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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California Title Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in...

2

Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Rice Cropping Schedule for Central Hokkaido, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A framework for the probabilistic risk assessment of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping schedule (PRARCS) is presented. The method accounts for interannual meteorological variation, as opposed to the traditional cultivation schedule planning ...

Manabu Nemoto; Takahiro Hamasaki; Ryoji Sameshima; Etsushi Kumagai; Hiroyuki Ohno; Yasuyuki Wakiyama; Atsushi Maruyama; Shinkichi Goto; Kiyoshi Ozawa

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Rice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rice Rice Nature Bulletin No. 364-A January 10, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RICE The Biblical saying, "All flesh is grass", is food for thought. Civilization depends on agriculture; and agriculture, fundamentally, depends upon the seeds of grasses that were originally wild: principally wheat, rice and corn; to a lesser extent upon barley, rye, oats and millet, These are the cereal grains that feed us. The seeds, stems and leaves of these and other grasses also sustain the animals upon which we depend for meat. Millet and, later, barley were apparently the first grains to be cultivated but civilization really arrived, probably 10, 000 years ago, when man learned how to grow wheat. He learned how to make bread, the staff of life. About the same time, in southeastern Asia, he learned how to cultivate rice and boil it for food. To lessen his labor, he invented the plow, the wheel and the cart. Here in the western hemisphere he domesticated maize, which we call corn. Until those times the land would not support relatively dense populations nor the central cities that advanced the progress of civilization.

5

Genomic organization of chromosomal centromeres in the cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., and its wild progenitor, O. rufipogon Griff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centromeres are responsible for sister-chromatid cohesion, kinetochore formation, and accurate transmission of chromosomes. Rice provides an excellent model for organizational and functional studies of centromeres since several of its chromosomes contain limited amounts of satellite and other repetitive sequences in their centromeres. To facilitate molecular characterization of the centromeres, we screened several BIBAC and BAC libraries of japonica and indica rice, using several centromere-specific repeat elements as probes. The positive clones were identified, fingerprinted and integrated into our whole genome physical map databases of the two rice subspecies. BAC/BIBACbased physical maps were constructed for the centromeric regions of the subspecies. To determine whether the genomic organization of the centromeres has changed since the cultivated rice split from its progenitor and to identify the sequences potentially playing an important role in centromere functions, we constructed a large-insert BIBAC library for the wild progenitor of Asian cultivated rice, O. rufipogon. The library contains 24,192 clones, has an average insert size of 163 kb, and covers 5 x haploid genome of wild rice. We screened the wild rice library with two centromere 8-specific overgo probes designed from the sequences flanking centromere 8 of japonica rice. A BIBACbased map was constructed for wild rice centromere 8. Two of the clones, B43P04 and B15E04, were found to span the entire region of the wild rice centromere and thus selected for sequencing the centromere. By sequencing the B43P09 clone, a 95% genomic sequence of the long arm side of wild rice centromere 8 was obtained. Comparative analysis revealed that the centromeric regions of wild rice have a similar gene content to japonica rice, but the centromeric regions of japonica rice have undergone chromosomal rearrangements at both large scale and nucleotide levels. In addition, although the 155-bp satellite repeats showed dramatic changes at the middle region, they are conserved at the 5' and 3' ends of satellite monomers, suggesting that those regions might have important functional roles for centromeres. These results provide not only new insights into genomic organization and evolution, but also a platform for functional analysis of plant centromeres.

Uhm, Taesik

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Wild Rice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an Algonquin Indian name for Wild Rice, the most productive and valuable wild grain crop we have. Wild rice and acorns were two crops harvested in autumn by the Indians in...

7

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbaceous crops for bioenergy. Biomass Bioenerg 14:317–24.Non-native species and bioenergy: Are we cultivating theniche estimates for bioenergy crops and invasive species of

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Characterization of paralogous protein families in rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: High gene numbers in plant genomes reflect polyploidy and major gene duplication events. Oryza sativa, cultivated rice, is a diploid monocotyledonous species with a ~390 Mb genome that has undergone segmental ...

Lin, Haining

9

Energy analysis of selected crops in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Energy analyses were made for the production of rice, corn and sugarcane crops in Thailand. All on-farm production activities from land preparation to harvesting were included. Energy inputs and yields for all crops were low. The energy returns for all three crops vary from 8 to 9 kilocalories for every kilocalorie put in.

Singh, G.; de Los Reyes, A.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Comparative Advantage in Bangladesh Crop Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses data from 1996/97 through 1998/99 to examine the relative efficiency of production of crops in Bangladesh and their comparative advantage in international trade as measured by net economic profitability (the profitability using economic, rather than financial costs and prices), and the domestic resource cost ratio, (the amount of value of non-tradable domestic resources used in production divided by the value of tradable products). The economic profitability analysis demonstrates that Bangladesh has a comparative advantage in domestic production of rice for import substitution. However, at the export parity price, economic profitability of rice is generally less than economic profitability of many non-rice crops, implying that Bangladesh has more profitable options other than production for rice export. Several non-cereal crops, including vegetables, potatoes and onions have financial and economic returns that are as high as or higher than those of High Yielding Variety (HYV) rice. The relatively minor role in cropping systems of these crops despite their higher returns, can largely be attributed to high price risks associated with marketing, suggesting the need for further development of agro-processing industries, rural infrastructure, and marketing networks. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.

Quazi Shahabuddin; Paul Dorosh; Ashok Gulati; K. M. Rahman; M. K. Mujeri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Simulating the Impact of Climate Change on Rice Phenology and Grain Yield in Irrigated Drylands of Central Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rice is the second major food crop in central Asia. Climate change may greatly affect the rice production in the region. This study quantifies the effects of projected increases in temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration on the phenological ...

K. P. Devkota; A. M. Manschadi; M. Devkota; J. P. A. Lamers; E. Ruzibaev; O. Egamberdiev; E. Amiri; P. L. G. Vlek

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Simulating the impact of climate change on rice phenology and grain yield in irrigated drylands of Central Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rice is the second major food crop in Central Asia. Climate change may greatly affect the rice production in the region. This study quantifies the effects of projected increases in temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration on the phenological ...

K. P. Devkota; A. M. Manschadi; M. K. Devkota; O. Egamberdiev; P. L. G. Vlek

13

Genetic characterization of red rice (Oryza sativa L.) and control in imidazolinone tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red rice from the southern United States was collected and analyzed using Simple Sequence Length Polymorphism (SSLP) markers in an effort to test the assumption that red rice is Oryza sativa ssp. indica. The 18 markers used are distributed across all 12 chromosomes of the rice genome and can be used to distinguish between sibling cultivars. The results indicate that traditional classification of red rice based on morphological characteristics alone is inadequate. Some red rice was closely related to Oryza sativa ssp. indica, while other red rice was more closely related to Oryza sativa ssp. japonica. Some red rice samples collected from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas are very closely related to the noxious weed, Oryza rufipogon accession IRGC 105491. This research revealed that different classes of red rice are intermingled across the southern United States rice belt. Within individual commercial production fields, Oryza sativa ssp. indica-like red rice and Oryza rufipogon-like red rice can be found within a single 9 m² collection site. In 2000 and 2001, studies were conducted at several locations across the Texas rice-producing region with imidazolinone tolerant rice to determine the most efficacious sequential application rate and timing of imazethapyr for control of red rice and other weeds. At Beaumont, red rice and barnyardgrass control was greater than 94% with 0.07, 0.09 and 0.10 kg/ha preplant incorporated or preemergence followed by at least 0.04 kg/ha early postemergence on a clay soil. Broadleaf signalgrass control near Eagle Lake showed that preplant incorporated and preemergence applications followed by early postemergence applications provided greater than 86% control in 2000, and greater than 90% control in 2001. Sequential postemergence applications at Beaumont resulted in greater than 95% red rice and barnyardgrass control when 0.04 kg/ha late postemergence followed any early postemergence application. Sequential postemergence applications controlled broadleaf signalgrass greater than 98% in both years. Red rice control at Lissie on a fine sandy loam soil was at least 98% with all sequential treatments. Crop injury was found to be a function of the postemergence application in all studies. Crop yields were not reduced by early season crop injury from imazethapyr applications, regardless of soil type.

Ottis, Brian Vance

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Study on the Bioenergy Crop Production Function of Land Use in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of the bioenergy crop production function of land use, combined with the current situation of Chinese land use, this paper analyzes and discusses the cultivation of energy plants and the bioenergy crop production function of land ... Keywords: Land use, Bioenergy crop production function, farmers income

Zhang Kun; Duan Jiannan; Yang Jun; Li Ping

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effects of Monsoonal Fluctuations on Grains in China. Part II: Crop Water Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper continues the description of the effects of monsoonal variability in regard to crop evapotranspiration (ET) and irrigation needs of rice, maize, and wheat for 16 Chinese stations between 1961 and 1975. For this analysis the previously ...

W. H. Terjung; L. O. Mearns; P. E. Todhunter; J. T. Hayes; H-Y. Ji

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Participatory agent-based modeling and simulation of rice production and labor migrations in Northeast Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfed lowland rice production in lower Northeast Thailand is a complex and adaptive farming activity. Complexity arises from interconnections between multiple and intertwined processes, affected by harsh climatic and soil conditions, cropping practices ... Keywords: Capacity building, Co-learning, Companion modeling, Rainfed lowland rice

W. Naivinit; C. Le Page; G. Trébuil; N. Gajaseni

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A GIS-based tool for modelling large-scale crop-water relations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research on crop-water relations has increasingly been directed towards the application of locally acquired knowledge to answering the questions raised on larger scales. However, the application of the local results to larger scales is often questionable. ... Keywords: Crop water productivity, EPIC, GEPIC, Maize, Rice, Wheat

Junguo Liu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Application of neural networks to discriminate fungal infection levels in rice panicles using hyperspectral reflectance and principal components analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting plant health condition is an important step in controlling disease and insect stress in agricultural crops. In this study, we applied neural network and principal components analysis techniques for discriminating and classifying different fungal ... Keywords: Derivative spectra, Neural networks, Principal component analysis, Remote sensing, Rice false smut disease, Rice glume blight disease, Spectral reflectance

Zhan-Yu Liu; Hong-Feng Wu; Jing-Feng Huang

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Crop Physiology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter, we review the physiology of switchgrass from seed dormancy till the effects of water and nutrients stress on grown plants. These characteristics are presented and discussed mainly at the canopy and whole-plant level with emphasis on the agro-physiology of the species in view of the possible contribution of crop physiology to agricultural development. Switchgrass is noted for the variable degrees of seed dormancy regulated by endogenous and exogenous factors that determine the successful seedling establishment. Plant growth rates are determined by temperature while the reproductive phase is controlled mainly by photoperiod. There is also evidence that some physiological attributes, such as photosynthesis, transpiration, and water use efficiency differ between tetraploid, hexaploid and octaploid ecotypes. But despite these differences, in general switchgrass combines important attributes of efficient use of nutrients and water with high yields thanks to its ability to acquire resources from extended soil volumes, especially at deep layers. Moreover at canopy level, resources capture and conservation are determined by morpho-physiological characteristics (C{sub 4} photosynthetic pathway, stomatal control of transpiration, high leaf area index, low light extinction coefficient) that enhance radiation use efficiency and reduce carbon losses. However, specific information on switchgrass physiology is still missing, in particular deeper understanding of physiological principles controlling the water and nutrients acquisition mechanisms and allocation under suboptimal growing conditions. The physiology of tillering and root respiration are also factors that need further investigation.

Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter [University of Bologna; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Monti, Andrea [University of Bologna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States John M. Ruter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States© John M. Ruter The University@uga.edu INTRODUCTION Camellia oleifera has been cultivated in China as a source of edible oil. oleifera as a commercial oil seed crop for the southeast (Ruter, 2002). Considerable research is being

Radcliffe, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Binary Cultivation in Photobioreactors - Available ...  

The approach uses binary cultivation—inside photobioreactors—to facilitate growth by creating a closed system in ... ranging from CO2 from power plant ...

22

Climate Change, High-Temperature Stress, Rice Productivity, and Water Use in Eastern China: A New Superensemble-Based Probabilistic Projection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of climate change on rice productivity in China remains highly uncertain because of uncertainties from climate change scenarios, parameterizations of biophysical processes, and extreme temperature stress in crop models. Here, the Model ...

Fulu Tao; Zhao Zhang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Microbially derived crop protection products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Project: Microbially derived crop protection productstransferred into major crop plants. Following greenhouseMicrobial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products " A

Torok, Tamas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sorghums as energy crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The botanical, physiological, and agronomic characteristics of sorghum are described. Integration concepts to improve sorghum prospects are discussed as follows: multiple sweet sorghum crops each year, integration with sugarcane, integration with sugar beets, integration with starch crops, sweet stemmed grain sorghum, and integration with lignocellulosic crops. (MHR)

Lipinsky, E.S.; Kresovich, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cover Crops for the Garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosynthesis. When the cover crops decompose, the nitrogenthe nodules becomes available for growing crops to draw on.to a fall planting of cover crops. Cover crops are grown not

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Global crop yield losses from recent warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

Lobell, D; Field, C

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

Ronald, Pamela

28

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Simulation of crop water and mineral relations in greenhouse soilless culture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite model was developed for water and mineral relations of greenhouse tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cultivated in semi-closed or open soilless (rockwool) culture. The model simulated on a daily basis: (i) the evolution of crop leaf area index ... Keywords: Closed growing systems, Fertigation, Modelling, NaCl salinity, Nitrate, Solanum lycopersicum L.

D. Massa; L. Incrocci; R. Maggini; C. Bibbiani; G. Carmassi; F. Malorgio; A. Pardossi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A farm-focused calculator for emissions from crop and livestock production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agriculture and deforestation contribute approximately one third of global greenhouse gas emissions. Major sources of emissions in this sector are from loss of soil carbon due to repeated soil disturbance under typical crop cultivation, fossil fuel use ... Keywords: Agriculture, Cool farm tool, Emissions, GHG

Jonathan Hillier; Christof Walter; Daniella Malin; Tirma Garcia-Suarez; Llorenç Mila-i-Canals; Pete Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Rice University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Rice University team on a deck extending from their unfinished Solar Decathlon house. The house is sided in corrugated metal. Rice University students display team spirit while...

32

Selection of herbaceous energy crops for the western corn belt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate economic feasibility of biomass depends on its cost of production and on the cost of competing fuels. The purpose of this research project is to evaluate the production costs of several combinations of species and management systems for producing herbaceous biomass for energy use in Iowa. Herbaceous biomass production systems have costs similar to other crop production systems, such as corn, soybean, and forages. Thus, the factors influencing the costs of producing dedicated biomass energy crops include technological factors such as the cultivation system, species, treatments, soil type, and site and economic factors such as input prices and use of fixed resources. In order to investigate how these production alternatives are influenced by soil resources, and climate conditions, two locations in Iowa, Ames and Chariton, with different soil types and slightly different weather patterns were selected for both the agronomic and economic analyses. Nine crops in thirteen cropping systems were grown at the two sites for five years, from 1988 to 1992. Some of the systems had multiple cropping or interplanting, using combinations of cool-season species and warm-season species, in order to meet multiple objectives of maximum biomass, minimal soil loss, reduced nitrogen fertilization or diminished pesticide inputs. Six of the systems use continuous monocropping of herbaceous crops with an emphasis on production. The seven other systems consist of similar crops, but with crop rotation and soil conservation considerations. While the erosion and other off-site effects of these systems is an important consideration in their overall evaluation, this report will concentrate on direct production costs only.

