size, a nd e nergy c onsumption. T hese i slands a re i solated f rom larger m ainland e nergy s upply n etworks, i ncluding p ipelines, railroads, a nd t ransmission g rids. B oth a re l ocated i n t ropical climates-Hawaii i n t he P acific O cean a nd P uerto R ico i n t

  2. Results of in-situ biofouling control, and corrosion test at Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico and its significance on OTEC heater exchanger design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasscer, D.S.; Morgan, T.O.; Tosteson, T.R.

    1983-06-01

    Because Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) operates at a low thermodynamic efficiency, heat exchangers represent a major portion of the overall cost of an OTEC power plant. For this reason, the commercial viability of OTEC depends on the design of efficient and inexpensive heat exchangers which have an operational life expectancy of 20 to 30 years and which can be maintained at a high level of efficiency by the use of effective biofouling control. Summarized here are the results of experiments conducted by the Center for Energy and Environment Research of the University of Puerto Rico to: determine the nature of the biofilm which develops on heat exchanger surfaces exposed to running seawater, test the effectiveness of brush cleaning and chlorination in controlling biofouling on these surfaces and study the corrosion behavior of zinc protected aluminum alloys under OTEC conditions in an attempt to qualify them for use in low cost OTEC heat exchangers.

  3. ParaView Red Blood Cell Tutorial | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ParaView Red Blood Cell Tutorial Goals This tutorial is intended to be a hands-on resource ... Data set for ParaView Red Blood Cell Tutorial File Open Icon Load Multi-component Dataset ...

  4. Herramientas para desarrollar proyectos de ERNC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Herramientas para desarrollar proyectos de ERNC Jump to: navigation, search En esta seccin, se presentan diferentes herramientas tiles a la hora de desarrollar proyectos de...

  5. Using ParaView for Scientific Data Visualization | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Using ParaView for Scientific Data Visualization May 16, 2016 1:00PM to 2:00PM Presenter Joseph Insley (ALCF) Location Building 401, Room A1100 Type Seminar Series APS Scientific Computation Seminar Series Abstract: ParaView is an open-source, multiplatform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView was developed to analyze extremely large datasets using distributed memory computing resources. It can be run on supercomputers to analyze large datasets as well as on

  6. Ortho- and para-hydrogen in neutron thermalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daemen, L. L.; Brun, T. O.

    1998-01-01

    The large difference in neutron scattering cross-section at low neutron energies between ortho- and para-hydrogen was recognized early on. In view of this difference (more than an order of magnitude), one might legitimately ask whether the ortho/para ratio has a significant effect on the neutron thermalization properties of a cold hydrogen moderator. Several experiments performed in the 60`s and early 70`s with a variety of source and (liquid hydrogen) moderator configurations attempted to investigate this. The results tend to show that the ortho/para ratio does indeed have an effect on the energy spectrum of the neutron beam produced. Unfortunately, the results are not always consistent with each other and much unknown territory remains to be explored. The problem has been approached from a computational standpoint, but these isolated efforts are far from having examined the ortho/para-hydrogen problem in neutron moderation in all its complexity. Because of space limitations, the authors cannot cover, even briefly, all the aspects of the ortho/para question here. This paper will summarize experiments meant to investigate the effect of the ortho/para ratio on the neutron energy spectrum produced by liquid hydrogen moderators.

  7. Slide 1 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico

  8. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer You are accessing a ...

  9. RVA: A Plugin for ParaView 3.14

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-09-04

    RVA is a plugin developed for the 64-bit Windows version of the ParaView 3.14 visualization package. RVA is designed to provide support in the visualization and analysis of complex reservoirs being managed using multi-fluid EOR techniques. RVA, for Reservoir Visualization and Analysis, was developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with contributions from the Illinois State Geological Survey, Department of Computer Science and National Center for Supercomputing Applications. RVA was designed to utilize andmore » enhance the state-of-the-art visualization capabilities within ParaView, readily allowing joint visualization of geologic framework and reservoir fluid simulation model results. Particular emphasis was placed on enabling visualization and analysis of simulation results highlighting multiple fluid phases, multiple properties for each fluid phase (including flow lines), multiple geologic models and multiple time steps. Additional advanced functionality was provided through the development of custom code to implement data mining capabilities. The built-in functionality of ParaView provides the capacity to process and visualize data sets ranging from small models on local desktop systems to extremely large models created and stored on remote supercomputers. The RVA plugin that we developed and the associated User Manual provide improved functionality through new software tools, and instruction in the use of ParaView-RVA, targeted to petroleum engineers and geologists in industry and research. The RVA web site (http://rva.cs.illinois.edu) provides an overview of functions, and the development web site (https://github.com/shaffer1/RVA) provides ready access to the source code, compiled binaries, user manual, and a suite of demonstration data sets. Key functionality has been included to support a range of reservoirs visualization and analysis needs, including: sophisticated connectivity analysis, cross sections through simulation results between selected wells, simplified volumetric calculations, global vertical exaggeration adjustments, ingestion of UTChem simulation results, ingestion of Isatis geostatistical framework models, interrogation of joint geologic and reservoir modeling results, joint visualization and analysis of well history files, location-targeted visualization, advanced correlation analysis, visualization of flow paths, and creation of static images and animations highlighting targeted reservoir features.« less

  10. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer (Technical Report)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer The ParaDiS code is developed to study bulk systems with periodic boundary conditions. When we try to perform discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for finite systems such as thin films or cylinders, the ParaDiS code must be extended. First, dislocations need to be contained inside the finite simulation box; Second,

  11. Conformation of ionizable poly Para phenylene ethynylene in dilute solutions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wijesinghe, Sidath; Maskey, Sabina; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-11-03

    The conformation of dinonyl poly para phenylene ethynylenes (PPEs) with carboxylate side chains, equilibrated in solvents of different quality is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PPEs are of interest because of their tunable electro-optical properties, chemical diversity, and functionality which are essential in wide range of applications. The polymer conformation determines the conjugation length and their assembly mode and affects electro-optical properties which are critical in their current and potential uses. The current study investigates the effect of carboxylate fraction on PPEs side chains on the conformation of chains in the dilute limit, in solvents of different quality. The dinonylmore » PPE chains are modeled atomistically, where the solvents are modeled both implicitly and explicitly. Dinonyl PPEs maintained a stretched out conformation up to a carboxylate fraction f of 0.7 in all solvents studied. The nonyl side chains are extended and oriented away from the PPE backbone in toluene and in implicit good solvent whereas in water and implicit poor solvent, the nonyl side chains are collapsed towards the PPE backbone. Thus, rotation around the aromatic ring is fast and no long range correlations are seen within the backbone.« less

  12. DYNA3D/ParaDyn Regression Test Suite Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J I

    2011-01-25

    The following table constitutes an initial assessment of feature coverage across the regression test suite used for DYNA3D and ParaDyn. It documents the regression test suite at the time of production release 10.1 in September 2010. The columns of the table represent groupings of functionalities, e.g., material models. Each problem in the test suite is represented by a row in the table. All features exercised by the problem are denoted by a check mark in the corresponding column. The definition of ''feature'' has not been subdivided to its smallest unit of user input, e.g., algorithmic parameters specific to a particular type of contact surface. This represents a judgment to provide code developers and users a reasonable impression of feature coverage without expanding the width of the table by several multiples. All regression testing is run in parallel, typically with eight processors. Many are strictly regression tests acting as a check that the codes continue to produce adequately repeatable results as development unfolds, compilers change and platforms are replaced. A subset of the tests represents true verification problems that have been checked against analytical or other benchmark solutions. Users are welcomed to submit documented problems for inclusion in the test suite, especially if they are heavily exercising, and dependent upon, features that are currently underrepresented.

  13. Puerto Rico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  14. El Verde, Puerto Rico, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    support for research projects throughout the 1970s and 1980s. In 1988, the National Science Foundation established the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research Program, and El...

  15. Recipient: [Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of this report are: Efran O'Neill-Carrillo, Armando Figueroa, Agustn Irizarry, Israel Ramrez, Eduardo Ortiz, Luis de Jesus, Vivian Rodrguez, Ezequiel Vassallo, ...

  16. Recovery Act State Memos Puerto Rico

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy tax credits and grants: 4 For total Recovery Act ... broad range of clean energy projects, from solar power to wind. ... efficient, expanding the home efficiency industry in ...

  17. Puerto Rico Farmers Market Cooler, Saving Money

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Buying fruits and vegetables at the Las Piedras farmers market is now more comfortable for the thousands of Puerto Ricans who shop there regularly. And, the reason for that comfort — revamped air conditioning — is costing the city less in energy costs than before.

  18. Puerto Rico - Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2035. Green energy resources fall into two categories. The first category is "Sustainable Renewable Energy" which includes solar, wind, geothermal, renewable biomass, qualified...

  19. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  20. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  1. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1999-05-25

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  2. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases. These enzymes exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ParaChoice: Parametric Vehicle Choice Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ParaChoice:...

  4. Experiments at Scale with In-Situ Visualization Using ParaView/Catalyst in RAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kares, Robert John

    2014-10-31

    In this paper I describe some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation on the Cielo supercomputer at Los Alamos. The detailed procedures for the creation of the visualizations using ParaView/Catalyst are discussed and several images sequences from the ICF simulation problem produced with the in-situ method are presented. My impressions and conclusions concerning the use of the in-situ visualization method in RAGE are discussed.

  5. Los lideres de energia en EEUU toman medidas para desarrollar la Alianza de

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energia y Clima de las Americas | Department of Energy lideres de energia en EEUU toman medidas para desarrollar la Alianza de Energia y Clima de las Americas Los lideres de energia en EEUU toman medidas para desarrollar la Alianza de Energia y Clima de las Americas June 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis In English LIMA, PERÚ - Ministros de energía y otros líderes de energía de gobiernos de a través de las Américas se reunieron con corporaciones de energía y otros expertos en Lima, el 15 y

  6. Preparation of ortho-para ratio controlled D{sub 2} gas for muon-catalyzed fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imao, H.; Ishida, K.; Matsuzaki, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Iwasaki, M.; Kawamura, N.; Strasser, P.; Toyoda, A.; Nagamine, K.

    2008-05-15

    A negative muon in hydrogen targets, e.g., D{sub 2} or D-T mixture, can catalyze nuclear fusions following a series of atomic processes involving muonic hydrogen molecular formation (muon-catalyzed fusion, {mu}CF). The ortho-para state of D{sub 2} is a crucial parameter not only for enhancing the fusion rate but also to precisely investigate various muonic atom processes. We have developed a system for controlling and measuring the ortho-para ratio of D{sub 2} gas for {mu}CF experiments. We successfully collected para-enriched D{sub 2} without using liquid-hydrogen coolant. Ortho-enriched D{sub 2} was also obtained by using a catalytic conversion method with a mixture of chromium oxide and alumina. The ortho-para ratio of D{sub 2} gas was measured with a compact Raman spectroscopy system. We produced large volume (5-30 l at STP), high-purity (less than ppm high-Z contaminant) D{sub 2} targets with a wide range of ortho-para ratios (ortho 20%-99%). By using the ortho-para controlled D{sub 2} in {mu}CF experiments, we observed the dependence of {mu}CF phenomena on the ortho-para ratio.

  7. The ortho:para ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crabtree, Kyle N.; Indriolo, Nick; Kreckel, Holger; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-22

    The discovery of H{sub 3}{sup +} in the diffuse interstellar medium has dramatically changed our view of the cosmic-ray ionization rate in diffuse molecular clouds. However, another surprise has been that the ortho:para ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} in these clouds is inconsistent with the temperature derived from the excitation of H{sub 2}, the dominant species in these clouds. In an effort to understand this discrepancy, we have embarked on an experimental program to measure the nuclear spin dependence of the dissociative electron recombination rate of H{sub 3}{sup +} using the CRYRING and TSR ion storage rings. We have also performed the first measurements of the reaction H{sub 3}{sup +}+H{sub 2}→H{sub 2}+H{sub 3}{sup +} below room temperature. This reaction is likely the most common bimolecular reaction in the universe, and plays an important role in interconverting ortho- and para-H{sub 3}{sup +}. Finally, we have constructed a steady-state chemical model for diffuse clouds, which takes into account the spin-dependence of the formation of H{sub 3}{sup +}, its electron recombination, and its reaction with H{sub 2}. We find that the ortho:para ratio of H{sub 3}{sup +} in diffuse clouds is likely governed by a competition between dissociative recombination and thermalization by reactive collisions.

  8. ParaDyn Implementation in the US Navy's DYSMAS Simulation System: FY08 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferencz, R M; DeGroot, A J; Lin, J I; Zywicz, E; Durrenberger, J K; Sherwood, R J; Corey, I R

    2008-07-29

    The goal of this project is to increase the computational efficiency and capacity of the Navy's DYSMAS simulation system for full ship shock response to underwater explosion. Specifically, this project initiates migration to a parallel processing capability for the structural portion of the overall fluid-structure interaction model. The capstone objective for the first phase is to demonstrate operation of the DYSMAS simulation engine with a production model on a Naval Surface Warfare Center (IHD) parallel platform using the ParaDyn code for parallel processing of the structural dynamics. This year saw a successful launch to integrate ParaDyn, the high-parallel structural dynamics code from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), into the DYSMAS system for simulating the response of ship structures to underwater explosion (UNDEX). The current LLNL version of DYNA3D, representing ten years of general development beyond the source branch used to initiate DYNA-N customization for DYSMAS, was first connected to the GEMINI flow code through DYSMAS Standard Coupler Interface (SCI). This permitted an early 'sanity check' by Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division (NSWC-IHD) personnel that equivalent results were generated for their standard UNDEX test problems, thus ensuring the Verification & Validation pedigree they have developed remains intact. The ParaDyn code was then joined to the SCI in a manner requiring no changes to GEMINI. Three NSWC-IHD engineers were twice hosted at LLNL to become familiar with LLNL computer systems, the execution of the prototype software system, and to begin assessment of its accuracy and performance. Scaling data for the flow solver GEMINI was attained up to a one billion cell, 1000 processor run. The NSWC-IHD engineers were granted privileges to continue their evaluations through remote connections to LLNL's Open Computing Facility. Finally, the prototype changes were integrated into the mainline ParaDyn source repository and issued as part of its Version 8.1 beta release. This source was transmitted to NSWC-IHD and in collaboration with LLNL personnel the entire ParaDyn software suite successfully installed and demonstrated on its new SGI Altix machine. The ability of even minor numbers of processors for the structural dynamics to impact overall time-to-solution for DYSMAS has been demonstrated. Assessments of combined parallel efficiencies are beginning to highlight areas for further DYSMAS optimizations.

  9. In-Situ Visualization Experiments with ParaView Cinema in RAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kares, Robert John

    2015-10-15

    A previous paper described some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation. One challenge of the in-situ approach apparent in these experiments was the difficulty of choosing parameters likes isosurface values for the visualizations to be produced from the running simulation without the benefit of prior knowledge of the simulation results and the resultant cost of recomputing in-situ generated images when parameters are chosen suboptimally. A proposed method of addressing this difficulty is to simply render multiple images at runtime with a range of possible parameter values to produce a large database of images and to provide the user with a tool for managing the resulting database of imagery. Recently, ParaView/Catalyst has been extended to include such a capability via the so-called Cinema framework. Here I describe some initial experiments with the first delivery of Cinema and make some recommendations for future extensions of Cinema’s capabilities.

  10. ORTHO-TO-PARA ABUNDANCE RATIO OF WATER ION IN COMET C/2001 Q4 (NEAT): IMPLICATION FOR ORTHO-TO-PARA ABUNDANCE RATIO OF WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Boice, Daniel C.; Martinez, Susan E.

    2012-04-20

    The ortho-to-para abundance ratio (OPR) of cometary molecules is considered to be one of the primordial characteristics of cometary ices, and contains information concerning their formation. Water is the most abundant species in cometary ices, and OPRs of water in comets have been determined from infrared spectroscopic observations of H{sub 2}O rovibrational transitions so far. In this paper, we present a new method to derive OPR of water in comets from the high-dispersion spectrum of the rovibronic emission of H{sub 2}O{sup +} in the optical wavelength region. The rovibronic emission lines of H{sub 2}O{sup +} are sometimes contaminated by other molecular emission lines but they are not affected seriously by telluric absorption compared with near-infrared observations. Since H{sub 2}O{sup +} ions are mainly produced from H{sub 2}O by photoionization in the coma, the OPR of H{sub 2}O{sup +} is considered to be equal to that of water based on the nuclear spin conservation through the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence excitation model of H{sub 2}O{sup +} and applied it to the spectrum of comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT). The derived OPR of water is 2.54{sup +0.32}{sub -0.25}, which corresponds to a nuclear spin temperature (T{sub spin}) of 30{sup +10}{sub -4} K. This is consistent with the previous value determined in the near-infrared for the same comet (OPR = 2.6 {+-} 0.3, T{sub spin} = 31{sup +11}{sub -5} K).

  11. Transient effects and pump depletion in stimulated Raman scattering. [Para-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsten, J.L.; Wenzel, R.G.; Druehl, K.

    1983-01-01

    Stimulated rotational Raman scattering in a 300-K multipass cell filled with para-H/sub 2/ with a single-mode CO/sub 2/-pumped laser is studied using a frequency-narrowed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a probe laser at the Stokes frequency for the S/sub 0/(O) transition. Amplification and pump depletion are examined as a function of incident pump energy. The pump depletion shows clear evidence of transient behavior. A theoretical treatment of transient stimulated Raman scattering, including effects of both pump depletion and medium saturation is presented. In a first approximation, diffraction effects are neglected, and only plane-wave interactions are considered. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental pulse shapes.

  12. Searching for Auxetics with DYNA3D and ParaDyn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, W G; Hoover, C G

    2004-09-11

    We sought to simulate auxetic behavior by carrying out dynamic analyses of mesoscopic model structures. We began by generating nearly periodic cellular structures. Four-node 'Shell' elements and eight-node 'Brick' elements are the basic building blocks for each cell. The shells and bricks obey standard elastic-plastic continuum mechanics. The dynamical response of the structures was next determined for a three-stage loading process: (1) homogeneous compression; (2) viscous relaxation; (3) uniaxial compression. The simulations were carried out with both serial and parallel computer codes--DYNA3D and ParaDyn--which describe the deformation of the shells and bricks with a robust contact algorithm. We summarize the results found here.

  13. Practical in-situ determination of ortho-para hydrogen ratios via fiber-optic based Raman spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutherland, Liese -Marie; Knudson, James N.; Mocko, Michal; Renneke, Richard M.

    2015-12-17

    An experiment was designed and developed to prototype a fiber-optic-based laser system, which measures the ratio of ortho-hydrogen to para-hydrogen in an operating neutron moderator system at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source. Preliminary measurements resulted in an ortho to para ratio of 3.06:1, which is within acceptable agreement with the previously published ratio. As a result, the successful demonstration of Raman Spectroscopy for this measurement is expected to lead to a practical method that can be applied for similar in-situ measurements at operating neutron spallation sources.

  14. Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

    2001-10-31

    This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

  15. Puerto Rico- Green Energy Fund Tier II Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: There is one application period per quarter. Applications must be submitted by the fifth day of each quarter (July 5, October 5, January 5, and April 5).  Incentives are expected to be...

  16. Puerto Rico- Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Green Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rican law exempts from the sales and use tax solar electric equipment, associated accessories, and components used to produce electrical energy. Distributors or manufacturers must submit a...

  17. Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Marketing and Spanish; Joseph Miscioscia, Computer Science Engineering; Carlos Lopez Morales, Industrial Engineering; Patrick Nicodemus, Electrical Engineering; Chee Hau ...

  18. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agraz, Jose Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; BIRI, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, West Hollywood, California 90048 ; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-15

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 ({sup 13}C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (B{sub o}), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of {sup 13}C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  19. ParaText : scalable solutions for processing and searching very large document collections : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-09-01

    This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Scalable Solutions for Processing and Searching Very Large Document Collections' LDRD, which ran from FY08 through FY10. Our goal was to investigate scalable text analysis; specifically, methods for information retrieval and visualization that could scale to extremely large document collections. Towards that end, we designed, implemented, and demonstrated a scalable framework for text analysis - ParaText - as a major project deliverable. Further, we demonstrated the benefits of using visual analysis in text analysis algorithm development, improved performance of heterogeneous ensemble models in data classification problems, and the advantages of information theoretic methods in user analysis and interpretation in cross language information retrieval. The project involved 5 members of the technical staff and 3 summer interns (including one who worked two summers). It resulted in a total of 14 publications, 3 new software libraries (2 open source and 1 internal to Sandia), several new end-user software applications, and over 20 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun or will start in FY11, with additional projects currently in proposal.

  20. Conformation of ionizable poly Para phenylene ethynylene in dilute solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wijesinghe, Sidath; Maskey, Sabina; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-11-03

    The conformation of dinonyl poly para phenylene ethynylenes (PPEs) with carboxylate side chains, equilibrated in solvents of different quality is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PPEs are of interest because of their tunable electro-optical properties, chemical diversity, and functionality which are essential in wide range of applications. The polymer conformation determines the conjugation length and their assembly mode and affects electro-optical properties which are critical in their current and potential uses. The current study investigates the effect of carboxylate fraction on PPEs side chains on the conformation of chains in the dilute limit, in solvents of different quality. The dinonyl PPE chains are modeled atomistically, where the solvents are modeled both implicitly and explicitly. Dinonyl PPEs maintained a stretched out conformation up to a carboxylate fraction f of 0.7 in all solvents studied. The nonyl side chains are extended and oriented away from the PPE backbone in toluene and in implicit good solvent whereas in water and implicit poor solvent, the nonyl side chains are collapsed towards the PPE backbone. Thus, rotation around the aromatic ring is fast and no long range correlations are seen within the backbone.

  1. Out-of-field organ doses and associated radiogenic risks from para-aortic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazonakis, Michalis Berris, Theocharis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to (a) calculate the radiation dose to out-of-field organs from radiotherapy for stage I testicular seminoma and (b) estimate the associated radiogenic risks. Methods: Monte Carlo methodology was employed to model radiation therapy with typical anteroposterior and posteroanterior para-aortic fields on an anthropomorphic phantom simulating an average adult. The radiation dose received by all main and remaining organs that defined by the ICRP publication 103 and excluded from the treatment volume was calculated. The effect of field dimensions on each organ dose was determined. Additional therapy simulations were generated by introducing shielding blocks to protect the kidneys from primary radiation. The gonadal dose was employed to assess the risk of heritable effects for irradiated male patients of reproductive potential. The lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of radiotherapy-induced cancer were estimated using gender- and organ-specific risk coefficients for patient ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old. The risk values were compared with the respective nominal risks. Results: Para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 5.0538.6 mGy. Blocked field treatment led to a dose change up to 28%. The mean organ dose variation by increasing or decreasing the applied field dimensions was 18.7% 3.9% and 20.8% 4.5%, respectively. The out-of-field photon doses increased the lifetime intrinsic risk of developing thyroid, lung, bladder, prostate, and esophageal cancer by (0.11.4)%, (0.41.1)%, (2.55.4)%, (0.20.4)%, and (6.49.2)%, respectively, depending upon the patient age at exposure and the field size employed. A low risk for heritable effects of less than 0.029% was found compared with the natural incidence of these defects. Conclusions: Testicular cancer survivors are subjected to an increased risk for the induction of bladder and esophageal cancer following para-aortic radiotherapy. The probability for the appearance of any other malignant disease to out-of-field organs was slightly elevated in respect to the nominal cancer incidence rates.

  2. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Japan Science and Technology Agency, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H{sub 2}. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H{sub 2} liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  3. Refinement of the experimental dynamic structure factor for liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium using semi-classical quantum simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kyle K. G. Rossky, Peter J.; Poulsen, Jens Aage; Cunsolo, A.

    2014-01-21

    The dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium in corresponding thermodynamic states (T = 20.0?K, n = 21.24?nm{sup ?3}) and (T = 23.0?K, n = 24.61?nm{sup ?3}), respectively, has been computed by both the Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral (FK-LPI) and Ring-Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) methods and compared with Inelastic X Ray Scattering spectra. The combined use of computational and experimental methods enabled us to reduce experimental uncertainties in the determination of the true sample spectrum. Furthermore, the refined experimental spectrum of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium is consistently reproduced by both FK-LPI and RPMD results at momentum transfers lower than 12.8?nm{sup ?1}. At larger momentum transfers the FK-LPI results agree with experiment much better for ortho-deuterium than for para-hydrogen. More specifically we found that for k ? 20.0 nm{sup ?1} para-hydrogen provides a test case for improved approximations to quantum dynamics.

  4. Para-hydrogen and helium cluster size distributions in free jet expansions based on Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J. Peter

    2015-02-21

    The size distribution of para-H{sub 2} (pH{sub 2}) clusters produced in free jet expansions at a source temperature of T{sub 0} = 29.5 K and pressures of P{sub 0} = 0.91.96 bars is reported and analyzed according to a cluster growth model based on the Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling. Good overall agreement is found between the measured and predicted, N{sub k} = A?k{sup a} e{sup ?bk}, shape of the distribution. The fit yields values for A and b for values of a derived from simple collision models. The small remaining deviations between measured abundances and theory imply a (pH{sub 2}){sub k} magic number cluster of k = 13 as has been observed previously by Raman spectroscopy. The predicted linear dependence of b{sup ?(a+1)} on source gas pressure was verified and used to determine the value of the basic effective agglomeration reaction rate constant. A comparison of the corresponding effective growth cross sections ?{sub 11} with results from a similar analysis of He cluster size distributions indicates that the latter are much larger by a factor 6-10. An analysis of the three body recombination rates, the geometric sizes and the fact that the He clusters are liquid independent of their size can explain the larger cross sections found for He.

  5. Application of a New Ensemble Conserving Quantum Dynamics Simulation Algorithm to Liquid para-Hydrogen and ortho-Deuterium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Kyle K.G.; Poulsen, Jens Aage; Nyman, Gunnar; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Rossky, Peter J.

    2015-06-30

    Here, we apply the Feynman-Kleinert Quasi-Classical Wigner (FK-QCW) method developed in our previous work [Smith et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244112 (2015)] for the determination of the dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium at state points of (T = 20.0 K, n = 21.24 nm-3) and (T = 23.0 K, n = 24.61 nm-3), respectively. When applied to this challenging system, it is shown that this new FK-QCW method consistently reproduces the experimental dynamic structure factor reported by Smith et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034501 (2014)] for all momentum transfers considered. Moreover, this shows that FK-QCWmore » provides a substantial improvement over the Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral method, in which purely classical dynamics are used. Furthermore, for small momentum transfers, it is shown that FK-QCW provides nearly the same results as ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), thus suggesting that FK-QCW provides a potentially more appealing algorithm than RPMD since it is not formally limited to correlation functions involving linear operators.« less

  6. ParaView

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    when the job executes. Login to the desired system, and submit your job using the batch startup script. For example on Hopper the sequence of command would be: ssh...

  7. Dosimetric Predictors of Duodenal Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Treatment of the Para-aortic Nodes in Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sulman, Erik P.; Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rauch, Gaiane M. [Department of Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of duodenal toxicity in patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of para-aortic nodes and to identify dosimetric parameters predictive of late duodenal toxicity. Methods and Materials: We identified 105 eligible patients with gynecologic malignancies who were treated with IMRT for gross metastatic disease in the para-aortic nodes from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009. Patients were treated to a nodal clinical target volume to 45 to 50.4 Gy with a boost to 60 to 66 Gy. The duodenum was contoured, and dosimetric data were exported for analysis. Duodenal toxicity was scored according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine associations between dosimetric variables and time to toxicity and to identify the optimal threshold that separated patients according to risk of toxicity. Results: Nine of the 105 patients experienced grade 2 to grade 5 duodenal toxicity, confirmed by endoscopy in all cases. The 3-year actuarial rate of any duodenal toxicity was 11.7%. A larger volume of the duodenum receiving 55 Gy (V55) was associated with higher rates of duodenal toxicity. The 3-year actuarial rates of duodenal toxicity with V55 above and below 15 cm{sup 3} were 48.6% and 7.4%, respectively (P<.01). In Cox univariate analysis of dosimetric variables, V55 was associated with duodenal toxicity (P=.029). In recursive partitioning analysis, V55 less than 13.94% segregated all patients with duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT can safely and effectively treat para-aortic nodal disease in gynecologic malignancies, provided that care is taken to limit the dose to the duodenum to reduce the risk of late duodenal toxicity. Limiting V55 to below 15 cm{sup 3} may reduce the risk of duodenal complications. In cases where the treatment cannot be delivered within these constraints, consideration should be given to other treatment approaches such as resection or initial chemotherapy.

  8. Tapping Solar for Hot Water and Cheaper Bills for Puerto Rico...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Angel Rivera Berrios, a retired police officer living in San Juan is one of them. He and his wife, a retired school teacher, live in a one story, concrete house. They received two ...

  9. Test of the consistency of various linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions in application to inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William; Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

    2008-03-15

    The linearized approximation to the semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR) is used to calculate time correlation functions relevant to the incoherent dynamic structure factor for inelastic neutron scattering from liquid para-hydrogen at 14 K. Various time correlations functions were used which, if evaluated exactly, would give identical results, but they do not because the LSC-IVR is approximate. Some of the correlation functions involve only linear operators, and others involve non-linear operators. The consistency of the results obtained with the various time correlation functions thus provides a useful test of the accuracy of the LSC-IVR approximation and its ability to treat correlation functions involving both linear and nonlinear operators in realistic anharmonic systems. The good agreement of the results obtained from different correlation functions, their excellent behavior in the spectral moment tests based on the exact moment constraints, and their semi-quantitative agreement with the inelastic neutron scattering experimental data all suggest that the LSC-IVR is indeed a good short-time approximation for quantum mechanical correlation functions.

  10. Obama-Biden Administration Announces Nearly $86 Million in Weatherization Funding and Energy Efficiency Grants for Puerto Rico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Part of nearly $8 billion in Recovery Act funding for energy efficiency efforts nationwide that will create 100,000 jobs and cut energy bills for families

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico- Building Energy Code with Mandatory Solar Water Heating In 2009, the Governor of Puerto Rico provided assurance that Puerto Rico would update its building energy codes...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico- Green Energy Fund In July 2010, Puerto Rico enacted two important laws aimed at accelerating Puerto Rico's adaptation of renewable energy and to reduce the island's...

  13. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory January 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drexel University Pennsylvania State University University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia University of Pittsburgh Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Rhode...

  14. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory August 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drexel University Pennsylvania State University University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico,...

  15. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory FY 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico,...

  16. Infrared identification of the {sigma}-complex of Cl-C{sub 6}H{sub 6} in the reaction of chlorine atom and benzene in solid para-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahou, Mohammed; Witek, Henryk; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2013-02-21

    The reaction of a chlorine atom with benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) is important in organic chemistry, especially in site-selective chlorination reactions, but its product has been a subject of debate for five decades. Previous experimental and theoretical studies provide no concrete conclusion on whether the product is a {pi}- or {sigma}-form of the Cl-C{sub 6}H{sub 6} complex. We took advantage of the diminished cage effect of para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) to produce Cl in situ to react with C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (or C{sub 6}D{sub 6}) upon photolysis of a Cl{sub 2}/C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (or C{sub 6}D{sub 6})/p-H{sub 2} matrix at 3.2 K. The infrared spectrum, showing intense lines at 1430.5, 833.6, 719.8, 617.0, and 577.4 cm{sup -1}, and several weaker ones for Cl-C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and the deuterium shifts of observed new lines unambiguously indicate that the product is a 6-chlorocyclohexadienyl radical, i.e., the {sigma}-complex of Cl-C{sub 6}H{sub 6}. Observation of the {sigma}-complex rather than the {pi}-complex indicates that the {sigma}-complex is more stable in solid p-H{sub 2} at 3.2 K. The spectral information is crucial for further investigations of the Cl + C{sub 6}H{sub 6} reaction either in the gaseous or solution phase.

  17. Infrared absorption of trans-1-chloromethylallyl and trans-1-methylallyl radicals produced in photochemical reactions of trans-1,3-butadiene and C Script-Small-L {sub 2} in solid para-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahou, Mohammed; Wu, Jen-Yu; Tanaka, Keiichi; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2012-08-28

    The reactions of chlorine and hydrogen atoms with trans-1,3-butadiene in solid para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) were investigated with infrared (IR) absorption spectra. When a p-H{sub 2} matrix containing C Script-Small-L {sub 2} and trans-1,3-butadiene was irradiated with ultraviolet light at 365 nm, intense lines at 650.3, 809.0, 962.2, 1240.6 cm{sup -1}, and several weaker ones due to the trans-1-chloromethylallyl radical, Bullet (CH{sub 2}CHCH)CH{sub 2}C Script-Small-L , appeared. Observed wavenumbers and relative intensities agree with the anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers and IR intensities predicted with the B3PW91/6-311++g(2d, 2p) method. That the C Script-Small-L atom adds primarily to the terminal carbon atom of trans-1,3-butadiene is in agreement with the path of minimum energy predicted theoretically, but in contrast to the reaction of C Script-Small-L + propene in solid p-H{sub 2}[J. Amicangelo and Y.-P. Lee, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 1, 2956 (2010)] in which the addition of C Script-Small-L to the central C atom is favored, likely through steric effects in a p-H{sub 2} matrix. A second set of lines, intense at 781.6, 957.9, 1433.6, 2968.8, 3023.5, 3107.3 cm{sup -1}, were observed when the UV-irradiated C Script-Small-L {sub 2}/trans-1,3-butadiene/p-H{sub 2} matrix was further irradiated with IR light from a SiC source. These lines are assigned to the trans-1-methylallyl radical, Bullet (CH{sub 2}CHCH)CH{sub 3}, produced from reaction of 1,3-butadiene with a H atom resulted from the reaction of C Script-Small-L atoms with solid p-H{sub 2} exposed to IR radiation.

  18. Sistemas Eolicos Pequenos para Generacion de Electricidad: Una guia para consumidores en Nuevo Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-09-01

    This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Sistemas Eolicos Pequenos para Generacion de Electricidad; Una guia para consumidores en los EE.UU.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-09-01

    This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Pevafersa America | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pevafersa America Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pevafersa-America Place: Puerto Rico Product: Puerto Rico-based assembler of PV panels. References: Pevafersa-America1 This...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico- Property Tax Exemption for Solar and Renewable Energy Equipment Puerto Rico provides a property tax exemption for all "solar powered material, equipment or accessory...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bonus

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Puerto Rico Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS), Puerto Rico, Decommissioned Reactor Site Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdficon Key Documents Fact...

  3. EA-1394: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- CEER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rico Center for Energy and Environment Research (CEER), Puerto Rico Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdficon Key Documents Fact Sheet Please be...

  5. Eco Alternative Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eco Alternative Energy Solutions Place: Puerto Rico Product: Puerto Rico-based majority owner of joint venture Pevafersa America, which...

  6. Apoyando La Energia Sostenible Para Todos (Spanish Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center, an initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial and UN-Energy, helps governments design and adopt policies and programs that support the deployment of transformational low-carbon technologies. The Solutions Center serves as a first-stop clearinghouse of clean energy policy reports, data, and tools and provides expert assistance and peer-to-peer learning forums. This factsheet highlights key Solutions Center offerings, including 'ask an expert' assistance on clean energy policy matters, training and peer learning, and technical resources for policy makers worldwide.

  7. Introduccion de nuevos servicios para el Publico Portuguese e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cray's Cascade Program John Levesque CTO Office Director - Cray Supercomputing Center of Excellence Preliminary Information Copyright 2006 Cray Inc. 3 High Productivity Computing Systems Goals:  Provide a new generation of economically viable high productivity computing systems for the national security and industrial user community (2007 - 2010) Impact:  Performance (efficiency): critical national security applications by a factor of 10X to 40X  Productivity (time-to-solution) 

  8. Ultrascale visualization capabilities for the ParaView/VTK framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-09

    The software is a set of technologies developed by the SciDAC Institute for Ultrascale Visualization in order to address the visualization needs for petascale computing and beyond. These technologies include improved I/O performance, simulation co-processing, advanced rendering capabilities, and specialized visualization techniques developed for SciDAC applications.

  9. Analyzing and Visualizing Cosmological Simulations with ParaView...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Therefore, the development of very efficient analysis tools combining qualitative and ... Research Org: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Sponsoring Org: ORNL work for others ...

  10. Modelos para evaluar y dimensionar proyectos de ERNC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    consiguiente ahorro que trae la instalacin de un sistema fotovoltaico conectado a la red. El software realiza simulaciones horarias de generacin de electricidad que permiten...

  11. Los lideres de energia en EEUU toman medidas para desarrollar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    conjuncin con el gobierno de Per y un Centro Regional de Viento apoyado por Mxico. ... hidrocarburos ms limpios, la infraestructura crtica, y alivio de pobreza de energa. ...

  12. PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2000 FINAL 15-026(E)/022416 Environmental Assessment Property Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date IssuedFebruary 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Oak Ridge, Tennessee 15-026(E)/022416 FONSI-1 Finding of No Significant Impact Property Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  13. ParaView on Tukey | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a running pvserver, you need to know the host (and port) where the server is listening. This will be the head node of the job. There are several ways to do this, but...

  14. Final Report - Streamlined and Standardized Permitting and Interconnection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Processes for Rooftop PV in Puerto Rico | Department of Energy Streamlined and Standardized Permitting and Interconnection Processes for Rooftop PV in Puerto Rico Final Report - Streamlined and Standardized Permitting and Interconnection Processes for Rooftop PV in Puerto Rico Awardee: Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico Subprogram: Soft Costs Funding Program: Rooftop Solar Challenge 1 The plan to transform the rooftop photovoltaic (PV) market in Puerto

  15. Final Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Processes for Rooftop PV in Puerto Rico | Department of Energy Streamlined and Standardized Permitting and Interconnection Processes for Rooftop PV in Puerto Rico Final Report - Streamlined and Standardized Permitting and Interconnection Processes for Rooftop PV in Puerto Rico Awardee: Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico Subprogram: Soft Costs Funding Program: Rooftop Solar Challenge 1 The plan to transform the rooftop photovoltaic (PV) market in Puerto

  16. CX-009135: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rico State Energy Program for Physical Year 2012 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Puerto Rico Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-008432: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rico-City-Toa Baja CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/16/2012 Location(s): Puerto Rico Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- El_Verde

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rico El Verde, Puerto Rico, Site Other Regulatory Framework elverde The DOE Office of Legacy Management assumed responsibility for a tree in Study Area 4 of El Verde site in 2005....

  19. Obama Administration Awards More than $162 Million for State Energy Programs in Seven States and Territories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funding Will Speed Adoption of Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technologies in Colorado, Delaware, Indiana, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Puerto Rico

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico- Renewable Energy Equipment Certification Certification of Photovoltaic Equipment Eligibility: Construction, Industrial, InstallersContractors Savings Category: Solar...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydroelectric (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Other Distributed Generation Technologies, Microturbines Puerto Rico- Net Metering Eligibility and Availability Eligibility:...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Municipal Solid Waste Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Puerto Rico- Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard Eligible Technologies Eligibility:...

  3. Sistemas Eólicos Pequeños para Generación de Electricidad: Una guia para consumidores en Nuevo México

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-10-01

    This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. I D A E Instituto para la Diversificacion y Ahorro de la Energia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and technical counselling, as well as project financing for technological innovation and or a replicable kind. The Institute also develops an intense international...

  5. Status of ParaDyn: DYNA3D for parallel computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudreau, G.L.; Hoover, C.G.; DeGrout, A.J.; Raboin, P.J.

    1996-04-17

    The evolution of DYNA3D from a vector supercomputer code into a parallel code is reviewed. Current status and target applications, especially those of interest to the Department of Defense.

  6. Servicios del Centro de Soluciones Para la Energia Limpia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This is the Spanish translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  7. Barotrauma em peixes em usinas hidrelétricas: ferramentas para o estudo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Do Vale Beirao, Bernardo; Castelo Branco Marciano, Natlia; de Souza Dias, Luma; Carvalho Falco, Ricardo; Wander Dias, Edson; Leite Fabrino, Daniela; Barreira Martinez, Carlos; Martins Da Silva, Luiz Gustavo; Walker, Ricardo W.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2015-09-30

    The main source of electric power generation in Brazil comes from hydropower plants, nevertheless, the installed power is expected to raise 56.8%, reaching a total of 116,000 MW at the year 2020. The increase at the hydroelectric sector will be responsible for a series of fish community impacts. One of the impacts over the fish community is related to fish kills due to downstream passage through turbines or fish entrance at the draft tube from the tailrace. Usually when there is a maneuver and the turbine stops, fish get attracted and enter the draft tube and, just as the downstream passage through a turbine, when the turbine starts, a rapid decompression occurs and can cause barotrauma. When such events happen, according to Boyle’s law (P1V1=P2V2), swim bladder volume expands at the same rate that the pressure decreases, which can lead to the organ’s rupture.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ParaChoice: Parametric Vehicle Choice Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about parametric...

  9. SE HAN FINALIZADO LOS PREPARATIVOS PARA LA CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DE JUSTICIA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory SB Electronics Breaks Ground on New Factory April 29, 2010 - 5:22pm Addthis U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (from left), Vermont Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie, SBE board member Win Hunter, SBE board chair Stan Fishkin, Assi U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (from left), Vermont Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie, SBE board member Win Hunter, SBE board chair Stan Fishkin, Assi Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs A Vermont company broke ground on a new

  10. Obama Administration Announces Additional $33,977,000 for Local Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico | Department of Energy 3,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico Obama Administration Announces Additional $33,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Joe Biden and Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced plans to invest $3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native

  11. Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc Region: Puerto Rico Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  12. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Puerto Rico, and more extreme climate events are affecting society and ecosystems. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), the increasing air and water temperatures, ...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savings Category: Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Wind (Small), Other Distributed Generation Technologies Puerto Rico- Interconnection Standards Customer-generators seeking to...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico- Interconnection Standards Customer-generators seeking to interconnect first submit a standardized "Evaluation Request" to PREPA to determine whether or not the...

  15. SREL Reprint #3081

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    population ranged from 0.320 to 0.920. Keywords: amphibian, conservation genetics, invasive species, population structure, primer, Puerto Rico SREL Reprint 3081 Peters, M. B.,...

  16. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda...

  17. Category:Countries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway O Oman P Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Q Qatar R Republic of Macedonia...

  18. LUG 2015 | Registration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territory, Occupied Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian...

  19. Utility Rate Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territories Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Islands Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oregon Palau Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming...

  1. Final Report - Streamlined and Standardized Permitting and Interconnec...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The plan to transform the rooftop photovoltaic (PV) market in Puerto Rico strives to create not only a standardized framework for PV deployment, but also streamlined and organized, ...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Apply Current search Combined...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Apply Current search Solar...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Apply Current search Heat...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Apply Current search...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Apply Current search Anaerobic...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montana N. Mariana Islands Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Palau Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Islands Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Palau Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South...

  9. New results from BLAST on the nucleon electromagnetic form factors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: CIPAN2006: 9. conference on intersections of particle and nuclear physics, Rio Grande (Puerto Rico), 30 May - 3 Jun 2006; Other Information: DOI: 10.10631.2402594; ...

  10. EIS-0511: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0511: Final Environmental Impact Statement Aguirre Offshore GasPort Project, Puerto Rico FERC issued a Final EIS with 10 cooperating...

  11. TO: FROM: Procurement Directors

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Ground Domestic Delivery Services (DDS2) in the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. DDS2 is a full service Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative (FSSI)...

  12. Microsoft Word - TR07-27.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS), Site, Rincn, Puerto Rico July 2010 Page 1 2010 Inspection and Status Report for the Former Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS) Reactor...

  13. 2010 Inspection and Status Report for the Boiling Nuclear Superheater...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection - Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Site, Rincn, Puerto Rico October 2013 Page 1 2013 Inspection and Status Report for the Former Boiling Nuclear Superheater...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico- Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Green Energy Puerto Rican law exempts from the sales and use tax solar electric equipment, associated accessories, and components used...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    not identified, Anaerobic Digestion Puerto Rico- Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Green Energy Puerto Rican law exempts from the sales and use tax solar electric equipment,...

  16. U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District 5 Alaska Arizona California Hawaii Nevada Oregon Washington Guam Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Period: Annual (as of January 1) Download Series History Download Series ...

  17. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IL Violinist Paolo Castellani and guitarist Francesco Di Giandomenico play the colorful music from Argentina, Spain and Puerto Rico. They will present their latest album,...

  18. MEMO TO:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    21 September 2011 To: Madeline Ramos, Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) Copy: Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) File and Gunseli Shareef, URS (Program Manager) From:...

  19. SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme Sea State Contour...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  20. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Suriname ...

  1. Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  2. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  3. MELCOR / CSARP / MCAP / IMUG Meetings 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa ...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Puerto Rico's adaptation of renewable energy and to reduce the island's reliance on fossil fuels. This is especially... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Investor-Owned...

  5. Office of Legacy Management

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Energy Office of Legacy Management JUL 1 0 2008 Alonso Ramirez, Scientific Director EI Verde Research Station Institute for Tropical Ecosystem Studies University of Puerto Rico...

  6. CX-004639: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Colorado State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Geothermal Power Direct Use Grant - Town of RicoCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 12/08/2010Location(s): Rico, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  7. CX-009926: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Municipality of Canovanas, Puerto Rico CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B5.16 Date: 01/31/2013 Location(s): Puerto Rico Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. Production of energy and high-value chemicals from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colucci-Raeos, J.A.; Saliceti-Piazza, L.; Herncndez, A.

    1996-12-31

    Landfills have been used for decades in Puerto Rico as the only alternative for the disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW). In the present, 7,300 metric tons (8,000 tons) of MSW are generated on a daily basis, of which about 43% are generated in the San Juan Metropolitan Area. Garbage dumps in the Metropolitan Area have an estimated useful life of two years from now. Furthermore, Puerto Rico`s average daily per capita generation exceeds that of US and is almost as twice as that of Europe. A novel alternative for the disposal of MSW needs to be implemented. The University of Puerto Rico (Department of Chemical Engineering), in a collaborative effort with the Sandia National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Puerto Rico`s Energy Affairs Administration, and the Institute of Chemical Engineers of Puerto Rico, have conceptualized a research program that would address the utilization of MSW and other agricultural residues for the generation of energy and/or high-value chemical products. The concept, {open_quotes}biorefinery{close_quotes} would consist of the collection of MSW and other agricultural wastes, separation of materials for recycling (glass, ceramics, metals), and use of gasification and/or hydrolysis of the screened material to produce energy and/or chemicals (such as alcohols and oxyaromatics).

  9. University of Regina celebrates physics project milestone at Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Puerto Rico (Universidad de Puerto Rico) Spotlights Home DOE Applauds UPR Science and Technical Programs UPR Mayagüez High Energy Physics Group The High Energy Physics Group is currently working in the experiment Compact Muon Solenoid at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland. The group is funded by the U.S. DOE Office of Science. Portico of the Mayaguez Campus The University of Puerto Rico has the largest and most

  10. Obama Administration Announces Additional $351,658,900 for Local Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico | Department of Energy Chu today announced plans to invest $3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native American tribes. This includes $33,977,000 for state, county and city efforts in Puerto Rico. A detailed breakdown is below. Today's announcement builds on an investment of $85,951,588 in Puerto Rico weatherization and energy funding announced by the Administration on March 12th

  11. CX-011269: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Real-Time In-Situ Carbon Dioxide Monitoring (RICO2M) Network for Sensitive Subsurface... CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/30/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc.Commonwealth of Puerto Rico RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc....

  13. Photo of the Week: Women in STEM -- Elaine Zworykin | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In this photo, Yaniel Ramirez from Colegio Catolico Notre Dame in Caguas, Puerto Rico launches his team's electric car down the test track.

  14. Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization Programs in Six States and Territories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs, create jobs and weatherize nearly 17,000 homes in American Samoa, Northern Arapahoe Tribe, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, Tennessee and the U.S. Virgin Islands

  15. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2010-01-08

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  16. RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL CO ",442,"EL DORADO","AR","ARKANSAS",3 41305,"ATLANTIC TRADING MARKETING ",1,215,"Jet Fuel, Kerosene-Type",4909,"SAN JUAN, PR","PUERTO RICO",6,940,"VENEZUELA...

  17. 38017,"AMERADA HESS CORP ",1,130,"MOTOR...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    INC ",1,130,"MOTOR GAS, CONVENTIONAL, OTHER",4912,"GUAYANILLA, PR","PUERTO RICO",6,830,"SPAIN",15,0,0,,,,, 38017,"TRAMMO PETRO INC ",2,130,"MOTOR GAS, CONVENTIONAL,...

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) campaign. Error bars in AMF data represent 95 percent confidence intervals. SPOP from AMF data, compared to (b) SPOP from the VOCALS Regional...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri High School Students...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Cities Clean up With Biofuels Nov. 21, 2013 Photo of buses Clean Cities Reflects on 20 Years of Alternative Fuels Oct. 3, 2013 Photo of a fire truck Rio Rico Fire District Turns ...

  20. Meet the Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 Teams: Part 2 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    deployed to provide power in very specific off-grid ... a wind energy application relevant to Puerto Rico. With that in mind, the team concentrates on implementing a vertical ...

  1. STGWG Meeting Attendees for May 3, 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brooklyn Baptiste, Gabe Bohnee, Rico Cruz, Greg Kaufman, Governor Joshua Madalena, ... at the STGWG Tribal and State Issues with U.S. DOE session from 2:00pm-5:00pm) Vice ...

  2. Developers Diversified Realty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    manages approximately 720 retail operating and development properties in 45 US states, plus Puerto Rico, Brazil, Russia and Canada, and has signed a deal with SunEdison to...

  3. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2009-01-30

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on weekly cruises originating from Miami Florida with port calls in the Bahamas, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and St. Thomas. The repeat track of the cruise provides for long-term...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rico and the general direction of the Gulf of Mexico (where these storms might cause energy-producing platforms to be evacuated and supplies to be shut in). However, companies...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Rico and the general direction of the Gulf of Mexico (where these storms might cause energy-producing platforms to be evacuated and supplies to be shut in). However, companies...

  7. Thousands of Students Prepare to Compete in the National Science Bowl

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Until March 9th, thousands of middle- and high-school students will compete in 120 regional competitions all across the country as well as Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

  8. Senate Confirms DOE Nominees Daniel Poneman, David Sandalow,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Department has set aggressive goals for creating green ... Pratt School of Engineering from 1999-2007 where she ... Raised in Puerto Rico, she earned her Ph.D. in chemistry ...

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Profile Territory Profile and Energy Estimates Change State/Territory Choose a U.S. State or Territory United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon

  10. ORISE: Research Team Experiences - Jonathan Mbah and Kiara Moorer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan Mbah and Kiara Moorer Tuskegee research team spends summer in Puerto Rico improving homeland security Jonathan Mbah and Kiara Moorer Assistant professor Jonathan Mbah and recent graduate Kiara Moorer, both of Tuskegee University, conducted research at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez as part of the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security's 2012 Summer Research Team Program for Minority Serving Institutions. Their goal was to improve the detection of explosive materials to help counteract

  11. University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) Team roster: Harry Bonilla, Mechanical Engineering; Coral D. Colón, Electrical Engineering; Gabriel Cotto, Mechanical Engineering; Miguel Díaz, Mechanical Engineering; Eduardo Fenollal, Mechanical Engineering; Jorge W. Flores, Mechanical Engineering; Leishla González, Graphic Design (International School of Design and Architecture); Viany González, Industrial Engineering; Rubén I. Maldonado, Mechanical Engineering;

  12. Conocimiento de Energía: Principios Esenciales y Conceptos Fundamentales para la Educación de Energía

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-01

    This is the Spanish version of our Energy Literacy guidebook. Esta guía presenta conceptos de energía que, cuando se entienden y se aplican, ayudan a individuos y a comunidades a tomar decisiones sobre la energía con conocimiento de causa. No es un currículo sino que ofrece un marco sobre el cual puede basarse un plan de estudios. La guía se dirige a cualquier persona que participe en la educación de energía.

  13. One Month, Two Reasons to Celebrate the Hispanic Energy Community | Un Mes, Dos Razones Para Celebrar la Comunidad Hispana en Energía

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As one of the nation’s largest ethnic minority groups, Hispanics can play a major role in America’s energy future. To empower these future leaders, the Energy Department provides resources that help Spanish-speaking families, teachers, and students learn about energy.

  14. Report on the CEPA activities [Consorcio Educativo para la Proteccion Ambiental/Educational Consortium for Environmental Preservation] [Final report of activities from 1998 to 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, Miriam

    2003-02-01

    This report compiles the instances of scientific, educational, and institutional cooperation on environmental issues and other activities in which CEPA was engaged during the past five years, and includes several annual reports and meeting summaries. CEPA is a collaborative international consortium that brings together higher education institutions with governmental agencies, research laboratories, and private sector entities. CEPA's mission is to strengthen the technical, professional, and educational environmental infrastructure in the United States and Latin America. The CEPA program includes curriculum development, student exchange, faculty development, and creation of educational materials, joint research, and other cooperative activities. CEPA's goals are accomplished by actively working with Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education in the United States, in collaboration with institutions of higher education in Latin America and other Consortium members to deliver competitive environmental programs.

  15. Employment-generating projects for the energy and minerals sectors of Honduras. Proyectos generadores de empleos para los sectores energetico y minero de Honduras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, J.A.

    1988-12-01

    A mission to Honduras invited by the Government of Honduras and sponsored by the Organization of American States addressed the generation of employment in various areas of interest to the country. The mission was made up of experts from numerous countries and international agencies. In the energy sector, the mission recommended consolidating the sector under a coordinating body; carrying out projects to promote reforestation, tree farms, and rational forest utilization; encouraging industrial energy conservation; developing alternative energy sources; and promoting rural electrification and expansion of the electrical grid. In the mining sector, the mission supported promotion and technical assistance for small gold-leaching and placer operations, the national mineral inventory, detailed exploration of promising sites, and the development of a mining school. 13 refs., 7 tabs.

  16. Ahorre Energía | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Son buenos para su monedero y tambin para el medio ambiente-y las medidas que usted tome ayudarn a reducir las necesidades del pas para producir o importar ms energa, ...

  17. Ayuda:Pginas protegidas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sysop pueden dar carcter de protegida a una pgina, o en su defecto, quitar este estado para levantar la restriccin. Existen varias razones para justificar la proteccin...

  18. CX-011270: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Real-Time In-Situ Carbon Dioxide Monitoring (RICO2M) Network for Sensitive Subsurface... CX(s) Applied: A11, B4.6 Date: 09/30/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-013850: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Real-Time In-Situ CO2 Monitoring (RICO2M) Network for Sensitive Subsurface Areas in CCS CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.13Date: 06/23/2015 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), addresses the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. This webinar is part of a 7-part series created for 5 states (Kentucky, Mississippi, Texas, Puerto Rico, and Alaska) with a cooperative agreement and funding under the State Energy Program with DOE.

  1. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  2. [pic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... |6.|Mexico|2|0%| |7.|Portugal|2|0%| |8.|France|2|0%| |9.|Greece|2|0%| |10.|Spain|2|0%| |11.|Lithuania|1|0%| |12.|Puerto Rico|1|0%| |13.|Ukraine|1|0%| |14.|Austria|1|0%| ...

  3. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Peru 14 11 8 11 9 6 1995-2015 Puerto Rico 1973-1997 Russia 269 223 101 42 18 28 1973-2015 Singapore 1993-2006 South Africa 2006-2009 Spain 1995-1996 Sweden 2000-2000 Syria 3 ...