Anderson, I.C.; Buxton, D.R.; Hallam, J.A. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A novel framework for information technology based agricultural information dissemination system to improve crop productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indian farming community is facing a multitude of problems to maximize crop productivity. In spite of successful research on new agricultural practices concerning crop cultivation, the majority of farmers is not getting upper-bound yield due to several reasons. One of the reasons is that expert/scientific advice regarding crop cultivation is not reaching farming community in a timely manner. It is true that India possesses a valuable agricultural knowledge and expertise. However, a wide information gap exists between the research level and practice. Indian farmers need timely expert advice to make them more productive and competitive. In this paper, we made an effort to present a solution to bridge the information gap by exploiting advances in Information Technology (IT). We propose a framework of a cost-effective agricultural information dissemination system (AgrIDS) to disseminate expert agriculture knowledge to the farming community to improve the crop productivity. Some of the crucial benefits of AgrIDS are as follows. It is a scalable system which can be incrementally developed and extended to cover all the farmers (crops) of India in a cost effective manner. It enables the farmer to cultivate a crop with expertise, as that of an agricultural expert, by disseminating both crop and location specific expert advice in a personalized and timely manner. With AgrIDS, the lag period between research effort to practice can be reduced significantly. Finally, the proposed system assumes a great importance due to the trend of globalization, as it aims to provide expert advice which is crucial to for the Indian farmer to harvest different kinds of crop varieties based on the demand in the world market. 1

P. Krishna Reddy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Economic analysis of wind-powered crop drying. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in crop drying. Drying of corn, soybeans, rice, peanuts, tobacco, and dehydrated alfalfa were addressed.

Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance page 17 ReferencesR.A. Kramer. “Experience with Crop Insurance Programs in theUnited States. ” Crop Insurance for Agricultural

LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Spatial Patterns Confound Experiments in Orchard Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patterns differ among sites, crops, and process of interest,currently lacking in the tree crops, specifically, and thecommonly used in tree crop experiments and in fertilizer

Rosenstock, Todd S; Plant, Richard E; Brown, Patrick H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Department of Earth: February 2010 Downloadable at: http://esag.harvard.edu/rice/e0_Solid_Mechanics_94_10.pdf TABLE OF CONTENTS provided on last three pages, pp. 87-89 INTRODUCTION The application of the principles of mechanics to bulk

38

Rice Yearbook | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rice Yearbook Rice Yearbook Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Rice Yearbook Dataset Summary Description U.S. rice production, supply, disappearance, trade, and price data. Includes state acreage, yield, and production data; U.S. and world price series; and program statistics. Contains world supply and use estimates as well. Tags {Rice,production,supply,use,price,acreage,yield,imports,exports,ERS,USDA} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 4/8/2013 Publisher Economic Research Service, Department of Agriculture Contact Name Contact Email karlg@ers.usda.gov

39

Legume Crop Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will present this technical theme in a manner that should help many readers answer the question, "What is genomics?" And finally, this book should help readers formulate an opinion on the question, "Why is genomic research needed?" Legume Crop Ge

40

Crop Insurance Terms and Definitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication is a glossary of terms used by the crop insurance industry. There are definitions for terms used in crop insurance documents and for terms pertaining to coverage levels, farming, reports, units and parties to contracts.

Stokes, Kenneth; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe; Barnaby, G. A. Art

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Weed Management in Pulse Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During At harvest #12;GoldSky ­ Crop Rotation · 9 Months: alfalfa, barley, canola, chickpea, dry bean PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY GOLDSKY Crop Rotation Study #12;GoldSky Crop Rotation Study ­ Herbicide #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Lentil Canola Camelina Barley Field Pea Oat VisualDamage(%) GoldSky 1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

42

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

43

Crop to wild introgression in lettuce: following the fate of crop genome segments in backcross populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article as: Uwimana et al. : Crop to wild introgression infollowing the fate of crop genome segments in backcrossto the wild parent reduces the crop genome content in amount

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Crop specific micronutrient formulations for limited resource situation for horticultural crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management in horticultural crops, but this approach is nothectares under horticultural crops are managed in about 2.2monitoring was done for crops (mango, banana, orange) for

Muthaia, Edward Raja Dr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Conservation tillage and cover cropping influence soil properties in San Joaquin Valley cotton-tomato crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STNO Fertilizer Cover crop Total Harvest Balance . . . . . .conservation tillage, cover crop CTNO: conservation tillagestandard tillage, cover crop STNO: standard tillage only

Veenstra, Jessica; Horwath, William; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Munk, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Early estimation of crop surfaces and agriculture monitoring using RADARSAT data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owing to the success of past experiments carried out using ERS SAR time-series from late fall to late winter [1-6], we herewith evaluate the potential of RADARSAT in substituting optical images for early crop identification and early crop surfaces estimation. This paper outlines the operational feasibility of very early RADARSAT based acreage estimation of noncultivated terrain (set-aside, fallow, bare soils) and economically important crops, already during the winter season. Also the monitoring of growing crops during spring and early summer has been also carried out to investigate RADARSAT potential for cereals discrimination. To this end, this pre-operational project has been carried out in a real-time environment (rapid data acquisition, delivery, processing and exploitation). From May 1997 to January 1998, the test site of the West-Flevoland polder in the Netherlands was monitored in the framework of ADRO Project #581. To discriminate between non-cultivated/cultivated surfaces and to identify the major crop types, the methodology already successfully applied with ERS SAR data [1-6] has been used. 1.

Francis Yakam-simen; Edmond Nezry; Francis Zagolski

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Feasibility study for anaerobic digestion of agricultural crop residues. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides cost estimates for the pretreatment/digestion of crop residues to fuel gas. Agricultural statistics indicate that the crop residues wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw are available in sufficient quantity to provide meaningful supplies of gas. Engineering economic analyses were performed for digestion of sheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw for small farm, cooperative, and industrial scales. The results of the analyses indicate that the production of fuel gas from these residues is, at best, economically marginal, unless a credit can be obtained for digester effluent. The use of pretreatment can double the fuel gas output but will not be economically justifiable unless low chemical requirements or low-cost chemicals can be utilized. Use of low-cost hole-in-the-ground batch digestion results in improved economics for the small farm size digestion system, but not for the cooperative and industrial size systems. Recommendations arising from this study are continued development of autohydrolysis and chemical pretreatment of agricultural crop residues to improve fuel gas yields in an economically feasible manner; development of a low-cost controlled landfill batch digestion process for small farm applications; and determination of crop residue digestion by-product values for fertilizer and refeed.

Ashare, E.; Buivid, M. G.; Wilson, E. H.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Feasibility study for anaerobic digestion of agricultural crop residues. Dynatech report No. 1935  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide cost estimates for the pretreatment/digestion of crop residues to fuel gas. A review of agricultural statistics indicated that the crop residues wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw are available in sufficient quantity to provide meaningful supplies of gas. Engineering economic analyses were performed for digestion of wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw for small farm-, cooperative-, and industrial scales. The small farm scale processed the residue from an average size US farm (400 acres), and the other sizes were two and three orders of magnitude greater. The results of the analyses indicate that the production of fuel gas from these residues is, at best, economically marginal, unless a credit can be obtained for digester effluent. The use of pretreatment can double the fuel gas output but will not be economically justifiable unless low chemical requirements or low cost chemicals can be utilized. Additional development is necessary in this area. Use of low cost hole-in-the-ground batch digestion results in improved economics for the small farm size digestion system, but not for the cooperative and industrial size systems. Recommendations arising from this study are continued development of autohydrolysis and chemical pretreatment of agricultural crop residues to improve fuel gas yields in an economically feasible manner; development of a low cost controlled landfill batch digestion process for small farm applications; and determination of crop residue digestion by-product values for fertilizer and refeed.

Ashare, E.; Buivid, M. G.; Wilson, E. H.

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Floral Crops: Insects 5-19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In order to use a pesticide safely and effectively, the product label should be read thoroughly each time. Effective application of pesticides depends on: proper timing, favorable treatment conditions of temperature;HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 5-20 Floral Crops: Insects · Apply pesticides when foliage is dry

Liskiewicz, Maciej

50

Global Seed and Crop Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adventitious presence deserves discussion to understand whether farmers engaged in conventional, organic, and transgenic agriculture can coexist as neighbors using known and practical agronomic practices. When a farmer buys and sows certified seed of his or her chosen crop variety, the crop starts with the highest degree of purity deemed commercially achievable, which then becomes increasingly less pure as various

L. Kershen; Alan Mchughen; Earl Sneed; Centennial Professor; Law Biotechnology Specialist; Thomas Parker Redick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrient removal and net costs weigh on decisions to use crop residues as biofuel feedstocks. Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Inform Archives Crop residues as feedstock for rene

52

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breeding program for cassava. Crop Sci 1998; 38: 325-332. [opportunities for an ancient crop. seventh regional cassavaCassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Jansson

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cultivation of algae on highly concentrated municipal wastewater as an energy crop for biodiesel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??University of Minnesota Ph.D. dissertation. June 2012. Major: Bioproducts/Biosystems Science Engineering and Management. Advisor:Dr. Roger Ruan. 1 computer file (PDF); x, 181 pages. There has… (more)

Li, Yecong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cover Crops for the Garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effect of continuous cropping on changes in crop productivity nutrient budgets and soil properties with and without FYM under pearl millet - mustard – cowpea cropping sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KKM. In: Soil fertility and crop production under long-termfertilization for sustaining crop productivity at Punjabimportant factors that limit crop yield. Addition of organic

PATEL, KISHORBHAI PARSOTTAM; Swarnkar, Puspkant K; Singh, Mahavir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Plant-Soil Interactions, Weed Control, and Rice Tolerance as Affected by Saflufenacil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saflufenacil is a new herbicide for broadleaf weed control. Limited information is available for crop tolerance, weed control and herbicide behavior in the rice environment. Studies were designed to 1 and 2) evaluate rice tolerance and weed control to saflufenacil in combination with clomazone and imazethapyr; 3) evaluate the absorption and translocation of imazethapyr and saflufenacil in weed species 4) assess saflufenacil degradation and persistence in soils; and 5) investigate the use of reference compounds during the determination of pesticide adsorption (Kd). None or minimal rice injury was observed from preemergence (PRE) application of saflufenacil. Intense injury (68%) was noted with combinations of clomazone (505 g ha-1) applied PRE and saflufenacil (50 g ha-1) applied postemergence (POST). Similarly, rice injury up to 83% was observed in earlier evaluations when saflufenacil was applied POST with imazethapyr. However, subsequent evaluations indicated rice recovery from herbicide treatments. Combination of saflufenacil with imazethapyr resulted in hemp sesbania control ? 88% and red rice control of 100%. Rice yield was not adversely altered by the herbicide treatments used in the clomazone and imazethapyr weed control programs. Imazethapyr plus saflufenacil provided a greater uptake (30%) and translocation (35%) of 14C-imazethapyr than imazethapyr alone in the TX4 red rice. Absorption of 14C-saflufenacil ranged from approximately 40 to 60% in hemp sesbania plants. At 12 and 24 hours after treatment a greater percentage of the absorbed saflufenacil was quantified above the treated leaf at the two lower light intensities. Similar trends were observed for basipetal movement of saflufenacil. An accelerated solvent extraction method was developed to extract saflufenacil from soil. Half-life averaged among soils was 59 and 33 days for saturated and field capacity, respectively. Saflufenacil persistence in the environment was 2 to 3 times longer under flooded conditions for most of the studied soils. Adsorption values were affected by soil to solution ratios, particularly when the soil-pesticide interaction resulted in Kd values > than 2 mL g-1. The use of reference compounds during Kd estimation allowed for calculation of a conceptual adsorption window generating a more comprehensive set of data with alternatives for comparison of soils and methods.

Camargo, Edinalvo

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Examining the Interaction of Growing Crops with Local Climate Using a Coupled Crop–Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines to what extent crops and their environment should be viewed as a coupled system. Crop impact assessments currently use climate model output offline to drive process-based crop models. However, in regions where local climate is ...

Tom Osborne; Julia Slingo; David Lawrence; Tim Wheeler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Using Legumes to Enhance Sustainability of Sorghum Cropping Systems in the East Texas Pineywoods Ecoregion: Impacts on Soil Nitrogen, Soil Carbon, and Crop Yields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overall soil productivity is declining in the U.S. due to loss of soil organic matter (SOM). Decreased SOM lowers soil water storage, reduces water infiltration, slows aggregate formation, and depletes soil of nutrients. In many systems, crop nutrients are replaced by expensive synthetic fertilizers that can lead to environmental concerns. This practice is not economically or environmentally sustainable in the long term. To secure future soil use and crop production, sustainable management practices are needed to prevent further SOM depletion. Incorporating legumes into cropping systems is one alternative that can bolster soil organic C (SOC) (key indicator of SOM) and reduce N fertilizer applications through symbiotic legume N fixation. Three studies were conducted over multiple years at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center near Overton, TX. Annual cool- and warm-season legumes were evaluated as potential green manure crops and intercrops under grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], high-biomass sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and annual forage cropping systems. These studies quantified legume soil moisture usage and C and N contributions to the soil and subsequent crop yields in East Texas. Primary project objectives were to maintain or maximize primary crop yields at reduced N fertilizer rates and to build SOC through the integration of legume green manures and intercrops. Green manuring cool-season legumes showed the most beneficial effect on SOC, soil total N, and crop yields; however, significant increases in yield were only detected after three years in rotation. Intercropping Iron-and-Clay cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. [Walp]) decreased yield of both high-biomass sorghum and grain sorghum due to competitive vegetative growth. Iron-and-Clay did however improve biomass yields of high-biomass sorghum in two subsequent years when implemented as a green manure. Despite large N yields as high as 310 kg ha-1, impacts of legumes on annual forage crops was limited. Poor response was likely a result of previous field history in which a permanent warm-season grass pasture was cultivated for site preparation and mineralized SOC released substantial amounts of available N. Under low soil N conditions, legume green manures produce enough N to likely reduce N fertilizer requirements cost-effectively for subsequent crops in East Texas.

Neely, Clark B

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Despite benefits, commercialization of transgenic horticultural crops lags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Gianessi is Director, Crop Protection Research Institute,differ- ent folks in tree crops: What works and what doesBiotechnology of floriculture crops — scientific questions

Clark, David; Klee, Harry; Dandekar, Abhaya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Survey of glucosinolate variation in leaves of Brassica rapa crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1), representing most major crops of B. rapa, were sampledgsl-containing vegetable crops included in human diet. A fewbeen surveyed in several crops such as broccoli, broccoli

Yang, Bo; Quiros, Carlos F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Biological and cultural controls . . . Nonpesticide alternatives can suppress crop pests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternatives can suppress crop pests Nicholas J. Mills Kentsuppression of major arthropod crop pests in California. Wevines, and ?eld and row crops. For example, a historic suc-

Mills, Nicholas J.; Daane, Kent M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Blueberry research launches exciting new California specialty crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Estimated highbush blueberry crop, 2004 State Growers whoin spearhead- ing specialty crops research and efforts tonew California specialty crop Manuel Jimenez Francis

Jimenez, Manuel; Carpenter, Francis; Molinar, Richard H.; Wright, Kathryn; Day, Kevin R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ial divers ity- based new crop protection products andicultural production of major crop plan ts and industrialand insect pests major crop plants. If the of cell- free

Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Statistical Profile of Horticultural Crop Farm Industries in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Profile of Horticultural Crop Farm Industries in Californiaproject funded by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation,Williams. “Model- ing Farm-Level Crop Insurance Demand with

Lee, Hyunok; Blank, Steven C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Remote Sensing and Geospatial Technological Applications for Site-specific Management of Fruit and Nut Crops: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Site-specific crop management (SSCM) is one facet of precision agriculture which is helping increase production with minimal input. It has enhanced the cost-benefit scenario in crop production. Even though the SSCM is very widely used in row crop agriculture like corn, wheat, rice, soybean, etc. it has very little application in cash crops like fruit and nut. The main goal of this review paper was to conduct a comprehensive review of advanced technologies, including geospatial technologies, used in site-specific management of fruit and nut crops. The review explores various remote sensing data from different platforms like satellite, LIDAR, aerial, and field imaging. The study analyzes the use of satellite sensors, such as Quickbird, Landsat, SPOT, and IRS imagery as well as hyperspectral narrow-band remote sensing data in study of fruit and nut crops in blueberry, citrus, peach, apple, etc. The study also explores other geospatial technologies such as GPS, GIS spatial modeling, advanced image processing techniques, and information technology for suitability study, orchard delineation, and classification accuracy assessment. The study also provides an example of a geospatial model developed in ArcGIS ModelBuilder to automate the blueberry production suitability analysis. The GIS

Sudhanshu Sekhar P; Gerrit Hoogenboom; Joel O. Paz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Rice Production Texas produces nearly 225,000 acres high quality long grain rice for domestic and export  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice Production · Texas produces nearly 225,000 acres high quality long grain rice for domestic and export markets. · Rice produces $145 million for farmers and generates $480 million for Texas. · Pest-chemicalpracticestoreducewaterweevildamageincludelaserlevelinganddelayed floodingforwatermanagement,seedingratesforuniformstands,andselectiveplanting dates. · 100% of the Texas rice acreage

Wilkins, Neal

67

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C. Flynn and Pete Smith #12;Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C or boundaries. #12;3Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends About

Levi, Ran

68

Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, agribusinesses and policy makers, but an economic model making these projections for Texas did not previously exist. The objective of this study was to develop a model to project annual NFI for producers of major crops in Texas. The Texas crop model was developed to achieve this objective, estimating state prices, yields and production costs as a function of their national counterparts. Five hundred iterations of national price and yield projections from the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI), along with FAPRI�s average production cost projections, were used as input to the Texas crop model. The stochastic FAPRI Baseline and residuals for Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) equations relating Texas variables to national variables were used to incorporate the risk left unexplained by OLS equations between Texas and U.S. variables. Deterministic and probabilistic NFI projections for Texas crops were compared under the January 2005 and January 2006 FAPRI Baseline projections. With production costs increasing considerably and prices rising moderately in the January 2006 Baseline, deterministic projections of 2006-2014 Texas NFI decreased by an average of 26 percent for corn, 3 percent for cotton, 15 percent for peanuts, and 12 percent for rice, and were negative for sorghum and wheat. Probability distributions of projected NFI fell for all program crops, especially sorghum and wheat. Higher hay price projections caused deterministic projections of NFI for hay to rise roughly 13 percent, and increased the probability distributions of projected hay NFI. Deterministic and probabilistic projections of total NFI decreased for each year, especially for 2006-2008 when fuel price projections were the highest. The Texas crop model can be used to simulate NFI for Texas crop producers under alternative FAPRI baselines. The model shows the impact of baseline changes on probability distributions of NFI for each crop and for Texas as a whole. It can also be useful as a policy analysis tool to compare impacts of alternative farm and macroeconomic policies on NFI.

Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Management of lignite fly ash for improving soil fertility and crop productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and bioferfertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy metal contents and in the level of gamma-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

Ram, L.C.; Srivastava, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Masto, R.E.; Selvi, V.A. [Central Fuel Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Far West Rice | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Rice West Rice Jump to: navigation, search Name Far West Rice Place Nelson, California Zip 95958 Sector Solar Product California-based family-owned rice mill. Owns a solar farm used mostly for the electricity needs of their factory. Coordinates 44.422864°, -92.009187° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.422864,"lon":-92.009187,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States. In selecting biofuel crops, a balance must bethe degree of risk that a biofuel crop (including cultivarsthe risk potential of biofuel crops: qualitative and

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy. BiomassStates. In selecting biofuel crops, a balance must be struckdegree of risk that a biofuel crop (including cultivars and

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18-673389 Keywords: cassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolicRecently, cassava-derived bioethanol production has beenbenefits compared to other bioethanol- producing crops in

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

CropEnergies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name CropEnergies Place Mannheim, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Zip 68165 Sector Biofuels Product A German biofuels company focused on bioethanol production for use as...

76

Seasonality and Its Effects on Crop Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding crop seasonality can improve a producer's marketing skills and options. The causes of seasonality and its effects on price changes are discussed.

Tierney Jr., William I.; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Climate Change Impact on Rice Insurance Payouts in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors constructed the framework for a preliminary assessment of climate change impact on the rice insurance payout in Japan. The framework consisted of various models ranging from climate projection downscaling, rice yield estimation, yield ...

Toshichika Iizumi; Masayuki Yokozawa; Yousay Hayashi; Fujio Kimura

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Short rotation Wood Crops Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the technical progress of research projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program for the year ending September 30, 1989. The primary goal of this research program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, is the development of a viable technology for producing renewable feedstocks for conversion to biofuels. One of the more significant accomplishments was the documentation that short-rotation woody crops total delivered costs could be $40/Mg or less under optimistic but attainable conditions. By taking advantage of federal subsidies such as those offered under the Conservation Reserve Program, wood energy feedstock costs could be lower. Genetic improvement studies are broadening species performance within geographic regions and under less-than-optimum site conditions. Advances in physiological research are identifying key characteristics of species productivity and response to nutrient applications. Recent developments utilizing biotechnology have achieved success in cell and tissue culture, somaclonal variation, and gene-insertion studies. Productivity gains have been realized with advanced cultural studies of spacing, coppice, and mixed-species trials. 8 figs., 20 tabs.

Wright, L.L.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable feedstock resources. The Department of Energy is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soil conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row crops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different biomass crops for selected wildlife species is also under study. To date, these studies have shown that in comparison with row crops biomass plantings of both grass and tree crops increased biodiversity of birds; however, the habitat value of tree plantations is not equivalent to natural forests. The effects on native wildlife of establishing multiple plantations across a landscape are being studied. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing biomass feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the probable effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Texas Rice Industry Coalition for the Environment (R.I.C.E.): Main Points from Six Focus Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................... iv Background ..................................................................1 Texas R.I.C.E. ..........................................................2 Methods .....................................................................4 Rice Producers Focus Groups Materials ......................................5 Environmental Interests and General Public Focus Groups Materials ...............5 Children Focus Group Interview Materials ....................................6 West Side Rice Producers Focus Group ............................................6 EastSideRiceProducersFocusGroup ............................................11 OfficersofEnvironmentalOrganizationsFocusGroup ...............................16 MembersofEnvironmentalOrganizationsFocusGroup ..............................20 Unaffiliated Public Citizens of Houston Focus Group ................................24 ChildrenFocusGroup .............................

Texas A; Ed Rister; Amy Purvis Thurow; Amy Purvis Thurow; Shannon Sneary; Shannon Sneary; Sarah Stasny; Sarah Stasny

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Growing Energy Biomass crops as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide our heat, electricity and liquid transport fuels. It is widely agreed that wind, wave, tidal carbon emissions set by the Kyoto Protocol are to be met. Biomass from crop plants can make an important of research activities aimed at the sustainable production of biomass from energy crops for heat and power

Rambaut, Andrew

82

Short Rotation Crops in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

responders anticipated that energy will comprise 25% or less of the utilization of single-stem short-rotation woody crops between now and 2010. The only exception was a response from California where a substantial biomass energy market does currently exist. Willows (Salix species) are only being developed for energy and only in one part of the United States at present. Responses from herbaceous crop researchers suggested frustration that markets (including biomass energy markets) do not currently exist for the crop, and it was the perception of many that federal incentives will be needed to create such markets. In all crops, responses indicate that a wide variety of research and development activities are needed to enhance the yields and profitability of the crops. Ongoing research activities funded by the U.S. Department of Energy?s Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program are described in an appendix to the paper.

Wright, L.L.

1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

Rust disease continues to threaten California garlic crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

threaten California garlic crop Steven T. Koike u Richard F.severely damaged the garlic crop in Califor- nia. Thestudy, it infected allium crops such as gar- lic, onion and

Koike, Steven T.; Smith, Richard; Davis, R. Michael; Nunez, J. Joe; Voss, Ron E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

New crop coefficients developed for high-yield processing tomatoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after planting Fig. 2. Daily crop coefficients with daysFor all years, seasonal crop ETc ranged from 20.8 to 29.64. Relationship between average crop coefficient and canopy

Hanson, Blaine R.; May, Donald M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

When crop transgenes wander in California, should we worry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modi?ed herbicide- tolerant crops. J Applied Ecol 40:2–16.No 421. Gressel J. 2005. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism.Can genetically engineered crops become weeds? Biotechnology

Ellstrand, Norman C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Weather-based yield forecasts developed for 12 California crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precipitation on California crop yields. Climatic Change. InG. 1999. Understanding crop statis- tics. www.usda.gov/nass/developed for 12 California crops by David B. Lobell,

Lobell, David; Cahill, Kimberly Nicholas; Field, Christopher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pharmaceutical crops have a mixed outlook in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8:18–25. Ellstrand NC. 2006. When crop transgenes wander inM, Van Acker R. 2005. Can crop transgenes be kept on aEconomics of Pharmaceuti- cal Crops: Potential Bene?ts and

Marvier, Michelle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Buffers between grazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sheep and the edge of a food crop was adequate to preventgrazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety Thedomestic animals and the crop edge is adequate to minimize

Hoar, Bruce R; Atwill, Edward R; Carlton, Lesa; Celis, Jorge; Carabez, Jennifer; Nguyen, Tran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An Approach to Crop-Hail Insurance Rate Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hailstorms are meteorological events that have a considerably adverse impact on crop production. Variation of these events in time and space, in turn, influence crop-hail insurance rate structure. Crop-hail insurance companies normally review ...

J. C. Neill

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Water use of tall and dwarf crop plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

height in a spring wheat. Crop Science 34(No. 6); \\ i i *O F T A L L AND D W A R F CROP PLANTS By J . Giles Wainesbetween water application, crop yields, and management

Waines, J. Giles; Ehdaie, Bahman

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. R. Linden. 2004. Crop and soil productivity responseresistance in cowpea. Crop Science 40:611-618. Enache A. J.McGiffen. 2000. Cowpea cover crop mulch for weed control in

Bachie, Oli Gurmu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Rice Lake Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rice Lake Utilities Rice Lake Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Rice Lake Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15938 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

93

Spatializing Growth Suitability for Spring Soybean Cultivation in Northeast China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an integrated indicator-based system is established to map the suitability of spring soybean cultivation in northeast China. The indicator system incorporates both biophysical and socioeconomic factors, including the effects of ...

Yingbin He; Dongmei Liu; Yanmin Yao; Qing Huang; Jianping Li; Youqi Chen; Shuqin Shi; Li Wan; Shikai Yu; Deying Wang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nitrogen supply from fertilizer and legume cover crop in the transition to no-tillage for irrigated row crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

152–155 CTIC (2004) National crop residue management survey.15 labeled legume cover crop. Soil Sci Soc Am J 53:822–827fertilizer and legume cover crop in the transition to no-

Doane, Timothy A.; Horwath, William R.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Jackson, Jim; Miyao, Gene; Brittan, Kent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Short Rotation Crops in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The report is based primarily on the results of survey questions sent to approximately 60 woody and 20 herbaceous crop researchers in the United States and on information from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program. Responses were received from 13 individuals involved in woody crops research or industrial commercialization (with 5 of the responses coming from industry). Responses were received from 11 individuals involved in herbaceous crop research. Opinions on market incentives, technical and non-technical barriers, and highest priority research and development areas are summarized in the text. Details on research activities of the survey responders are provided as appendices to the paper. Woody crops grown as single-stem systems (primarily Populus and Eucalyptus species) are perceived to have strong pulp fiber and oriented strand board markets, and the survey responders anticipated that energy will comprise 25% or less of the utilization of single-stem short-rotation woody crops between now and 2010. The only exception was a response from California where a substantial biomass energy market does currently exist. Willows (Salix species) are only being developed for energy and only in one part of the United States at present. Responses from herbaceous crop researchers suggested frustration that markets (including biomass energy markets) do not currently exist for the crop, and it was the perception of many that federal incentives will be needed to create such markets. In all crops, responses indicate that a wide variety of research and development activities are needed to enhance the yields and profitability of the crops. Ongoing research activities funded by the U.S. Department of Energy?s Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program are described in an appendix to the paper.

Wright, L.L.

1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s PETRO Project, short for “Plants Engineered to Replace Oil,” aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Bioenergy: What`s in it for the grower? The cost of producing dedicated energy crops. Comparisons with conventional crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dedicated energy crops must be at least as profitable as conventional crops that could be grown on a given site before farmers will produce energy crops on that site. This report concentrates on the cost of producing dedicated energy crops and compare those costs to the profitability of conventional crops. This comparison allows one to estimate a breakeven price, that is, a price for which the profitability of dedicated energy crops is equivalent to the profitability of conventional crops. Switchgrass and hybrid poplar have been chosen as representative herbaceous and woody crop species for the estimation.

Walsh, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Methane Emissions from Rice Fields - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Methane (Ch4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning.

Khalil, M. Aslam; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres  

SciTech Connect

The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

Jiang, Jiming

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

Bioeconomy Crop Initiative (Prince Edward Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bioeconomy Crop Initiative is being offered by the P.E.I. Department of Agriculture through the Agricultural Flexibility Fund, a cost-sharing agreement between the Government of Canada and the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Optimizing Crop Insurance under Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the selection of optimal crop insurance under climate variability and fluctuating market prices. A model was designed to minimize farmers’ expected losses (including insurance costs) while using the conditional-value-at-risk ...

Juan Liu; Chunhua Men; Victor E. Cabrera; Stan Uryasev; Clyde W. Fraisse

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a biomass for biofuel production and some of its economiceconomic viability of biofuel production is the efficiencybiofuel; metabolic engineering; China Abstract Cassava is ranking as fifth among crops in global starch production.

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Conservation tillage and cover cropping influence soil properties in San Joaquin Valley cotton-tomato crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 147 TREATMENTS CTCC: conservation tillage, covercrop CTNO: conservation tillage only STCC: standard tillage,1.24bc 1.35d * CTCC = conservation tillage, cover crop; CTNO

Veenstra, Jessica; Horwath, William; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Munk, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable resources. The DOE is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water, and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soils conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row drops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different crops for wildlife species is also considered. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

Gayam, Narsi Reddy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 1957–81. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited  

SciTech Connect

By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

Firewood crops: shrub and tree species for energy production. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than one-third of the world's population depends on wood for cooking and heating. Eighty-six percent of all the wood consumed annually in the developing countries is used for fuel, and of this total at least half is used for cooking. In the face of global concern over the dwindling supply of firewood, the rate of forest decimation to provide basic human necessities in developing countries is alarming. This report suggests potentially significant fuelwood candidates for introduction to suitable environments. Primary emphasis is on species suitable for growing firewood for individual family needs. However, species suited to plantation cultivation for fueling small industrial factors, electric generators, and crop driers are also considered.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chloroplast DNA insertions into the nuclear genome of rice: the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shahmuradov IA, Akbarova YY, Solovyev VV, Aliye JA (2003). Abundance of plastid DNA insertions in nuclear genomes of rice and Arabidopsis. Plant Mol Biol ...

111

DOE Solar Decathlon: Rice University: Transforming the Row House...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Houses Now? Arizona Cornell Illinois Iowa State Kentucky Minnesota Ohio State Penn State Puerto Rico Rice Team Alberta Team Boston Team California Team Germany Team Missouri Team...

112

VBH-0062- In the Matter of Sue Rice Gossett  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Sue Rice Gossett (Gossett) against her former employer, the Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC), under the Department of...

113

VBZ-0062- In the Matter of Sue Rice Gossett  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Sue Rice Gossett (Gossett) against her former employer, the Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC), under the Department of...

114

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have created opportunities for the use of crops and crop residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels 2 Soybeans Soybean acreage is on the increase in Pennsylvania For more information about using Pennsylvania crops as biofuels, contact: GREG ROTH PROFESSOR OF AGRONOMY

Lee, Dongwon

115

The Energy Crops Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crops Company Crops Company Jump to: navigation, search Name The Energy Crops Company Place Cobham, United Kingdom Zip KT11 2LA Sector Biomass Product Distributor of pellets and installer of biomass heating equipment in Surrey, UK. Coordinates 41.739891°, -79.322189° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.739891,"lon":-79.322189,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

Top Crop Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crop Wind Farm Crop Wind Farm Facility Top Crop Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Location Grundy/Livingston/La Salle Counties IL Coordinates 41.159826°, -88.637381° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.159826,"lon":-88.637381,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

117

Signature Region of Interest using Auto cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach for signature region of interest pre-processing was presented. It used new auto cropping preparation on the basis of the image content, where the intensity value of pixel is the source of cropping. This approach provides both the possibility of improving the performance of security systems based on signature images, and also the ability to use only the region of interest of the used image to suit layout design of biometric systems. Underlying the approach is a novel segmentation method which identifies the exact region of foreground of signature for feature extraction usage. Evaluation results of this approach shows encouraging prospects by eliminating the need for false region isolating, reduces the time cost associated with signature false points detection, and addresses enhancement issues. A further contribution of this paper is an automated cropping stage in bio-secure based systems.

Al-Mahadeen, Bassam; AlTarawneh, Islam H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Efficacy and Timing of Fungicides, Bactericides, and Biologicals for Decidous Tree Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strawberry, and Vine Crops—2008 University of California —NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2008 (Updated 2/19/08)crops .