  4. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2013-05-29

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  5. Collegiate Wind Competition Teams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Teams Collegiate Wind Competition Teams Twelve universities will send teams to the Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 in New Orleans, Louisiana, May 23-26, 2016. Hailing from across the United States, from Alaska to Puerto Rico, with five new schools and seven returning schools from the 2014 competition, the 2016 contestants are: Boise State University The California Maritime Academy California State University, Chico Kansas State University Northern Arizona University The Pennsylvania State

  6. Facility Security Officer Contractor Toolcart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL Sandia DOE cleared individuals must receive SNL and DOE approval to conduct official international travel prior to departure. This includes travel to Mexico and Canada. The term "official" international travel is defined by DOE as: "Official" International Travel - Approved travel (whether wholly or partly on official business) meeting any of the following criteria: Travel from the United States, which includes the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the

  7. Impact of cloud microphysics on squall line organization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Observations to Validate and Improve Cloud Micrfophysical Schemes Wojciech Grabowski (PI) Hugh Morrison, Sally McFarlane (Co-PIs) Hanna Pawlowska (Co-I) CMWG Breakout, ARM STM 2008 Two major efforts of project * Warm clouds. We will use microphysical retrievals from Nauru and SGP (including CLASIC), together with aircraft observations (RICO) to assess model simulations of shallow cumulus. * Focus is on treatment of turbulent- microphysical interactions and impact on optical properties. *

  8. SC In Your State | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SC In Your State Universities Universities Home Interactive Grants Map SC In Your State University Science Highlights University Research News Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 SC In Your State Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page The Office of Science directly supports scientists, engineers, and students in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Each annual report available

  9. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Thank

    Overview U.S. Territories: American Samoa | Guam | Northern Mariana Islands | Puerto Rico | U.S. Virgin Islands More State Data & Analysis by Source Petroleum Natural Gas Electricity Coal Renewable & Alternative Fuels Nuclear Environment Total Energy Summary Reports Household Energy Use State Electricity Summaries State Renewable Electricity Statistics State Nuclear Summaries Natural Gas Summary Statistics Today In Energy Hydropower conditions improve as West Coast drought eases

  10. Structure, Activity, and Substrate Selectivity of the Orf6 Thioesterase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from Photobacterium profundum (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure, Activity, and Substrate Selectivity of the Orf6 Thioesterase from Photobacterium profundum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure, Activity, and Substrate Selectivity of the Orf6 Thioesterase from Photobacterium profundum Authors: Rodríguez-Guilbe, María ; Oyola-Robles, Delise ; Schreiter, Eric R. ; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel [1] ; HHMI) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Puerto Rico) ( Publication Date:

  11. WINDExchange: Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps The U.S. Department of Energy provides 50-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind resource maps for most of the states and territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in the United States. Counties, towns, utilities, and schools use community-scale wind resource maps to locate and quantify the wind resource, identifying potentially windy sites determining a potential site's economic and technical viability. Map of the updated wind resource assessment

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Overview U.S. Territories: American Samoa | Guam | Northern Mariana Islands | Puerto Rico | U.S. Virgin Islands More State Data & Analysis by Source Petroleum Natural Gas Electricity Coal Renewable & Alternative Fuels Nuclear Environment Total Energy Summary Reports Household Energy Use State Electricity Summaries State Renewable Electricity Statistics State Nuclear Summaries Natural Gas Summary Statistics Today In Energy Hydropower conditions improve as West Coast drought eases May

  13. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  14. EXAMINATION REPORT: OAS-RA-13-27 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EXAMINATION REPORT: OAS-RA-13-27 EXAMINATION REPORT: OAS-RA-13-27 July 15, 2013 Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program received $3.2 billion to develop, promote, implement and manage energy efficiency and

  15. LM Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LM Sites LM Sites Alaska Puerto Rico Continental US Click on a site for more information. The Energy Department is committed to managing its responsibilities associated with the environmental legacy of World War II and the Cold War. This legacy includes radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous material at sites across the country. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for ensuring that Energy's post-closure responsibilities are met and for providing

  16. NREL: News - Nationally Renowned Architect Panel Announces Judging Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Solar Decathlon Nationally Renowned Architect Panel Announces Judging Results at Solar Decathlon Sunday, September 29, 2002 Design, Livability Results Important to Competing University Teams Washington, D.C.-A panel of nationally renowned architects today announced that The University of Virginia had taken place first in the Design and Livability contest at the Solar Village on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. today. The University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez placed second and The

  17. STGWG Meeting Minutes for May 3, 2010

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Meeting Summary-Nashville 2010 Page 1 State and Tribal Government Working Group Meeting Notes May 3, 2010 Doubletree Downtown Nashville Nashville, Tennessee TRIBAL EXECUTIVE SESSION (closed session) 9:00am-10:15am Attendees: Vice Chairman Brooklyn Baptiste, Gabe Bohnee, Rico Cruz, Greg Kaufman, Governor Joshua Madalena, Brooke Oleen Tieperman, Willie Preacher, Michael Sobotta and John Stanfill. Neil Weber and Peter Chestnut-participated by conference call. Governor Madalena of the Jemez Pueblo

  18. Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 Inside this Update: Public Access Established for the Dr. Modesto Iriarte Technological Museum in Rincόn, Puerto Rico; Draft LM Strategic Plan Available for Review; Legacy Management Business Center Awarded Second Energy-Efficiency Award; LM Assumes Responsibility for Yucca Mountain Records and Information; Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico; Rio Blanco and Rulison, Colorado; Nuclear Gas Sites; Students from Native American Environmental Youth

  19. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond dioxide Topic Carbon Sequestration - Helping to Save Our Beautiful World by Kathy Chambers 17 Apr, 2014 in Warmer winters are changing bird migratory patterns, warmer seawater is linked to coral reef bleaching in the Florida Keys and Puerto Rico, and more extreme climate events are affecting society and ecosystems. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), the increasing air and water temperatures, decreasing water availability

  20. Mr. Robert C, Smith Federal Acquisition Service General Services Administration

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8,2010 Mr. Robert C, Smith Federal Acquisition Service General Services Administration 2200 Crystal Drive, Suite 300 Arlington, VA 20406 Dear Mr. Smith: The Department of Energy (DOE) will participate as an authorized user of the second generation General Services Administration (GSA) Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) Number GS-33F-BQV08 for Express and Ground Domestic Delivery Services (0052) in the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. All existing United Parcel Service

  1. U.S. Office of Personnel Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area: U.S. PAD District 1 Delaware Florida Georgia Maryland New Jersey New York North Carolina Pennsylvania Virginia West Virginia PAD District 2 Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Tennessee Wisconsin PAD District 3 Alabama Arkansas Louisiana Mississippi New Mexico Texas PAD District 4 Colorado Montana Utah Wyoming PAD District 5 Alaska Arizona California Hawaii Nevada Oregon Washington Guam Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Period: Annual

  2. Student Intern: Non-Traditional Water Resources | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Student Intern: Non-Traditional Water Resources Share Argonne intern Nicole Virella Maldonado from the University of Puerto Rico-San Juan, Río Piedras campus, worked with Argonne mentor Margaret MacDonell in studying the use of nontraditional waters for energy and agriculture, including impaired and reclaimed waters. This research will help communities preserve their limited fresh water resources for other uses. Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 6, 2010 [Facility News] Call for Abstracts for Aquatic Sciences Meeting in 2011 Bookmark and Share The next biennial American Society for Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) Aquatic Sciences Meeting will be held in San Juan, Puerto Rico, February 13-18, 2011. The goal of this conference is to bring together aquatic scientists from around the world to meet the challenge of global climate change and explore the wide range of aquatic systems impacted by humans. Abstracts are due October 11,

  4. BID | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sostenible y respetuosa con el clima. Fundado en 1959, somos la mayor fuente de financiamiento para el desarrollo de Amrica Latina y el Caribe, con un slido compromiso para...

  5. Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

  6. Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels Percent 1960 NA [8] [9] 30,786 333,046 450,799 31,454 -620 -4,267 12,553 139,406

  7. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report The cover of the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report. According to the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, distributed wind reached a cumulative capacity of almost 1 GW (906 MW) in the United States in 2014, reflecting nearly 74,000 wind turbines deployed across all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In total, 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity was added in 2014, representing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment

  8. Sunrayce 93: The hottest new sport on campus. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The solar powered electric vehicle race began in Arlington, Texas on June 20, 1993 and finished 7 days later in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Thirty four teams from Universities across the United States and Puerto Rico completed the race out of thirty six entries. The race demonstrated the viability of sunlight powered vehicles as the better average daily speeds were in excess of 50 miles an hour. Even in the rain, most average speeds were in excess of 15 miles an hour. Analyzed results, photographs, and project details are included. (GHH)

  9. PV Value®

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PV Value® is a free solar PV Valuation tool that answers the question of "How much is solar PV worth" and is compliant with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice. It is available for and being used by real estate appraisers, realtors, homeowners, commercial building owners, home builders, solar installers, green raters, insurance companies, and mortgage lenders in all 50 states along with D.C. and Puerto Rico. PV Value® allows for the calculation of both the cost and income approach to value and was endorsed by the largest appraiser trade organization, the "Appraisal Institute," as an innovative approach to valuing solar assets.

  10. Use of New Strategically Sourced Blanket Purchase Agreement for Domestic Delivery Services with United Parcel Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is participating as an authorized user of the second generation General Services Administration (GSA) Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) GS-33F-BQV08 for Express and Ground Domestic Delivery Services (DDS2) in the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. DDS2 is a full service Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative (FSSI) solution providing agencies with a range of delivery options as well as streamlined acquisition, data analytics, and dedicated customer service. GSA awarded one (1) master task order to the DDS2 BPA holder, United Parcel Service (UPS).

  11. Director > Héctor D. Abruña > Leadership Team > The Energy Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center at Cornell Director Héctor D. Abruña hda1@cornell.edu Professor Abruña, Emile M. Chamot Professor of Chemistry, completed his graduate studies with Royce W. Murray and Thomas J. Meyer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1980 and was a postdoctoral research associate with Allen J. Bard at the University of Texas at Austin. After a brief stay at the University of Puerto Rico, he came to Cornell in 1983. Professor Abruña is an AAAS Fellow and recipient of a

  12. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Import/Export Locations

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    List Pipelines > Import/Export Location List About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Currently, there are 58 locations at which natural gas can be exported or imported into the United States, including 9 LNG (liquefied natural gas) facilities in the continental United States and Alaska (There is a tenth U.S. LNG import facility located in Puerto Rico). At 28 of these locations natural gas or LNG currently can only

  13. Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot-Humid Climates Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates Map of the Hot and Humid Climate Zone of the United States. This zone covers eastern Texas through Florida and reaches up to mid-Georgia it also includes Puerto Rico and Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in hot-humid climates. Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House

  14. NREL: News - Winner of Solar Decathlon to be Announced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winner of Solar Decathlon to be Announced Friday, October 4, 2002 Washington, D.C.- The winner of the U.S. Department of Energy's first Solar Decathlon will be announced noon, Saturday, October 6 in the Solar Village on the National Mall. The Solar Decathlon is a team competition among 14 colleges and universities from across the country and Puerto Rico to design and build the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered homes. The winning team must blend aesthetics and modern conveniences

  15. Angels and Demons: The Science Behind the Scenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, Norman

    2009-05-12

    Does antimatter really exist? How and why do scientists produce and use it? Does CERN exist and is there an underground complex deep beneath the Swiss/French border? Is truth stranger than fiction? Find out at the coming public lecture. On Tuesday, May 12, SLAC physicist Norman Graf will discuss the real science behind Angels & Demons, Dan Brown's blockbuster novel and the basis of an upcoming Tom Hanks movie. Graf's' talk is one in a series of public lectures across the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico to share the science of antimatter and the Large Hadron Collider, and the excitement of particle physics research.

  16. National Solar Radiation Data Bases (NSRDB): 1961 to 1990 and 1991 to 2005

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Solar Radiation Data Base 1961-1990 (NSRDB) contains 30 years of solar radiation and supplementary meteorological data from 237 NWS sites in the U.S., plus sites in Guam and Puerto Rico. The updated 1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database holds solar and meteorological data for 1,454 locations in the United States and its territories. See also the interactive data maps for the 1961 to 1990 data at http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/nsrdb/1961-1990/redbook/atlas/.

  17. DOE National Science Bowl Kicks Off Tomorrow, April 27 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Off Tomorrow, April 27 DOE National Science Bowl Kicks Off Tomorrow, April 27 April 26, 2012 - 12:11pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Friday, April 27, through Monday, April 30, 113 regional high school and middle school championship teams from 42 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands will compete in the 22nd annual U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl final competition in Washington D.C. The students will be quizzed on all science

  18. DOE National Science Bowl Kicks off Saturday, April 30 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy off Saturday, April 30 DOE National Science Bowl Kicks off Saturday, April 30 April 28, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - 110 regional high school and middle school championship teams from 44 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands will compete in the 21st annual U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl final competition in Washington D.C. April 30th through May 2nd. The students will be quizzed on all science disciplines, including

  19. 2014 Feature Stories | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Distributed Wind Market Report 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report The cover of the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report. According to the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, distributed wind reached a cumulative capacity of almost 1 GW (906 MW) in the United States in 2014, reflecting nearly 74,000 wind turbines deployed across all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In total, 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity was added in 2014, representing nearly 1,700 units and $170

  20. Purpose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 6. Cuando termines el experimento, limpia el imn con una toalla de papel y tira ... papel entre ellas para observar la conversin de energa mecnica a energa trmica. ...

  1. Las tecnogias de energia verde crean trabajos verdes (Green Jobs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    A medida que se comiencen a utilizar comercialmente estas nuevas tecnologías, se crearán nuevos puestos de empleo para los trabajadores norteamericanos.

  2. La energia geotermica en la actualidad: Geothermal Today (Spanish version - 2003)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-09-01

    Por encargo del Secretario Abraham, la Oficina de Eficiencia Energética y Energía Renovable suministra el liderazgo a nivel nacional para impulsar las tecnologías de eficiencia energética y energía renovables, para saltar por encima de las limitaciones del status quo, y para alcanzar beneficios ambientales notables. El Programa de Tecnologías Geotérmicas, parte crítica de nuestro esfuerzo conjunto, está avanzando a grandes zancadas para aumentar la viabilidad y el despliegue de electricidad ...

  3. Vehiculos de combustible flexible: brindando opciones en combustible...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    actualizada para convertidores de combustible alternativo de la EPA en su sitio web, www.epa.govotaq certdearmfrcisd0602.pdf. El E85 afecta el desempeo del...

  4. Category:En Espaol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    de recursos ERNC A cont. Gateway:Amrica LatinaModelos para desarrollar proyectos de ERNC Gateway:Amrica LatinaPotencial de recursos energticos renovables...

  5. Centro de Energas Renovables (CER) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    para invertir en energas renovables En septiembre Ernst &38; Young lanz el Renewable energy country attractiveness index - 2015, que posiciona a Chile en el nmero...

  6. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties. Carbon nanoclusters produced by high-repetition-rate laser ablation of graphite and glassy carbon, which is typical diamagnetic material, exhibits para- and...

  7. Gateway:Amrica Latina/Diseo de polticas y programas | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    para garantizar el desarrollo sostenible, teniendo en cuenta la equidad social, crecimiento econmico, la gobernabilidad y compatibilidad con el ambiente, de acuerdo con los...

  8. Evaluacin del impacto | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sectores de la economa. Puede ser utilizado para las fuentes de emisin de gases de efecto invernadero tanto del sector elctrico como de los otros sectores. Adems puede...

  9. Ayuda:Registro de Cambios | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    la edicin. Vista Mejorada Si se encuentra conectado al sitio y se tiene habilitado Javascript, se podr probar la vista "mejorada". Para acceder a esto simplemente dirjase a...

  10. Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage and Liquid Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... performance for US ITER 67k * Para-ortho conversion enhanced vapor cooled shielding 66k * 1 st dual-sinker magnetic levitation balance for cryogenic density & ...

  11. Print

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conversa con tus padres sobre los termostatos digitales y programables. Conversa con tus padres sobre el mejoramiento del hogar para ahorrar energa (ventanas, puertas y techos). ...

  12. Reserva La Fecha: Conferencia y Programa de Capacitación de...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIN 2014 2013 National Environmental Justice ...

  13. Application Deadline Extended to Jan. 8, 2016: Opportunity from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... energy agencies in Canada and Mexico, National Resources Canada and Comisin Nacional para el Uso Eficiente de la Energa (National Commission for the Efficient Use of Energy). ...

  14. CSE Solar Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CSE Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: CSE Solar Energy Name: CSE Solar Energy Abbreviation: CSE Solar Energy Address: rua belem do para Place: Campinas, So Paulo...

  15. Ayuda:Eliminar una pgina | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    La pgina est obsoleta. En este caso se requiere reescribir las oraciones en tiempo pasado para convertir la pgina en un registro de historial. Otra opcin es...

  16. Cooley | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes from Tukey to Cooley Compiling and Linking Using Cobalt on Cooley Visit on Cooley Paraview on Cooley ParaView Tutorial Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide...

  17. Biotins Energia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biotins Energia Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biotins Energia Place: Para-so do Tocantins, Tocantins, Brazil Zip: 77600-000 Product: Brazil based biodiesel producer, with...

  18. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quantifiable and relevant para- meters, while leaving the sample available for further testing. Facilities Medical CT Scanner Core-scale Characterization and Fluid Flow The...

  19. Ayuda:Subpginas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    organizar pginas por medio de categoras, elemento mucho ms adecuado para crear una red jerrquica de informacin. Vase tambin Meta:Help:LinkSubpage feature...

  20. Gateway:Amrica Latina/Financiamiento | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sitio web provee publicaciones, una base de datos gratis de prestamistas en lnea, una red de alianza para intercambio de buenas prcticas y recursos compartidos, entrenamiento...

  1. Biopalma da Amaz nia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    da Amaznia Place: Belem, Para, Brazil Product: Brazilian palm oil plantation for food industry developer company. Coordinates: -1.454426, -48.502537 Show Map Loading...

  2. Untitled Document

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    comunidade cientfica e empregado na produo de mapas de irradiao solar para a Europa (Beyer et al., 1996; Cano et al., 1986). No presente documento so apresentados...

  3. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Communication:...

  4. Ahorra energía y dinero con el viento: 5 pasos antes de invertir...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... local de energa para obtener informacin sobre los incentivos de tu estado o municipio. Buscas ms informacin sobre la eficiencia energtica y la energa renovable? ...

  5. NORTH AMERICAN ISO 50001/SEP PILOT PROGRAM INFORMATIONAL WEBINAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy agencies in Canada and Mexico, National Resources Canada and Comisin Nacional para el Uso Eficiente de la Energa (National Commission for the Efficient Use of Energy). ...

  6. Antonio Ruette Agroindustrial Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ruette Agroindustrial Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name: Antonio Ruette Agroindustrial Ltda Place: Para-so, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 15825-000 Product: Sao Paulo-based...

  7. ACM Biotech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biotech Jump to: navigation, search Name: ACM Biotech Place: Bavaria, Germany Product: German company developing palm oill plantations in Para, Brazil. References: ACM Biotech1...

  8. Energa Elica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elica Jump to: navigation, search Energa Elica en Latinoamrica Este mapa muestra la capacidad instalada en MW, para cada pas de Latinomerica. La informacin fue...

  9. U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ...intercity bus transportation OTHS Other shuttle service PARA Paratransit (a.k.a. demand response) PERS Personal transportation RENT Daily or short-term rental STUD Student ...

  10. mira_bootcamp_May2014_vis_slides.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    across processes, read in parallel 23 Movie Making VisItParaView: save animation can save animation file can save individual images I tend to do...

  11. One Month, Two Reasons to Celebrate the Hispanic Energy Community...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Traducir al espaol algunos de nuestros recursos ms populares nos ayudar a expandir la educacin energtica a diversos grupos dentro de la comunidad latina: Para los ...

  12. Table 5.6 Petroleum Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Barrels)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Barrels) Year Belgium 1 Brazil Canada France Italy Japan Mexico Nether- lands South Korea Spain United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Other Total 1960 1,128 1,547 12,622 1,591 2,184 22,681 6,428 2,057 NA NA 4,273 487 18,908 73,906 1961 1,418 1,337 8,401 1,442 1,706 21,473 4,548 1,496 NA NA 3,705 400 17,637 63,563 1962 1,182 1,649 7,714 969 1,994 19,687 4,981 1,671 NA NA 3,044 344 18,155 61,390 1963 3,191 1,335 7,987

  13. DISCOVERY OF 6.035 GHz HYDROXYL MASER FLARES IN IRAS 18566+0408

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Marzouk, A. A.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.

    2012-05-10

    We report the discovery of 6.035 GHz hydroxyl (OH) maser flares toward the massive star-forming region IRAS 18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20), which is the only region known to show periodic formaldehyde (4.8 GHz H{sub 2}CO) and methanol (6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH) maser flares. The observations were conducted between 2008 October and 2010 January with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico. We detected two flare events, one in 2009 March and one in 2009 September to November. The OH maser flares are not simultaneous with the H{sub 2}CO flares, but may be correlated with CH{sub 3}OH flares from a component at corresponding velocities. A possible correlated variability of OH and CH{sub 3}OH masers in IRAS 18566+0408 is consistent with a common excitation mechanism (IR pumping) as predicted by theory.

  14. Microcomputer Spectrum Analysis Models (MSAM) with terrain data base (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The package contains a collection of 14 radio frequency communications engineering and spectrum management programs plus a menu program. An associated terrain elevation data base with 30-second data is provided for the U.S. (less Alaska), Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and border areas of Canada and Mexico. The following programs are included: Bearing/Distance Program (BDIST); Satellite Azimuth Program (SATAZ); Intermodulation Program (INTMOD); NLAMBDA-90 smooth-earth propagation program (NL90); Frequency Dependent Rejection program (FDR); ANNEX I program to evaluate frequency proposals per NTIA Manual (ANNEXI); Antenna Field Intensity program (AFI); Personal Computer Plot 2-D graphics program (PCPLT); Profile 4/3 earth terrain elevation plot program (PROFILE); Horizon radio line-of-sight plot program (HORIZON); Single-Emitter Analysis Mode (SEAM); Terrain Integrated Rough-Earth Model (TIREM); Power Density Display Program to produce power contour map (PDDP); Line-of-Sight antenna coverage map program (SHADO).

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Renewable Energy Annual 2009 71

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table 2.5 Shipments of solar thermal collectors ranked by origin and destination, 2008 Origin Top Five States 10,933 64 California 4,933 29 New Jersey 4,211 25 Florida 1,271 7 Nevada 289 2 Puerto Rico 230 1 Other Domestic 512 3 Imported 5,517 33 U.S. Total 16,963 100 Destination Top Five States 11,093 65 Florida 5,175 31 California 3,746 22 Arizona 939 6 Haw aii 780 5 Oregon 452 3 Other Domestic 3,623 21 Exported 2,247 13 U.S. Total 16,963 100 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration,

  16. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orell, A.; Foster, N.

    2015-08-01

    The cover of the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report.According to the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, distributed wind reached a cumulative capacity of almost 1 GW (906 MW) in the United States in 2014, reflecting nearly 74,000 wind turbines deployed across all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In total, 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity was added in 2014, representing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment across 24 states. In 2014, America's distributed wind energy industry supported a growing domestic industrial base as exports from United States-based small wind turbine manufacturers accounted for nearly 80% of United States-based manufacturers' sales.

  17. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  18. Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution System of the U. S. Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Olis, D.; Gevorgian, V.; Warren, A.; Butt, R.; Lilienthal, P.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-09-01

    This report focuses on the economic and technical feasibility of integrating renewable energy technologies into the U.S. Virgin Islands transmission and distribution systems. The report includes three main areas of analysis: 1) the economics of deploying utility-scale renewable energy technologies on St. Thomas/St. John and St. Croix; 2) potential sites for installing roof- and ground-mount PV systems and wind turbines and the impact renewable generation will have on the electrical subtransmission and distribution infrastructure, and 3) the feasibility of a 100- to 200-megawatt power interconnection of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority (WAPA), and British Virgin Islands (BVI) grids via a submarine cable system.

  19. Chaos in laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerhalt, J.; Milonni, P.; Shih, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    This is a set of lecture notes given by the authors at the Universities of Rochester, Arkansas and Puerto Rico. This volume introduces the main ideas of chaos and its applications to a broad range of problems in quantum optics, electronics and laser physics. Contents: Introduction; Nonlinearity; The Period Doubling Route to Chaos; The Duffing Oscillator; Strange Attractors; Two-Frequency Route to Chaos; Intermittency; Dimensions of Attractors; Noise, The Lorenz Model and the Single-Mode Laser; Chaotic Lasers: Theory and Experiment; Hamiltonian Systems; The Henon-Heiles System; The Standard Mapping; Fat Fractals; Ergodicity and Mixing; Chaos and the Microwave Ionization of Hydrogen; The Kicked Pendulum: Classical Theory and Quantum Theory; Chaos and Multiple-Photon Excitation of Molecular Vibrations; Chaos and Molecular Rotations; Ideas in Quantum Chaos; Outlook.

  20. Data from Fermilab E-687 (Photoproduction of Heavy Flavours) and Fermilab E-831 (FOCUS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The FERMILAB E687 Collaboration studies production and decay properties of heavy flavours produced in photon-hadron interactions. The experiment recorded approximately 500 million hadronic triggers in the 1990-91 fixed target run at Fermilab from which over 80 thousand charm decays were fully reconstructed. Physics publications include the precision lifetime measurements of the charm hadrons, D meson semileptonic form factors, detailed Dalitz plot analyses, charm meson and baryon decay modes and spectroscopy, searches for rare and forbidden phenomena, and tests of QCD production mechanisms. The follow-on experiment FOCUS Collaboration (Fermilab E831) successfully recorded huge amount of data during the 1996-1997 fixed target run. The FOCUS home page is located at http://www-focus.fnal.gov/. FOCUS is an international collaboration with institutions in Brazil, Italy, South Korea, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the U.S.

  1. Improving oiled shoreline cleanup with COREXIT 9580

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiocco, R.J.; Lessard, R.R.; Canevari, G.P.

    1996-08-01

    The cleanup of oiled shorelines has generally been by mechanical, labor-intensive means. The use of a chemical shoreline cleaner to assist in water-flushing oil from the surfaces can result in more complete and more rapid cleaning. Not only is the cleaning process more efficient, but it can also be less environmentally damaging since there is potentially much less human intrusion and stress on the biological community. This paper describes research and applications of COREXIT 9580 shoreline cleaner for treatment of oiled shorelines, including four recent applications in Puerto Rico, Bermuda, Texas and Nova Scotia. Research work on shoreline vegetation, such as mangroves, has also demonstrated the potential use of this product to save and restore oiled vegetation.

  2. Army Reserve Comprehensive Water Efficiency Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Kearney, Jaime

    2015-04-14

    The Army Reserve has partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop comprehensive water assessments for numerous Army Reserve Centers in all five regions including the Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and at Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett. The objective of these assessments is to quantify water use at the site, and identify innovative water efficiency projects that can be implemented to help reduce water demand and increase efficiency. Several of these assessments have focused on a strategic plan for achieving net zero water to help meet the Army’s Net Zero Directive . The Army Reserve has also leveraged this approach as part of the energy conservation investment program (ECIP), energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). This article documents the process involved.

  3. Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

  4. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Moab Quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Franczyk, K.J.; Lupe, R.D.; Peterson, F.

    1982-09-01

    Portions of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison, the Chinle, the Rico, the Cutler, and the Entrada Formations are favorable for uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the US Department of Energy within the Moab 1' x 2' Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. Nine areas are judged favorable for the Late Jurassic Salt Wash Member. The criteria used to evaluate these areas as favorable include the presence of (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Three favorable areas have been outlined for the Late Triassic Chinle Formation. The criteria used to evaluate these areas are the sandstone-to-shale ratios for the Chinle Formation and the distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle, which is considered the source for the uranium. Two favorable areas have been delineated for the Permian Cutler Formation, and one for the Permian Rico Formation. The criteria used to outline favorable areas are the distribution of favorable facies within each formation. Favorable facies are those that are a result of deposition in environments that are transitional between fluvial and marine. One favorable area is outlined in the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone in the southeastern corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district. Boundaries for this area were established by geologic mapping.

  5. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul T. Jacobson; George Hagerman; George Scott

    2011-12-01

    This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

  6. Energy Vulnerability Assessment for the US Pacific Islands. Technical Appendix 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F.; Rizer, J.P.; Greer, L.S.

    1994-05-01

    The study, Energy Vulnerability Assessment of the US Pacific Islands, was mandated by the Congress of the United States as stated in House Resolution 776-220 of 1992, Section 1406. The resolution states that the US Secretary of Energy shall conduct a study of the implications of the unique vulnerabilities of the insular areas to an oil supply disruption. Such study shall outline how the insular areas shall gain access to vital oil supplies during times of national emergency. The resolution defines insular areas as the US Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and Palau. The US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico are not included in this report. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has broadened the scope of the study contained in the House Resolution to include emergency preparedness and response strategies which would reduce vulnerability to an oil supply disruption as well as steps to ameliorate adverse economic consequences. This includes a review of alternative energy technologies with respect to their potential for reducing dependence on imported petroleum. USDOE has outlined the four tasks of the energy vulnerability assessment as the following: (1) for each island, determine crude oil and refined product demand/supply, and characterize energy and economic infrastructure; (2) forecast global and regional oil trade flow patterns, energy demand/supply, and economic activities; (3) formulate oil supply disruption scenarios and ascertain the general and unique vulnerabilities of these islands to oil supply disruptions; and (4) outline emergency preparedness and response options to secure oil supplies in the short run, and reduce dependence on imported oil in the longer term.

  7. Biocombustibles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Folleto para colorear y de actividades 1 ¿Qué es bioenergía y de dónde proviene? ? Bioenergía es un tipo de energía renovable que se deriva de la biomasa para generar calor, electricidad, productos renovables y combustibles líquidos para el transporte. 2 Biocombustibles provienen de la biomasa (plantas-árboles) y desechos Pacas Rastrojo de maíz Pastos altos Trocitos de madera D E SEC H O S Algas 2 3 BIOMASA Combustible Etanol Biodiésel Combustible de aviones Diésel Gasolina

  8. OneTouch 4.0 Sanned Documents

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dos Razones Para Celebrar la Comunidad Hispana en Energía | Department of Energy One Month, Two Reasons to Celebrate the Hispanic Energy Community | Un Mes, Dos Razones Para Celebrar la Comunidad Hispana en Energía One Month, Two Reasons to Celebrate the Hispanic Energy Community | Un Mes, Dos Razones Para Celebrar la Comunidad Hispana en Energía October 17, 2014 - 1:03pm Addthis Students learn about the components of a computer at a STEM Fair hosted by the Latin American Youth Center

  9. E-Verify If you have the Right to Work Poster (English)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SI USTED TIENE DERECHO A TRABAJAR, no deje que nadie se lo quite. Si tiene derecho a trabajar legalmente en los Estados Unidos, existen leyes para protegerlo contra la discrim-...

  10. Freedom of Information Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RECEiVED ISY BPA FOLk OFFICE TillS DATE - iia(j DUE DATE: LOG zOf c4f9 F Lsa Este mensaie es para uso exciusivo de su destinatario intencional. Cualquier uso de la...

  11. Job Safety and Health Poster Spanish | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spanish Departamento de Energa (DOE) de Seguridad en el Trabajo y el cartel de la Salud. Programa DOE Order 440.1B de Proteccin del Trabajador para DOE (Incluyendo la...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The new features in ParaView include particle readers and a very efficient halo finder that identifies friends-of-friends halos and determines common halo properties, including ...

  13. Ayuda:Categoras | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    modificar el ttulo de la pgina visible en la categora. Crear una categora El proceso de creacin de categoras es el mismo que se utiliza para crear pginas wiki...

  14. thesis.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The d capture reaction has two strongly-interacting particles in the outgoing channel, ... composed of concrete, steel, iron, lead and para n (see left side of Figure 2.4). ...

  15. Diapositiva 1

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    se utilizaron los siguientes parmetros en el mdulo de anlisis geoestadstico de ArcGis: Tamao del lag igual a 9000 metros. Para ello se utiliz la regla emprica de que...

  16. Accident Investigations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-29

    Cancels Para. 1 Thru 5, 6A(1) Thru (10), Both 6F (1) Thru (8) and the second misnumbered 6F, and chaps. I and II of DOE 5484.1.

  17. Tesis LT.PDF

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    es muy deficiente, pues esta vara mucho por zonas, en dependencia de la nubosidad. Una red de estaciones para caracterizar el rgimen de radiacin solar en todo el pas...

  18. Gateway:Amrica Latina/Aprender ms sobre las ERNC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search En esta seccin encontrar una seleccin de webcasts disponibles en la red, para aprender ms de cada etapa de la cadena de valor de un proyecto de ERNC. Etapas...

  19. The Reaction of bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)ceriumbenzyl...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    involves a haptotropic shift of the Cp2Ce fragment so that at the transition state the para-carbon of the benzene ring is attached to the Cp2Ce fragment while the CH2 fragment of ...

  20. General Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1990-06-29

    To establish environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Operations for assuring compliance with applicable Federal, State and local environmental protection laws and regulations, Executive Orders, and internal Department policies. Cancels DOE O 5480.1A. Para. 2b, 4b, and 4c of Chap. II and para. 2d and 3b of Chap. III canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  1. Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-30

    Cancels DOE 3790.1B, Except VIII; attach. 2, para. 2C, 2D(2)-(3), 2E(1)-(8), attach. 3, para. 2C, 2D(2)-(3), 2E(1)-(7), of DOE 5480.4; DOE 5480.7A; DOE 5480.8A; DOE 5480.9A; DOE 5480.10; DOE 5480.16A; DOE 5483.1A

  2. Advanced Hydrogen Liquefaction Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Kromer, Brian; Neu, Ben; Jankowiak, Jerome; Barrett, Philip; Drnevich, Raymond

    2011-09-28

    The project identified and quantified ways to reduce the cost of hydrogen liquefaction, and reduce the cost of hydrogen distribution. The goal was to reduce the power consumption by 20% and then to reduce the capital cost. Optimizing the process, improving process equipment, and improving ortho-para conversion significantly reduced the power consumption of liquefaction, but by less than 20%. Because the efficiency improvement was less than the target, the program was stopped before the capital cost was addressed. These efficiency improvements could provide a benefit to the public to improve the design of future hydrogen liquefiers. The project increased the understanding of hydrogen liquefaction by modeling different processes and thoroughly examining ortho-para separation and conversion. The process modeling provided a benefit to the public because the project incorporated para hydrogen into the process modeling software, so liquefaction processes can be modeled more accurately than using only normal hydrogen. Adding catalyst to the first heat exchanger, a simple method to reduce liquefaction power, was identified, analyzed, and quantified. The demonstrated performance of ortho-para separation is sufficient for at least one identified process concept to show reduced power cost when compared to hydrogen liquefaction processes using conventional ortho-para conversion. The impact of improved ortho-para conversion can be significant because ortho para conversion uses about 20-25% of the total liquefaction power, but performance improvement is necessary to realize a substantial benefit. Most of the energy used in liquefaction is for gas compression. Improvements in hydrogen compression will have a significant impact on overall liquefier efficiency. Improvements to turbines, heat exchangers, and other process equipment will have less impact.

  3. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, Hector

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1)#3; Λ0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon θ-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras (Carlos Malca). The students H. Moreno and C. Malca has been directly supervised by Dr. Mendez and S. Santiesteban supervised by Dr. Ramirez. During the last 13 years, our group have graduated 23 MS students on experimental High Energy Physics data analysis and applied hardware techniques. Most of the students have been supported by DOE grants, included this grant. Since 2001, Dr. Mendez have directly supervised eleven students, Dr. Ramirez three students and the former PI (Dr. Lopez) nine students. These theses work are fully documented in the group web page (http://charma.uprm.edu). The High Energy Physics group at Mayaguez is small and presently consists of three Physics faculty members, the Senior Investigators Dr. Hector Mendez (Professor) and Dr. Juan Eduardo Ramirez (Professor), and Dr. Sudhir Malik who was just hired in July 2014. Dr. Ramirez is in charge of the UPRM Tier-3 computing and will be building the network bandwidth infrastructure for the campus, while Dr. Mendez will continues his effort in finishing the heavy quark physics data analysis and moving to work on SUSY analysis for the 2015 data. Our last grant application in 2012 was awarded only for 2013-2014. As a result our postdoc position was lost last month of March. Since then, we have hired Dr. Malik as a new faculty in order to reinforce the group and to continue our efforts with the CMS experiment. Our plan is to hire another junior faculty in the next two years to strengthen the HEP group even further. Dr. Mendez continues with QuarkNet activities involving an ever larger group of high school physics teachers from all around Puerto Rico.

  4. Aerosol specification in single-column CAM5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lebassi-Habtezion, B.; Caldwell, P.

    2014-11-17

    The ability to run a global climate model in single-column mode is very useful for testing model improvements because single-column models (SCMs) are inexpensive to run and easy to interpret. A major breakthrough in Version 5 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) is the inclusion of prognostic aerosol. Unfortunately, this improvement was not coordinated with the SCM version of CAM5 and as a result CAM5-SCM initializes aerosols to zero. In this study we explore the impact of running CAM5-SCM with aerosol initialized to zero (hereafter named Default) and test three potential fixes. The first fix is to use CAM5's prescribedmore » aerosol capability, which specifies aerosols at monthly climatological values. The second method is to prescribe aerosols at observed values. The third approach is to fix droplet and ice crystal numbers at prescribed values. We test our fixes in four different cloud regimes to ensure representativeness: subtropical drizzling stratocumulus (based on the DYCOMS RF02 case study), mixed-phase Arctic stratocumulus (using the MPACE-B case study), tropical shallow convection (using the RICO case study), and summertime mid-latitude continental convection (using the ARM95 case study). Stratiform cloud cases (DYCOMS RF02 and MPACE-B) were found to have a strong dependence on aerosol concentration, while convective cases (RICO and ARM95) were relatively insensitive to aerosol specification. This is perhaps expected because convective schemes in CAM5 do not currently use aerosol information. Adequate liquid water content in the MPACE-B case was only maintained when ice crystal number concentration was specified because the Meyers et al. (1992) deposition/condensation ice nucleation scheme used by CAM5 greatly overpredicts ice nucleation rates, causing clouds to rapidly glaciate. Surprisingly, predicted droplet concentrations for the ARM95 region in both SCM and global runs were around 25 cm−3, which is much lower than observed. This finding suggests that CAM5 has problems capturing aerosol effects in this climate regime.« less

  5. Conocimiento

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conocimiento de Energía Principios Esenciales y Conceptos Fundamentales para la Educación de Energía Una Estructura para la Enseñanza de Energía para Alumnos de Todas las Edades estudios sin prescripción alguna de cuándo, dónde y cómo debe presentarse el contenido. El uso previsto de esta guía incluye, pero no se limita a, la educación formal o informal en materia de energía, al desarrollo de normas de educación, al diseño del plan de estudios, al desarrollo de evaluación de

  6. Anaerobic dehalogenation of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls by Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegel, J.; Zhang, X.; Wu, Q.

    1999-05-01

    Ten years after reports on the existence of anaerobic dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediment slurries, the authors report here on the rapid reductive dehalogenation of para-hydroxylated PCBs (HO-PCBs), the excreted main metabolites of PCB in mammals, which can exhibit estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in humans. The anaerobic bacterium Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans completely dehalogenates all flanking chlorines (chlorines in ortho position to the para-hydroxyl group) from congeners such as 3,3{prime},5,5{prime}-tetrachloro-4,4{prime}-dihydroxybiphenyl.

  7. Conocimiento de Energia | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conocimiento de Energia Conocimiento de Energia Conocimiento de Energia Conocimiento de Energía: Principios Esenciales y Conceptos Fundamentales para la Educación de Energía presenta conceptos de energía que, cuando se entienden y se aplican, ayudan a individuos y a comunidades a tomar decisiones sobre la energía con conocimiento de causa. Descargue una copia gratis de Conocimiento de Energía (en la parte inferior de esta página) o escríbanos a energyliteracy@ee.doe.gov para obtener

  8. Classification of generalized quantum statistics associated with the exceptional Lie (super)algebras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoilova, N. I.; Jeugt, J. van der

    2007-04-15

    Generalized quantum statistics (GQS) associated with a Lie algebra or Lie superalgebra extends the notion of para-Bose or para-Fermi statistics. Such GQS have been classified for all classical simple Lie algebras and basic classical Lie superalgebras. In the current paper we finalize this classification for all exceptional Lie algebras and superalgebras. Since the definition of GQS is closely related to a certain Z grading of the Lie (super)algebra G, our classification reproduces some known Z gradings of exceptional Lie algebras. For exceptional Lie superalgebras such a classification of Z gradings has not been given before.

  9. University of Delaware | CCEI Patents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patents and Patent Applications Production of Para-xylene by Catalytically Reacting 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene in a Solvent Dauenhauer, P. J.; Williams, C. L.; Vlachos, D. G.; Lobo, R. F.; Chang, C.-C.; Fan, W. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell and Stack Designs Gorte, R. J.; Oh, T.-S. Rapid Synthesis of Beta Zeolites Fan, W.; Chang, C.-C.; Dornath, P. Selective Production of Para-xylene by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Huber, G.W.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Fan, W.; Wang, Z. One-Step Synthesis of

  10. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Spanish Version) (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Manual del vehículo eléctrico enchufable para consumidores Manual del vehículo eléctrico enchufable para consumidores 2 Aviso legal Este informe fue preparado en el marco de un trabajo patrocinado por una agencia del gobierno de los Estados Unidos. Ni el gobierno de los Estados Unidos ni ninguna de sus agencias, ni ninguno de sus empleados, otorgan ninguna garantía, ya sea expresa o implícita, ni asumen ninguna obligación ni responsabilidad legal por la exactitud, integridad o utilidad de

  11. MarmotViz User Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander S. Rattner; Donna Post Guillen; Srinivas Garimella; Alark Joshi

    2012-08-01

    MarmotViz is an illustrative visualization plug-in for ParaView. It is intended for generating enhanced visualizations of time-varying datasets on unstructured connected meshes. A detailed description of the implemented algorithms and program structure can be found in the related document: Generalized framework and algorithms for illustrative visualization of time-varying data on unstructured meshes . This document provides details for compiling/building MarmotViz, using the MarmotViz plug-in in ParaView, and extending the MarmotViz plug-in.

  12. Modular OTEC platforms, SKSS designs. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-02-29

    One of the possible options for generating electrical energy from ocean thermal gradients requires the use of a floating offshore platform. The platform would contain all OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) systems and power cycle components and consist of the hull, seawater, station-keeping, platform service, and mission support subsystems. It would be stationed at one of the designated OTEC sites, and would transmit the generated electricity to the shore power networks by means of an electrical transmission cable. The objective of the present study is to investigate the station-keeping subsystem (SKSS) requirements and develop preliminary SKSS designs for the two Modular Experiment Plant (MEP) candidates of 10/40 MW/sub e/ capacity for deployment at a specific site. The two MEP hull candidates are a Barge type platform and a Spar shaped hull with external heat exchangers. The specific site assigned for this study is Puerto Rico. The preliminary SKSS designs are developed for both platforms as follows: (1) an 8-leg spread catenary mooring system for the Spar, and (2) a 12-leg spread catenary mooring system for the Barge. Applicability of these designs to larger capacity commercial OTEC platforms is also investigated.

  13. Dynamic interaction between an OTEC power plant and a power grid. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-31

    The objectives of the research reported are: to identify and resolve potential technical problems that may arise from the incorporation of an OTEC power plant in the existing generation mix of Puerto Rico and to develop the tools and to identify the technical resources needed for dynamic analysis of island power systems to which OTEC power plants provide a substantial portion of the load demand. The issues addressed are system modelling and data gathering, network simplification, selection of OTEC plant site and power system, stability analysis, and economic dispatch when OTEC power plants contribute substantially to the island's load. The slow dynamics of the OTEC plant make it a reference for the rest of the power system during a transient, but this slowness is a drawback in terms of system recovery from fault-induced transients. It is found that simple dynamic models can, in most instances, describe the transient behavior of both the OTEC plant and the island's power system, but it was not possible to reduce the non-OTEC portion of the power system to a single generation point and a single load. (LEW)

  14. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in Paso Robles, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campion, L.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    Ninety-eight geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted, and a geologic map and cross sections were compiled. Detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The geological and geophysical work delineated the basement highs and trough-like depressions that can exercise control on the occurrence of the thermal waters. The Rinconada fault was also evident. Cross sections drawn from oil well logs show the sediments conforming against these basement highs and filling the depressions. It is along the locations where the sediments meet the basement highs that three natural warm springs in the area occur. Deep circulation of meteoric waters along faults seems to be a reasonable source for the warm water. The Santa Margarita, Pancho Rico, and Paso Robles Formations would be the first permeable zones that abut the faults through which water would enter. Temperatures and interpretation of well logs indicate the warmest aquifer at the base of the Paso Robles Formation. Warm water may be entering higher up in the section, but mixing with water from cooler zones seems to be evident. Geothermometry indicates reservoir temperatures could be as high as 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F).

  15. Solar in Remote Applications in the U.S.: Challenges & Implications for Local Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since the landfall of Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, municipalities and jurisdictions in the United States have been increasingly focused on the vulnerability of their electricity infrastructure and enhancing resilience to extreme events. Renewable energy and distributed generation resources have a critical role to play in increasing the resilience of electric grids. In remote areas and on islands, these issues have risen to the forefront because remote electric grids function in near isolation, making grid reliability, electricity supply, cost controls, and stability essential. The integration of such resources into smaller, isolated grids poses unique challenges given the relatively high penetration rates of solar photovoltaics (PV). In the U.S. these remote locations include Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, Marianas, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, communities off the coast of Maine and Massachusetts, mainland communities in Alaska, and even U.S. government installations such as national parks and military bases. This paper explores how policy makers and planners interested in furthering grid resilience and increasing reliance on renewable energy resources can learn from the opportunities and challenges facing remote communities as they work to shift their generation mix to higher levels of solar PV.

  16. U.S. Solar Market Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Sherwood

    2006-07-01

    U.S. solar installations by technology are detailed for 1998???¢????????2005. The growth and state distribution of installations are different for the three primary solar sectors: ???¢???????¢ photovoltaics, ???¢???????¢ solar water heating and space heating, and ???¢???????¢ solar pool heating. Photovoltaic installations have grown steadily. Since 2001, grid-connected installations grew at an average rate of 52%. California has 79% of the installations, with Arizona, New Jersey, New York, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Oregon accounting for most of the remaining installations. The offgrid growth has been steady, but significantly lower. Solar water heating and solar space heating installations have shown little growth since 1997. Hawaii dominates, with 41% of the market. Other states with a large number of installations include Puerto Rico, California, Florida, and Arizona. Solar pool heating accounts for the largest number of installations and has grown at an average rate of 13% since 1997. Installations in California and Florida are 75% of the pool heating market.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management's Tribal Interactions - 12513

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gil, April; Shafer, David; Elmer, John

    2012-07-01

    Effective government-to-government interactions with tribal nations and maintaining stakeholder relations with members of tribes are increasingly important to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). As of October 2011, LM was responsible for long-term surveillance and maintenance of 87 sites and facilities in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico, including some sites on tribal lands. The sites on tribal lands can affect natural resources that are managed or used by tribes, or the sites can potentially affect areas of cultural significance to tribal nations in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Tribes are separate sovereign governments recognized in the U.S. Constitution and are significant stakeholders for LM sites. The tribes are individual nations with diverse histories, cultures, customs, religions, and laws. LM has regular communication with the affected tribes to inform members of issues, to allow the tribe to participate in decision making, to provide technical reviews, and to ensure tribal concerns are addressed. Four LM sites are in the Navajo Nation. Three of those sites contain uranium mill tailings disposal cells regulated under long-term surveillance and maintenance programs that require monitoring and annual inspections. The fourth site was remediated but still has a groundwater plume that LM is responsible for. DOE and LM have worked with the Navajo Nation for almost 30 years on technical issues and to ensure tribal concerns are addressed. (authors)

  18. Annotated bibliography of coal in the Caribbean region. [Lignite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orndorff, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of preparing this annotated bibliography was to compile information on coal localities for the Caribbean region used for preparation of a coal map of the region. Also, it serves as a brief reference list of publications for future coal studies in the Caribbean region. It is in no way an exhaustive study or complete listing of coal literature for the Caribbean. All the material was gathered from published literature with the exception of information from Cuba which was supplied from a study by Gordon Wood of the US Geological Survey, Branch of Coal Resources. Following the classification system of the US Geological Survey (Wood and others, 1983), the term coal resources has been used in this report for reference to general estimates of coal quantities even though authors of the material being annotated may have used the term coal reserves in a similar denotation. The literature ranges from 1857 to 1981. The countries listed include Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the countries of Central America.

  19. Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

  20. Recording of absorption spectra by a three-beam integral technique with a tunable laser and external cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korolenko, P V; Nikolaev, I V; Ochkin, V N; Tskhai, S N

    2014-04-28

    An integral method is considered for recording absorption using three laser beams transmitted through and reflected from an external cavity with the absorbing medium (R-ICOS). The method is the elaboration of a known single-beam ICOS method and allows suppression of the influence of radiation phase fluctuations in the resonator on recording weak absorption spectra. First of all, this reduces high-frequency instabilities and gives a possibility to record spectra during short time intervals. In this method, mirrors of the resonator may have moderate reflection coefficients. Capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by the examples of weak absorption spectra of atmospheric methane and natural gas in a spectral range around 1650 nm. With the mirrors having the reflection coefficients of 0.80.99, a spectrum can be recorded for 320 ?s with the accuracy sufficient for detecting a background concentration of methane in atmosphere. For the acquisition time of 20 s, the absorption coefficients of ?210{sup -8} cm{sup -1} can be measured, which corresponds to a 40 times less molecule concentration than the background value. (laser spectroscopy)

  1. Evaluation of the State Energy Conservation Program from program initiation to September 1978. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heller, James N.; Grossmann, John R.; Shochet, Susan; Bresler, Joel; Duggan, Noreene

    1980-03-01

    The State Energy Conservation Program was established in 1975 to promote energy conservation and to help states develop and implement their own conservation programs. Base (5) and supplemental (3) programs required states to implement programs including: mandatory thermal-efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; mandatory lighting efficiency standards for public buildings; mandatory standards and policies affecting the procurement practices of the state and its political subdivisions; program measures to promote the availability and use of carpools, vanpools, and public transportation; a traffic law or regulation which permits a right turn-on-red; and procedures to carry out a continuing public education effort to increase awareness of energy conservation; procedures which promote effective coordination among local, state, and Federal energy conservation programs; and procedures for carrying out energy audits on buildings and industrial plants. All 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the District of Columbia participated in the program. The total 1980 energy savings projected by the states is about 5.9 quadrillion Btu's or about 7% of the DOE projected 1980 baseline consumption of just under 83 quads. The detailed summary is presented on the following: information the SECP evaluation; DOE response to the SECP; DOE's role in the program management process; the effectiveness of the states in managing the SECP; the status of program measure implementation; innovative state energy conservation programs; and the evaluation methodology.

  2. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  3. Survival and distribution of Vibrio cholerae in a tropical rain forest stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Rosas, N.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    For 12 months Vibrio cholerae and fecal coliforms were monitored along with 9 other water quality parameters at 12 sites in a rain forest watershed in Puerto Rico. Densities of V. cholerae and fecal coliforms were not significantly correlated even though the highest densities of both bacteria were found at a sewage outfall. High densities of V. cholerae were also found at pristine sites high in the watershed. V. cholerae and Escherichia coli were inoculated into membrane diffusion chambers, placed at two sites and monitored for 5 days on two different occasions. Two different direct count methods indicated that the density of E. coli and V. cholerae did not change significantly during the course of either study. Physiological activity, as measured by INT-reduction and relative nucleic acid composition declined for E. coli during the first 12 h then increased and remained variable during the remainder of the study. V. cholerae activity, as measured by relative nucleic acid concentrations, remained high and unchanged for the entire study. INT-reduction in V. cholerae declined initially but regained nearly all of it`s original activity within 48 h. This study suggests that V. cholerae is an indigenous organism in tropical freshwaters and that assays other than fecal coliforms or E. coli must be used for assessing public health risk in tropical waters.

  4. Benthic foraminifera of Puerto Rican mangrove-lagoon systems: Potential for paleoenvironmental interpretations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culver, S.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Recent foraminiferal assemblages from four traverses across mangrove-lagoonal environments off Puerto Rico exhibit patterns of distribution that should be useful in paleoenvironmental interpretations. Variations in sediment substrate type, abundance and distribution of marine vegetation, and degree of exposure to wave and current activity appear to be important factors related to foraminiferal distributions and abundances. Cluster analysis of foraminiferal abundance data distinguishes four major assemblages. Other generally recognizable trends in foraminiferal assemblages include: offshore increase in species diversity; offshore increase in percent miliolids while percent rotaliids remain more or less constant; small peaks in percent textulariids immediately adjacent to mangrove growth; almost 100% agglutinated assemblages in fully mangrove environments; offshore increase in foraminiferal number except in areas of abundant Halimeda plate production where numbers of foraminifera are diluted; restriction of high abundances of Fissurina, Nonionella, Fursenkoina and Helenina to lagoons behind mangrove islands; restrictions of high abundances of Rosalina, Cibicides, Discorbis, Spiroloculina, Cyclogyra, Quinqueloculina, Amphistegina, Peneroplis and Archaias to lagoons seaward of mangrove islands. These trends provide a micropaleontological link between a potential petroleum source, mangrove swamps, and the potential petroleum reservoir, reef rocks.

  5. Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

  6. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  7. Enteric viruses in a mangrove lagoon, survival and shellfish incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez de Cardona, I.; Bermudez, M.; Billmire, E.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) were screened for enteric viruses. For 18 months oysters were collected from Cano Boqueron, a tropical mangrove lagoon on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. This popular tourist resort has two primary sewage treatment plants which service 158 single family cabanas. In spite of the heavy seasonal input of sewage to Cano Boqueron and high densities of fecal coliform bacteria, enteric viruses were not detected in shellfish meat. Because no viruses were detected in the oysters, a virus survival study was performed. Poliovirus type 1 was placed in diffusion chambers in situ at two sites in Cano Boqueron. More than 95% of the poliovirus inactivation occurred within 24 h. Virus inactivation was significantly different by site, indicating different inactivation rates within the lagoon. Chamber studies done simultaneously with Escherichia coli did not reveal differences between sites. It is suggested that the sewage effluent had an antiviral effect in the absence of an antibacterial effect. This study demonstrates the importance for establishing microbial contamination standards for shellfish growing waters in the tropics based upon in situ studies with tropical species, e.g. mangrove oyster.

  8. U.S. Solar Market Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Sherwood

    2010-04-01

    Grid-connected photovoltaic installations grew by 40% in 2009 compared with installations in 2008. California and New Jersey have the largest markets. Growth occurred in the residential and utility markets, but non-residential customer-sited installations did not change compared with the installations in 2008. Two small solar thermal electric plants were connected to the grid in 2009 with a combined capacity of 7 MW. The future prospects for solar thermal electric plants look bright, although developers are not expected to complete any new large plants until at least 2011. Solar water heating and solar space heating annual installations grew by 40% in 2008 compared with 2007. Hawaii, California, Puerto Rico, and Florida dominate this market. Solar pool heating annual installation capacity fell by 1% in 2008 following a dramatic decline of 15% in solar pool heating capacity in 2007 compared with 2006. Florida and California are the largest markets for solar pool heating. The economic decline in the real estate markets in Florida and California likely led to the decrease in pool installations and thus the dramatic decline in capacity installed of solar pool systems in 2007.

  9. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  10. Parallel Dislocation Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-30

    ParaDiS is software capable of simulating the motion, evolution, and interaction of dislocation networks in single crystals using massively parallel computer architectures. The software is capable of outputting the stress-strain response of a single crystal whose plastic deformation is controlled by the dislocation processes.

  11. Occupational Safety and Health Program for DOE Contractor Employees at Government-Owned Contractor-Operated Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1983-06-22

    Cancels DOE O 5483.1. Canceled by DOE O 440.1 of 9-30-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & para. 2a, 2b, 2c of Chapter III canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  12. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, T.J.; Ja, L.; Yang, X.

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetrafluoro-aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  13. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-07

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  14. Mira Performance Boot Camp 2015 | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Vis - Holger Brunst, Dresden University of Technology 10:00 - 10:30 a.m. TAU Performance System - Sameer Shende, ParaTools, Inc. 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Hands-on...

  15. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J.; Ja, Li; Yang, Xinmin

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetra fluoro, aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  16. Paradyn a parallel nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite-element code for solid and structural mechanics user manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, C G; DeGroot, A J; Sherwood, R J

    2000-06-01

    ParaDyn is a parallel version of the DYNA3D computer program, a three-dimensional explicit finite-element program for analyzing the dynamic response of solids and structures. The ParaDyn program has been used as a production tool for over three years for analyzing problems which range in size from a few tens of thousands of elements to between one-million and ten-million elements. ParaDyn runs on parallel computers provided by the Department of Energy Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) and the Department of Defense High Performance Computing and Modernization Program. Preprocessing and post-processing software utilities and tools are designed to facilitate the generation of partitioned domains for processors on a massively parallel computer and the visualization of both resultant data and boundary data generated in a parallel simulation. This manual provides a brief overview of the parallel implementation; describes techniques for running the ParaDyn program, tools and utilities; and provides examples of parallel simulations.

  17. Development of quality control procedures for mass produced and released Bactrocera Philippinensis (Diptera: Tephritidae) for sterile insect technique programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resilva, S.; Obra, G.; Zamora, N.; Gaitan, E.

    2007-03-15

    Quality control procedures for Bactrocera philippinensis Drew and Hancock 1994 (Diptera: Tephritidae) used in sterile insect technique (SIT) programs were established in the mass rearing facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. Basic studies on pupal irradiation, holding/packaging systems, shipping procedures, longevity, sterility studies, and pupal eye color determination in relation to physiological development at different temperature regimes were investigated. These studies will provide baseline data for the development of quality control protocols for an expansion of B. philippinensis field programs with an SIT component in the future. (author) [Spanish] Los procedimientos de control de calidad para Bactrocera philippinensis Drew y Hancock 1994 (Diptera: Tephritidae) usados en programas de la tecnica de insecto esteril (TIE) fueron establecidos en la facilidad de cria en masa del Instituto Filipino de Investigacion Nuclear. Estudios basicos sobre la irradiacion de las pupas, sistemas de almacenaje/empaque, procedimientos del envio, longevidad, estudios de esterilidad y la determinacion del color de ojo de la pupa en relacion con el desarrollo fisiologico en regimenes diferentes de temperatura fueron investigados. Estos estudios proveeran una linea de informacion basica para el desarrollo de protocolos de control de calidad para una expansion de los programas de campo para B. philippinensis con un componente de TIS en el futuro. (author)

  18. Operational characteristics of the J-PARC cryogenic hydrogen system for a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Ohtsu, Kiichi; Aso, Tomokazu; Kawakami, Yoshihiko; Teshigawara, Makoto

    2014-01-29

    The J-PARC cryogenic hydrogen system provides supercritical hydrogen with the para-hydrogen concentration of more than 99 % and the temperature of less than 20 K to three moderators so as to provide cold pulsed neutron beams of a higher neutronic performance. Furthermore, the temperature fluctuation of the feed hydrogen stream is required to be within 0.25 K. A stable 300-kW proton beam operation has been carried out since November 2012. The para-hydrogen concentrations were measured during the cool-down process. It is confirmed that para-hydrogen always exists in the equilibrium concentration because of the installation of an ortho-para hydrogen convertor. Propagation characteristics of temperature fluctuation were measured by temporarily changing the heater power under off-beam condition to clarify the effects of a heater control for thermal compensation on the feed temperature fluctuation. The experimental data gave an allowable temperature fluctuation of 1.05 K. It is clarified through a 286-kW and a 524-kW proton beam operations that the heater control would be applicable for the 1-MW proton beam operation by extrapolating from the experimental data.

  19. Safety Requirements for the Packaging and Transportation of Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Substances, and Hazardous Wastes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1985-07-09

    Cancels Chapter 3 of DOE 5480.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1 of 9-27-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 9c canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

  20. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-28

    Establishes an Information Security Program for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. Cancels DOE 5630.8A, DOE 5639.1, DOE 5639.5, DOE 5639.6A, DOE 5639.7, DOE M 5632.1C-1, Chapter III, Para. 1, 2, and 4-9

  1. Quality management systems for fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) sterile insect technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caceres, C.; Robinson, A.; Shelly, T.; Hendrichs, J.

    2007-03-15

    The papers presented in this issue are focused on developing and validating procedures to improve the overall quality of sterile fruit flies for use in area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programs with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component. The group was coordinated and partially funded by the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, under a five-year Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Quality Assurance in Mass-Reared and Released Fruit Flies for Use in SIT Programmes'. Participants in the CRP from 16 countries came from both basic and applied fields of expertise to ensure that appropriate and relevant procedures were developed. A variety of studies was undertaken to develop protocols to assess strain compatibility and to improve colonization procedures and strain management. Specific studies addressed issues related to insect nutrition, irradiation protocols, field dispersal and survival, field cage behavior assessments, and enhancement of mating competitiveness. The main objective was to increase the efficiency of operational fruit fly programs using sterile insects and to reduce their cost. Many of the protocols developed or improved during the CRP will be incorporated into the international quality control manual for sterile tephritid fruit flies, standardizing key components of the production, sterilization, shipment, handling, and release of sterile insects. (author) [Spanish] Los articulos presentados en este numero se enfocan en el desarrollo y la validacion de procedimientos para mejorar la calidad total de moscas de las frutas esteriles para su uso en programas de manejo integrado de plagas en donde la tecnica del insecto esteril (TIE) es uno de los componentes clave. El grupo fue coordinado y parcialmente financiado por la Division Conjunta de Tecnicas Nucleares para la Alimentacion y la Agricultura de la FAO/OIEA, Viena, Austria, por un periodo de cinco anos bajo el proyecto de Investigacion Coordinada (PIC) sobre 'el Aseguramiento de la Calidad de Moscas de las Frutas Criadas y Liberadas para su Uso en Programas de TIE'. Los participantes en el PIC representan 16 paises con experiencia en campos de investigacion basica y aplicada. Para asegurar que los procedimientos desarrollados fueran apropiados y pertinentes, se realizaron una variedad de estudios para el desarrollo de protocolos para evaluar la compatibilidad y para mejorar los procedimientos de colonizacion y manejo de cepas salvajes. Estudios especificos trataron asuntos relacionados con la nutricion de insectos, los protocolos de irradiacion, la dispersion y supervivencia en el campo, evaluacion del comportamiento en jaulas de campo, y el mejoramiento de la competitividad sexual. Los objetivos fundamentales fueron el aumentar la eficiencia y reducir los costos de los programas operacionales de control de moscas de las frutas donde TIE es utilizada. Muchos de los protocolos desarrollados o mejorados durante el PIC seran incorporados en el Manual Internacional de Control de Calidad para Moscas Estriles de la familia Tephritidae, para estandarizar componentes claves como la produccion, esterilizacion, envio, manejo y liberacion de insectos esteriles. (author)

  2. Conceptual designs for modular OTEC SKSS. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-02-29

    This volume presents the results of the first phase of the Station Keeping Subsystem (SKSS) design study for 40 MW/sub e/ capacity Modular Experiment OTEC Platforms. The objectives of the study were: (1) establishment of basic design requirements; (2) verification of technical feasibility of SKSS designs; (3) identification of merits and demerits; (4) estimates of sizes for major components; (5) estimates of life cycle costs; (6) deployment scenarios and time/cost/risk assessments; (7) maintenance/repair and replacement scenarios; (8) identifications of interface with other OTEC subsystems; (9) recommendations for and major problems in preliminary design; and (10) applicability of concepts to commercial plant SKSS designs. A brief site suitability study was performed with the objective of determining the best possible location at the Punta Tuna (Puerto Rico) site from the standpoint of anchoring. This involved studying the vicinity of the initial location in relation to the prevailing bottom slopes and distances from shore. All subsequent studies were performed for the final selected site. The two baseline OTEC platforms were the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR. The results of the study are presented in detail. The overall objective of developing two conceptual designs for each of the two baseline OTEC platforms has been accomplished. Specifically: (1) a methodology was developed for conceptual designs and followed to the extent possible. At this stage, a full reliability/performance/optimization analysis based on a probabilistic approach was not used due to the numerous SKSS candidates to be evaluated. A deterministic approach was used. (2) For both of the two baseline platforms, the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR, all possible SKSS candidate concepts were considered and matrices of SKSS concepts were developed.