Adaskaveg, Jim; Gubler, Doug; Michailides, Themis; Holtz, Brent

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Biomass resource potential using energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

W.: Auto Cropping for Digital Photographs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an effective approach to the nearly untouched problem, still photograph auto cropping, which is one of the important features to automatically enhance photographs. To obtain an optimal result, we first formulate auto cropping as an optimization problem by defining an energy function, which consists of three sub models: composition sub model, conservative sub model and penalty sub model. Then, particle swarm optimization (PSO) is employed to obtain the optimal solution by maximizing the objective function. Experimental results and user studies over hundreds of photographs show that the proposed approach is effective and accurate in most cases, and can be used in many practical multimedia applications. 1.

Mingju Zhang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NeSmith, 1991. Temperature and crop development, p.5–29. In:Using reference evapotranspiration and crop coefficientsto estimate crop evapotranspiration for agronomic crops,

Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Preplant 1,3-D treatments test well for perennial crop nurseries, but challenges remain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 26-month June-budded crop if soil has been previouslyfruit and nut nursery crops in the United States. Outlooktest well for perennial crop nurseries, but challenges

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. (1982). Assessment of crop loss from ozone. Journal of1984). Assessing impacts of ozone on agricultural crops: II.crop yield functions and alternative exposure statistics.

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark; McCubbin, Donald; Kim, H.J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Conventional and molecular assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicide resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orchards in California. Crop Protec Ma Z, Yoshimura MA,assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicidemonitor, diagnose and quantify crop pathogens. We have also

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Integrated nutrient managment for sustainable production of sorghum-wheat crop sequeence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhizosperic environment and crop productivity. A reviewpaol) is the most important crop sequence of India occupyingMore over sorghum-wheat crop sequence is an exhaustive

Bhale, Vilas Madhukar Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pigeonpea genomics initiative (PGI): an international effort to improve crop productivity of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to improve crop productivity of pigeonpea (CajanusMallikarjuna International Crops Research Institute for thean important food legume crop in the semi-arid regions of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Outlook Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives:Research Plant Pathologist, Crops Pathology and GeneticsS Jack Kelly Clark pecialty crop farms and nurseries in

Browne, Greg T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life Cyclefield with the harvested crops and the nutrients supplied bysee Fig. 1). Supply of crop residues & organic fertilizer

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Weighing lysimeters aid study of water relations in tree and vine crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ross D, Smith M. 1998. Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelinesfor computing crop water requirements. FAO Irrigation andJ, Trout T, et al. 2000. Crop coefficients for mature peach

Johnson, R. Scott; Williams, Larry E.; Ayars, James E.; Trout, Tom J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Effect of Organic Farming on Soil Fertility , Yield and Quality of Crops in the Tropics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the most essential crops in organic farming systems.Among the various vegetable crops grown in Kerala, cowpeahealth, yield, and quality of crops under organic farming.

Bhaskaran, Usha Pankajam; Krishna, Devi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Access to intellectual property is a major obstacle to developing transgenic horticultural crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies for targeted crop applications in sub- Saharanof genetically engineered crop variet- ies — such as publictransgenic horticultural crops Gregory D. Graff Brian D.

Graff, Gregory D.; Wright, Brian D.; Bennett, Alan B.; Zilberman, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. T. Tingey, Assessment of Crop Loss From Air Pollutants,,Assessing Impacts of Ozone on Agricultural Crops: II.Crop Yield Functions and Alternative Exposure Statistics",

Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; Kim, Jin; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Crop rotation and genetic resistance reduce risk of damage from Fusarium wilt in lettuce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReVIEW Article Crop rotation and genetic resistance reduceon lettuce, not on any other crops tested (Hubbard and Gerikapproach that includes crop rotation to reduce soil inoculum

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityEM, Davis RM. 2005. Mustard crops ineffective in soil-bornefor selective weed control. Crop Prot Ramirez-Villapudua J,

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responses of switchgrass crops to nitrogen fertilizer haveproduction systems for biomass energy crops. Because it canas forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may be well

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds, Hay, and Winegrapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Agriculture. “State Organic Crop and Acreage Report. ”Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds,Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds,

Brodt, Sonja; Klonsky, Karen; Thrupp, Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Density derived estimates of standing crop and net primary production in the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates of standing crop and net primary production in thevariables of standing crop and net primary production (NPP)southern California. Standing crop was much more strongly

Reed, Daniel; Rassweiler, Andrew; Arkema, Katie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops May 24, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis The self-propelled baler collects and...

139

D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip SE1 2RE Product London-based JV between BP and D1 oils focusing on the...

140

Contemporary and historical classification of crop types in Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research compares three different classification algorithms for mapping crops in Pinal County, Arizona, using both present and historical image data. The study area lacked past crop maps, and farmers were dealing with the risk of evolution of resistance ...

KyleA. Hartfield, StuartE. Marsh, ChristaD. Kirk, Yves Carrière

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Century of Monitoring Weather and Crops: The Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Publication of a national weekly weather summary called the Weekly Weather Chronicle began in 1872. This summary was the precursor of today's Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (WWCB), a publication that reports global weather and climate ...

Thomas R. Heddinghaus; Douglas M. Le Comte

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pharmaceutical crops have a mixed outlook in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crops have a mixed outlook in California by Michelle Marvieras environmental harm. The outlook for the production of

Marvier, Michelle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt Miljø A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer Søren �stergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

144

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

145

Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

Neal, Justin N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

146

Gaze-Based Interaction for Semi-Automatic Photo Cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an interactive method for cropping photographs given minimal information about the location of important content, provided by eye tracking. Cropping is formulated in a general optimization framework that facilitates adding new composition rules, as well as adapting the system to particular applications. Our system uses fixation data to identify important content and compute the best crop for any given aspect ratio or size, enabling applications such as automatic snapshot recomposition, adaptive documents, and thumbnailing. We validate our approach with studies in which users compare our crops to ones produced by hand and by a completely automatic approach. Experiments show that viewers prefer our gaze-based crops to uncropped images and fully automatic crops. Author Keywords cropping, photography, composition, evaluation, eye tracking, visual perception

Anthony Santella; Maneesh Agrawala; Doug Decarlo; David Salesin; Michael Cohen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics Jump to: navigation, search Name International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics Place India Sector Biofuels Product Biofuels ( Academic / Research foundation ) References International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics is a company located in India . References ↑ "International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Crops_Research_Institute_for_the_Semi_Arid_Tropics&oldid=347036

148

Economic Analysis of Energy Crop Production in the U.S. - Location, Quantities, Price, and Impacts on Traditional Agricultural Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

POLYSYS is used to estimate US locations where, for any given energy crop price, energy crop production can be economically competitive with conventional crops. POLYSYS is a multi-crop, multi-sector agricultural model developed and maintained by the University of Tennessee and used by the USDA-Economic Research Service. It includes 305 agricultural statistical districts (ASD) which can be aggregated to provide state, regional, and national information. POLYSYS is being modified to include switchgrass, hybrid poplar, and willow on all land suitable for their production. This paper summarizes the preliminary national level results of the POLYSYS analysis for selected energy crop prices for the year 2007 and presents the corresponding maps (for the same prices) of energy crop production locations by ASD. Summarized results include: (1) estimates of energy crop hectares (acres) and quantities (dry Mg, dry tons), (2) identification of traditional crops allocated to energy crop production and calculation of changes in their prices and hectares (acres) of production, and (3) changes in total net farm returns for traditional agricultural crops. The information is useful for identifying areas of the US where large quantities of lowest cost energy crops can most likely be produced.

Walsh, M.E.; De La Torre Ugarte, D.; Slinsky, S.; Graham, R.L.; Shapouri, H.; Ray, D.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

EIS-0439: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California 9: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California EIS-0439: Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, California Summary This environmental review was prepared by DOE's Western Area Power Administration with the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) as a cooperating agency. This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of the Rice Solar Energy Project, a 150-megawatt solar concentrating electric powerplant proposed to be constructed on private land in the Sonoran Desert. DOE's Western Area Power Administration actions under this proposal include building and operating a new substation to interconnect the solar project to Western's transmission system. DOE may also use this EIS as part of its decision whether to issue a Federal loan guarantee to support the proposal. BLM's

150

Surface Energy Components and Land Characteristics of a Rice Paddy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many meteorological and air-quality models require land characteristics as inputs. A field experiment was conducted to study the surface energy budget of a rice paddy in Taiwan. During the day, the energy balance ratio measured by an eddy ...

Jeng-Lin Tsai; Ben-Jei Tsuang; Po-Sheng Lu; Ming-Hwi Yao; Yuan Shen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

International Experience in Standards and Labeling Programs for Rice Cookers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity Saving mode warm mode mode mode achivement consumption (Yen/Year)electricity ode Saving mode warmmode mode m achivement consumption (Yen/Year)electricity consumption of an IH type rice cooker is 110.9 kWh /year,

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

VBA-0062- In the Matter of Susan Rice Gossett  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on May 8, 2002, involving a Complaint filed by Susan Rice Gossett (Gossett or the Complainant) under the Department of...

153

R-1: AMD Treatment Using Rice Husk as Biosorbent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to study the rice husk as a biosorbent for the AMD treatment keeping constant: pH (2.6), biomass concentration (1g/L), temperature  ...

154

Characterization of novel rice germplasm from West Africa and genetic marker associations with rice cooking quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic resource enhancement is the foundation of any good breeding program. Landraces from West Africa, interspecifics between Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima and improved lines from the West African Rice Development Association and other research centers were introduced to the Beaumont Rice Research center for in situ evaluation and characterization. Beside the introduction of seeds, milled samples were also introduced for grain chemistry analysis. Field evaluation combined with physicochemical and molecular characterization revealed unique characteristics among African germplasm. New rice for Africa (NERICA) lines performed well in the USA environment. Varieties like Nerica 2, Nerica 3, Nerica 4, and Nerica 5 need more attention because of their superior performance in yield and grain quality. Landraces did not perform well due to their height and late maturity and their resulting problems with lodging. The rapid visco analyzer RVA profiles showed that the cultivar Jaya has unusually strong paste viscosity features. Comparing West Africa samples grown in Cote d�Ivoire with those grown in Texas, parameters like AA, ASV, Hot, Cool, and CT were not stongly affected by the environment. According to the Stbk value, cultivars grown in Cote d�Ivoire will cook softer than when they were grown in Texas. The lack of the environmental effect is somewhat surprising considering the difference in latitude, soil types, weather patterns, and management practices between the two locations. Apparent amylose is a key element to characterize a rice cultivar; however certain varieties like Cocodrie and Dixiebelle have similar apparent amylose content but dramatically different functional qualities. A population derived from Cocodrie and Dixiebelle was developed for genotypic and phenotypic analysis of grain chemistry traits that affect functionality. It was concluded that the amount of soluble amylose in the grain had a significant effect on flour pasting properties, even when total apparent amylose content did not vary. Marker association studies revealed that the Waxy microsatellite and the Waxy exon 10 SNP markers were associated with soluble amylose content and RVA characteristics. These markers will speed up the development of new rice cultivars with desirable quality characteristics in West Africa and in the USA.

Traore, Karim

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

PROJECT SHEET SUBCOMMITTEE: Food Residues Subcommittee PROJECT TITLE: Expansion, Development and Harmonization of Crop Groups With Specified Representative Crops for Field Crop Residues Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOAL/OBJECTIVE: To further develop and implement Crop groups utilized by NAFTA and based on representative commodities to foster worldwide harmonization of Crop groups and commodity terminology which will help remove trade irritants due to differences in commodity tolerance levels or MRLs for minor and specialty crops. PROJECT DESCRIPTION/PROCEDURE The Chairperson (Hong Chen) of the International Crop Grouping Consulting Committee (ICGCC) forwards the Symposium proposal for a particular crop group to the appropriate workgroup of the ICGCC via emails and requests the workgroup members to provide input on crop information and maximum residue limit (MRL) information (includes U.S., NAFTA, Codex and EU) on the commodities. Growers and commodity experts also provide valuable input on commodities. International members provide specific information on the commodities grown in their countries and regions which provides perspectives on harmonization approaches. Based on the input, the ICGCC Chairperson will prepare commodity monographs, divide subgroups, select representative crops and draft new crop group petitions. The draft petitions will be forwarded to the workgroup for review and comments before being finalized, and the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Management practices to improve the use efficiency of nutrients and water in a sandy soil under rice based cropping system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Productivity of coarse textured sandy soil and loamy sandwater and nutrients. Onattukara sandy tract is a fluvial andthe physical constraints of sandy soil and to enhance the

Bhaskaran, Usha Pankajam Dr.; S, Pushkala. Dr; A.K., Sreelatha Dr; Aparna, B Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Partner: Farm Service Agency Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=ener&topic=bcap Cost: Free The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. Overview The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. The Biomass Crop

159

The involvement of Pseudomonas putida in basidiome initiation of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The involvement of pseudomonads In the process of basidiome initiation of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus was investigated. Pseudomonads used throughout the study were identified… (more)

Rainey, Paul Barton

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

An Anthropological Perspective on Shifting Cultivation: A case Study of Khoriya Cultivation in the Arun Valley of Eastern Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)..!a. Manisha. (1993). 1~'II\\1irol1lnenfill Pol/ulion alld Its Impact 011 I·oranosi. Ph.D Thesis. Dept of Geograph). B.II.l/. 2S. Subcdi. l3lJi. P. (1995). IJoprdatioll olld Ellviro/lmellt ill tile COlltex/ of Oel'fdolJllJeJl/ in Nepal. ill Population... .f. Angelsen 1994:1). From 6.5.million ha. in 1964. the total forest area is estimated to have declined to around 5.5 million ha. in late 1980s. Thus, the current extent of shifting cultivation has been calculated to be about 8.3 percent of the tropical land...

Dhakal, Suresh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Crops Engineered for Increased Sugar Extraction through ...  

Energy Crops Engineered for Increased Sugar Extraction through Inhibition of snl6 Expression Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This ...

162

Essays on ethanol-driven corn demand and crop choice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two essays are focused on crop choice and the growth of corn production in the Corn Belt and surrounding areas. The first essay develops a… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields  

SciTech Connect

Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 14 Rice Bran Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 14 Rice Bran Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 14 Rice Bran Oil from the b

165

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock 1 cup wild rice, rinsed Sea ground pepper to taste 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons buttermilk or plain low-fat

Blanchette, Robert A.

166

Fuels from sugar crops. Second quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Substantial progress was made on both the agricultural and the processing aspects of the fuels from biomass research program. Despite droughts and hurricanes, yields on narrow row spacings show substantial gains over conventional spacings at all locations for both sugarcane and sweet sorghum. The biomass gains are most pronounced (40% to 100% increase) for Louisiana sugarcane and for sweet sorghum in Louisiana and Texas (50 to 100% gains). Although biomass increases are smaller in Florida, early ripening and possible soil conservation effects cause interest in close spacing in Florida to be maintained. The concept of integrating sweet sorghum production with sugarcane production could expand the area available for extensive sugar crop production by a factor of 10 or more. Sugar beets and sweet sorghum mesh together well from an agronomic viewpoint and the introduction of the Canadian Separator Equipment Process may make feasible integration of the processing of these crops. Evaluation of U.S. and Brazilian ethanol technology indicates that ethanol can be made quite economically in locations with long sugarcane processing seasons (e.g., Hawaii and Puerto Rico). The Melle Process practiced in Brazil appears to make possible extremely short fermentation times (10 to 16 hours, compared with 24 to 30 hours for U.S. practices). The primary key to reducing processing costs lies in increasing the concentration of ethanol in the fermented mash, not reduction in fermentation time. Suggestions for appropriate improvements have been made and the Reports of Invention filed with DOE's patent office. Five appendices are included.

Lipinsky, E.S.; Kresovich, S.; McClure, T.A.; Helper, E.W.; Lawhon, W.T.