  3. 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, J.A.; Hemborg, H.T.

    1995-01-01

    Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.

  4. Annual report to the President and the Congress on the State Energy Conservation Program for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Department is required by Section 365(c) of Title 3, Part C, of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), 42 U.S.C. 6321-6327, as amended by Title 4, Part B of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), to report annually to the President and the Congress on the operation of the State Energy Conservation Program. The report is to include an estimate of the energy conservation achieved, and the degree of state participation and achievement as well as a description of innovative conservation programs undertaken by individual states. Together the EPCA and the ECPA constitute the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP) which has provided the states (any one of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Territories and possessions of the United States) with funding to help establish and maintain their capability to plan, design, implement and coordinate a variety of programs and initiatives designed to promote energy conservation and efficiency at state and local levels. All states have operational programs funded under EPCA (no monies have been appropriated under ECPA since FY 1981). In addition, the majority of states have augmented the SECP with oil overcharge funding they have received over the past several years. Each state is required to provide a twenty-percent match for the Federal funds received, and its Base Plan must include the following program measures: (1) mandatory lighting efficiency standards for state public buildings; (2) programs to promote the availability and use of carpool, vanpool, and public transportation; (3) mandatory standards and policies relating to energy efficiency to govern the state procurement practices; (4) mandatory thermal efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; and (5) a traffic law or regulation, which permits the operator of a motor vehicle to turn right at a red stop light after stopping. 6 tabs.

  5. National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Networks: Data on the chemistry of precipitation

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) is a nationwide network of sites collecting data on the chemistry of precipitation for monitoring of geographical and temporal long-term trends. The precipitation at each station is collected weekly according to strict clean-handling procedures. It is then sent to the Central Analytical Laboratory where it is analyzed for hydrogen (acidity as pH), sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, and base cations (such as calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium). The network is a cooperative effort between many different groups, including the State Agricultural Experiment Stations, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and numerous other governmental and private entities. DOE is one of these cooperating agencies, though it plays a smaller funding role than some of the other federal sources. Since 1978, the NADP/NTN has grown from 22 stations to over 250 sites spanning the continental United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program has also expanded its sampling to two additional networks: 1) the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN), currently with over 90 sites, was formed in 1995 to collect weekly samples of precipitation which are analyzed by Frontier Geosciences for total mercury, and 2) the Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN), formed for the purpose of studying precipitation chemistry trends with greater temporal resolution than the NTN. [taken from the NADP History and Overview page at http://nadp.sws.uiuc.edu/nadpoverview.asp] Data from these networks are freely available in via customized search interfaces linked to interactive maps of the stations in the three networks. Animated Isopleth maps in Flash and PowerPoint are also available to display concentrations and depositions various substances such as sulfate, nitrate, etc. (Specialized Interface)

  6. Determination of a cost-effective air pollution control technology for the control of VOC and HAP emissions from a steroids processing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    A steroids processing plant located in northeastern Puerto Rico emits a combined average of 342 lb/hr of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various process operations. The approach that this facility used to implement maximum achievable control technology (MACT) may assist others who must contend with MACT for pharmaceutical or related manufacturing facilities. Federal air regulations define MACT standards for stationary sources emitting any of 189 HAPs. The MACT standards detailed in the NESHAPs are characterized by industry and type of emission control system or technology. It is anticipated that the standard will require HAP reductions of approximately 95%. The steroid plant`s emissions include the following pollutant loadings: VOC/HAP Emission Rate (lb/hr): Methanol 92.0; Acetone 35.0; Methylene chloride 126.0; Chloroform 25.0; Ethyl acetate 56.0; Tetrahydrofuran 5.00; and 1,4-Dioxane 3.00. The facility`s existing carbon adsorption control system was nearing the end of its useful life, and the operators sought to install an air pollution control system capable of meeting MACT requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. Several stand-alone and hybrid control technologies were considered for replacement of the carbon adsorption system at the facility. This paper examines the following technologies: carbon adsorption, membrane separation, thermal oxidation, membrane separation-carbon adsorption, and condensation-carbon adsorption. Each control technology is described; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing each technology for the steroid processing plant are examined; and capital and operating costs associated with the implementation of each technology are presented. The rationale for the technology ultimately chosen to control VOC and HAP emissions is presented.

  7. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness of metagenomic-based enzyme discovery in lignocellulytic microbial communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Gladden, J.G.; Allgaier, M.; D'haeseleer, P.; Fortney, J.L.; Reddy, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Singer, S.W.; Vander Gheynst, J.; Silver, W.L.; Simmons, B.; Hazen, T.C.

    2010-03-01

    Producing cellulosic biofuels from plant material has recently emerged as a key U.S. Department of Energy goal. For this technology to be commercially viable on a large scale, it is critical to make production cost efficient by streamlining both the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass and fuel production. Many natural ecosystems efficiently degrade lignocellulosic biomass and harbor enzymes that, when identified, could be used to increase the efficiency of commercial biomass deconstruction. However, ecosystems most likely to yield relevant enzymes, such as tropical rain forest soil in Puerto Rico, are often too complex for enzyme discovery using current metagenomic sequencing technologies. One potential strategy to overcome this problem is to selectively cultivate the microbial communities from these complex ecosystems on biomass under defined conditions, generating less complex biomass-degrading microbial populations. To test this premise, we cultivated microbes from Puerto Rican soil or green waste compost under precisely defined conditions in the presence dried ground switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) or lignin, respectively, as the sole carbon source. Phylogenetic profiling of the two feedstock-adapted communities using SSU rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing or phylogenetic microarray analysis revealed that the adapted communities were significantly simplified compared to the natural communities from which they were derived. Several members of the lignin-adapted and switchgrass-adapted consortia are related to organisms previously characterized as biomass degraders, while others were from less well-characterized phyla. The decrease in complexity of these communities make them good candidates for metagenomic sequencing and will likely enable the reconstruction of a greater number of full length genes, leading to the discovery of novel lignocellulose-degrading enzymes adapted to feedstocks and conditions of interest.

  8. Documented Safety Analysis Addendum for the Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility Core Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2009-05-01

    The Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility (NRAD) is a Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor which was installed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) in the mid 1970s. The facility provides researchers the capability to examine both irradiated and non-irradiated materials in support of reactor fuel and components programs through non-destructive neutron radiography examination. The facility has been used in the past as one facet of a suite of reactor fuels and component examination facilities available to researchers at the INL and throughout the DOE complex. The facility has also served various commercial research activities in addition to the DOE research and development support. The reactor was initially constructed using Fuel Lifetime Improvement Program (FLIP)- type highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel obtained from the dismantled Puerto Rico Nuclear Center (PRNC) reactor. In accordance with international non-proliferation agreements, the NRAD core will be converted to a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and will continue to utilize the PRNC control rods, control rod drives, startup source, and instrument console as was previously used with the HEU core. The existing NRAD Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was created and maintained in the preferred format of the day, combining sections of both DOE-STD-3009 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.70. An addendum was developed to cover the refueling and reactor operation with the LEU core. This addendum follows the existing SAR format combining required formats from both the DOE and NRC. This paper discusses the project to successfully write a compliant and approved addendum to the existing safety basis documents.

  9. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  10. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  11. 102940_EEREcoloringbook_spanish.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    folleto para colorear ENERGÍA HIDRÁULICA ENERGÍA SOLAR TU CASA ENERGÍA GEOTÉRMICA BIOENERGÍA ENERGÍA EÓLICA ¡Forma parte de la nueva generación en energía limpia! ponte en onda Energía limpia puede venir del sol. 2 Energía en el viento puede producir electricidad. Nosotros podemos crear energía con el movimiento del agua. Bioenergía viene de plantas que podemos convertir a combustibles. Leña Trocitos de madera Paja Maíz Pastos Altos Podemos usar energía de la tierra para

  12. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamone, Salvatore Concistr, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  13. SDAV Viz July Progress Update: LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sewell, Christopher Meyer

    2012-07-30

    SDAV Viz July Progress Update: (1) VPIC (Vector Particle in Cell) Kinetic Plasma Simulation Code - (a) Implemented first version of an in-situ adapter based on Paraview CoProcessing Library, (b) Three pipelines: vtkDataSetMapper, vtkContourFilter, vtkPistonContour, (c) Next, resolve issue at boundaries of processor domains; add more advanced viz/analysis pipelines; (2) Halo finding/merger trees - (a) Summer student Wathsala W. from University of Utah is working on data-parallel halo finder algorithm using PISTON, (b) Timo Bremer (LLNL), Valerio Pascucci (Utah), George Zagaris (Kitware), and LANL people are interested in using merger trees for tracking the evolution of halos in cosmo simulations; discussed possible overlap with work by Salman Habib and Katrin Heitmann (Argonne) during their visit to LANL 7/11; (3) PISTON integration in ParaView - Now available from ParaView github.

  14. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 AÇORIANO ORIENTAL SEGUNDA-FEIRA, 5 DE MARÇO DE 2012 PUB Da Graciosa para a Índia graças à estação atmosférica Carlos está atualmente a trabalhar na estação atmosférica móvel instalada na Índia, a dois mil metros de altitude Estar no lugar certo na hora cer- ta pode mudar radicalmente a vida de uma pessoa. Foi isso que aconteceu ao graciosense Carlos Sousa, de 41 anos, que começou por ser trabalhador daconstrução civil antes de emigrar para os Es- tados Unidos da América. No

  15. Ponte en onda: prende la energía limpia, (Spanish) Get Current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    Cambiar a tecnologías de energía limpia significa que fortalecemos la economía y protegemos al medio ambiente. Este libreto de actividades educativas para todas las edades promueve el uso consciente de la energía, con datos de distintas formas de energía aplicables y una variedad de rompecabezas y crucigramas en temas energéticos.

  16. Collaboration Topics - Visualization | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Visualization This collaboration area focuses on visualization and data analysis and centers on the open source development of the Visualization Toolkit (VTK), which forms the basis of our customized visualization and analysis tools (ParaView, VisIt and LOVE). We are partnering on common VTK needs and working on methods for visualizing and analyzing data on advanced architectures that are memory and I/O constrained. Accomplishments 1) Portions of the CEA visualization tool

  17. Correlated electron dynamics with time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Three-dimensional helium (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Correlated electron dynamics with time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo: Three-dimensional helium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Correlated electron dynamics with time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo: Three-dimensional helium Here the recently proposed time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo method is applied to three dimensional para- and ortho-helium atoms subjected to an external electromagnetic field with amplitude sufficient

  18. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-11-10

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities and procedures to implement the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) Cancels DOE O 5440.1D. Canceled by DOE O 451.1 of 9-11-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 5b(1) and 6a(23) is canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

  19. Remote Visualization on Cooley Using VNC | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Changes from Tukey to Cooley Compiling and Linking Using Cobalt on Cooley Visit on Cooley Paraview on Cooley ParaView Tutorial VNC on Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Remote Visualization on Cooley Using VNC When running graphics applications on Cooley, it is best to use the client/server mode, when available, where a lightweight client can run on

  20. Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Basic and applied research in theoretical continuum dynamics, modern hydrodynamic theory, materials modeling, global climate modeling, numerical algorithm development, and large-scale computational simulations. Global climate modeling simulation The Art of Climate Modeling Global climate change ParaView visualization READ MORE Multiscale modeling Multiscale Modeling Strain contours illustrate the process of shear localization in metallic materials Projectile

  1. User Data Forum Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M01: Perspectives from DOE June 16, 2014 | Author(s): Laura Biven, Ph.D. Senior Science and Technology Advisor, DOE Office of the Deputy Director for Science Programs | Download File: M01-2014JuneNERSCBIVEN.pdf | pdf | 2.6 MB M05: In situ Visualization with the Sierra Simulation Framework Using ParaView Catalyst June 16, 2014 | Author(s): Jeff Mauldin, Thomas Otahal, David Karelitz, Alan Scott, Warren Hunt, Nathan Fabian, Sandia National Laboratories | Download File:

  2. RAIL ROUTING PRACTICES AND PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on "Strawman" Report: RAIL ROUTING PRACTICES AND PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES Number Section Comment Response RTG-1-AAR SECTION II Safeguards Routing Regulations, Para. 2 The NRC has identified five types of route characteristics that receive special consideration when NRC staff review routes for approval pursuant to 10 CFR 73: (1) routes through highly populated areas; (2) routes that would place the shipment or escort vehicle in a significantly disadvantageous position (for example, tunnels

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performed molecular simulation to understand the role of solvent in the production of renewable p-xylene, a key monomer for green plastics. Driving up the Yield of Para-Xylene Work was performed at the Univ. of Delaware and Massachusetts led by Sandler's, Vlachos' and Dauenhauer's groups Research Details - Configurational biased Monte Carlo simulations were preformed for multicomponent systems of p- xylene production. - Hydrophobic solvents expel water and thereby reduce hydrolysis of DMF and

  4. Engineering a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase with high selectivity for the condensed lignin precursor coniferyl alchohol

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Yuanheng; Shanklin, John; Mohammad -Wadud Bhuiya; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2015-09-16

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create anmore » enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. Lastly, the resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta.« less

  5. Engineering a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase with high selectivity for the condensed lignin precursor coniferyl alchohol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yuanheng; Shanklin, John; Mohammad -Wadud Bhuiya; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2015-09-16

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create an enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. Lastly, the resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta.

  6. Changes to Saturn's zonal-mean tropospheric thermal structure after the 2010-2011 northern hemisphere storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achterberg, R. K.; Hesman, B. E.; Gierasch, P. J.; Conrath, B. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Flasar, F. M.

    2014-05-10

    We use far-infrared (20-200 μm) data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on the Cassini spacecraft to determine the zonal-mean temperature and hydrogen para-fraction in Saturn's upper troposphere from observations taken before and after the large northern hemisphere storm in 2010-2011. During the storm, zonal mean temperatures in the latitude band between approximately 25°N and 45°N (planetographic latitude) increased by about 3 K, while the zonal mean hydrogen para-fraction decreased by about 0.04 over the same latitudes, at pressures greater than about 300 mbar. These changes occurred over the same latitude range as the disturbed cloud band seen in visible images. The observations are consistent with low para-fraction gas being brought up from the level of the water cloud by the strong convective plume associated with the storm, while being heated by condensation of water vapor, and then advected zonally by the winds near the plume tops in the upper troposphere.

  7. RVA. 3-D Visualization and Analysis Software to Support Management of Oil and Gas Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keefer, Donald A.; Shaffer, Eric G.; Storsved, Brynne; Vanmoer, Mark; Angrave, Lawrence; Damico, James R.; Grigsby, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    A free software application, RVA, has been developed as a plugin to the US DOE-funded ParaView visualization package, to provide support in the visualization and analysis of complex reservoirs being managed using multi-fluid EOR techniques. RVA, for Reservoir Visualization and Analysis, was developed as an open-source plugin to the 64 bit Windows version of ParaView 3.14. RVA was developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with contributions from the Illinois State Geological Survey, Department of Computer Science and National Center for Supercomputing Applications. RVA was designed to utilize and enhance the state-of-the-art visualization capabilities within ParaView, readily allowing joint visualization of geologic framework and reservoir fluid simulation model results. Particular emphasis was placed on enabling visualization and analysis of simulation results highlighting multiple fluid phases, multiple properties for each fluid phase (including flow lines), multiple geologic models and multiple time steps. Additional advanced functionality was provided through the development of custom code to implement data mining capabilities. The built-in functionality of ParaView provides the capacity to process and visualize data sets ranging from small models on local desktop systems to extremely large models created and stored on remote supercomputers. The RVA plugin that we developed and the associated User Manual provide improved functionality through new software tools, and instruction in the use of ParaView-RVA, targeted to petroleum engineers and geologists in industry and research. The RVA web site (http://rva.cs.illinois.edu) provides an overview of functions, and the development web site (https://github.com/shaffer1/RVA) provides ready access to the source code, compiled binaries, user manual, and a suite of demonstration data sets. Key functionality has been included to support a range of reservoirs visualization and analysis needs, including: sophisticated connectivity analysis, cross sections through simulation results between selected wells, simplified volumetric calculations, global vertical exaggeration adjustments, ingestion of UTChem simulation results, ingestion of Isatis geostatistical framework models, interrogation of joint geologic and reservoir modeling results, joint visualization and analysis of well history files, location-targeted visualization, advanced correlation analysis, visualization of flow paths, and creation of static images and animations highlighting targeted reservoir features.

  8. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2015-03-05

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3?, and POx (representing the sum of PO43?, HPO42?, and H2PO4?)) and five potential competitors (plantmoreroots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive) followed this order: (1) for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2) for NO3?, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3) for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed competition among different nutrient consumers. Although we used as many observations as we could obtain, more nutrient addition experiments in tropical systems would greatly benefit model testing and calibration. In summary, the N-COM model provides an ecologically consistent representation of nutrient competition appropriate for land BGC models integrated in Earth System Models.less

  9. Final Report for EPSCoR Implementation Award DE-FG02-08ER46528 to University of Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egami, Takeshi

    2015-12-15

    With the completion of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and upgrading of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the state of Tennessee now leads the world in the capability of neutron scattering research. This project aimed at directing the great impact of these facilities to researchers in the EPSCoR states, Tennessee in particular, by creating a research collaboration network around these facilities. The plan consisted of two parts: (1) Direct effort to increase the user base through the travel fellowship for graduate students and faculty from the EPSCoR states to use the neutron facilities at the ORNL, and through workshops and schools on the application of neutron scattering, and (2) Research collaboration among the core participants from UTK, ORNL and other states. The EPSCoR Travel Fellowship Program has supported over 300 distinct and 600 cumulative neutron facility users and over 250 workshop participants, with the total of nearly 600 distinct recipients. This program has been highly popular particularly among young faculty members who often have difficulty in raising travel funds, and enabled participation of young graduate students to neutron research. This program has been the foundation of this project. We supported several educational workshops, organized one (“neutrons for novice”) by ourselves each year, targeting non-users of neutron scattering. These efforts significantly contributed to expand the neutron user base among the EPSCoR states. The core research targeted condensed matter physics and soft matter sciences. The core research groups participating in this project include not only researchers from Tennessee but those from Kansas, South Carolina, Puerto Rico and Louisiana, making this project a national, rather than regional, enterprise. Collaborations that were seeded by this project have grown into two major projects, one in materials science (irradiation effects on high-entropy alloys) and the other in soft matter sciences (bio-membranes). Through this project we promoted the use of neutron scattering, particularly in biological and life sciences and in energy sciences, and facilitated the DOE investment in this field to impact wide fields of science and engineering. This project was administered through the Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences (JINS) of the University of Tennessee (UT) and ORNL. JINS is jointly supported by both UT and ORNL, and participate in organizing workshops and schools to promote the use of neutron scattering.

  10. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-04-29

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore » large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (66 ± 2%) was rapid (11 to 26 years; mean and SE: 18 ± 3 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial–millennial turnover was typically much less abundant (34 ± 3%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral-associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were statistically similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–25% of annual litter production. Observed trends in mineral-associated Δ14C over time could not be fit using the single-pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and Δ14C as compared with a more realistic two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils documented here are supported by findings from paired 14C studies in other types of ecosystems, and suggest that most mineral-associated C cycles relatively rapidly (decadal scales) across ecosystems that span a broad range of state factors.« less

  11. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-01-16

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore » large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (74 ± 4%) was rapid (9 to 29 years, mean and SE 20 ± 2 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial – millennial turnover was much less abundant (26%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–30% of annual litterfall production (estimated by doubling aboveground litterfall). Observed trends in mineral-associated Δ14C over time could not be fit using the single pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and Δ14C as compared with a more realistic constrained two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils implied by our data suggest that other studies using single-pool Δ14C models of mineral-associated C dynamics, unconstrained by multiple time points, may have systematically underestimated C turnover.« less

  12. Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Schroeder

    2011-11-13

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II, Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling at Kitware Inc. in collaboration with Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The goal of the work was to develop collaborative visualization tools for large-scale data as illustrated in the figure below. The solutions we proposed address the typical problems faced by geographicallyand organizationally-separated research and engineering teams, who produce large data (either through simulation or experimental measurement) and wish to work together to analyze and understand their data. Because the data is large, we expect that it cannot be easily transported to each team member's work site, and that the visualization server must reside near the data. Further, we also expect that each work site has heterogeneous resources: some with large computing clients, tiled (or large) displays and high bandwidth; others sites as simple as a team member on a laptop computer. Our solution is based on the open-source, widely used ParaView large-data visualization application. We extended this tool to support multiple collaborative clients who may locally visualize data, and then periodically rejoin and synchronize with the group to discuss their findings. Options for managing session control, adding annotation, and defining the visualization pipeline, among others, were incorporated. We also developed and deployed a Web visualization framework based on ParaView that enables the Web browser to act as a participating client in a collaborative session. The ParaView Web Visualization framework leverages various Web technologies including WebGL, JavaScript, Java and Flash to enable interactive 3D visualization over the web using ParaView as the visualization server. We steered the development of this technology by teaming with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. SLAC has a computationally-intensive problem important to the nations scientific progress as described shortly. Further, SLAC researchers routinely generate massive amounts of data, and frequently collaborate with other researchers located around the world. Thus SLAC is an ideal teammate through which to develop, test and deploy this technology. The nature of the datasets generated by simulations performed at SLAC presented unique visualization challenges especially when dealing with higher-order elements that were addressed during this Phase II. During this Phase II, we have developed a strong platform for collaborative visualization based on ParaView. We have developed and deployed a ParaView Web Visualization framework that can be used for effective collaboration over the Web. Collaborating and visualizing over the Web presents the community with unique opportunities for sharing and accessing visualization and HPC resources that hitherto with either inaccessible or difficult to use. The technology we developed in here will alleviate both these issues as it becomes widely deployed and adopted.

  13. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Allen D. Malony; Dr. Sameer S. Shende; Dr. Kevin A. Huck; Mr. Alan Morris, and Mr. Wyatt Spear

    2012-03-14

    The goal of the FACETS project (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) was to provide a multiphysics, parallel framework application (FACETS) that will enable whole-device modeling for the U.S. fusion program, to provide the modeling infrastructure needed for ITER, the next step fusion confinement device. Through use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, FACETS is able to switch from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics in a flexible manner. This enables use of simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that can take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS does so in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application execute in parallel by utilizing task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. ParaTools, Inc. was tasked with supporting the performance analysis and tuning of the FACETS components and framework in order to achieve the parallel scaling goals of the project. The TAU Performance System® was used for instrumentation, measurement, archiving, and profile / tracing analysis. ParaTools, Inc. also assisted in FACETS performance engineering efforts. Through the use of the TAU Performance System, ParaTools provided instrumentation, measurement, analysis and archival support for the FACETS project. Performance optimization of key components has yielded significant performance speedups. TAU was integrated into the FACETS build for both the full coupled application and the UEDGE component. The performance database provided archival storage of the performance regression testing data generated by the project, and helped to track improvements in the software development.

  14. UNVEILING SOURCES OF HEATING IN THE VICINITY OF THE ORION BN/KL HOT CORE AS TRACED BY HIGHLY EXCITED INVERSION TRANSITIONS OF AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Matthews, L. D.

    2011-09-20

    Using the Expanded Very Large Array, we have mapped the vicinity of the Orion BN/KL Hot Core with subarcsecond angular resolution in seven metastable inversion transitions of ammonia (NH{sub 3}): (J, K) = (6,6) to (12,12). This emission comes from levels up to 1500 K above the ground state, enabling identification of source(s) responsible for heating the region. We used this multi-transition data set to produce images of the rotational/kinetic temperature (T {sub rot}/T {sub kin}) and the column density N {sub col} of NH{sub 3} for ortho and para species separately and on a position-by-position basis. We find T {sub rot} and N {sub col} in the range 160-490 K and (1-4) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, respectively. Our spatially resolved images show that the highest (column) density and hottest gas is found in a northeast-southwest elongated ridge to the southeast of Source I. We have also measured the ortho-para ratio of ammonia, estimated to vary in the range 0.9-1.6. Enhancement of ortho with respect to para and the offset of hot NH{sub 3} emission peaks from known (proto)stellar sources provide evidence that the NH{sub 3} molecules have been released from dust grains into the gas phase through the passage of shocks and not by stellar radiation. We propose that the combined effect of Source I's proper motion and its low-velocity outflow impinging on a pre-existing dense medium is responsible for the excitation of NH{sub 3} and the Orion Hot Core. Finally, we found for the first time evidence of a slow ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) and compact ({approx}1000 AU) outflow toward IRc7.

  15. Using Cobalt on Cooley | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes from Tukey to Cooley Compiling and Linking Using Cobalt on Cooley Visit on Cooley Paraview on Cooley ParaView Tutorial VNC on Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Using Cobalt on Cooley Overview Like our Blue Gene system, Cooley uses the Cobalt job scheduler. Use the "qstat" command to see what jobs are in the queue, and the "nodelist"

  16. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  17. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-11-19

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  18. Translation--Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington - FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Declaración de Impacto Ambiental Final para el Cierre de Tanques y la Administración de Desechos del Establecimiento de Hanford, Richland, Washington (DIAF CC & AD) (Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington) (DOE/EIS-0391) Preguntas Frecuentes ¿Cuáles son las acciones propuestas del Departamento de Energía de los Estados Unidos (DDE) (U.S. Department of Energy) presentadas en la DIAF CC & AD? La DIAF CC &

  19. Direct non-Born-Oppenheimer variational calculations of all bound vibrational states corresponding to the first rotational excitation of D{sub 2} performed with explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Kirnosov, Nikita; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-05-07

    Direct variational calculations where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not assumed are done for all rovibrational states of the D{sub 2} molecule corresponding to first excited rotational level (the N = 1 states). All-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions are used in the calculations. The exponential parameters of the Gaussians are optimized with the aid of analytically calculated energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The results allow to determine the ortho-para spin isomerization energies as a function of the vibrational quantum number.

  20. Upcoming Events | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May16 First-Principles Approaches for Intermolecular Interactions: From Gas-Phase Dimers to Liquid Water and Molecular Crystal Polymorphism 10:00 am Building 240, Room 4301 Lessons Learned from the MagLab Cell 14 Magnet Cooling Water System Incident 10:00 am Building 402 Active at Argonne Challenge Kickoff 11:00 am Building 213 (Cafeteria) Choral Group Rehearsal 11:45 am Building 362 Using ParaView for Scientific Data Visualization 1:00 pm Building 401, Room A1100 Beam-Normal Single-Spin

  1. Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution Print For the first time, a team of scientists led by Roger Kornberg has synthesized thiol-covered gold nanoparticles and, using ALS Beamlines 5.0.2 and 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamlines 11-1 and 11-3, conclusively ascertained their atomic structure (at 1.1 Å resolution). The gold-thiol nanoparticle consists of 102 gold atoms surrounded by 44 molecules of a thiol compound (para-mercaptobenzoic acid, or p-MBA). The central gold atoms

  2. Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution Print For the first time, a team of scientists led by Roger Kornberg has synthesized thiol-covered gold nanoparticles and, using ALS Beamlines 5.0.2 and 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamlines 11-1 and 11-3, conclusively ascertained their atomic structure (at 1.1 Å resolution). The gold-thiol nanoparticle consists of 102 gold atoms surrounded by 44 molecules of a thiol compound (para-mercaptobenzoic acid, or p-MBA). The central gold atoms

  3. Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution Print For the first time, a team of scientists led by Roger Kornberg has synthesized thiol-covered gold nanoparticles and, using ALS Beamlines 5.0.2 and 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamlines 11-1 and 11-3, conclusively ascertained their atomic structure (at 1.1 Å resolution). The gold-thiol nanoparticle consists of 102 gold atoms surrounded by 44 molecules of a thiol compound (para-mercaptobenzoic acid, or p-MBA). The central gold atoms

  4. Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution Print For the first time, a team of scientists led by Roger Kornberg has synthesized thiol-covered gold nanoparticles and, using ALS Beamlines 5.0.2 and 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamlines 11-1 and 11-3, conclusively ascertained their atomic structure (at 1.1 Å resolution). The gold-thiol nanoparticle consists of 102 gold atoms surrounded by 44 molecules of a thiol compound (para-mercaptobenzoic acid, or p-MBA). The central gold atoms

  5. Monolayer-induced band shifts at Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkinen, A. J. Kim, Chul-Soo; Kushto, G. P.