1977-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Developing Switchgrass as a Bioenergy Crop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of energy crops produced on American farms as a source of renewable fuels is a concept with great relevance to current ecological and economic issues at both national and global scales. Development of a significant national capacity to utilize perennial forage crops, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) as biofuels could benefit our agricultural economy by providing an important new source of income for farmers. In addition energy production from perennial cropping systems, which are compatible with conventional fining practices, would help reduce degradation of agricultural soils, lower national dependence on foreign oil supplies, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants to the atmosphere (McLaughlin 1998). Interestingly, on-farm energy production is a very old concept, extending back to 19th century America when both transpofiation and work on the farm were powered by approximately 27 million draft animals and fueled by 34 million hectares of grasslands (Vogel 1996). Today a new form of energy production is envisioned for some of this same acreage. The method of energy production is exactly the same - solar energy captured in photosynthesis, but the subsequent modes of energy conversion are vastly different, leading to the production of electricity, transportation fuels, and chemicals from the renewable feedstocks. While energy prices in the United States are among the cheapest in the world, the issues of high dependency on imported oil, the uncertainties of maintaining stable supplies of imported oil from finite reserves, and the environmental costs associated with mining, processing, and combusting fossil fuels have been important drivers in the search for cleaner burning fuels that can be produced and renewed from the landscape. At present biomass and bioenergy combine provide only about 4% of the total primary energy used in the U.S. (Overend 1997). By contrast, imported oil accounts for approximately 44% of the foreign trade deficit in the U.S. and about 45% of the total annual U.S. oil consumption of 34 quads (1 quad = 1015 Btu, Lynd et al. 1991). The 22 quads of oil consumed by transportation represents approximately 25% of all energy use in the US and excedes total oil imports to the US by about 50%. This oil has environmental and social costs, which go well beyond the purchase price of around $15 per barrel. Renewable energy from biomass has the potential to reduce dependency on fossil fhels, though not to totally replace them. Realizing this potential will require the simultaneous development of high yielding biomass production systems and bioconversion technologies that efficiently convert biomass energy into the forms of energy and chemicals usable by industry. The endpoint criterion for success is economic gain for both agricultural and industrial sectors at reduced environmental cost and reduced political risk. This paper reviews progress made in a program of research aimed at evaluating and developing a perennial forage crop, switchgrass as a regional bioenergy crop. We will highlight here aspects of research progress that most closely relate to the issues that will determine when and how extensively switchgrass is used in commercial bioenergy production.

Bouton, J.; Bransby, D.; Conger, B.; McLaughlin, S.; Ocumpaugh, W.; Parrish, D.; Taliaferro, C.; Vogel, K.; Wullschleger, S.

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

International Experience in Standards and Labeling Programs for Rice Cookers  

SciTech Connect

China has had an active program on energy efficiency standards for household appliances since the mid-1990s. Rice cooker is among the first to be subject to such mandatory regulation, since it is one of the most prevalent electric appliances in Chinese households. Since first introduced in 1989, the minimum energy efficiency standard for rice cookers has not been revised. Therefore, the potential for energy saving is considerable. Initial analysis from CNIS indicates that potential carbon savings is likely to reach 7.6 million tons of CO2 by the 10th year of the standard implementation. Since September 2007, CNIS has been working with various groups to develop the new standard for rice cookers. With The Energy Foundation's support, LBNL has assisted CNIS in the revision of the minimum energy efficiency standard for rice cookers that is expected to be effective in 2009. Specifically, work has been in the following areas: assistance in developing consumer survey on usage pattern of rice cookers, review of international standards, review of international test procedures, comparison of the international standards and test procedures, and assessment of technical options of reducing energy use. This report particularly summarizes the findings of reviewing international standards and technical options of reducing energy consumption. The report consists of an overview of rice cooker standards and labeling programs and testing procedures in Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan and Thailand, and Japan's case study in developing energy efficiency rice cooker technologies and rice cooker efficiency programs. The results from the analysis can be summarized as the follows: Hong Kong has a Voluntary Energy Efficiency Labeling scheme for electric rice cookers initiated in 2001, with revision implemented in 2007; South Korea has both MEPS and Mandatory Energy Efficiency Label targeting the same category of rice cookers as Hong Kong; Thailand's voluntary endorsement labeling program is similar to Hong Kong in program design but has 5 efficiency grades; Japan's program is distinct in its adoption of the 'Top Runner' approach, in which, the future efficiency standards is set based on the efficiency levels of the most efficient product in the current domestic market. Although the standards are voluntary, penalties can still be evoked if the average efficiency target is not met. Both Hong Kong and South Korea's tests involve pouring water into the inner pot equal to 80% of its rated volume; however, white rice is used as a load for its tests in Hong Kong whereas no rice is used for tests in South Korea. In Japan's case, water level specified by the manufactures is used and milled rice is used as a load only partially in the tests. Moreover, Japan does not conduct heat efficiency test but its energy consumption measurements tests are much more complex, with 4 different tests are conducted to determine the annual average energy consumption. Hong Kong and Thailand both set Minimum Allowable Heat Efficiency for different rated wattages. The energy efficiency requirements are identical except that the minimum heat efficiency in Thailand is 1 percentage point higher for all rated power categories. In South Korea, MEPS and label's energy efficiency grades are determined by the rice cooker's Rated Energy Efficiency for induction, non-induction, pressure, nonpressure rice cookers. Japan's target standard values are set for electromagnetic induction heating products and non-electromagnetic induction heating products by different size of rice cookers. Specific formulas are used by type and size depending on the mass of water evaporation of the rice cookers. Japan has been the leading country in technology development of various types of rice cookers, and developed concrete energy efficiency standards for rice cookers. However, as consumers in Japan emphasize the deliciousness of cooked rice over other factors, many types of models were developed to improve the taste of cooked rice. Nonetheless, the efficie

Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Short-term dynamics of soil carbon, microbial biomass, and soil enzyme activities as compared to longer-term effects of tillage in irrigated row crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates by tillage and crop rotation: a global data analysis.of tillage in irrigated row crops Daniel Geisseler & Williamthe cropping season in all crop sequences D. Geisseler (*) :

Geisseler, Daniel; Horwath, William R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Incorporation of crop phenology in Simple Biosphere Model (SiBcrop) to improve land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from croplands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for integrated field crop management. Cornell Universityactivity within the crop canopy. Aust. J. agric. Res. , 23,Assessing uncertainties in crop model simulations using

Lokupitiya, Erandathie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTNut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops—2011 Table of Contents — 1Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops in California Single active

Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Integrated plant nutrient management on diversified cropping system in aqua-terrestrial ecosystem for yield potentiality, quality and rural sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agronomic Management of Wetland Crops, published by Kalyanion these aquatic beneficial crops for obtaining higherof aquatic food and non-food crops in neglected way ( Puste,

PUSTE, ANANDAMOY DR.; DE, PRALAY ER.; MAITY, TAPAN KUMAR DR.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Combined Water-Fertilizer Management to Minimize Non-Point Water Pollution While Achieving High Crop Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLLUTION WHILE ACHIEVING HIGH CROP PRODUCTION JOHN ~ETEYand broccoli relationships and crop yield and nitrogen as amust anticipate Applica- crop nutrient and must be placed in

Letey, John; Jarrell, Wesley M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Dynamics of Irrigated Perennial Crop Production With Applications to the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

severe damages to U.S. crop yields under climate change,”demand for perennial crops is identified by systematicallyspace approach to perennial crop supply analysis,” American

Franklin, Bradley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The cost of producing switchgrass as a dedicated energy crop  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass offers many air soil, and water quality benefits as discussed in Herbaceous Energy Crops and the Potential for Soil conservation. But for large-scale biofuel production to become a reality several economic criteria must be met. This article summarizes the biological and economic potential for making switchgrass a commercial energy crop.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Biomass Crop Production: Benefits for Soil Quality and Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research at three locations in the southeastern US is quantifying changes in soil quality and soil carbon storage that occur during production of biomass crops compared with row crops. After three growing seasons, soil quality improved and soil carbon storage increased on plots planted to cottonwood, sycamore, sweetgum with a cover crop, switchgrass, and no-till corn. For tree crops, sequestered belowground carbon was found mainly in stumps and large roots. At the TN site, the coarse woody organic matter storage belowground was 1.3 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}yr{sup {minus}1}, of which 79% was stumps and large roots and 21% fine roots. Switchgrass at the AL site also stored considerable carbon belowground as coarse roots. Most of the carbon storage occurred mainly in the upper 30 cw although coarse roots were found to depths of greater than 60 cm. Biomass crops contributed to improvements in soil physical quality as well as increasing belowground carbon sequestration. The distribution and extent of carbon sequestration depends on the growth characteristics and age of the individual biomass crop species. Time and increasing crop maturity will determine the potential of these biomass crops to significantly contribute to the overall national goal of increasing carbon sequestration and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Bandaranayake, W.; Bock, B.R.; Houston, A.; Joslin, J.D.; Pettry, D.E.; Schoenholtz, S.; Thornton, F.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Tyler, D.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

Surrogate Data to Estimate Crop-Hail Loss  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail insurance loss data for 1948–94 are useful as measures of the historical variability of damaging hail in those 26 states where most crop damages occur. However, longer records are needed for various scientific and business applications, ...

David Changnon; Stanley A. Changnon

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

13September 2011 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13September 2011 2010 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative- tonnage bioenergy crop on a commercial scale and convert it into an advanced biofuel (gasoline) in a pilot the biofuels production goals of the United States while helping to alleviate constraints on food and feed

179

Review: Sensing technologies for precision specialty crop production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advances in electronic and information technologies, various sensing systems have been developed for specialty crop production around the world. Accurate information concerning the spatial variability within fields is very important for precision ... Keywords: Precision agriculture, Review, Sensing, Specialty crop

W. S. Lee; V. Alchanatis; C. Yang; M. Hirafuji; D. Moshou; C. Li

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Changes in the Asian monsoon climate during 17001850 induced by preindustrial cultivation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in the Asian monsoon climate during 1700­1850 induced by preindustrial cultivation Kumiko in the Asian summer monsoon climate from the 1700s to the 1850s were estimated with an atmospheric general years. Ex- tended cultivation resulted in a decrease in monsoon rainfall over the Indian subcontinent

Takahashi, Ryo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

182

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

183

Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system Home > content > Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system

184

Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rice Electric Coop, Inc Rice Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc Place Minnesota Utility Id 20639 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png AUTOMATIC YARD LIGHT SERVICE Lighting FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 10 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 15 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 25 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 37.5 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 50 KVA transformer Residential

185

A SIMPLE PROOF OF THE HOBBY-RICE THEOREM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper presents a simple proof of the following theorem due to Hobby and Rice. THEOREM. Let {cp,- (jc)}"_, be n real functions in Ú(d¡i;[0,1]), where ¡i is a finite, nonatomic, real measure. Then there exist {£,}'=1, r < n, 0 = Jq < ^ < • • • < Í, < ¿+1- 1 such that 2 (-.y JC * Rice Theorem, which arises in the study of L1-approximation. Theorem A (Hobby, Rice [2]). Let {

Allan Pinkus

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Efficient crop type mapping based on remote sensing in the Central Valley, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based approach to map crop types in the San Joaquin Valley,focus on the solutions of identifying these crop types orcategories when crop mapping is extended to a larger extent

Zhong, Liheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Toxic hazards of the industrial atmospheric pollutant sulphur dioxide on tree crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

most important perennial tree crop of Kerala, which plays aeconomy, is the major tree crop in and around factories ofsulphur dioxide on tree crops such as coconut. The study

Rani, B Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Drought-tolerant Biofuel Crops could be a Critical Hedge for Biorefineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canopy Temperature as a Crop Water-Stress Indicator. WaterM.S. , et al. , Estimating Crop Water-Deficit Using theNations (FAO), N.R.a.E. , Crop evapotrasporation - Guidlines

Morrow, III, William R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ozone reduces crop yields and alters competition with weeds such as yellow nutsedge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DT (eds. ). Assessment of Crop Loss from Air Pollutants:Ambient ozone and adverse crop re- sponse: An evaluation ofthe effects of ozone on crops and trees. In: Lefohn AS (

Grantz, David A.; Shrestha, Anil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Dynamics of lettuce drop incidence and Sclerotinia minor inoculum under varied crop rotations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Koike, S. T. 1998. Effects of crop rotation and irrigationImplications for yield and crop rotation. Asp. Appl. Biol.minor Inoculum Under Varied Crop Rotations J. J. Hao and K.

Hao, J J; Subbarao, K V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Critical Zinc Deficiency Levels in Indian Soils and Cereal Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, N.K. 1986 Field Crops Res. 13: 55-61. 9. Singh,Singh, Kuldeep 1984 Field Crops Res, 9: 143-149. 7. Singh,than any other group of crops, suffer from Zn deficiency,

Kuldeep, Singh - -

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequent tomato, ?lettuce and broccoli transplants through allelopathy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Article t Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequentJ. Stapleton Grass cover crops can be harvested for biomassmay affect subsequent crops. We stud- ied the effects of

Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Prather, Timothy S.; Stapleton, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Impact of tillage and crop rotation on aggregate-associated carbon in two oxisols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oades. 1980. The effect of crop rotation on aggregation in aand J.H. Long. 1990. Crop rotation and tillage effects onImpact of Tillage and Crop Rotation on Aggregate-Associated

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Crop growth as influenced by Zinc and organic matter in Cadmium-rich polluted soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the soil as well as the crop plants, which affect theamount of Pb, Ni and Cd in crops in sewage irrigated areastubers and lowest in cereal crops (Setia et al. 1998). A

Talatam, Satyanarayana; talatam, satyanarayana; Parida, Binaya Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ultrasonic techniques for measuring rheological properties of rice slurries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of new sensors to monitor food quality is an emerging issue of today. Many food processing industries rely on batch methods to inspect food quality. These techniques yield results which are delayed in responding to the dynamic systems during food processing, resulting in poorly processed foods or production delays in processing plants. This research describes the development of a ultrasonic sensor to measure viscoelastic properties of rice slurries and dough. This inexpensive sensor can be applied in the food processing plant to minimize batch methods of Theological testing. Rice was milled to two different particle size distributions (PSD). Concentrations of 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% rice flour (for each PSD flour) were mixed with 4% Carboxy-methylcellulose solutions and tested for power law Theological parameters and for viscoelastic parameters with the Haake CV20 rheometer. Two repetitions were completed for each treatment. Sensors were fabricated to measure the relative acoustic impedance of rice slurries. Slurries of different concentration and particle characteristics were placed on the top surface of the sensor. An ultrasonic longitudinal wave was transmitted through the sensor and into the sample where a portion of the energy was absorbed by the slurry and a portion reflected to a receiving transducer. The samples were subjected for ten minutes to continuous, longitudinal waves at 500 kHZ, 1 MHz, and 2 MHz. The output voltage from the receiving transducer was recorded every 10 seconds. Results indicated that the sensors were able to detect differences in the different rice slurries. The sensor output voltage decreased with increased rice flour concentration. The values for flow behavior index follow the same trend. The sensor voltage values correlated to the measured Theological parameters. The sensors were able to detect the differences between the PSD flours (P=0.0739). The small PSD flour created slurries of significantly higher viscosities than the large PSD slurries.

Howell, Terry Allen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Impacts of Future Climate Change on California Perennial Crop Yields: Model Projections with Climate and Crop Uncertainties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most research on the agricultural impacts of climate change has focused on the major annual crops, yet perennial cropping systems are less adaptable and thus potentially more susceptible to damage. Improved assessments of yield responses to future climate are needed to prioritize adaptation strategies in the many regions where perennial crops are economically and culturally important. These impact assessments, in turn, must rely on climate and crop models that contain often poorly defined uncertainties. We evaluated the impact of climate change on six major perennial crops in California: wine grapes, almonds, table grapes, oranges, walnuts, and avocados. Outputs from multiple climate models were used to evaluate climate uncertainty, while multiple statistical crop models, derived by resampling historical databases, were used to address crop response uncertainties. We find that, despite these uncertainties, climate change in California is very likely to put downward pressure on yields of almonds, walnuts, avocados, and table grapes by 2050. Without CO{sub 2} fertilization or adaptation measures, projected losses range from 0 to >40% depending on the crop and the trajectory of climate change. Climate change uncertainty generally had a larger impact on projections than crop model uncertainty, although the latter was substantial for several crops. Opportunities for expansion into cooler regions are identified, but this adaptation would require substantial investments and may be limited by non-climatic constraints. Given the long time scales for growth and production of orchards and vineyards ({approx}30 years), climate change should be an important factor in selecting perennial varieties and deciding whether and where perennials should be planted.

Lobell, D; Field, C; Cahill, K; Bonfils, C

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Optimal compost rates for organic crop production based on a decay series.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? One of the more challenging aspects of organic farming is the development of an appropriate fertility plan, which may include crop rotation, cover crops,… (more)

Endelman, Jeffrey B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Optimal Compost Rates for Organic Crop Production Based on a Decay Series.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One of the more challenging aspects of organic farming is the development of an appropriate fertility plan, which may include crop rotation, cover crops, and/or… (more)

Endelman, Jeffrey B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as biomass crops for biofuel production also possess prop-candidate species for biofuel production are taxonomicallyof switching from food production crops to biofuel feedstock

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges  

SciTech Connect

Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a source of renewable energy provide critical data for the development of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been used for simulating bioenergy crops including herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). Although it lacks the complexity of other bioenergy crop models, the environmental productivity index (EPI) is the only model used to estimate biomass production of CAM (Agave and Opuntia) plants. Except for the EPI model, all models include representations of leaf area dynamics, phenology, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few models simulate soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle dynamics, making them especially useful for assessing the environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the large-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. The rapid increase in use of models for energy crop simulation is encouraging; however, detailed information on the influence of climate, soils, and crop management practices on biomass production is scarce. Thus considerable work remains regarding the parameterization and validation of process-based models for bioenergy crops; generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation; and implementation of an integrated framework for efficient, high-resolution simulations of biomass production for use in planning sustainable bioenergy systems.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xuesong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miguez, Fernando [Iowa State University; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pome and stone fruit crops including almond; pistachio,NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTCrops ..

Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cultivation and conversion of marine macroalgae. [Gracilaria and Ulva  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research was conducted on the development of an alternative ocean energy farm concept that would not be dependent upon deep ocean water or other extraneous sources for its nutrient supply and that could be located in shallow, near shore, and protected coastal ocean areas. There are five tasks reported in this document: determination of the annual yield of Ulva in non-intensive cultures; evaluation of the effect of carbon concentration on Gracilaria and Ulva yields; evaluation of spray/mist culture of Ulva and Gracilaria; species screening for the production of petroleum replacement products; and synthesis analysis, and economic energy evaluation of culture data. An alternative concept to open ocean culture is a land-based energy production system utilizing saline waters from underground aquifers or enclosed coastal areas. Research was performed to evaluate growth and biomass production of all macroscopic algal species that could be obtained in adequate quantity in the central Florida area. A total of 42 species were grown in specially adapted burial vaults. These included 16 green algae (Garcilaria 4 weekshlorophyta), 2 brown algae (Phaeophyta), and 18 red algae (Rhodophyta). Of these, the most successful and suitable species were a strain of Gracilaria (a red seaweed) and Ulva (a green seaweed). These two species have a high carbohydrate content that may be anaerobically digested to methane gas. Well-nourished Gracilaria will double its biomass in 1 to 4 weeks, depending on the season, water flow, and other variables. After its biomass has doubled (i.e., from 2 to 4 kg/m/sup 2/) the incremental growth is harvested to return the crop to a starting density. Enrichment of the new starting crop following harvest could conceivably be accomplished onsite at the seaweed farm, but the rapid uptake and storage of nutrients by depleted seaweeds makes possible a simpler process, known as pulse fertilization.

Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Blakeslee, M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Short Rotation Woody Crops Program: Project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of summaries describing research efforts in the US Department of Energy's Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP). The SRWCP is sponsored by DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division and is field-managed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SRWCP is an integrated basic research program with 18 field research projects throughout the United States. The overall objective of the program is to improve the productivity and increase the cost efficiency of growing and harvesting woody trees and shrubs. In a competitive technical review, 25 projects were chosen to form a new research program. Although some of the original projects have ended and new ones have begun, many of the long-term research projects still form the core of the SRWCP. This document contains individual summaries of each of the 18 research projects in the SRWCP from October 1985 to October 1986. Each summary provides the following information: name and address of the contracting institution, principal investigator, project title, current subcontract or grant number, period of performance, and annual funding through fiscal year 1986. In addition, each summary contains a brief description of the project rationale, objective, approach, status, and future efforts. A list of publications that have resulted from DOE-sponsored research follows many of the summaries.

Not Available

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

6. Fracture mechanics lead author: J, R. Rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6. Fracture mechanics lead author: J, R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University. F. Shih, and the ASME/AMD Technical Committee on Fracture Mechanics, pro- vided by A. S. Argon, S. N, W. D. Stuart, and R. Thomson. 6.0 ABSTRACT Fracture mechanics is an active research field

205

Effects of amylose and amylopectin on quality of rice noodles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of amylose content, amylose solubility, and amylopectin structure of rice flour on quality of rice noodles were determined. Milled rice was ground into flour. Noodles were prepared by mixing 100 g flour, 80 g water and 1 g salt. The mixture was heated in a microwave oven for 75 sec, extruded using a pasta maker, and dried at 60?C using a 2-step procedure: 100% RH (2 hr) and 30% RH (2 hr). Cooking, texture, and physico-chemical characteristics of dough and noodles were determined. More amylose in flour contributed to better texture of noodles, i.e., greater firmness and less stickiness. Texture of noodles prepared from flour with 25-30% amylose was substantially improved compared to flour with less than 25% amylose. Rice flour containing amylopectin with more long chains with degree of polymerization (DP) of 70-156, improved the quality of noodles. In contrast, flour containing more intermediate chains, DP 26-69, impaired noodle quality. The starch in dough was partially modified during processing. Correlation coefficients of noodle texture with pasting properties were lower for flour compared to dough. Hence, dough pasting properties could better predict noodle quality. Heating and extrusion processes caused rice starch to partially gelatinize. The crystalline structure of amylopectin was partly disrupted and some amylose leached from the granule. The noodle drying process enhanced the mobility of amylopectin chains. Amylose and long amylopectin chains probably associated and provided a gel network that strengthened the structure of the noodles. Intermediate amylopectin chains, in contrast, inhibited these associations. Short amylopectin chains, DP 5-25, did not affect the properties of noodles. These chains were probably too short to enhance or inhibit formation of the gel network. Amylose solubility in excess water at 120?C did not correlate with the noodle quality. Rice flours with amylose content between 25-30% are recommended for preparing rice noodles. Using flours with amylose contents less than 25% yielded unacceptable noodle textures, i.e., too sticky, while using flours with amylose contents more than 30% yielded noodles with poor appearance and high dry matter loss.

Chinnapha, Naliwan, Dd 1976-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comprehensively address biofuel production and use, as welladdition, biofuel crops should be propagated in productionto enhance production of food or fiber, but biofuel breeders

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Phylogenetics of the genus sorghum, genetic diversity and nutritional value of its cultivated species.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) ranks fifth among cereal crops and second highest in production after maize in Africa particularly in the semi arid regions… (more)

Ng'uni, Dickson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic 1: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHECs). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000

210

Drought has significant effect on corn crop condition, projected ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The corn crop in the affected region is a main feedstock for ethanol, ... out of a total supply of 14.2 billion ... Farmers took advantage of the relatively warm ...

211

Phenological Crop–Climate Models for Illinois, 1951–80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To examine whether crop climate modeling using data based on phonological stages is appropriate for identifying different climatic effects on corn yields, two phonological models and a model using monthly data are devised for portions of Illinois ...

Pradnya S. Dharmadhikari; David M. Sharpe; Wayne M. Wendland

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Descriptions Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (Site Descriptions) West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon...

213

Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of known plant viruses and are responsible for more than half the viral damage to crop plants throughout the world. New images of the viruses' structures, which were poorly...

214

The molecular biology and biochemistry of rice endosperm. alpha. -globulin  

SciTech Connect

The author's first objective was to isolate a cDNA clone that encodes the rice endosperm {alpha}-globulin. Purified antibodies against a rice storage protein, {alpha}-globulin, were used to screen a {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library constructed from immature rice seed endosperm. The cDNA insert of clone 4A1 (identified by antibody screening) was used as a probe to identify long cDNA inserts in the library. The deduced amino acid sequence of clone A3-12 cDNA insert (identified by cDNA screening) contained the amino acid sequences of three cyanogen bromide peptides fragment of {alpha}-globulin. The calculated molecular weight and amino acid composition of the deduced amino acid sequence were similar to the {alpha}-globulin protein. Northern blot analysis indicated that mRNA of one size, approximately 1.0 kb, is expressed. Southern genomic blot analysis revealed one band with EcoRI or Hind III digestion. Cell-free translation and immunoprecipitation showed that the initial translation product is approximately 2,000 daltons larger than the mature protein. The amino acid sequence of {alpha}-globulin revealed limited regions of similarities with wheat storage proteins. The author concludes that the cDNA insert in clone A3-12 contained the entire coding region of {alpha}-globulin protein and that {alpha}-globulin is encoded by a single gene. My second objective was to inhibit the degradation of {alpha}-globulin in the salt extract of rice flour. The salt extract of rice flour contained an acid protease whose optimal pH was 3 for {sup 3}H-casein hydrolysis. A polypeptide with molecular weight of 20,000 was immunologically reactive with {alpha}-globulin antibodies and is produced by limited proteolysis in the extract. Pepstatin inhibited the proteolysis of 3H-casein and slowed the proteolysis of {alpha}-globulin.

Shorrosh, B.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Copula Based Stochastic Weather Generator as an Application for Crop Growth Models and Crop Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic Weather Generators (SWG) try to reproduce the stochastic patterns of climatological variables characterized by high dimensionality, non-normal probability density functions and non-linear dependence relationships. However, conventional SWGs usually typify weather variables with unjustified probability distributions assuming linear dependence between variables. This research proposes an alternative SWG that introduces the advantages of the Copula modeling into the reproduction of stochastic weather patterns. The Copula based SWG introduces more flexibility allowing researcher to model non-linear dependence structures independently of the marginals involved, also it is able to model tail dependence, which results in a more accurate reproduction of extreme weather events. Statistical tests on weather series simulated by the Copula based SWG show its capacity to replicate the statistical properties of the observed weather variables, along with a good performance in the reproduction of the extreme weather events. In terms of its use in crop growth models for the ratemaking process of new insurance schemes with no available historical yield data, the Copula based SWG allows one to more accurately evaluate the risk. The use of the Copula based SWG for the simulation of yields results in higher crop insurance premiums from more frequent extreme weather events, while the use of the conventional SWG for the yield estimation could lead to an underestimation of risks.

Juarez Torres, Miriam 77-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of an optical sensor for crop leaf chlorophyll content detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen content in crop leaf is an important indication for evaluating crop health and predicting crop yield. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is widely used as an indicator in estimating leaf nitrogen content in practice. How to effectively ... Keywords: Crop leaf nitrogen content, Hand-held instrument, In-field NDVI measurement, Lower cost design

Di Cui; Minzan Li; Qin Zhang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

VEE-0035 - In the Matter of Rice Oil Company, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35 - In the Matter of Rice Oil Company, Inc. 35 - In the Matter of Rice Oil Company, Inc. VEE-0035 - In the Matter of Rice Oil Company, Inc. On October 22, 1996, Rice Oil Company, Inc. (Rice) of Greenfield, Massachusetts filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its Application, Rice requests that it be relieved of the requirement to file Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA- 782B), and Form EIA-821, entitled "Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report". vee0035.pdf More Documents & Publications VEE-0082 - In the Matter of Fleischli Oil Company VEE-0085 - In the Matter of Smith Brothers Gas Company VEE-0066 - In the Matter of Taylor Oil Company

218

Soil and water quality implications of production of herbaceous and woody energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-scale studies in three physiographic regions of the Tennessee Valley in the Southeastern US are being used to address the environmental effects of producing biomass energy crops on former agricultural lands. Comparison of erosion, surface water quality and quantity, and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops began with crop establishment in 1994. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes, and productivity of the different crops are also being monitored at the three sites.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lindberg, J.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States); Green, T.H. [Alabama A and M Univ., Normal, AL (United States). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production  

SciTech Connect

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Conversion of rice straw to bio-based chemicals: an integrated process using Lactobacillus brevis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND PROCESS ENGINEERING Conversion of rice straw to bio-LB, Bothast RJ (1999) Conversion of corn fiber to ethanol by

Kim, Jae-Han; Block, David E.; Shoemaker, Sharon P.; Mills, David A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electricity-independent Generation of Si Based on the Use of Rice ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Electricity-independent Generation of Si Based on the Use of Rice Husk: A ... Delivering a National Process Design Unit with Industry Support.

222

Long-term Black Carbon Dynamics in Cultivated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) is a quantitatively important C pool in the global carbon cycle due to its relative recalcitrance against decay compared with other C pools. However, how rapidly BC is oxidized and in what way the molecular structure changes during decomposition over decadal time scales, is largely unknown. In the present study, the long-term dynamics in quality and quantity of BC were investigated in cultivated soil using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. BC particles, obtained from soil samples at 8 conversion ages stretching over 100 years and from a forest soil sample from Kenya, were manually picked under a light microscope for characterization and quantification. BC contents rapidly decreased from 12.7 to 3.8 mg C g?¹ soil during the first 30 years since conversion, after which they slowly decreased to a steady state at 3.51 mg C g ?¹soil. BC-derived C losses over 100 years were estimated at 6000 kg C ha?¹ to a depth of 0.1 m. The initial rapid changes in BC stocks resulted in a mean residence time of only around 8.3 years, which was likely a function of both decomposition as well as transport processes. The molecular properties of BC changed more rapidly on surfaces than in the interior of BC particles and more rapidly during the first 30 years than during the following 70 years. The Oc/C ratios (Oc is O bound to C) and carbonyl groups (C=O) increased over time by 133 and 192 %, respectively, indicating oxidation was an important degradation process controlling BC quality. Al, Si, polysaccharides, and to a lesser extent Fe were rapidly adsorbed on BC particle surfaces within the first few years after BC deposition to soil. The protection by physical and chemical stabilization was apparently sufficient to not only minimize decomposition below detection between 30 and 100 years after deposition, but also physical export by erosion and vertical transport below 0.1 m.

Nguyen, Binh T.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Kinyangi, James; Smernik, Ron; Riha, Susan J.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Evaluating environmental consequences of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy  

SciTech Connect

The environmental costs and benefits of producing bioenergy crops can be measured both in kterms of the relative effects on soil, water, and wildlife habitat quality of replacing alternate cropping systems with the designated bioenergy system, and in terms of the quality and amount of energy that is produced per unit of energy expended. While many forms of herbaceous and woody energy crops will likely contribute to future biofuels systems, The Dept. of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), has chosen to focus its primary herbaceous crops research emphasis on a perennial grass species, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), as a bioenergy candidate. This choice was based on its high yields, high nutrient use efficiency, and wide geographic distribution, and also on its poistive environmental attributes. The latter include its positive effects on soil quality and stabiity, its cover value for wildlife, and the lower inputs of enerty, water, and agrochemicals required per unit of energy produced. A comparison of the energy budgets for corn, which is the primary current source of bioethanol, and switchgrass reveals that the efficiency of energy production for a perennial grass system can exceed that for an energy intensive annual row crop by as much as 15 times. In additions reductions in CO{sub 2} emission, tied to the energetic efficiency of producing transportation fuels, are very efficient with grasses. Calculated carbon sequestration rates may exceed those of annual crops by as much as 20--30 times, due in part to carbon storage in the soil. These differences have major implications for both the rate and efficiency with which fossil energy sources can be replaced with cleaner burning biofuels.

McLaughlin, S.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental effects of growing short-rotation woody crops on former agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-scale studies in the Southeast have been addressing the environmental effects of converting agricultural lands to biomass crop production since 1994. Erosion, surface water quality and quantity and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops are being compared. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes and crop productivity are also being monitored at the three sites. Maximum sediment losses occurred in the spring and fall. Losses were greater from sweetgum planted without a cover crop than with a cover crop. Nutrient losses of N and P in runoff and subsurface water occurred primarily after spring fertilizer application.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thornton, F.C.; Joslin, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ORECCL - Summary of a national database on energy crop landbase, yields, and costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biofuels Feedstock Development Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a county-level database on energy crops-the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County-Level database (RECCL). This database encompasses all U.S. counties and provides easy access to energy crop information specific to a state or county. The database contains predictions of energy crop yields and farmgate prices along with county-level data on the acreage of land suitable for energy crop production. This paper describes the database and presents state-level summary statistics on land suitable for energy crop production and average predicted yields and farmgate prices.