    2014-01-27

    We report our study of the interfacial electronic structure of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces that have been chemically modified with various organic monolayers, including octadecene and two para-substituted benzene derivatives. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals an upward band shift, associated with the assembly of these organic monolayers on the Si substrates, that does not correlate with either the dipole moment or the electron withdrawing/donating character of the molecular moieties. This suggests that the nature and quality of the self-assembled monolayer and the intrinsic electronic structure of the semiconductor material define the interfacial electronic structure of the functionalized Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces.

  6. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures in soil using phanerochaete chrysosporium in nutrient rich, non-ligninolytic conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yadav, Jagjit S.; Reddy, Chilekampalli A.; Quensen, John F.; Tiedje, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Substantial degradation of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures is carried out using the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, under nutrient, carbon and nitrogen source rich, non-ligninolytic conditions. The PCBs with various numbers of ortho, meta, and para chlorines were extensively degraded, indicating relative nonspecificity for the position of chlorine substitutions on the biphenyl ring. Maximal degradation of PCBs in a mixture was observed in malt extract medium (18.4% on a molar basis), in which most of the individual PCBs were degraded.

  7. Improved di-p-xylylene polymer and apparatus and method for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jahn, R.K.; Liepins, R.

    Solid di-para-xylyene dimer is sublimed in a sublimation furnace at approximately 100 to 200/sup 0/C and subsequently conducted to a pyrolysis furnace where it is pyrolyzed to the diradical p-xylylene monomer while in the vapor state at approximately 600 degrees C. The diradical monomer is then introduced into a deposition chamber for deposition onto a suitable substrate. The deposition chamber includes electrodes for producing a low pressure plasma through which the diradical monomer passes prior to deposition. The interaction of the diradical monomer with the low pressure plasma results in the formation of poly-p-xylyene film which is exceptionally hard and thermally stable.

  8. Low temperature bainitic ferrite: Evidence of carbon super-saturation and tetragonality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garcia-Mateo, C.; Jimenez, J. A.; Yen, Hung-Wei; Miller, Michael K.; Morales-Rivas, L; Kuntz, M; Ringer, S. P.; Yang, Jer-Ren; Caballero, Francesca G.

    2015-03-31

    Experimental evidence indicates that bainitic ferrite formed by transformation at low temperatures (200-350 °C) includes quantities of carbon in solid solution far beyond those expected from para-equilibrium. A change in the conventional symmetry of the bainitic ferrite lattice from cubic to tetragonal explains the abnormal solid solubility detected. This carbon supersaturation was measured by atom probe tomography, and the tetragonality of the bainitic ferrite, was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  9. Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solving the Unsovlable: The Nanostructure of Gold at 1.1 Å Resolution Print For the first time, a team of scientists led by Roger Kornberg has synthesized thiol-covered gold nanoparticles and, using ALS Beamlines 5.0.2 and 8.2.2 and SSRL Beamlines 11-1 and 11-3, conclusively ascertained their atomic structure (at 1.1 Å resolution). The gold-thiol nanoparticle consists of 102 gold atoms surrounded by 44 molecules of a thiol compound (para-mercaptobenzoic acid, or p-MBA). The central gold atoms

  10. Compiling and Linking | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes from Tukey to Cooley Compiling and Linking Using Cobalt on Cooley Visit on Cooley Paraview on Cooley ParaView Tutorial VNC on Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Compiling and Linking Compilers and MPI GNU compilers, version 4.4.7, are installed and are available in your default environment. To use version 4.8.1 of the GNU compilers instead, add +gcc-4.8.1 to

  11. Health assessment for Stringfellow, Glen Avon, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAT08001286. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-25

    The Stringfellow Hazardous Waste site lies at the head of the Pyrite Canyon in Riverside County less than a mile north of the community of Glen Avon. The principal contaminants of concern in the ground water include trichloroethene (TCE), chloroform, chlorobenzene, dichlorobenzene, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, para-chlorobenzene sulfonic acid (p-CBSA), chromium, and cadmium. The principal environmental pathways for contaminant transport include ground water, surface water, soil, sediment, and air. The Pyrite Canyon portion of the site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from probable past and present exposure to hazardous substances that may result in adverse human health effects.

  12. DOE Chair of Excellence in Environmental Disciplines-Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurunganty, Sastry; Loran, Roberto; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Hijazi, Yazan; Nieto, Santander; Gomez, Will A.; Duconge, Jose; Cotto, María del C.; Muniz, Carlos; Diaz, Francisco J.; Neira, Carlos F.; Marquez, Francisco; Del Valle, W.; Thommes, M.

    2014-02-19

    The report Massie Chair of Excellence Program at Universidad del Turabo, contract DE-FG02-95EW12610, during the period of 9/29/1995 to 9/29/2011. The initial program aims included development of academic programs in the Environmental Sciences and Engineering, and Research and Development focused initially on environmentally friendly processes and later revised also include: renewable energy and international cooperation. From 1995 -2005, the Program at UT lead the establishment of the new undergraduate program in electrical engineering at the School of Engineering (SoE), worked on requirements to achieve ABET accreditation of the SoE B.S. Mechanical Engineering and B.S. Electrical Engineering programs, mentored junior faculty, taught undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, and revised the electrical engineering curriculum. Engineering undergraduate laboratories were designed and developed. The following research sub-project was developed: Research and development of new perovskite-alumina hydrogen permeable asymmetrical nanostructured membranes for hydrogen purification, and extremely high specific surface area silica materials for hydrogen storage in the form of ammonia, Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Subproject PI, Dr. Santander Nieto and Mr. Will Gómez Research Assistants. In 2006, the Massie Chair of Excellence Program was transferred to the National Nuclear Security Agency, NNSA and DNN. DoE required a revised proposal aligned with the priorities of the Administration. The revised approved program aims included: (1) Research (2) Student Development: promote the development of minority undergraduate and graduate students through research teams, internships, conferences, new courses; and, (3) Support: (a) Research administration and (b) Dissemination through international conferences, the UT Distinguished Lecturer Series in STEM fields and at the annual Universidad del Turabo (UT) Researchers Conference. Research included: Sub-Project 1: Synthesis and Characterization of low Refractive Index Aerogel Silica for Cherenkov Counters- Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Sub-project PI, Dr. Jose Duconge Sub-project Co-PI, Dr. Santander Nieto Assistant Researcher, Francisco Diaz and Carlos Neira Associate Researchers. The initial aim of this sub-project was changed to the synthesis and characterization of extremely high specific surface area aerogel silica for gas storage. A high specific surface area silica gel that has applications in gas drying, cleaning operation useful in nuclear industry in process was developed. Sub-Project 2: Investigation Study of Magnetic and Electronic Transport Properties at Material Interfaces in Magnetic Multilayer Heterostructure using Gd. – Dr. Yazan Hijazi, Sub-project Co-PI. UT developed the capability and infrastructure to produce high quality thin-film magnetic films and magnetic multilayer structures with fine control over film quality and thickness using sputter deposition capability to perform in-house electric and magnetic characterization of these films. The research experimentally quantified the effect of Gd incorporation within the magnetic multilayer structure and produce magnetic media with exchanged decoupled multilevel magnetic anisotropy. From September 2006 to September 2011 the Massie Chair produced nineteen (19) publications, (including 3 books), five (5) presentations and three (3) international conferences abstracts. A total of fourteen (14) undergraduates and (6) graduate students acquired research experience. Two Ph.D. students presented their dissertations on topics related to nuclear energy and graduated as follows: María Cotto (May 2009) and Eric Calderón (May 2011). Five of the participating undergraduate students graduated: Ramon Polanco (BSME, May 2009), Jason Pérez (BSEE, May 2008), Rafael Colón (BSME, May 2008), Jessenia Marfisi (BS Chemistry, May 2008). Eleven (11) students were sent to National Laboratories (LANL, SNL and LLNL), NNSA and DoE facilities for summer internships. Twenty eight (28) undergraduate students participated in Summer Internships (2010, 2011) at the Puerto Rico Energy Center (PREC). Four international energy symposiums were held aligned with the DoE and the NNSA missions and dissemination of Massie Chair research activities (660 attendees). Academic programs developed or revised under advice of the Massie Chair: Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences (revised); MSc in Environmental Sciences (revised); MSc in Mechanical Engineering with concentration in Alternative Energy (new); BS in Industrial Management & Engineering (revised to fulfill the ABET requirements); BS in Civil Engineering including an environmental option (new); BS in Electrical Engineering (revised); and, Associate in Renewable Energy (new). The Puerto Rico Energy Center (PREC) was designed and developed under the Massie Chair initiative. Thirty-three (33) proposals were developed and submitted during the period of which 12 were approved in the amount of $ $1,931,306.

  13. Studies of thin films and surfaces with optical harmonic generation and electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilk, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum frequency generation (SFG) were used to study C{sup 60} thin solid films (low energy ED forbidden electronic excitations), and electron spectroscopy was used to study organic overlayers (xylenes) on Pt(111). Theory of SHG from a thin film is described in terms of surface and bulk contributions as well as local and nonlocal contributions to the optical nonlinearities. (1)In situ SHG data on C{sub 60} films during UHV film growth can be described in terms of only nonlocal contributions to both surface and bulk nonlinear susceptibilities. Microscopic origin of SHG response is discussed in terms of electric quadrupole and ED transitions of C{sub 60}. (2)Adsorption and thermal decomposition of ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111) is studied using HREELS, LEED, AES, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. We have observed preferential decomposition of the methyl groups which leads to distinct decomposition pathways for ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111).

  14. H{sub 2}AgCl: A spectroscopic study of a dihydrogen complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grubbs, G. S.; Obenchain, Daniel A.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Novick, Stewart E.

    2014-09-21

    H{sub 2}AgCl has been observed on a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer equipped with laser ablation source and determined to be a dihydrogen complex. Transitions up to J = 32 have been measured and analyzed for four isotopologues of the complex containing ortho and para H{sub 2}. The ortho and para spin states have been included in one fit, a deviation from the typical H{sub 2} complex. Rotational constants B and C, centrifugal distortion constants ?{sub J} and ?{sub JK}, nuclear electric quadrupole coupling constants ?{sub aa}, ?{sub bb}, and ?{sub cc} for {sup 35}Cl and {sup 37}Cl have been fit for both spin states while nuclear spin-nuclear spin constants D{sub aa}, D{sub bb}, and D{sub cc}, and nuclear spin-rotation constant C{sub aa} have been reported for the ortho spin state. Quantum chemical calculations predict a strong bonding interaction and the strength of the complex has been related to reported ?{sub aa} and ?{sub J} values amongst a host of comparable species, including the AgCl monomer itself. Bond lengths have been determined for AgCl, AgH{sub 2} center-of-mass, and HH and are reported.

  15. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area sponsors research into the underlying solid, structural and fluid mechanics and heat transfer necessary for the development of state-of-the-art general purpose computational software. The scale of computational capability spans office workstations, departmental computer servers, and Cray-class supercomputers. The DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ codes have achieved world fame through our broad collaborators program, in addition to their strong support of on-going Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. Several technology transfer initiatives have been based on these established codes, teaming LLNL analysts and researchers with counterparts in industry, extending code capability to specific industrial interests of casting, metalforming, and automobile crash dynamics. The next-generation solid/structural mechanics code, ParaDyn, is targeted toward massively parallel computers, which will extend performance from gigaflop to teraflop power. Our work for FY-92 is described in the following eight articles: (1) Solution Strategies: New Approaches for Strongly Nonlinear Quasistatic Problems Using DYNA3D; (2) Enhanced Enforcement of Mechanical Contact: The Method of Augmented Lagrangians; (3) ParaDyn: New Generation Solid/Structural Mechanics Codes for Massively Parallel Processors; (4) Composite Damage Modeling; (5) HYDRA: A Parallel/Vector Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional, Transient, Incompressible Viscous How; (6) Development and Testing of the TRIM3D Radiation Heat Transfer Code; (7) A Methodology for Calculating the Seismic Response of Critical Structures; and (8) Reinforced Concrete Damage Modeling.

  16. Cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (TcbB) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, expressed in Escherichia coli DH5{alpha}(pTCB149), catalyzes enantioselective dehydrogenase reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raschke, H.; Fleischmann, T.; Meer, J.R. van der; Kohler, H.P.E.

    1999-12-01

    cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (CDD) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, cloned into Escherichia coli DH5{alpha}(pTCB149) was able to oxidize cis-dihydrodihydroxy derivatives (cis-dihydrodiols) of dihydronaphthalene, indene, and four para-substituted toluenes to the corresponding catechols. During the incubation of a nonracemic mixture of cis-1,2-indandiol, only the (+)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was oxidized; the (-)-cis-(S,2R) enantiomer remained unchanged, CDD oxidized both enantiomers of cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, but oxidation of the (+)-cis-(1S,2R) enantiomer was delayed until the (-)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was completely depleted. When incubated with nonracemic mixtures of para-substituted cis-toluene dihydrodiols, CDD always oxidized the major enantiomer at a higher rate than the minor enantiomer. When incubated with racemic 1-indanol, CDD enantioselectively transformed the (+)-(1S) enatiomer to 1-indanone. This stereoselective transformation shows that CDD also acted as an alcohol dehydrogenase. Additionally, CDD was able to oxidize (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene, (+)-cis-monochlorobiphenyl dihydrodiols, and (+)-cis-toluene dihydrodiol to the corresponding catechols.

  17. ThreatView

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-09-25

    The ThreatView project is based on our prior work with the existing ParaView open-source scientific visualization application. Where ParaView provides a grapical client optimized scientific visualization over the VTK parallel client server architecture, ThreatView provides a client optimized for more generic visual analytics over the same architecture. Because ThreatView is based on the VTK parallel client-server architecture, data sources can reside on remote hosts, and processing and rendering can be performed in parallel. As seenmore » in Fig. 1, ThreatView provides four main methods for visualizing data: Landscape View, which displays a graph using a landscape metaphor where clusters of graph nodes produce "hills" in the landscape; Graph View, which displays a graph using a traditional "ball-and-stick" style; Table View, which displays tabular data in a standard spreadsheet; and Attribute View, which displays a tabular "histogram" of input data - for a selected table column, the Attribute View displays each unique value within the column, and the number of times that value appears in the data. There are two supplemental view types: Text View, which displays tabular data one-record-at-a-time; and the Statistics View, which displays input metadata, such as the number of vertices and edges in a graph, the number of rows in a table, etc.« less

  18. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality-controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASATs manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  19. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-03-15

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [Spanish] Una prueba de campo fue conducida para evaluar la especificidad del escarabajo suramericano defoliador Gratiana boliviana Spaeth para control biologico de Solanum viarum Dunal en los Estados Unidos. La prueba con berenjena se realizo en el campo experimental de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y una parcela control con S. viarum fue establecida a 40 km. Cien escarabajos adultos fueron liberados en cada parcela al inicio del experimento durante la fase vegetativa, y cuarenta escarabajos adicionales fueron liberados en la parcela de berenjena durante la floracion. Todas las plantas en cada parcela fueron inspeccionadas dos veces a la semana y el numero de adultos, larvas, y posturas fueron registrados. Resultados indicaron un casi completo rechazo de la berenjena por G. boliviana. Ningun dano visible de defoliacion en la berenjena fue detectado. Las pruebas concluyeron cuando las plantas de berenjena alcazaron su madurez o fueron severamente danadas por mosca blanca y acaros. Resultados corroboran previas pruebas de especificidad en laboratorio/cuarentena que indican que la berenjena no es un hospedero de G. boliviana y que la posibilidad de llegar a ser una plaga de este cultivo es muy remota. Gratiana boliviana fue aprobado para ser liberado en el campo en mayo del 2003. Ningun dano ha sido observado hasta la fecha a plantas no blanco. (author)

  20. Comparative developmental toxicity of environmentally relevant oxygenated PAHs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knecht, Andrea L.; Goodale, Britton C.; Truong, Lisa; Simonich, Michael T.; Swanson, Annika J.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-09-01

    Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) are byproducts of combustion and photo-oxidation of parent PAHs. OPAHs are widely present in the environment and pose an unknown hazard to human health. The developing zebrafish was used to evaluate a structurally diverse set of 38 OPAHs for malformation induction, gene expression changes and mitochondrial function. Zebrafish embryos were exposed from 6 to 120 h post fertilization (hpf) to a dilution series of 38 different OPAHs and evaluated for 22 developmental endpoints. AHR activation was determined via CYP1A immunohistochemistry. Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PHEQ), 1,9-benz-10-anthrone (BEZO), xanthone (XAN), benz(a)anthracene-7,12-dione (7,12-B[a]AQ), and 9,10-anthraquinone (9,10-ANTQ) were evaluated for transcriptional responses at 48 hpf, prior to the onset of malformations. qRT-PCR was conducted for a number of oxidative stress genes, including the glutathione transferase(gst), glutathione peroxidase(gpx), and superoxide dismutase(sod) families. Bioenergetics was assayed to measure in vivo oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in 26 hpf embryos exposed to OPAHs. Hierarchical clustering of the structure-activity outcomes indicated that the most toxic of the OPAHs contained adjacent diones on 6-carbon moieties or terminal, para-diones on multi-ring structures. 5-carbon moieties with adjacent diones were among the least toxic OPAHs while the toxicity of multi-ring structures with more centralized para-diones varied considerably. 9,10-PHEQ, BEZO, 7,12-B[a]AQ, and XAN exposures increased expression of several oxidative stress related genes and decreased oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a measurement of mitochondrial respiration. Comprehensive in vivo characterization of 38 structurally diverse OPAHs indicated differential AHR dependency and a prominent role for oxidative stress in the toxicity mechanisms. - Highlights: OPAHs are byproducts of combustion present in the environment. OPAHs pose a largely unknown hazard to human health. We assayed the developmental toxicology of 39 different OPAHs in zebrafish. The most toxic OPAHs contained adjacent diones or terminal, para-diones. AHR dependency varied among OPAHs, and oxidative stress influenced their toxicology.

  1. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babac, Gulru; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a Knudsen heat capacity as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  2. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tappmeyer, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    Petroleum exploration in the region was generally less in 1983 than in 1982. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Barbados increased crude production, whereas Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Trinidad-Tobago reported increases in gas production. Although drilling activities remained low compared to past years, significant oil discoveries were reported in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil. In Colombia, Cano Limon field is reported to be the largest field found in the Llanos region. In Brazil, important oil discoveries were made offshore in the Para, Potiquas, and Ampos basins. In Mexico, discoveries were reported in the Cerro Azul, Poza Rica (Chicontepec, Villahermosa, and Tabasco) areas onshore and in the Bay of Campeche offshore. In Argentina, discoveries were made in the San Jorge basin and the Noreste Tarija basin. 10 figures, 11 tables.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In s itu Visualiza(on w ith t he S ierra Simula(on F ramework U sing ParaView C atalyst Jeff M auldin, T homas O tahal, D avid K arelitz, Alan S coF, W arren H unt, N athan F abian What i s I n s itu Visualiza(on? § A t ypical v isualiza(on w orkflow: § Run s imula(on a nd o utput t he f ull 3 d m esh d ata a t s ome s parse (me i nterval. § ASer s imula(on c ompletes, l oad o utput d ata i nto a v isualiza(on tool s uch a s P araView, E nSight, V isIt, e tc. § In s itu

  4. Effects of polymethylmethacrylate-transfer residues on the growth of organic semiconductor molecules on chemical vapor deposited graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratzer, Markus Teichert, Christian; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Matkovi?, Aleksandar; Gaji?, Rado; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S.; Hofmann, Stephan

    2015-03-09

    Scalably grown and transferred graphene is a highly promising material for organic electronic applications, but controlled interfacing of graphene thereby remains a key challenge. Here, we study the growth characteristics of the important organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenyl (6P) on chemical vapor deposited graphene that has been transferred with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) onto oxidized Si wafer supports. A particular focus is on the influence of PMMA residual contamination, which we systematically reduce by H{sub 2} annealing prior to 6P deposition. We find that 6P grows in a flat-lying needle-type morphology, surprisingly independent of the level of PMMA residue and of graphene defects. Wrinkles in the graphene typically act as preferential nucleation centers. Residual PMMA does however limit the length of the resulting 6P needles by restricting molecular diffusion/attachment. We discuss the implications for organic device fabrication, with particular regard to contamination and defect tolerance.

  5. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Spanish Version) (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Los vehículos de accionamiento eléctrico se valen de la electricidad como fuente principal de energía o la utilizan para mejorar la efciencia de diseños vehiculares convencionales. Estos vehículos se pueden dividir en tres categorías: * Vehículos eléctricos híbridos (HEV, por sus siglas en inglés) * Vehículos eléctricos híbridos enchufables (PHEV, por sus siglas en inglés) * Vehículos totalmente eléctricos (EV, por sus siglas en inglés) Juntos, tienen el enorme potencial de

  6. Next generation extractants for separation of cesium from high-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartsch, R.A.; Zhou, H.; Delmau, L.H.; Moyer, B.A.

    2008-07-01

    Using calix[4]arene as a scaffold, lipophilic, proton-ionizable ligands for cesium ion extraction have been synthesized. In the 1,3-alternate conformation, lipophilic octyl groups are attached to distal oxygens on one side of the calix[4]arene molecule, and an alkylated benzo-crown-6 unit is connected to distal oxygens on the other side. One phenyl octyl ether unit bears an acidic group in the para-position which orients it directly over the polyether ring. Solvent extractions of trace cesium ion from aqueous solutions into toluene have been performed. The efficiency of cesium ion extraction as a function of the aqueous phase pH and the identity of the acidic group have been assessed. Promising results are obtained for this new series of cesium ion extractants. (authors)

  7. A density functional theory study of magneto-electric Jones birefringence of noble gases, furan homologues, and mono-substituted benzenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahleson, Tobias; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia; Rizzo, Antonio; Rikken, Geert L. J. A.

    2013-11-21

    We report on the results of a systematic ab initio study of the Jones birefringence of noble gases, of furan homologues, and of monosubstituted benzenes, in the gas phase, with the aim of analyzing the behavior and the trends within a list of systems of varying size and complexity, and of identifying candidates for a combined experimental/theoretical study of the effect. We resort here to analytic linear and nonlinear response functions in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. A correlation is made between the observable (the Jones constant) and the atomic radius for noble gases, or the permanent electric dipole and a structure/chemical reactivity descriptor as the para Hammett constant for substituted benzenes.

  8. Nanostructure induced changes in lifetime and enhanced second-harmonic response of organic-plasmonic hybrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leißner, Till; Kostiučenko, Oksana; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Fiutowski, Jacek; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2015-12-21

    In this letter we show that the optical response of organic nanofibers, grown from functionalized para-quaterphenylene molecules, can be controlled by forming organic-plasmonic hybrid systems. The interaction between nanofibers and supporting regular arrays of nanostructures leads to a strongly enhanced second harmonic response. At the same time, the fluorescence lifetime of the nanofibers is reduced from 0.32 ns for unstructured gold films to 0.22 ns for gold nanosquare arrays, demonstrating efficient organic–plasmonic interaction. To study the origin of these effects, we applied two-photon laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. These findings provide an effective approach for plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation at the nanoscale, which is attractive for nanophotonic circuitry.

  9. Di-p-xylylene polymer and method for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jahn, Randy K.; Liepins, Raimond

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming an improved poly-p-xylylene film. Solid di-para-xylylene dimer is sublimed in a sublimation furnace at approximately 100.degree. to 200.degree. C. and subsequently conducted to a pyrolysis furnace where it is pyrolyzed to the diradical p-xylylene monomer while in the vapor state at approximately 600 degrees C. The diradical monomer is then introduced into a deposition chamber for deposition onto a suitable substrate. The deposition chamber includes electrodes for producing a low pressure plasma through which the diradical monomer passes prior to deposition. The interaction of the diradical monomer with the low pressure plasma results in the formation of poly-p-xylylene film which is exceptionally hard and thermally stable.

  10. MarmotViz

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-07-09

    MarmotViz is an illustrative visualization plug-in for ParaView. It enables users to identify and track time-varying features in simulation datasets. It permits the application of illustrative visualization effects to these features including: selective visualization, feature coloring, boundary smoothing, haloing, silhouette outlining, speedlines, and strobe silhouettes. These techniques serve to assist in exploration and interpretation of simulation data and can be used to generate enhanced renderings for presentation. The MarmotViz plug-in is developed as a flexiblemore » framework, and can be easily extended to incorporate new region-of-interest (ROI) identification algorithms, feature matching and tracking algorithms, and illustrative visualization effects.« less

  11. Enzyme activity in dialkyl phosphate ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, M.F.; Dunn, J.; Li, L.-L.; Handley-Pendleton, J. M.; van der lelie, D.; Wishart, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    The activity of four metagenomic enzymes and an enzyme cloned from the straw mushroom, Volvariellavolvacea were studied in the following ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [mmim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [emim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate, [emim][dep] and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [emim][OAc]. Activity was determined by analyzing the hydrolysis of para-nitrobenzene carbohydrate derivatives. In general, the enzymes were most active in the dimethyl phosphate ionic liquids, followed by acetate. Generally speaking, activity decreased sharply for concentrations of [emim][dep] above 10% v/v, while the other ionic liquids showed less impact on activity up to 20% v/v.

  12. Dislocation Dynamics Simulations of Junctions in Hexagonal Close-Packed Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C; Aubry, S; Chung, P; Arsenlis, A

    2011-12-05

    The formation and strength of dislocations in the hexagonal closed packed material beryllium are studied through dislocation junctions and the critical stress required to break them. Dislocation dynamics calculations (using the code ParaDiS) of junction maps are compared to an analytical line tension approximation in order to validate our model. Results show that the two models agree very well. Also the critical shear stress necessary to break 30{sup o} - 30{sup o} and 30{sup o} - 90{sup o} dislocation junctions is computed numerically. Yield surfaces are mapped out for these junctions to describe their stability regions as function of resolved shear stresses on the glide planes. The example of two non-coplanar binary dislocation junctions with slip planes [2-1-10] (01-10) and [-12-10] (0001) corresponding to a prismatic and basal slip respectively is chosen to verify and validate our implementation.

  13. Environmental restoration and waste management: An introduction. Student edition; Restauracion ambiental y administracion de residuos nucleares: Introduccion; Edicion estudiantil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    For more than 40 years, the United States has produced nuclear weapons. These production activities generated both radioactive and hazardous waste and often contaminated the environment. For many years, the public was unaware of the problem and unable to do anything about it. All of this has changed. In response to recent public outcry, the former Secretary of Energy, Retired Admiral James D. Watkins, established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The creation of EM was the first step toward correcting contamination problems from the past 40 years In this booklet, we at DOE, through the efforts of the students at Oak Hills High School of Cincinnati, Ohio, will introduce you to EM and encourage your involvement in this major program within the Department of Energy. [Espanol] Durante mas de 40 anos, los Estados Unidos fabricaron armamentos nucleares. Esta produccion genero residuos radiactivos y peligrosos y, en muchos casos, contaminaron el medio ambiente. Durante mucho tiempo, el publico norteamericano no tenia conocimiento de este problema y no pudo hacer nada para solucionarlo. Todo esto ha cambiado. Respondiendo a crecientes protestas publicas, el ex Secretario de Energia Almirante James D. Watkins, establecio en noviembre de 1989 la Subsecretaria de Administracion Ambiental. La creacion de esta Subsecretaria fue el primer paso que dio el Departamento de Energia para corregir los problemas de contaminacion ambiental de los ultimos 40 anos. En esta publicacion, los que trabajamos en el Departamento de Energia con la ayuda de los estudiantes de la Escuela Secundaria de Oak Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio, te introduciermos a la administracion ambiental y alentamos tu participacion en este programa de fundamental importancia en el Departamento de Energia.

  14. PDR MODEL MAPPING OF PHYSICAL CONDITIONS VIA SPITZER/IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF H{sub 2}: THEORETICAL SUCCESS TOWARD NGC 2023-SOUTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffer, Y.; Wolfire, M. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Kaufman, M. J.; Cordier, M.

    2011-11-01

    We use the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer to observe the southern part of the reflection nebula NGC 2023, including the Southern Ridge, which is a photodissociation region (PDR) par excellence excited by HD 37903. Five pure-rotational H{sub 2} emission lines are detected and mapped over and around the Southern Ridge in order to compare with predicted level column densities from theoretical PDR models. We find very good agreement between PDR model predictions and emission line intensities and ratios measured with Spitzer, leading us to conclude that grain photoelectric heating sufficiently warms the gas to produce the observed H{sub 2} line emission via collisional excitation. On the Southern Ridge, we infer a hydrogen nucleus density n{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} and radiation field strength {chi} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} relative to the local Galactic interstellar radiation field. This high value for {chi} independently predicts a distance toward HD 37903 of 300 pc and is consistent with the most recent Hipparcos results. Over the map we find that both n{sub H} and {chi} vary by a factor of {approx}3. Such two-dimensional variations provide clues about the underlying three-dimensional structure of the Southern Ridge field, which appears to be the tip of a molecular cloud. We also map variations in excitation temperature and the ortho-to-para ratio, the latter attaining values of {approx}1.5-2.0 on the Southern Ridge, and find that PDR modeling can readily reproduce observed ortho-to-para ratios that are <3 for rotational excitation dominated by collisional processes. Last, the stars Sellgren C and G are discovered to be resolved on archival Hubble Space Telescope images into two point sources each, with separations of {approx}<0.''5.