Graham, R.L.; Allison, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Becker, D.A. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Investigation of SPAD meter-based indices for estimating rice nitrogen status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One solution-culture and two field experiments with four rice genotypes were conducted to relate SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter readings to variables reflecting nitrogen (N) status at different developmental stages. We systemically compared differences of ... Keywords: Chlorophyll meter, Leaf, Plant nitrogen diagnosis, Rice

Fen Fang Lin; Le Feng Qiu; Jing Song Deng; Yuan Yuan Shi; Li Su Chen; Ke Wang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on rice production in Mainland China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+Business Media B.V. 2012 Abstract A regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan with a 5 Tg black carbonImpacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on rice production in Mainland China Lili Xia & Alan Robock agricultural simulation model to simulate regional nuclear war impacts on rice yield in 24 provinces in China

Robock, Alan

228

Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on rice production in Mainland China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan with a 5 Tg black carbon injection into the upperImpacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on rice production in Mainland China Lili Xia & Alan Robock to simulate regional nuclear war impacts on rice yield in 24 provinces in China. We first evaluated the model

Robock, Alan

229

Evaluation of herbacceous biomass crops in the northern Great Plains. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Herbaceous lignocellulose crops are a potential renewable feedstock for biochemical conversion systems second in size to wood products. Several herbaceous crops are utilized as forage crops in the northern Great Plains, but forage quality considerations usually dictates a early harvest. Biomass cropping does not have this constraint; therefore, little information was available on herbaceous crops utilized as energy crops prior to this project. Our primary objectives were to evaluate the biomass yield and select chemical components of several herbaceous crops for energy crops in the northern Great Plains, compare the economic feasibility of energy crops with common competing crops, and evaluate biomass cropping on summer fallow lands. Three good, two marginal, and one irrigated sites were used during 1988 to 1992 for the first component. At least six perennial and four annual biomass species were included at all sites. Three to four nitrogen (N) levels and a crop-recrop comparison (annuals only) were management intensities included. Biomass cropping on idled lands was performed on dryland at Carrington and evaluated the effects of removing leguminous biomass on fallowed lands. This report summarizes results from the 5-year project.

Meyer, D.W.; Norby, W.E.; Erickson, D.O.; Johnson, R.G. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Formation and emission of methane in rice soils: Experimental determination and modeling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rice paddy soils have been identified as a major source of methane emissions contributing to the observed atmospheric increase in methane. This points to the need for a method of quantifying and predicting methane emissions for the widely varying conditions used in rice agriculture throughout the world. In the present work, a mathematical model for estimating the emission of methane from rice paddy soils is developed and refined. Kinetic parameters for methanogenesis in a Louisiana rice soil are determined from laboratory data on methane production from acetic acid substrate. Use of a stirred reactor allows simultaneous measurement of acetate consumption and methane production while minimizing mass transfer limitations. An existing model for rice plant growth is utilized to provide data on the availability of root exudates as a carbon source for the methanogens. The final methane model includes the kinetic parameters, plant data, and estimated transport parameters. With adjustments in these parameters, it provides an acceptable match to field data.

Law, V.J.; Bhattacharya, S.K.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Multiobjective hierarchical control architecture for greenhouse crop growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of determining the trajectories to control greenhouse crop growth has traditionally been solved by using constrained optimization or applying artificial intelligence techniques. The economic profit has been used as the main criterion in most ... Keywords: Agriculture, Hierarchical systems, Optimization methods, Process control, Yield optimization

A. Ramírez-Arias; F. Rodríguez; J. L. Guzmán; M. Berenguel

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

QuarkNet/Walta/CROP Cosmic Ray Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QuarkNet/Walta/CROP Cosmic Ray Detectors User's Manual Jeff Rylander and Tom Jordan, Fermilab R. J. Project Development Team Fermilab: Sten Hansen, Tom Jordan, Terry Kiper Univeristy of Nebraska: Dan Claes energies. However, it is possi- ble to do high-energy physics in your school without a particle accelerator

California at Santa Cruz, University of

233

Short rotation wood crops program: Annual progress report for 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes accomplishments in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP) for the year ending September 30, 1986. The program is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division and consists of research projects at 29 institutions and corporations. The SRWCP is an integrated program of research and development devoted to a single objective: improving the productivity, cost efficiency, and fuel quality of wood energy crops as feedstocks for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels. SRWCP directives have shifted from species-screening and productivity evaluations to large-scale viability trials of model species selected for their productivity potential and environmental compatibility. Populus was chosen the lead genera of five model species, and initial steps were taken toward organizing a Populus Research Consortium. Production yields from SRWCP research plots and coppice studies are discussed along with new efforts to model growth results and characteristics on a tree and stand basis. Structural and chemical properties of short-rotation intensive culture wood have been evaluated to determine the desirability of species traits and the potential for genetic improvements. Innovative wood energy crop handling techniques are presented as significant cost reduction measures. The conclusion is that new specialized wood energy crops can be feasible with the advances that appear technically possible over the next 10 years. 34 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Ranney, J.W.; Wright, L.L.; Layton, P.A.; McNabb, W.A.; Wenzel, C.R.; Curtin, D.T.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Crop residue conversion to biogas by dry fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple 'dry fermentation' process has been developed that may enable economical conversion of drier crop residues to biogas. Results from two years of process definition and scale-up to a 110 m/sup 3/ prototype show that biogas production rates exceeding those necessary to make the dry fermentor competitive have been achieved. 13 refs.

Jewell, W.J.; Dell'Orto, S.; Fanfoni, K.J.; Fast, S.J.; Jackson, D.A.; Kabrick, R.M.; Gottung, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments 2009 Lead lignocellulosic "drop-in" biofuels. "Drop-in" means they are compatible with the existing petroleum refining and distribution infrastructure. With this project Texas can become a leader in biofuels production

236

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

237

Ethiopian Highlands Crop-Climate Prediction: 1979–2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares different methods of predicting crop-related climate in the Ethiopian highlands for the period 1979–2009. A target index (ETH4) is developed as an average of four variables in the June–September season—rainfall, rainfall minus ...

Mark R. Jury

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed to improve crop yields. As this publication advises, growers should evaluate such products carefully and conduct field trials to determine their merit.

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

Interactive Crop Management in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal Influences on Land–Atmosphere Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1) is evaluated with two coupled atmosphere–land simulations. The CTRL (control) simulation represents crops as unmanaged grasses, while CROP represents a crop managed simulation that includes ...

Samuel Levis; Gordon B. Bonan; Erik Kluzek; Peter E. Thornton; Andrew Jones; William J. Sacks; Christopher J. Kucharik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparison of Crop Rotation for Verticillium Wilt Management and Effect on Pythium Species in Conventional and Organic Strawberry Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Koike, S. T. 1998. Effects of crop rotation and irrigationwww.apsnet.org Comparison of Crop Rotation for VerticilliumK. V. 2009. Comparison of crop rotation for Verticillium

Subbarao, Krishna V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

How ancient agriculturalists managed yield fluctuations through crop selection and reliance on wild plants: An example from central India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land under the principal crops grown in the Centraland the loss of Amazonian crop genetic resources. I. TheEngland. Howard, A. 1924. Crop production in India. Humphrey

Smith, Monica L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Crop–Climate Modeling Using Spatial Patterns of Yield and Climate. Part 1: Background and an Example from Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique in statistical crop-climate analysis, the direct linking of spatial patterns of crop yield and spatial patterns of climate, is explored. Yield and climate data from networks of crop reporting districts and meteorological stations ...

T. M. L. Wigley; Tu Qipu

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Regulating the Regulators: The Increased Role for the Federal Judiciary in Monitoring the Debate over Genetically Modified Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Links Europe's Ban on Bio-Crops With Hunger, N.Y. TIMES, MayRichmond, Genetically Modified Crops in the Philippines: Canw]hat Monsanto [a GM crop producer] wished for from

Denton, Blake

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Scientists, growers assess trade-offs in use of tillage, cover crops and compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depth depth depth depth compost was added two times perConv. crops were present. Compost was ap- Main effect Fof tillage, cover crops and compost Louise E. Jackson Irenee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Impact of Climate Change on Crop Yield: A Case Study of Rainfed Corn in Central Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the effect of climate change on crop yield from a soil water balance perspective. The uncertainties of regional-scale climate models, local-scale climate variability, emissions scenarios, and crop growth models are combined to ...

Ximing Cai; Dingbao Wang; Romain Laurent

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges  

SciTech Connect

Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a potential source of renewable energy are making available critical information for the development, validation, and use of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been developed and validated for herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops adapted to arid lands. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane as plant function types at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). A model of biomass production in CAM plants has been developed (EPI), but lacks the sophistication of the other models. Except for CAM plants, all the models include representations of leaf area dynamics, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few of the models are capable of simulating soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle processes, making them especially useful for assessing environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the field-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. Similar to other process-based models, simulations are challenged by computing and data management issues and an integrated framework for model testing and inter-comparison is needed. Considerable work remains concerning the development of models for unconventional bioenergy crops like CAM plants, generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation, and development of an integrated framework for efficient execution of large-scale simulations for use in planning regional to global sustainable bioenergy production systems.

Surendran Nair, Sujith; Kang, Shujiang; Zhang, Xuesong; Miguez, Fernando; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Post, W. M.; Dietze, Michael; Lynd, Lee R.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

Browne, Greg T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Online biomass and specific growth rate estimation aimed to control of a chemostat microbial cultivation accounting for the memory effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general chemostat microbial cultivation model accounting for the memory effects (in two modifications - µ-type and S-type) is used for biomass and growth rate estimation, based on measurements of the substrate concentration. The influence ... Keywords: Kalman filtering method, chemostat cultivation, memory (time delay) effects

Trayana Patarinska; Silvia Popova

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A LIDAR-based crop height measurement system for Miscanthus giganteus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop a stem height measurement system for Miscanthus giganteus (MxG), to be used as a component in a future Look Ahead Yield Monitor (LAYM). For this purpose, a SICK(R) LMS 291 LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) ... Keywords: Crop height, Crop sensor, Energy crop, Laser scanner, Plant phenotype, Yield monitor

Lei Zhang; Tony E. Grift

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Original paper: Development of an integrated Cropland and Soil Data Management system for cropping system applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most cropping system models and decision support tools are structured for site-specific (i.e. field- or point-based) simulation and analysis. As the need grows for analyses on crop production and management at local, county, state, national, and even ... Keywords: Cropland Data Layer, Cropping system, Database management system, Geographic Information System (GIS), Map service, SSURGO, Soil data

Yubin Yang; Lloyd Ted Wilson; Jing Wang; Xiaobao Li

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A GIS-based approach to evaluate biomass potential from energy crops at regional scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the paper is to propose a method to maximize energy production from arboreous and herbaceous dedicated crops given the characteristics of the local environment: geo-morphology, climate, natural heritage, current land use. The best energy crops ... Keywords: Agricultural land, Carbon mitigation, Energy crops, GIS, Land use, Spatial analysis

Giulia Fiorese; Giorgio Guariso

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Genomics assisted design of training populations of perennial forage and biofuel crops for predicting breeding value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biofuel crops for predicting breeding value Supervisors: Leif Skøt (IBERS), Gancho improvement of crops for food, feedstock and biofuel is an urgent priority to meet with respect to training populations in perennial forage and biofuel crops, specifically

Millar, Andrew J.

254

Relating United States Crop Land Use to Natural Resources and Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop ...

K. G. Hubbard; F. J. Flores-mendoza

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Regional crop monitoring and discrimination based on simulated ENVISAT ASAR wide swath mode images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paper investigates the potential contribution of ENVISAT wide swath (WS) images for discrimination and monitoring of crops at a regional scale. The study was based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired throughout an entire growing ... Keywords: Coarse spatial resolution, Crop discrimination, Crop monitoring, ENVISAT, Synthetic aperture radar, Wide swath-ASAR

X. Blaes; F. Holecz; H. J. C. van Leeuwen; P. Defourny

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geo-MHYDAS: A landscape discretization tool for distributed hydrological modeling of cultivated areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of landscape variabilities by means of an adequate landscape discretization is of major importance in distributed hydrological modeling. In this paper, we present Geo-MHYDAS, a landscape discretization tool that allows explicit representation ... Keywords: Cultivated catchment, Discretization, GIS, Hydrology, Landscape, Topology

P. Lagacherie; M. Rabotin; F. Colin; R. Moussa; M. Voltz

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Investigation of Flow Characteristics in an Airlift-Driven Raceway Reactor for Algae Cultivation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the most common choice for outdoor algae cultivation due to their low cost relative to enclosed commercial viability has been restricted mostly to high-value strains such as Spirulina for health food from algae is promising, the high cost of production compared to the relatively low price of fuels

259

RAPID FUSION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES IN LARGE RICE SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new rapid fusion method for the determination of plutonium in large rice samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used to determine very low levels of plutonium isotopes in rice. The recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid, reliable radiochemical analyses for radionuclides in environmental and food samples. Public concern regarding foods, particularly foods such as rice in Japan, highlights the need for analytical techniques that will allow very large sample aliquots of rice to be used for analysis so that very low levels of plutonium isotopes may be detected. The new method to determine plutonium isotopes in large rice samples utilizes a furnace ashing step, a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a column separation process with TEVA Resin? cartridges. The method can be applied to rice sample aliquots as large as 5 kg. Plutonium isotopes can be determined using alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory plutonium particles are effectively digested. The MDA for a 5 kg rice sample using alpha spectrometry is 7E-5 mBq g{sup -1}. The method can easily be adapted for use by ICP-MS to allow detection of plutonium isotopic ratios.

Maxwell, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES,BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (rev. April 1, 2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pome and stone fruit crops including almond; pistachio,NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTCrops ..

Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15.2 Crop yield14 Impact of ozone on crop yield 15 Data 15.1 Ozonecrop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Investigation of management strategies for the production of sweet sorghum as a bioenergy crop and preservation of crop residue by the ensiling process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this project was to investigate management practices for sweet sorghum as a bioenergy crop in Iowa and its storability as an ensiled… (more)

Cogdill, Todd Joseph

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Aligning Insect IPM Programs with a Cropping Systems Perspective: Cover Crops and Cultural Pest Control in Wisconsin Organic Corn and Soybean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a conversation among researcher, agroecology student, and farmers about the association between cover crops and seedcorn maggot in organic grain crops. Survey data showed that Wisconsin organic farmers would use cover crop management, insect degree day forecasting, and planting date cultural controls, given appropriate knowledge context and extension information provision. We developed electronic and print resources and engaged with farmers and educators nationally through the eOrganic Community of Practice. Project outcomes exemplify student and farmer ability to effect change in land grant university extension recommendations through integrated pest management content and delivery aligned with a cropping systems perspective.

Copyright Taylor; Francis Group; Eileen M. Cullen; Katelin M. Holm

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Phase II) (Phase II) Jump to: navigation, search Name Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) Facility Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Location Grundy County IL Coordinates 41.202313°, -88.530078° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.202313,"lon":-88.530078,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Potential supply and cost of biomass from energy crops in the TVA region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and supply structures of energy crop markets have not been established. Establishing the likely price and supply of energy crop biomass in a region is a complex task because biomass is not an established commodity as are oil, natural gas, and coal. In this study, the cost and supply of short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) and switchgrass biomass for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region-a 276-county area that includes portions of 11 states in the southeastern United States - are projected. Projected prices and quantities of biomass are assumed to be a function of the amount and quality of crop and pasture land available in a region, expected energy crop yields and production costs on differing soils and land types, and the profit that could be obtained from current conventional crop production on these same lands. Results include the supply curves of SRWC and switchgrass biomass that are projected to be available from the entire region, the amount and location of crop and pasture land that would be used, and the conventional agricultural crops that would be displaced as a function of energy crop production. Finally, the results of sensitivity analysis on the projected cost and supply of energy crop biomass are shown. In particular, the separate impacts of varying energy crop production costs and yields, and interest rates are examined.

Graham, R.L.; Downing, M.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Biomass fuel from woody crops for electric power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the biologic, environmental, economic, and operational issues associated with growing wood crops in managed plantations. Information on plantation productivity, environmental issues and impacts, and costs is drawn from DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development as well as commercial operations in the US and elsewhere. The particular experiences of three countries--Brazil, the Philippines, and Hawaii (US)--are discussed in considerable detail.

Perlack, R.D.; Wright, L.L.; Huston, M.A.; Schramm, W.E.