  15. Ground-based multiwavelength observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gicquel, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Cordiner, M. A.; Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.; Remijan, A. J.; Coulson, I. M.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Kuan, Y.-J. E-mail: stefanie.n.milam@nasa.gov E-mail: steven.b.charnley@nasa.gov E-mail: aremijan@nrao.edu E-mail: ylchuang@std.ntnu.edu.tz

    2014-10-10

    The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here, we report detections of HCN, H{sub 2}CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN toward 103P using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12 m telescope (ARO 12 m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, Q{sub H{sub 2O}} = (0.67-1.07) 10{sup 28} s{sup 1}, was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H{sub 2}CO relative to water (0.13 0.03% and 0.14 0.03%, respectively), we conclude that H{sub 2}CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of HCN with water shows a large diversity with time. Using the JCMT data, we measured an upper limit for the DCN/HCN ratio <0.01. Consecutive observations of ortho-H{sub 2}CO and para-H{sub 2}CO on November 2 (from data obtained at the JCMT) allowed us to derive an ortho:para ratio (OPR) of ?2.12 0.59 (1?), corresponding to T {sub spin} > 8 K (2?).

  16. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Suttora, Linda C.; Phifer, Mark

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  17. Practice Patterns of Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer Among Member Groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffney, David K. . E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu; Du Bois, Andreas; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nick; Toita, Takafumi; Pignata, Sandro; Blake, Peter; Portelance, Lorraine; Sadoyze, Azmat; Poetter, Richard; Colombo, Alessandro; Randall, Marcus; Mirza, Mansoor R.; Trimble, Edward L.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Methods and Materials: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph node cases. Items focused on indications for radiation therapy, radiation fields, dose, use of chemotherapy, brachytherapy and others. The cooperative groups from North America were compared with the other groups to evaluate potential differences in radiotherapy doses. Results: A total of 39 surveys were returned from 13 different cooperative groups. For the treatment of advanced cervical cancer, external beam pelvic doses and total doses to point A were 47 + 3.5 Gy (mean + SD) and 79.1 + 7.9 Gy, respectively. Point A doses were not different between the North American cooperative groups compared with the others (p = 0.103). All groups used concomitant chemotherapy, with 30 of 36 respondents using weekly cisplatin. Of 33 respondents, 31 intervened for a low hemoglobin level. For a para-aortic field, the upper border was most commonly (15 of 24) at the T12-L1 interspace. Maintenance chemotherapy (after radiotherapy) was not performed by 68% of respondents. For vaginal brachytherapy after hysterectomy, 23 groups performed HDR brachytherapy and four groups used LDR brachytherapy. In the use of brachytherapy, there was no uniformity in dose prescription. Conclusions: Radiotherapy practices among member groups of the GCIG are similar in terms of both doses and use of chemotherapy.

  18. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  19. Tuning the reactivity of mononuclear nonheme manganese(iv)-oxo complexes by triflic acid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Junying; Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong -Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-14

    Triflic acid (HOTf)-bound nonheme Mn(IV)-oxo complexes, [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 (L = N4Py and Bn-TPEN; N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine and Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine), were synthesized by adding HOTf to the solutions of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes and were characterized by various spectroscopies. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes exhibited a significant positive shift upon binding of HOTf. The driving force dependences of electron transfer (ET) from electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)–(HOTf)2 complexes were examined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of ET to determine the reorganization energies of ET. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentialsmore » of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes resulted in greatly enhanced oxidation capacity towards one-electron reductants and para-X-substituted-thioanisoles. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were markedly enhanced by binding of HOTf, such as a 6.4 × 105-fold increase in the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reaction (i.e., sulfoxidation). Such a remarkable acceleration in the OAT reaction results from the enhancement of ET from para-X-substituted-thioanisoles to the MnIV(O) complexes as revealed by the unified ET driving force dependence of the rate constants of OAT and ET reactions of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2. In contrast, deceleration was observed in the rate of H-atom transfer (HAT) reaction of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes with 1,4-cyclohexadiene as compared with those of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes. Thus, the binding of two HOTf molecules to the MnIV(O) moiety resulted in remarkable acceleration of the ET rate when the ET is thermodynamically feasible. When the ET reaction is highly endergonic, the rate of the HAT reaction is decelerated due to the steric effect of the counter anion of HOTf.« less

  20. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: H{sub 2}S as a probe of dense gas and possibly hidden luminosity toward the Orion KL hot core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L.; Black, J. H.; Blake, G. A.; Kleshcheva, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H{sub 2}S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H{sub 2} {sup 32}S, H{sub 2} {sup 34}S, and H{sub 2} {sup 33}S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H{sub 2}S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T {sub rot} = 141 12 K. This indicates H{sub 2}S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E {sub up} ? 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N {sub tot}(H{sub 2} {sup 32}S) = 9.5 1.9 10{sup 17} cm{sup 2}, gas kinetic temperature, T {sub kin} = 120{sub 10}{sup 13} K, and constrain the H{sub 2} volume density, n{sub H{sub 2}} ? 9 10 {sup 7} cm{sup 3}, for the H{sub 2}S emitting gas. These results point to an H{sub 2}S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H{sub 2}S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H{sub 2}S of <4.9 10 {sup 3}.

  1. Tuning the reactivity of mononuclear nonheme manganese(iv)-oxo complexes by triflic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Junying; Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong -Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-14

    Triflic acid (HOTf)-bound nonheme Mn(IV)-oxo complexes, [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2 (L = N4Py and Bn-TPEN; N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine and Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine), were synthesized by adding HOTf to the solutions of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes and were characterized by various spectroscopies. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes exhibited a significant positive shift upon binding of HOTf. The driving force dependences of electron transfer (ET) from electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)(HOTf)2 complexes were examined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of ET to determine the reorganization energies of ET. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentials of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2 complexes resulted in greatly enhanced oxidation capacity towards one-electron reductants and para-X-substituted-thioanisoles. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were markedly enhanced by binding of HOTf, such as a 6.4 105-fold increase in the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reaction (i.e., sulfoxidation). Such a remarkable acceleration in the OAT reaction results from the enhancement of ET from para-X-substituted-thioanisoles to the MnIV(O) complexes as revealed by the unified ET driving force dependence of the rate constants of OAT and ET reactions of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2. In contrast, deceleration was observed in the rate of H-atom transfer (HAT) reaction of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2 complexes with 1,4-cyclohexadiene as compared with those of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes. Thus, the binding of two HOTf molecules to the MnIV(O) moiety resulted in remarkable acceleration of the ET rate when the ET is thermodynamically feasible. When the ET reaction is highly endergonic, the rate of the HAT reaction is decelerated due to the steric effect of the counter anion of HOTf.

  2. Proof-of-concept of moving through casing resistivity apparatus. Final report, October 1, 1989--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vail, W.B.; Momii, S.T.

    1997-03-01

    ParaMagnetic Logging, Inc. (PML) demonstrated for the first time during 1990 in a Test Well located in Forth Worth, Texas that formation resistivity could be measured, in-principle, from within cased wells with the Through Casing Resistivity Tool (TCRT) designed and built by PML. Early results from this first instrument provided the impetus to investigate measurements methods to increase data acquisition rates and mechanical designs to improve vertical resolution which were implemented in the second experimental version of the TCRT. PML investigated the design requirements for a tool that could continuously move upward within a cased well. It was found that although such measurements can be done, various interfering signals, including those identified as due to the Triboelectric Effect, would mask the weak borehole casing signals if standard wirelines and components from the industry are utilized which limit the amount of electrical current delivered to the well. Extensive laboratory measurements were performed with the Moving Test Jig to investigate the properties of the Triboelectric Effect. Successful methods of measurement were devised to achieve acceptable performance objectives and to overcome problems with the Triboelectric Effect. One such method is called the Slider Method of Measurement.

  3. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1993--1994 interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Deverman, G.S.; Werpy, T.A.; Phelps, M.R.; Baker, E.G.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Process development research is continuing on a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system that has been demonstrated to convert organics in water (dilute or concentrated) to useful and environmentally safe gases. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEESO), treats a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from hazardous organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of continuous-feed, tubular reactors systems for testing catalysts and feedstocks in the process. A range of catalysts have been tested, including nickel and other base metals, as well as ruthenium and other precious metals. Results of extensive testing show that feedstocks, ranging from 2% para-cresol in water to potato waste and spent grain, can be processed to > 99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The product fuel gas contains from 40% up to 75% methane, depending on the feedstock. The balance of the gas is mostly carbon dioxide with < 5% hydrogen and usually < 1% ethane and higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics from 10 to 1,000 mg/l COD, depending on the feedstock. The level of development of TEES has progressed to the initial phases of industrial process demonstration. Testing of industrial waste streams is under way at both the bench scale and engineering scale of development.

  4. Evolution of Structure-Reactivity Correlations for the Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction by Hydroxyl Radical and Comparison with that by Chlorine Atom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2013-01-01

    A structure-reactivity correlation for the reaction (HO + HCR3 HOH + CR3 ) has been formulated: log k298(per H) = 0.000630 rH2 0.151 rH 1.056 F 1.053 R 21.26 (r2 = 0.885; n = 70; mean unsigned deviation = 0.29 log units), where rH is the reaction enthalpy and F and R represent the dissection of Hammett s para constant into its field/inductive and resonance effects, and compared for the analogous case for Cl (ref 1). Although more exothermic, the dependence of HO on rH is somewhat greater than Cl . However the dependence on F and R is much less, suggestive of less charge separation in the transition state for the less electronegative HO . The range of k(OH) is significantly less than that of Cl , i.e., it is less dependent on substrate structure. Yet a cross-over exists such that k(Cl) > k(HO) predominates for more reactive cases whereas k(Cl) < k(OH) characterizes the less reactive. The Arrhenius parameters reveal that this cross-over results from a change in {E(Cl) E(OH)} from negative to positive. In contrast, whereas the A factors for both increase significantly as reactivity increases, {A(Cl) / A(OH)} always exceeds unity.

  5. Inner-shell and double ionization potentials of aminophenol isomers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryzhevoi, N. V.; Santra, R.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study of single and double core ionization potentials of the aminophenol molecule is reported. The role of relaxation, correlation, relativistic, and basis set effects in these potentials is clarified. Special attention is paid to the isomer dependence of the single and double core ionization potentials. Some of them are also compared with the respective values of the phenol and aniline molecules. It is shown that the core level single ionization potentials of the para-, meta-, and ortho-aminophenol molecules differ only slightly from each other, rendering these structural isomers challenging to distinguish for conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In contrast, the energy needed to remove two core electrons from different atoms depends noticeably on the mutual arrangement and even on the relative orientations of the hydroxyl and amine groups. Together with the electrostatic repulsion between the two core holes, relaxation effects accompanying double core ionization play a crucial role here. The pronounced sensitivity of the double ionization potentials, therefore, enables a spectroscopic characterization of the electronic structure of aminophenol isomers by means of x-ray two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy.

  6. Image Composition Engine for Tiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-08-22

    The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. It is designed to be used in parallel applications requiring rendering. The primary purpose of IceT is to be integrated into parallel visualization applications such as ParaView to provide parallel rendering capabilities. The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (lceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. IceT uses a "sort-Iasf' approach to rendering. Each process in a parallel application independently rendersmore » a local piece of geometry. The resulting images are given to IceT, and IceT combines the images together to form a single cohesive image. Ice T is also capable of driving tiled displays, largeformat displays comprising an array of smaller displays. To this end IceT can collect the smaller tile images and organize them such that the entire tiled display can be driven. Ice T takes advantage of spatial coherence in geometry by identifying empty regions of the display and reducing the overall required work.« less

  7. Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2014-05-19

    A partnership across government, academic, and private sectors has created a novel system that enables climate researchers to solve current and emerging data analysis and visualization challenges. The Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) software project utilizes the Python application programming interface (API) combined with C/C++/Fortran implementations for performance-critical software that offers the best compromise between "scalability" and “ease-of-use.” The UV-CDAT system is highly extensible and customizable for high-performance interactive and batch visualization and analysis for climate science and other disciplines of geosciences. For complex, climate data-intensive computing, UV-CDAT’s inclusive framework supports Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallelism as well as taskfarming and other forms of parallelism. More specifically, the UV-CDAT framework supports the execution of Python scripts running in parallel using the MPI executable commands and leverages Department of Energy (DOE)-funded general-purpose, scalable parallel visualization tools such as ParaView and VisIt. This is the first system to be successfully designed in this way and with these features. The climate community leverages these tools and others, in support of a parallel client-server paradigm, allowing extreme-scale, server-side computing for maximum possible speed-up.

  8. The Role of Pretreatment FDG-PET in Treating Cervical Cancer Patients With Enlarged Pelvic Lymph Node(s) Shown on MRI: A Phase 3 Randomized Trial With Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Shinn-Yn; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Chen; Ng, Koon-Kwan; Chang, Ting-Chang; Kao, Wei-Heng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: This report is the second analysis of a prospective randomized trial to investigate the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on cervical cancer patients with enlarged pelvic lymph nodes identified by magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer with enlarged pelvic lymph nodes but free of enlarged para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) were eligible. Patients were randomized to receive either pretreatment FDG-PET (PET arm) or not (control arm). The whole pelvis was the standard irradiation field for all patients except those with FDG-avid extrapelvic findings. Results: In all, 129 patients were enrolled. Pretreatment PET detected extrapelvic metastases in 7 patients. No new patient experienced treatment failure during the additional 4-year follow-up period. There were no significant differences between the PET arm and the control arm regarding overall survival, disease-free survival, and freedom from extrapelvic metastasis. In the control arm, 8 of 10 patients with PALN relapse had limited extrapelvic nodal failures; their 5-year disease-specific survival was 34.3%. By contrast, only 1 of 5 patients with PALN relapse in the PET arm experienced such limited failures; their 5-year survival rate was 0%. Conclusions: Although the pretreatment detection of PALN did not translate into survival benefit, it indeed decreased the need for extended-field concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  9. Approaching the exa-scale: a real-world evaluation of rendering extremely large data sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchett, John M; Ahrens, James P; Lo, Li - Ta; Browniee, Carson S; Mitchell, Christopher J; Hansen, Chuck

    2010-10-15

    Extremely large scale analysis is becoming increasingly important as supercomputers and their simulations move from petascale to exascale. The lack of dedicated hardware acceleration for rendering on today's supercomputing platforms motivates our detailed evaluation of the possibility of interactive rendering on the supercomputer. In order to facilitate our understanding of rendering on the supercomputing platform, we focus on scalability of rendering algorithms and architecture envisioned for exascale datasets. To understand tradeoffs for dealing with extremely large datasets, we compare three different rendering algorithms for large polygonal data: software based ray tracing, software based rasterization and hardware accelerated rasterization. We present a case study of strong and weak scaling of rendering extremely large data on both GPU and CPU based parallel supercomputers using Para View, a parallel visualization tool. Wc use three different data sets: two synthetic and one from a scientific application. At an extreme scale, algorithmic rendering choices make a difference and should be considered while approaching exascale computing, visualization, and analysis. We find software based ray-tracing offers a viable approach for scalable rendering of the projected future massive data sizes.

  10. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  11. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Frederico; et al

    2016-01-04

    We study the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) chains produced by surface-catalyzed dehalogenative polymerization of 1,4-dibromobenzene on copper (110). The quantization of unoccupied molecular states is measured as a function of oligomer length by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, with Fermi level crossings observed for chains longer than ten phenyl rings. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-one-dimensional valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the organic band-structure, includingmore » the k-dispersion, the gap size and electron charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour. In summary, we have fully characterized the band structure of a carbon-based conducting wire. This model system may be considered as a fingerprint of -conjugation of surface organic frameworks.« less

  12. Generalized Framework and Algorithms for Illustrative Visualization of Time-Varying Data on Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander S. Rattner; Donna Post Guillen; Alark Joshi

    2012-12-01

    Photo- and physically-realistic techniques are often insufficient for visualization of simulation results, especially for 3D and time-varying datasets. Substantial research efforts have been dedicated to the development of non-photorealistic and illustration-inspired visualization techniques for compact and intuitive presentation of such complex datasets. While these efforts have yielded valuable visualization results, a great deal of work has been reproduced in studies as individual research groups often develop purpose-built platforms. Additionally, interoperability between illustrative visualization software is limited due to specialized processing and rendering architectures employed in different studies. In this investigation, a generalized framework for illustrative visualization is proposed, and implemented in marmotViz, a ParaView plugin, enabling its use on variety of computing platforms with various data file formats and mesh geometries. Detailed descriptions of the region-of-interest identification and feature-tracking algorithms incorporated into this tool are provided. Additionally, implementations of multiple illustrative effect algorithms are presented to demonstrate the use and flexibility of this framework. By providing a framework and useful underlying functionality, the marmotViz tool can act as a springboard for future research in the field of illustrative visualization.

  13. Kinetic analysis of the phenyl-shift reaction in $\\beta$-O-4 lignin model compounds: A computational study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beste, Ariana; Buchanan III, A C

    2011-01-01

    The phenyl-shift reaction in $\\beta$-phenethyl phenyl ether ($\\beta - \\rm PhCH_2CH_2OPh$, $\\beta$-PPE) is an integral step in the pyrolysis of PPE, which is a model compound for the $\\beta$-O-4 linkage in lignin. We investigated the influence of natural occurring substituents (hydroxy, methoxy) on the reaction rate by calculating relative rate constant using density functional theory in combination with transition state theory, including anharmonic correction for low-frequency modes. The phenyl-shift reaction proceeds through an intermediate and the overall rate constants were computed invoking the steady-state approximation (its validity was confirmed). Substituents on the phenethyl group have only little influence on the rate constants. If a methoxy substituent is located in para position of the phenyl ring adjacent to the ether oxygen, the energies of the intermediate and second transition state are lowered, but the overall rate constant is not significantly altered. This is a consequence of the dominating first transition from pre-complex to intermediate in the overall rate constant. {\\it O}- and di-{\\it o}-methoxy substituents accelerate the phenyl-migration rate compared to $\\beta$-PPE.

  14. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable group are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.

  15. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  16. Experimental Validation of LLNL Finite Element Codes for Nonlinear Seismic Simulations (Progress, Year 1 of 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves, S W; Noble, C R

    2006-12-06

    Shake table tests were performed on a full-scale 7-story slice of a reinforced concrete building at UC San Diego between October 2005 and January 2006. The tests were performed on the NEES Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table (LHPOST) at the Engelkirk Structural Engineering Center of UCSD. The structure was subjected to four uniaxial earthquake ground motions of increasing amplitude. The accelerations measured at the base of the structure and the measured roof displacements have been provided by UCSD. Details of the building construction have also been provided by UCSD. The measured response of this structure was used to assess the capability of the homogenized rebar model in DYNA3D/ParaDyn [1,2] to simulate the seismic response of reinforced concrete structures. The homogenized rebar model is a composite version of the Karagozian & Case concrete model [3]. Work has been done to validate this material model for use in blast simulations, but seismic simulations require longer durations. The UCSD experiment provides full-scale data that can be used to validate seismic modeling capabilities.

  17. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  18. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blom, Alex Jason

    2009-08-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  19. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; et al

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  20. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the NO2 radical.

  1. ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN PRIMITIVE SOLAR SYSTEM MATTER: SPIN-STATE-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF NITROGEN AND DEUTERIUM IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirstroem, Eva S.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-09-20

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and {sup 15}N. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and {sup 15}N and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large {sup 15}N enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, {sup 15}N enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H{sub 2}, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both {sup 15}N and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest {sup 15}N enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system {sup 15}N and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  2. Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico. Supplement to the IEA Expert Group Report on Recommended Practices for Wind Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Brian; Cochran, Jaquelin; Watson, Andrea; Katz, Jessica; Bracho, Ricardo

    2015-08-19

    As a recognized leader in efforts to mitigate global climate change, the Government of Mexico (GOM) works proactively to reduce emissions, demonstrating strong political will and capacity to comprehensively address climate change. Since 2010, the U.S. government (USG) has supported these efforts by partnering with Mexico under the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program. Through the program, the USG has partnered with Mexico’s Ministry of Energy (SENER), as well as other government agencies, to support GOM in reaching its clean energy and climate change goals. Specifically, the EC-LEDS program is supporting GOM’s clean energy goal of generating 35% of its electricity from renewable energy (RE) by 2024. EC-LEDS, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has been collaborating with SENER and GOM interagency working group—the Consejo Consultivo para las Energías Renovables (Consultative Council on Renewable Energy)—to create a grid integration roadmap for variable RE. 1 A key objective in creating a grid integration roadmap is assessing likely impacts of wind and solar energy on the power system and modifying planning and operations accordingly. This paper applies best practices in conducting a grid integration study to the Mexican context.

  3. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, RD; Krungleviciute, V; Clingerman, DJ; Mondloch, JE; Peng, Y; Wilmer, CE; Sarjeant, AA; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK; Mirkin, CA

    2013-09-10

    A Cu-carborane-based metal organic framework (MOF), NU-135, which contains a quasi-spherical para-carborane moiety, has been synthesized and characterized. NU-135 exhibits a pore volume of 1.02 cm(3)/g and a gravimetric BET surface area of ca. 2600 m(2)/g, and thus represents the first highly porous carborane-based MOF. As a consequence of the, unique geometry of the carborane unit, NU-135 has a very high volumetric BET surface area of ca. 1900 m(2)/cm(3). CH4, CO2, and H-2 adsorption isotherms were measured over a broad range of pressures and temperatures and are in good agreement with computational predictions. The methane storage capacity of NU-135 at 35 bar and 298 K is ca. 187 v(STP)/v. At 298 K, the pressure required to achieve a methane storage density comparable to that of a compressed natural gas (CNG) tank pressurized to 212 bar, which is a typical storage pressure, is only 65 bar. The methane working capacity (5-65 bar) is 170 v(STP)/v. The volumetric hydrogen storage capacity at 55 bar and 77 K is 49 g/L. These properties are comparable to those of current record holders in the area of methane and hydrogen storage. This initial example lays the groundwork for carborane-based materials with high surface areas.

  4. Subunit composition and glycosidic activities of the cellulase complex from Clostridium thermocellum JW20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohring, S.; Mayer, F. ); Wiegel, J. )

    1990-12-01

    The subunit composition of the extracellular complex from Clostridium thermocellum was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Twenty-six bands, representing proteins with apparent molecular sizes ranging from 37,500 to 185,000 Da, could be detected by silver staining. Endoglucanase activity was exhibited in 15 of 26 bands and 13 showed xylanase activity. In 8 of the 26 bands, both activities could be found. As minor activities, {beta}-glucosidase, {beta}-xylosidase, {beta}-galactosidase, and {beta}-mannosidase activities could be demonstrated in the cellulase complex. Upon measuring the release of para-nitrophenol (PNP) from PNP-cellobioside and determining the amount of glucose formed, the presence of exoglucanase activity was indicated. Upon glycoprotein staining of SDS-polyacrylamide gels, 14 of the 26 bands reacted positive, indicating the glycoprotein nature of the respective proteins. Four proteins (apparent molecular sizes, 58,000, 72,500, 94,000, and 110,000 Da) could be enriched from the originally bound cellulase complex by preparative SDS-PAGE. The two smaller proteins exhibited xylanase activity, whereas the 94,000-Da protein had endo- and exoglucanase activity, and the 110,000-Da protein degraded PNP-pyranosides.

  5. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  6. Alkali metal cation complexation by 1,3-alternate, mono-ionisable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Custelcean, Radu; Surowiec, Kazimierz; Bartsch, Richard A.

    2014-04-23

    Alkali metal cation extraction behavior for two series of 1,3-alternate, mono-ionizable calix[4]arene-benzocrown-6 compounds is examined. In Series 1, the proton-ionizable group is a substituent on the benzo group of the polyether ring that directs it away from the crown ether cavity. In Series 2, the proton-ionizable group is attached to one para position in the calixarene framework, thus positioning it over the crown ether ring. Competitive solvent extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform shows high Cs+ efficiency and selectivity. Single-species extraction pH profiles of Cs+ for Series 1 and 2 ligands with the same proton-ionizable groupmore » are very similar. Thus, association of Cs+ with the calixcrown ring is more important than the the proton-ionizable group’s position in relation to the crown ether cavity. Solid-state structures are presented for two unionized ligands from Series 2, as is a crystal containing two different ionized ligand–Cs+ complexes.« less

  7. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of [eta superscript 3]-allyl([alpha]-diimine)nickel(II) complexes bearing trimethylsilyl groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionkin, Alex S.; Marshall, William J.

    2012-02-10

    A set of isomeric para- and meta-trimethylsilylphenyl ortho-substituted N,N-phenyl {alpha}-diimine ligands [(Ar-N C(Me)-(Me)C N-Ar) Ar=2,6-di(4-trimethylsilylphenyl)phenyl (16); Ar=2,6-di(3-trimethylsilylphenyl)phenyl (17)] have been synthesized through a two-step procedure. The palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction between 2,6-dibromophenylamine (7) and 4-trimethylsilylphenylboronic acid (8), 3-trimethylsilylphenylboronic acid (9) was used to prepare 4,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)-[1,1;3,1]terphenyl-2-ylamine (10) and 3,3-bis(trimethylsilyl)-[1,1;3,1]terphenyl-2-ylamine (11). The di-1-adamantylphosphine oxide Ad{sub 2}P(O)H (13) and di-tert-butyl-trimethylsilylanylmethylphosphine tert-Bu{sub 2}P-CH{sub 2}-SiMe{sub 3} (14) were used for the first time as ligands for the Suzuki coupling. The condensation of 2,2,3,3-tetramethoxybutane (15) with anilines 10 and 11 afforded {alpha}-diimines 16 and 17. The reaction of {pi}-allylnickel chloride dimer (18), {alpha}-diimines (16), (17) and sodium tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BAF) (19) or silver hexafluoroantimonate (20) led to two sets of isomeric complexes [{eta}{sup 3}-allyl(Ar-N C(Me)-(Me)C N-Ar)Ni]{sup +} X{sup -}, [Ar=2,6-di(4-trimethylsilylphenyl)phenyl, X=BAF (3), X=SbF6 (4); Ar=2,6-di(3-trimethylsilylphenyl)phenyl, X=BAF (5), X=SbF6 (6)]. The steric repulsion of closely positioned trimethylsilyl groups in 4 caused the distortion of the nickel square planar coordination by 17.6{sup o} according to X-ray analysis.

  9. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of the plant cell wall.

  10. Spectral ellipsometry of a nanodiamond composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yastrebov, S. G. Gordeev, S. K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I. A.; Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2006-07-15

    Optical properties of a nanodiamond composite were analyzed by methods of spectral ellipsometry in the range of photon energies 1.4-5 eV, which are characteristic of {pi}-{pi}* transitions in amorphous carbon. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding nanodiamond powder with subsequent binding of diamond nanoparticles by pyrocarbon formed as a result of the heterogeneous chemical reaction of methane decomposition. The dispersion curves of the imaginary and real parts of the dielectric function were reconstructed. It is shown that the imaginary part of the dielectric function can be represented as the sum of two components generated by the two types of {pi}-{pi}* optical transitions. The maximum contribution of the transitions of the first and second types manifests itself at energies of 2.6 and 5.6 eV, respectively, which correspond to peaks in optical density at 2.9 and 6.11 eV. It was established that the main specific features of the normalized optical density of the nanodiamond composite almost coincide with those for poly(para-phenylenevinylene). It was found that the energy of a {sigma} + {pi} plasmon of the pyrocarbon component of the nanodiamond composite is 24.2 eV. On the basis on this value, the pyrocarbon density matrix was estimated to be 2 g/cm{sup 3}. Within the concepts of optimum filling of an elementary volume by carbon atoms in an amorphous material with such a density, the allotropic composition of the pyrocarbon matrix was restored.

  11. Changes in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in cisplatin-induced acute renal failure after treatment of JBP485 in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tao, E-mail: liutaomedical@qq.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China)] [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Meng, Qiang, E-mail: mengq531@yahoo.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Wang, Changyuan, E-mail: wangcyuan@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Liu, Qi, E-mail: llaqii@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Guo, Xinjin, E-mail: guo.xinjin@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China)] [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Sun, Huijun, E-mail: sunhuijun@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Peng, Jinyong, E-mail: jinyongpeng2005@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); and others

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cyclo-trans-4-L-hydroxyprolyl-L-serine (JBP485) on acute renal failure (ARF) induced by cisplatin is related to change in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in rats. JBP485 reduced creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and indoxyl sulfate (IS) in plasma and malondialdehyde (MDA) in kidney, and recovered the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in cisplatin-treated rats. The plasma concentration of PAH (para-aminohippurate) determined by LCMS/MS was increased markedly after intravenous administration of cisplatin, whereas cumulative urinary excretion of PAH and the uptake of PAH in kidney slices were significantly decreased. qRT-PCR and Western-blot showed a decrease in mRNA and protein of Oat1 and Oat3, an increase in mRNA and protein of Mrp2 in cisplatin-treated rats, and an increase in IS (a uremic toxin) after co-treatment with JBP485. It indicated that JBP485 promoted urinary excretion of toxins by upregulating renal Mrp2. This therefore gives in part the explanation about the mechanism by which JBP485 improves ARF induced by cisplatin in rats. -- Highlights: ? Cisplatin induces acute renal failure (ARF). ? The expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 were changed during ARF. ? The regulated expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 is an adaptive protected response. ? JBP485 could facilitate the adaptive protective action.

  12. Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using aminoindazole, diaminopyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer complexes of Zn(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Jennifer A.; Schubert, David M.; Amonette, James E.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Disselkamp, Robert S.

    2008-06-25

    Hydrogen peroxide is a valuable chemical commodity whose production relies on expensive methods. If an efficient, sustainable, and inexpensive solar-mediated production method could be developed from the reaction between dioxygen and water then its use as a fuel may be possible and gain acceptance. Hydrogen peroxide at greater than 10 M possesses a high specific energy, is environmentally clean, and is easily stored. However, the current method of manufacturing H2O2 via the anthraquinone process is environmentally unfriendly making the unexplored nature of its photochemical production from solar irradiation of interest. Here the concentration and quantum yield of hydrogen peroxide produced in an ultraviolet (UV-B) irradiated environment using aromatic and nitrogen-heterocyclic ring complexes of zinc(II) as solid substrates was studied. The amino-substituted isomers of the substrates indazole, pyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer complexes are examined. Samples exposed to the ambient atmosphere (e.g., aerated) were irradiated with a low power lamp with emission from 280-360 nm. Irradiation of various zinc complexes revealed Zn-5-aminoindazole to have the greatest first-day production of 63 mM/day with a 37% quantum yield. Para-phenylenediamine (PPAM) showed the greatest long-term stability and thus suggests H2O2 is produced photocatalytically. Isomeric forms of the catalysts organic components (e.g., amino groups) did have an effect on the production. Irradiation of diaminopyridine isomers indicated 2,3-diamino and 3,4-diamino structures were the most productive, each generating 32 mM/day hydrogen peroxide. However, the 2,5-diamino isomer showed no peroxide production. A significant decrease in hydrogen peroxide production in all but PPAM was noticed in the samples, suggesting the possibility of a catalyst poisoning mechanism. The samples ability to produce H2O2 is rationalized by proposing a reaction mechanism and examining the stability of the resonance structures of the different isomers.

  13. Metal ion complexation by ionizable crown ethers. Final report, January 1, 1988--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    During the report period a variety of new lipophilic ionizable crown ethers with pendent proton-ionizable groups has been synthesized. The ligands possess one or more ionizable group (carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid monoethyl ester, para-nitrophenol, phosphonic acid) attached to crown ether, monoazacrown ether or diazacrown ether frameworks. These novel chelating agents have either pendent or inward-facing proton-ionizable groups. Such lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ethers are designed for use in multiphase metal ion separations (solvent extraction, liquid membrane transport). In addition a series of proton-ionizable crown ethers without lipophilic groups was prepared to study how structural variations within the ligand influence metal ion complexation in homogeneous media as assessed by NMR spectroscopy or titration calorimetry. A third class of new metal ion-complexing agents is a series of lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids. Competitive solvent extractions of alkali metal and alkaline earth cations and of the mixed species have been conducted to reveal the influence of ring size, nature and attachment site of the lipophilic group, sidearm length, and proton-ionizable group identity and location upon the selectivity and efficiency of metal ion complexation. In addition to such studies of structural variation within the lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ether, the effect of changing the organic solvent and variation of the stripping conditions have been assessed. The influence of structural variations within lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids upon competitive solvent extraction of alkaline earth cations has been probed. Also a new chromogenic, di-ionizable crown ether with extremely high selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} has been discovered.

  14. SHOCK-ENHANCED C{sup +} EMISSION AND THE DETECTION OF H{sub 2}O FROM THE STEPHAN'S QUINTET GROUP-WIDE SHOCK USING HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, P. N.; Lord, S.; Lu, N.; Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forts, G.; Cluver, M. E.; Konstantopoulos, I.; Ogle, P.; Falgarone, E.; Duc, P.-A.; Gallagher, S.; Gao, Y.; Jarrett, T.; Lisenfeld, U.; Peterson, B. W.; Struck, C.; Sturm, E.; Tuffs, R.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the first Herschel spectroscopic detections of the [O I] 63 ?m and [C II] 158 ?m fine-structure transitions, and a single para-H{sub 2}O line from the 35 15 kpc{sup 2} shocked intergalactic filament in Stephan's Quintet. The filament is believed to have been formed when a high-speed intruder to the group collided with a clumpy intergroup gas. Observations with the PACS spectrometer provide evidence for broad (>1000 km s{sup 1}) luminous [C II] line profiles, as well as fainter [O I] 63 ?m emission. SPIRE FTS observations reveal water emission from the p-H{sub 2}O (1{sub 11}-0{sub 00}) transition at several positions in the filament, but no other molecular lines. The H{sub 2}O line is narrow and may be associated with denser intermediate-velocity gas experiencing the strongest shock-heating. The [C II]/PAH{sub tot} and [C II]/FIR ratios are too large to be explained by normal photo-electric heating in photodissociation regions. H II region excitation or X-ray/cosmic-ray heating can also be ruled out. The observations lead to the conclusion that a large fraction the molecular gas is diffuse and warm. We propose that the [C II], [O I], and warm H{sub 2} line emission is powered by a turbulent cascade in which kinetic energy from the galaxy collision with the intergalactic medium is dissipated to small scales and low velocities, via shocks and turbulent eddies. Low-velocity magnetic shocks can help explain both the [C II]/[O I] ratio, and the relatively high [C II]/H{sub 2} ratios observed. The discovery that [C II] emission can be enhanced, in large-scale turbulent regions in collisional environments, has implications for the interpretation of [C II] emission in high-z galaxies.

  15. THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-30

    Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

  16. VisIO: enabling interactive visualization of ultra-scale, time-series data via high-bandwidth distributed I/O systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Ahrens, James P; Wang, Jun

    2010-10-15

    Petascale simulations compute at resolutions ranging into billions of cells and write terabytes of data for visualization and analysis. Interactive visuaUzation of this time series is a desired step before starting a new run. The I/O subsystem and associated network often are a significant impediment to interactive visualization of time-varying data; as they are not configured or provisioned to provide necessary I/O read rates. In this paper, we propose a new I/O library for visualization applications: VisIO. Visualization applications commonly use N-to-N reads within their parallel enabled readers which provides an incentive for a shared-nothing approach to I/O, similar to other data-intensive approaches such as Hadoop. However, unlike other data-intensive applications, visualization requires: (1) interactive performance for large data volumes, (2) compatibility with MPI and POSIX file system semantics for compatibility with existing infrastructure, and (3) use of existing file formats and their stipulated data partitioning rules. VisIO, provides a mechanism for using a non-POSIX distributed file system to provide linear scaling of 110 bandwidth. In addition, we introduce a novel scheduling algorithm that helps to co-locate visualization processes on nodes with the requested data. Testing using VisIO integrated into Para View was conducted using the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) on TACC's Longhorn cluster. A representative dataset, VPIC, across 128 nodes showed a 64.4% read performance improvement compared to the provided Lustre installation. Also tested, was a dataset representing a global ocean salinity simulation that showed a 51.4% improvement in read performance over Lustre when using our VisIO system. VisIO, provides powerful high-performance I/O services to visualization applications, allowing for interactive performance with ultra-scale, time-series data.

  17. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  18. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raboin, P J

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

  19. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  20. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  1. Establishment of Lipolexis oregmae (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) in a classical biological control program directed against the brown citrus aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) in Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persad, A.B.; Hoy, M.A.; Ru Nguyen

    2007-03-15

    The parasitoid Lipolexis oregmae Gahan (introduced as L. scutellaris Mackauer) was imported from Guam, evaluated in quarantine, mass reared, and released into citrus groves in Florida in a classical biological control program directed against the brown citrus aphid, Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy. Releases of 20,200, 12,100, and 1,260 adults of L. oregmae were made throughout Florida during 2000, 2001, and 2002, respectively. To determine if L. oregmae had successfully established, surveys were conducted throughout the state beginning in the summer of 2001 and continuing through the summer of 2003. Parasitism during 2001 and 2002 was evaluated by holding brown citrus aphids in the laboratory until parasitoid adults emerged. Lipolexis oregmae was found in 10 sites in 7 counties and 4 sites in 3 counties with parasitism rates ranging from 0.7 to 3.3% in 2001 and 2002, respectively. Laboratory tests indicated that high rates of mortality occurred if field-collected parasitized aphids were held in plastic bags, so a molecular assay was used that allowed immature L. oregmae to be detected within aphid hosts immediately after collection. The molecular assay was used in 2003 with the brown citrus aphids and with other aphid species collected from citrus, weeds, and vegetables near former release sites; immatures of L. oregmae were detected in black citrus aphids, cowpea aphids, spirea aphids, and melon aphids, as well as in the brown citrus aphid, in 4 of 8 counties sampled, with parasitism ranging from 2.0 to 12.9%, indicating that L. oregmae is established and widely distributed. Samples taken in Polk County during Oct 2005 indicated that L. oregmae has persisted. The ability of L. oregmae to parasitize other aphid species on citrus, and aphids on other host plants, enhances the ability of L. oregmae to persist when brown citrus aphid populations are low. (author) [Spanish] El parasitoide Lipolexis oregmae Gahan (introducido como L. scutellaris Mackauer) fue importado de Guam, evaluado en cuarentena, criado en masa y liberado en huertos de citricos en un programa de control biologico clasico dirigido contra el afido pardo de citricos, Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy. Se hicieron liberaciones de 20,200, 12,100, y 1,260 adultos de L. oregmae a traves de la Florida durante los anos de 2000, 2001, y 2002, respectivamente. Para determinar si L. oregmae ha logrado en establecer, se realizaron sondeos a traves del estado empezando en el verano del 2001 y continuando hasta el final del verano del 2003. El parasitismo durante 2001 y 2002 fue evaluado con el mantenimiento de individuos del afido pardo de los citricos en el laboratorio hasta que los adultos emergieron. Lipolexis oregmae fue encontrado en 10 sitios en 7 condados y con tasas de parasitismo en 4 sitios en 3 condados entre 0.7 a 3.3% en el 2001 y 2002, respectivamente. Las pruebas del laboratorio indicaron que las tasas altas de mortalidad fueron posibles si los afidos con parasitos recolectados en el campo fueron mantenidos en bolsas plasticas, entonces un ensayo molecular fue usado con lo que permitio la deteccion de inmaduros de L. oregmae dentro de los hospederos de afidos inmediatamente despues de la recoleccion. El ensayo molecular fue usado en el 2003 con individuos del afido pardo de los citricos y con otras especies de afidos recolectados sobre citricos, malezas y hortalizas cerca de los sitios donde los parasitoides fueron liberados anteriormente; inmaduros de L. oregmae fueron detectados en individuos del afido negro de los citricos, el afido del caupi, el afido spirea y el afido del melon, ademas del afido pardo de los citricos en 4 de los 8 condados muestreados, con la tasa del parasitismo entre 2.0 a12.9%, indicando que L. oregmae estaba estabecido y ampliamente distribuido. Las muestras tomadas en el Condado de Polk durante octobre del 2005 indicaron que L. oregmae ha persistido. La capacidad de L. oregmae para parasitar otras especies de afidos sobre citricos y otros afidos sobre otras plantas hospederas, incrementa la capacidad de L. oregmae para persistir cuand

  2. AIJ in the Non-Energy Sector in India: Opportunities and Concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindranath, N.H.; Meili, A.; Anita, R.

    1998-11-01

    Although the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) has been signed and ratified by 168 countries, global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased substantially since the 1992 Rio Summit. In both developing countries (DCs) and industrialized countries (ICs), there has been a need to find mechanisms to facilitate environmentally sound mitigation strategies. This need led to the formation of Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) at the first Conference-of the Parties (COP) in 1995. In Article 4A, para 2D, the COP established an AIJ pilot phase in which Annex I (IC) countries would enter into agreements to implement activities jointly with non-Annex I parties. DCs would engage in AIJ on a purely voluntary basis and all AIJ projects should be compatible with and supportive of national environment and development goals. AIJ does not imply GHG reduction commitments by DCs. Neither do all projects undertaken during the pilot phase qualify as a fulfillment of current commitment s of Annex I parties under the COP. The current pilot phase for AIJ ends in the year 2000, a date which may be extended. Current AIJ activities are largely focused on the energy sector. The Nordic countries, for example, feel that the most important potential areas for cooperation in AIJ are fuel conversion, more effective energy production, increased energy efficiency, and reforms in energy-intensive industry (Nordic Council of Ministers, 1995). Denmark does not want to include non-energy sector projects such as carbon sink enhancement projects in the pilot phase (Nordic Council of Ministers, 1995). However, other countries, including the US, have already funded a number of forestry sector projects (Development Alternatives, 1997). Moreover, energy-sector projects involving high technology or capital-intensive technology are often a source of controversy between DCs and ICs regarding the kind of technology transferred and sharing of costs and benefits. Further, the pilot phase provide s an opportunity for capacity-building and learning about methods of planning, implementation, and monitoring of GHG abatement in land-based non-energy sector projects.

  3. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential contribution to product release.

  4. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL ASPECTS OF GAS RELEASE DURING THE 2010 APPARITION OF COMET 103P/HARTLEY 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumma, M. J.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Paganini, L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Gibb, E. L.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Ellis, R. S.; Lippi, M.; Boehnhardt, H.; Magee-Sauer, K.

    2011-06-10

    We report measurements of eight primary volatiles (H{sub 2}O, HCN, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO, and NH{sub 3}) and two product species (OH and NH{sub 2}) in comet 103P/Hartley 2 using high-dispersion infrared spectroscopy. We quantified the long- and short-term behavior of volatile release over a three-month interval that encompassed the comet's close approach to Earth, its perihelion passage, and flyby of the comet by the Deep Impact spacecraft during the EPOXI mission. We present production rates for individual species, their mixing ratios relative to water, and their spatial distributions in the coma on multiple dates. The production rates for water, ethane, HCN, and methanol vary in a manner consistent with independent measures of nucleus rotation, but mixing ratios for HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and CH{sub 3}OH are independent of rotational phase. Our results demonstrate that the ensemble average composition of gas released from the nucleus is well defined and relatively constant over the three-month interval (September 18 through December 17). If individual vents vary in composition, enough diverse vents must be active simultaneously to approximate (in sum) the bulk composition of the nucleus. The released primary volatiles exhibit diverse spatial properties which favor the presence of separate polar and apolar ice phases in the nucleus, establish dust and gas release from icy clumps (and from the nucleus), and provide insights into the driver for the cyanogen (CN) polar jet. The spatial distributions of C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and HCN along the near-polar jet (UT October 19.5) and nearly orthogonal to it (UT October 22.5) are discussed relative to the origin of CN. The ortho-para ratio (OPR) of water was 2.85 {+-} 0.20; the lower bound (2.65) defines T{sub spin} > 32 K. These values are consistent with results returned from the Infrared Space Observatory in 1997.

  5. C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) at IR wavelengths and the variability of CO abundances among Oort Cloud comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Gibb, E. L.

    2014-08-20

    We report production rates, rotational temperatures, and related parameters for gases in C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using the Near InfraRed SPECtrometer at the Keck Observatory, on six UT dates spanning heliocentric distances (R{sub h} ) that decreased from 1.35 AU to 1.16 AU (pre-perihelion). We quantified nine gaseous species (H{sub 2}O, OH*, CO, CH{sub 4}, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 2}) and obtained upper limits for two others (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO). Compared with organics-normal comets, our results reveal highly enriched CO, (at most) slightly enriched CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and HCN, and CH{sub 4} consistent with {sup n}ormal{sup ,} yet depleted, NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}CO. Rotational temperatures increased from ?50 K to ?70 K with decreasing R{sub h} , following a power law in R{sub h} of 2.0 0.2, while the water production rate increased from 1.0 to 3.9 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup 1}, following a power law in R{sub h} of 4.7 0.9. The ortho-para ratio for H{sub 2}O was 3.01 0.49, corresponding to spin temperatures (T {sub spin}) ? 29 K (at the 1? level). The observed spatial profiles for these emissions showed complex structures, possibly tied to nucleus rotation, although the cadence of our observations limits any definitive conclusions. The retrieved CO abundance in Lovejoy is more than twice the median value for comets in our IR survey, suggesting this comet is enriched in CO. We discuss the enriched value for CO in comet C/2013 R1 in terms of the variability of CO among Oort Cloud comets.

  6. IRS SCAN-MAPPING OF THE WASP-WAIST NEBULA (IRAS 16253-2429). I. DERIVATION OF SHOCK CONDITIONS FROM H{sub 2} EMISSION AND DISCOVERY OF 11.3 {mu}m PAH ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsony, Mary; Wolf-Chase, Grace A.; Ciardi, David R.

    2010-09-01

    The outflow driven by the Class 0 protostar, IRAS 16253-2429, is associated with bipolar cavities visible in scattered mid-infrared light, which we refer to as the Wasp-Waist Nebula. InfraRed Spectometer (IRS) scan mapping with the Spitzer Space Telescope of a {approx}1' x 2' area centered on the protostar was carried out. The outflow is imaged in six pure rotational (0-0 S(2) through 0-0 S(7)) H{sub 2} lines, revealing a distinct, S-shaped morphology in all maps. A source map in the 11.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature is presented in which the protostellar envelope appears in absorption. This is the first detection of absorption in the 11.3 {mu}m PAH feature. Spatially resolved excitation analysis of positions in the blue- and redshifted outflow lobes, with extinction-corrections determined from archival Spitzer 8 {mu}m imaging, shows remarkably constant temperatures of {approx}1000 K in the shocked gas. The radiated luminosity in the observed H{sub 2} transitions is found to be 1.94 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -5} L{sub sun} in the redshifted lobe and 1.86 {+-} 0.04 x 10{sup -5} L{sub sun} in the blueshifted lobe. These values are comparable to the mechanical luminosity of the flow. By contrast, the mass of hot (T {approx} 1000 K) H{sub 2} gas is 7.95 {+-} 0.19 x 10{sup -7} M{sub sun} in the redshifted lobe and 5.78 {+-} 0.17 x 10{sup -7} M{sub sun} in the blueshifted lobe. This is just a tiny fraction, of order 10{sup -3}, of the gas in the cold (30 K), swept-up gas mass derived from millimeter CO observations. The H{sub 2} ortho/para ratio of 3:1 found at all mapped points in this flow suggests previous passages of shocks through the gas. Comparison of the H{sub 2} data with detailed shock models of Wilgenbus et al. shows the emitting gas is passing through Jump (J-type) shocks. Pre-shock densities of 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3{<=}} n {sub H{<=}} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} are inferred for the redshifted lobe and n {sub H{<=}} 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} for the blueshifted lobe. Shock velocities are 5 km s{sup -1} {<=} v{sub s} {<=} 10 km s{sup -1} for the redshifted gas and v{sub s} = 10 km s{sup -1} for the blueshifted gas. Initial transverse (to the shock) magnetic field strengths for the redshifted lobe are in the range 10-32 {mu}G, and just 3 {mu}G for the blueshifted lobe. A cookbook for using the CUBISM contributed software for IRS spectral mapping data is presented in the Appendix.

  7. Transition Metal Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Multiple Bonds: Exploration of Second Generation Ruthenium Catalysts and Extension to Copper Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Brent Gunnoe

    2011-02-17

    Catalysts provide foundational technology for the development of new materials and can enhance the efficiency of routes to known materials. New catalyst technologies offer the possibility of reducing energy and raw material consumption as well as enabling chemical processes with a lower environmental impact. The rising demand and expense of fossil resources has strained national and global economies and has increased the importance of accessing more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of hydrocarbons to useful products. The goals of the research are to develop and understand single-site homogeneous catalysts for the conversion of readily available hydrocarbons into useful materials. A detailed understanding of these catalytic reactions could lead to the development of catalysts with improved activity, longevity and selectivity. Such transformations could reduce the environmental impact of hydrocarbon functionalization, conserve energy and valuable fossil resources and provide new technologies for the production of liquid fuels. This project is a collaborative effort that incorporates both experimental and computational studies to understand the details of transition metal catalyzed C-H activation and C-C bond forming reactions with olefins. Accomplishments of the current funding period include: (1) We have completed and published studies of C-H activation and catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu{l_brace}P(pyr){sub 3}{r_brace}(NCMe)R (pyr = N-pyrrolyl) complexes. While these systems efficiently initiate stoichiometric benzene C-H activation, catalytic olefin hydroarylation is hindered by inhibition of olefin coordination, which is a result of the steric bulk of the P(pyr){sub 3} ligand. (2) We have extended our studies of catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph systems to L = P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt. Thus, we have now completed detailed mechanistic studies of four systems with L = CO, PMe{sub 3}, P(pyr){sub 3} and P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt, which has provided a comprehensive understanding of the impact of steric and electronic parameters of 'L' on the catalytic hydroarylation of olefins. (3) We have completed and published a detailed mechanistic study of stoichiometric aromatic C-H activation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph (L = CO or PMe{sub 3}). These efforts have probed the impact of functionality para to the site of C-H activation for benzene substrates and have allowed us to develop a detailed model of the transition state for the C-H activation process. These results have led us to conclude that the C-H bond cleavage occurs by a {sigma}-bond metathesis process in which the C-H transfer is best viewed as an intramolecular proton transfer. (4) We have completed studies of Ru complexes possessing the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene). One of these systems is a unique four-coordinate Ru(II) complex that catalyzes the oxidative hydrophenylation of ethylene (in low yields) to produce styrene and ethane (utilizing ethylene as the hydrogen acceptor) as well as the hydrogenation of olefins, aldehydes and ketones. These results provide a map for the preparation of catalysts that are selective for oxidative olefin hydroarylation. (5) The ability of TpRu(PMe{sub 3})(NCMe)R systems to activate sp{sup 3} C-H bonds has been demonstrated including extension to subsequent C-C bond forming steps. These results open the door to the development of catalysts for the functionalization of more inert C-H bonds. (6) We have discovered that Pt(II) complexes supported by simple nitrogen-based ligands serve as catalysts for the hydroarylation of olefins. Given the extensive studies of Pt-based catalytic C-H activation, we believe these results will provide an entry point into an array of possible catalysts for hydrocarbon functionalization.

  8. The unexpectedly bright comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) unveiled at near-infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, Lucas; DiSanti, Michael A.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Gibb, Erika L.; Boehnhardt, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    We acquired near-infrared spectra of the Oort cloud comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) at three different heliocentric distances (R {sub h}) during the comet's 2013 perihelion passage, providing a comprehensive measure of the outgassing behavior of parent volatiles and cosmogonic indicators. Our observations were performed pre-perihelion at R {sub h} = 1.2 AU with CRIRES (on 2013 February 2 and 4), and post-perihelion at R {sub h} = 0.75 AU with CSHELL (on March 31 and April 1) and R {sub h} = 1.74 AU with NIRSPEC (on June 20). We detected 10 volatile species (H{sub 2}O, OH* prompt emission, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}CO, HCN, CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 2}), and obtained upper limits for two others (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and HDO). One-dimensional spatial profiles displayed different distributions for some volatiles, confirming either the existence of polar and apolar ices, or of chemically distinct active vents in the nucleus. The ortho-para ratio for water was 3.31 0.33 (weighted mean of CRIRES and NIRSPEC results), implying a spin temperature >37 K at the 95% confidence limit. Our (3?) upper limit for HDO corresponds to D/H < 2.45 10{sup 3} (i.e., <16 Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW). At R {sub h} = 1.2 AU (CRIRES), the production rate for water was Q(H{sub 2}O) = 1.9 0.1 10{sup 29} s{sup 1} and its rotational temperature was T {sub rot} ? 69 K. At R {sub h} = 0.75 AU (CSHELL), we measured Q(H{sub 2}O) = 4.6 0.6 10{sup 29} s{sup 1} and T {sub rot} = 80 K on March 31, and 6.6 0.9 10{sup 29} s{sup 1} and T {sub rot} = 100 K on April 1. At R {sub h} = 1.74 AU (NIRSPEC), we obtained Q(H{sub 2}O) = 1.1 0.1 10{sup 29} s{sup 1} and T {sub rot} ? 50 K. The measured volatile abundance ratios classify comet C/2012 F6 as rather depleted in C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and CH{sub 3}OH, while HCN, CH{sub 4}, and CO displayed abundances close to their median values found among comets. H{sub 2}CO was the only volatile showing a relative enhancement. The relative paucity of C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and CH{sub 3}OH (with respect to H{sub 2}O) suggests formation within warm regions of the nebula. However, the normal abundance of HCN and hypervolatiles CH{sub 4} and CO, and the enhancement of H{sub 2}CO, may indicate a possible heterogeneous nucleus of comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon), possibly as a result of radial mixing within the protoplanetary disk.

  9. HIGHLY DEPLETED ETHANE AND MILDLY DEPLETED METHANOL IN COMET 21P/GIACOBINI-ZINNER: APPLICATION OF A NEW EMPIRICAL {nu}{sub 2}-BAND MODEL FOR CH{sub 3}OH NEAR 50 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSanti, M. A.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.

    2013-01-20

    We obtained infrared spectra of Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (hereafter 21P/GZ) using NIRSPEC at Keck II on UT 2005 June 3, approximately one month before perihelion, that simultaneously sampled H{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and CH{sub 3}OH. Our production rate for H{sub 2}O (3.885 {+-} 0.074 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup -1}) was consistent with that measured during other apparitions of 21P/GZ as retrieved from optical, infrared, and radio observations. Our analysis also provided values for rotational temperature (T {sub rot} = 51 {+-} 3 K) and the abundance ratio of ortho and para spin populations for water (OPR = 2.99 {+-} 0.23, implying a spin temperature exceeding 50 K). Six Q-branches in the {nu}{sub 7} band of C{sub 2}H{sub 6} provided a production rate (5.27 {+-} 0.90 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} s{sup -1}) that corresponded to an abundance ratio of 0.136 {+-} 0.023 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} relative to H{sub 2}O, confirming the previously reported strong depletion of C{sub 2}H{sub 6} from IR observations during the 1998 apparition, and in qualitative agreement with the depletion of C{sub 2} known from optical studies of 21P/GZ. For CH{sub 3}OH, we applied our recently published quantum model for the {nu}{sub 3} band to obtain a rotational temperature (48{sup +10}/{sub -7} K) consistent with that obtained for H{sub 2}O. In addition, we developed a new empirical model for the CH{sub 3}OH {nu}{sub 2} band, based on observations of Comet 8P/Tuttle with NIRSPEC. The application of our {nu}{sub 2} model to 21P/GZ yielded a production rate in agreement with that obtained from the {nu}{sub 3} band. Combining results from both {nu}{sub 2} and {nu}{sub 3} bands provided a production rate (47.5 {+-} 4.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} s{sup -1}) that corresponded to an abundance ratio of 1.22 {+-} 0.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} relative to H{sub 2}O in 21P/GZ, indicating mild depletion of CH{sub 3}OH. Together with observations of 21P/GZ in 1998, our study provides a measure of primary volatile production rates for this Jupiter family comet over multiple apparitions using high-resolution IR spectroscopy.

  10. Secure Storage Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to clarify the challenges associated with storage for secure enclaves. The major focus areas for the report are: - review of relevant parallel filesystem technologies to identify assets and gaps; - review of filesystem isolation/protection mechanisms, to include native filesystem capabilities and auxiliary/layered techniques; - definition of storage architectures that can be used for customizable compute enclaves (i.e., clarification of use-cases that must be supported for shared storage scenarios); - investigate vendor products related to secure storage. This study provides technical details on the storage and filesystem used for HPC with particular attention on elements that contribute to creating secure storage. We outline the pieces for a a shared storage architecture that balances protection and performance by leveraging the isolation capabilities available in filesystems and virtualization technologies to maintain the integrity of the data. Key Points: There are a few existing and in-progress protection features in Lustre related to secure storage, which are discussed in (Chapter 3.1). These include authentication capabilities like GSSAPI/Kerberos and the in-progress work for GSSAPI/Host-keys. The GPFS filesystem provides native support for encryption, which is not directly available in Lustre. Additionally, GPFS includes authentication/authorization mechanisms for inter-cluster sharing of filesystems (Chapter 3.2). The limitations of key importance for secure storage/filesystems are: (i) restricting sub-tree mounts for parallel filesystem (which is not directly supported in Lustre or GPFS), and (ii) segregation of hosts on the storage network and practical complications with dynamic additions to the storage network, e.g., LNET. A challenge for VM based use cases will be to provide efficient IO forwarding of the parallel filessytem from the host to the guest (VM). There are promising options like para-virtualized filesystems to help with this issue, which are a particular instances of the more general challenge of efficient host/guest IO that is the focus of interfaces like virtio. A collection of bridging technologies have been identified in Chapter 4, which can be helpful to overcome the limitations and challenges of supporting efficient storage for secure enclaves. The synthesis of native filesystem security mechanisms and bridging technologies led to an isolation-centric storage architecture that is proposed in Chapter 5, which leverages isolation mechanisms from different layers to facilitate secure storage for an enclave. Recommendations: The following highlights recommendations from the investigations done thus far. - The Lustre filesystem offers excellent performance but does not support some security related features, e.g., encryption, that are included in GPFS. If encryption is of paramount importance, then GPFS may be a more suitable choice. - There are several possible Lustre related enhancements that may provide functionality of use for secure-enclaves. However, since these features are not currently integrated, the use of Lustre as a secure storage system may require more direct involvement (support). (*The network that connects the storage subsystem and users, e.g., Lustre s LNET.) - The use of OpenStack with GPFS will be more streamlined than with Lustre, as there are available drivers for GPFS. - The Manilla project offers Filesystem as a Service for OpenStack and is worth further investigation. Manilla has some support for GPFS. - The proposed Lustre enhancement of Dynamic-LNET should be further investigated to provide more dynamic changes to the storage network which could be used to isolate hosts and their tenants. - The Linux namespaces offer a good solution for creating efficient restrictions to shared HPC filesystems. However, we still need to conduct a thorough round of storage/filesystem benchmarks. - Vendor products should be more closely reviewed, possibly to include evaluation of performance/protection of select products. (Note, we are investigation the option of evaluating equipment from Seagate/Xyratex.) Outline: The remainder of this report is structured as follows: - Section 1: Describes the growing importance of secure storage architectures and highlights some challenges for HPC. - Section 2: Provides background information on HPC storage architectures, relevant supporting technologies for secure storage and details on OpenStack components related to storage. Note, that background material on HPC storage architectures in this chapter can be skipped if the reader is already familiar with Lustre and GPFS. - Section 3: A review of protection mechanisms in two HPC filesystems; details about available isolation, authentication/authorization and performance capabilities are discussed. - Section 4: Describe technologies that can be used to bridge gaps in HPC storage and filesystems to facilitate...