1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

Regional uptake and release of crop carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO(2) sinks where it is harvested and regional CO(2) sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. With respect to US Farm Resource Regions, net sources of CO(2) associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.3 to 6.1% yr(-1) during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Branstetter, Marcia L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Schuh, Andrew [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Ogle, Stephan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Conversion of rice straw to bio-based chemicals: an integrated process using Lactobacillus brevis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of rice straw to bio-based chemicals: anbiomass as a feedstock for bio-based chemical production ispositive strain is used for bio-based chemical production

Kim, Jae-Han; Block, David E.; Shoemaker, Sharon P.; Mills, David A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

Neumann, Rebecca B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Determination of Storage Time of Rice Seed Using ANN Based on NIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple, fast and nondestructive approach was put forward to classify rice seed of different storage time. This discrimination was conducted by integrated with wavelet transform (WT), principal component analysis (PCA) and artificial neural networks ...

Zhu Dengsheng; Li Xiaoli

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Prediction of Rice Production in the Philippines Using Seasonal Climate Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictive skills of retrospective seasonal climate forecasts (hindcasts) tailored to Philippine rice production data at national, regional, and provincial levels are investigated using precipitation hindcasts from one uncoupled general ...

Naohisa Koide; Andrew W. Robertson; Amor V. M. Ines; Jian-Hua Qian; David G. DeWitt; Anthony Lucero

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Influence of Cultivation Methods on Shewanella oneidensis Physiology and Proteome Expression  

SciTech Connect

High-throughput analyses that are central to microbial systems biology and ecophysiology research benefit from highly homogeneous and physiologically well-defined cell cultures. While attention has focused on the technical variation associated with high-throughput technologies, biological variation introduced as a function of cell cultivation methods has been overlooked. This study evaluated the impact of cultivation methods, controlled batch or continuous culture in bioreactors versus shake flasks, on the reproducibility of global proteome measurements in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Variability in dissolved oxygen concentration and consumption rate, metabolite profiles, and proteome was greater in shake flask than controlled batch or chemostat cultures. Proteins indicative of suboxic and anaerobic growth (e.g., fumarate reductase and decaheme c-type cytochromes) were more abundant in cells from shake flasks compared to bioreactor cultures, a finding consistent with data demonstrating that “aerobic” flask cultures were O2 deficient due to poor mass transfer kinetics. The work described herein establishes the necessity of controlled cultivation for ensuring highly reproducible and homogenous microbial cultures. By decreasing cell to cell metabolic variability, higher quality samples will allow for the interpretive accuracy necessary for drawing conclusions relevant to microbial systems biology research.

Elias, Dwayne A.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Kennedy, David W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Giometti, Carol S.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Incorporating Divine Presence, Orchestrating Medical Worlds: Cultivating Corporeal Capacities of Therapeutic Power and Transcendence in Ifa Everyday Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cultivate, within student-apprentice and healer-sage alike,devotional development of Ifá apprentices and priests/esses,and ruptures in the apprentice’s mundane habitus, while

Gardner, Amy Harriet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Contract Farming, Smallholders and Commercialization of Agriculture in Uganda: The Case of Sorghum, Sunflower, and Rice Contract Farming Schemes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rate of Adoption of Improved Sorghum Varieties in Easternand non contracted farmers Sorghum NCFs Total (n = 116) (n =in Uganda: The Case of Sorghum, Sunflower, and Rice Contract

Elepu, Gabriel; Nalukenge, Imelda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Prioritizing wood energy crop feedstock qualities for biofuel systems improvement  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge engineering or expert systems is needed in biofuel systems to adequately prioritize wood energy crop traits on which research and development should focus. Objectives at the various stages of the total biofuel process are clarifying the demands that will be placed on feedstock qualities. These objectives are forming more clearly from developments in the growing, handling, and conversion of wood under operational and regulatory circumstances. A process for systematic prioritization of wood qualities for possible improvement is presented in the content of the entire biofuel process.

Ranney, J.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Prioritizing wood energy crop feedstock qualities for biofuel systems improvement  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge engineering or expert systems is needed in biofuel systems to adequately prioritize wood energy crop traits on which research and development should focus. Objectives at the various stages of the total biofuel process are clarifying the demands that will be placed on feedstock qualities. These objectives are forming more clearly from developments in the growing, handling, and conversion of wood under operational and regulatory circumstances. A process for systematic prioritization of wood qualities for possible improvement is presented in the content of the entire biofuel process.

Ranney, J.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Transgenic crops get a test in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel British research program called PROSAMO - Planned Release of Selected and Modified Organisms - has just produced its first batch of results on the ecological behavior of a genetically manipulated variety of oil seed rape (known to Americans as canola). As expected, the preliminary data indicate that these plants do not outgrow their competitors in the wild, nor is there any evidence that they pass on their foreign genes to other species. PROSAMO is moving on to test other crops with other foreign genes. If these results are as reassuring, scientists around the world will have solid evidence with which to soothe fears.

Cherfas, J.

1991-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Pioneering energy crops in the Midwest, project update: Chariton Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a proven option for electricity generation. A diverse range of biopower producers includes electric utilities, independent power producers, and the pulp and paper industry. To help expand opportunities for biomass power production, the U.S. Department of Energy established the Biopower Program and is sponsoring efforts to increase the productivity of dedicated energy crops. The Program aims to double biomass conversion efficiencies, thus reducing biomass power generation costs. These efforts will promote industrial and agricultural growth, improve the environment, create jobs, increase U.S. energy security, and provide new export markets.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

280

Pioneering energy crops in the Northeast, project update: Salix Consortium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a proven option for electricity generation. A diverse range of biopower producers includes electric utilities, independent power producers, and the pulp and paper industry. To help expand opportunities for biomass power production, the U.S. Department of Energy established the Biopower Program and is sponsoring efforts to increase the productivity of dedicated energy crops. The Program aims to double biomass conversion efficiencies, thus reducing biomass power generation costs. These efforts will promote industrial and agricultural growth, improve the environment, create jobs, increase U.S. energy security, and provide new export markets.

Shepherd, P.

2000-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Genetic diversity and species relationships in the Oryza complex and glufosinate tolerance in rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The weed red rice is a major problem in rice producing areas world wide. All of the red rice in commercial rice fields in the United States has traditionally been considered to be the same species as commercial rice, Oryza sativa. However, using DNA markers it was found that most of the red rice with black hulls was sufficiently divergent to be considered a separate species. This includes TX4, a red rice ecotype that has been reported to have considerable natural tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate. TX4 is closely related to samples that have been classified as Oryza rufipogon. However, it was shown that both the TX4-like red rice from commercial fields and most of the Oryza rufipogon accessions in the US National Small Grains Collection are more accurately classified as Oryza nivara. This is significant since Oryza rufipogon is regulated under the Federal Noxious Weed Act, while Oryza nivara is not. Oryza nivara closely related to TX4 was found to be widely distributed across the rice production areas of Texas and was also found in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Of 240 samples from across Texas, 23 samples from six different counties were identical with TX4 with all 18 DNA markers tested. The reported glufosinate tolerance of TX4 is a potential problem since this same herbicide would be used in conjunction with genetically modified (GM) that is being developed as a method of red rice control. Thus, field, greenhouse and tissue culture studies were conducted to evaluate the degree of glufosinate tolerance in TX4. TX4 typically was severely damaged by glufosinate, but not efficiently controlled. Even with the maximum number of herbicide applications at the proposed maximum label rate, TX4 often re-sprouted and produced viable seed. Herbicide tolerance was found to be variable, but appears to be sufficient to present a problem with the use of the GM glufosinate resistant varieties currently under development, particularly when combined with variation in the response of ??sensitive?? varieties.

Vaughan, Laura Kelly

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

DOE grant to support enhanced biofuel crop design | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Highlights SHARE DOE grant to support enhanced biofuel crop design January 01, 2013 Xiaohan Yang works with a model plant for crassulacean...

283

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Lipids in seeds of oat (Avena spp.), a potential oil crop.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New oil crops with high yield and oil content are urgently needed. Oat is the only cereal that accumulates substantial amount of lipids in the… (more)

Leonova, Svetlana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid biofuels from biomass: The writings on the walls. Newreduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityMC, et al. 2009. Cali- fornia biomass resources, potentials,

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

DOE grant to support enhanced biofuel crop design | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE grant to support enhanced biofuel crop design January 01, 2013 Xiaohan Yang works with a model plant for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) genomics research. January 2013....

287

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Summer cover crops and soil amendments to improve growth and nutrient uptake of okra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pot experiment with summer cover crops and soil amendments was conducted in two consecutive years to elucidate the effects of these cover crops and soil amendments on 'Clemson Spineless 80' okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) yields and biomass production, and the uptake and distribution of soil nutrients and trace elements. The cover crops were sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana), and sorghum sudan-grass (Sorghum bicolor x S. bicolor var. sudanense) with fallow as the control. The organic soil amendments were biosolids (sediment from wastewater plants), N-Viro Soil (a mixture of biosolids and coal ash), coal ash (a combustion by-product from power plants), co-compost (a mixture of 3 biosolids: 7 yard waste), and yard waste compost (mainly from leaves and branches of trees and shrubs, and grass clippings) with a soil-incorporated cover crop as the control. As a subsequent vegetable crop, okra was grown after the cover crops, alone or together with the organic soil amendments, had been incorporated. All of the cover crops, except sorghum sudangrass in 2002-03, significantly improved okra fruit yields and the total biomass production. Both cover crops and soil amendments can substantially improve nutrient uptake and distribution. The results suggest that cover crops and appropriate amounts of soil amendments can be used to improve soil fertility and okra yield without adverse environmental effects or risk of contamination of the fruit. Further field studies will be required to confirm these findings.

Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W. [University of Florida, Homestead, FL (United States). Center for Tropical Research & Education

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Integrated nutrient managment for sustainable production of sorghum-wheat crop sequeence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Sorghum-(Sorghum bicolor) – Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.of the systems. More over sorghum-wheat crop sequence is an

Bhale, Vilas Madhukar Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Food-Regional Crop Areas and Climatic Profiles | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food-Regional Crop Areas and Climatic Profiles Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities...

292

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

useful as biomass crops for biofuel production also possesscandidate species for biofuel production are taxonomicallyDeleterious effects Biofuel (biodiesel, bioethanol),

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

TISSUE CULTURE AND TRANSFORMATION STUDIES OF JATROPHA CURCAS, A SECOND GENERATION BIOFUEL CROP.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) is an important second generation biofuel crop. In a time when energy needs are coming to the forefront of our nation’s… (more)

Tabatabai, Behnam

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extremophilic microorganisms are adapted to survive in ecological niches with high temperatures, extremes of pH, high salt concentrations, high pressure, radiation, etc. Extremophiles produce unique biocatalysts and natural products that function under extreme conditions comparab le to those prevailing in various industrial processes. Therefore, there is burgeoning interest in bioprospecting for extremophiles with potential immediate use in agriculture, the food, chemical, and pharm aceutical industries, and environmental biotechnology. Over the years, several thousand extremophilic bacteria, archaea, and filamentous fungi were collected at extreme environmental sites in the USA, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone surrounding the faeild nuclear power plant in Ukraine, in and around Lake Baikal in Siberia, and at geothermal sites on the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia. These organisms were cultured under proprietary conditions, and the cell- free supernatants were screened for biological activities against plant pathogenic fungi and major crop damaging insects. Promising peptide lead molecules were isolated, characterized, and sequenced. Relatively high hit rates characterized the tested fermentation broths. Of the 26,000 samples screened, over thousand contained biological activity of interest. A fair number of microorganisms expressed broad- spectrum antifungal or insecticidal activity. Two- dozen broadly antifungal peptides (AFPs) are alr eady patent protected, and many more tens are under further investigation. Tapping the gene pool of extremophilic microorganisms to provide novel ways of crop protection proved a successful strategy.

Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc.; DuPont Experimental Station; Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser; Herrmann, Rafael; Presnail, James; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Seasonal Production and Emission of Methane from Rice Fields, Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

B 139 - Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning. The global emissions from these sources are still not well known. In the middle 1980s there were few available data on methane emissions from rice fields leading to estimates of a global source between 100-280 Tg/yr. Extensive worldwide research during the last decade has shown that the global emissions from rice fields are more likely to be in the range of 30-80Tg/yr. While this work has led to a substantial reduction in the estimated emissions, the uncertainty is still quite large, and seriously affects our ability to include methane in integrated assessments for future climate change and environmental management.China dominated estimates of methane emissions from rice fields because it was, and is, the largest producer of rice, and major increases in rice production had taken place in the country over the last several decades. This report summarizes the work in Sichuan Province, China, in each of the following areas: the design of the experiment; the main results on methane emissions from rice fields, delineating the factors controlling emissions; production of methane in the soil; a survey of water management practices in sample of counties in Sichuan province; and results of ambient measurements including data from the background continental site. B139

Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

296

DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL ESTIMATE: UPDATE JUNE 11, 2010 by Professor Satish Nagarajaiah, Rice University (www.ruf.rice.edu/~nagaraja &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL ESTIMATE: UPDATE JUNE 11, 2010 by Professor Satish Nagarajaiah, Rice. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/11/us/11spill.html?hp New Estimates Double Rate of Oil Flowing on Thursday essentially doubled its estimate of how much oil has been spewing from the out-of-control BP well

Nagarajaiah, Satish

297

Rice Transformation as a Means to Study Gene Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exceptionally effective transformation procedure has been established by using class I embryo-derived rice callus. Every treated callus clump yielded multiple independently transformed plants (average 40 plantlets). Analysis of genomic DNA blots and pollen expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) from T0 plants revealed that 64% bore a single locus T-DNA insertion in which half had one T-DNA copy. Additive transgene expression was observed fromT0 plants with GFP driven by mUbi1 promoter. Transgenic plants could be rapidly characterized by analyzing GFP pollen from T0 plants without the need for further generations or genomic DNA blot analysis. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of microspore-derived callus for generating large numbers of T-DNA haploid and doubled haploid(DH) plants has also been investigated. The established transformation procedure resulted in 100% transformation frequency for class I microspore-derived rice callus. Each callus typically yields multiple independent transgenic plants. Genomic DNA blot analysis suggested 98% of the transgenic plants are independent events. About half of the transgenic plants were identified as haploid plants, whereas half are DH hemizygous or homozygous transgenic plants. DH homozygous transgenic plants were obtained from T0plants and confirmed by pollen GFP expression and genomic blot analysis in T0transgenic DH plants. In this study, about 60% ofT0transgenic DH plants had a single locus T-DNA insertion of which 45% bore one T-DNA copy. Furthermore, in a population of over 2,000 haploid and doubled haploid T-DNA plants , about 25% showed phenotypic differences from non-transformed haploid plants. Approximately 5% were seriously phenotypically abnormal including lethal or semi-lethal mutants. This highly efficient transformation procedure using microspore-derived callus could be valuable in speeding up plant breeding and in new gene discovery. Diversification of the mUbi1 promoter led to a minimal promoter that has a similar function as the original mUbi1. Transient and stable transformation as measured from gene expression driven by the minimal promoter suggested that it has a similar function as the original wild type promoter.

Jiang, Yiming

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do?documentID=1393 UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, "Pacific" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property., "Latin America and Caribbean" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property., "Western Asia & North Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property., Northern America, "South Asia" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property., "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property., "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

299

Evidence for glyphosate damage of winter wheat depending on waiting-times after pre-crop glyphosate application and density of desiccated weed plants under field and experimental conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

times for sowing after pre-crop glyphosate application aretimes before sowing of the subsequent crop resulted in muchstronger and longer lasting crop damage than the same amount

Bott, Sebastian; Lebender, Ulrike; Yoon, Duck-Joong; Tesfamariam, Tsehaye; Römheld, Volker; Neumann, Günter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Sensitivity of crop model predictions to entire meteorological and soil input datasets highlights vulnerability to drought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop growth models are increasingly used as part of research into areas such as climate change and bioenergy, so it is particularly important to understand the effects of environmental inputs on model results. Rather than investigating the effects of ... Keywords: Crop growth model, Drought, Input data, Parameterisation, Sensitivity analysis, Soil water

Mark Pogson; Astley Hastings; Pete Smith

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 SMALL GRAIN INSECT CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2013 196 SMALL GRAIN INSECT CONTROL Jay "exhaust pipes" protruding upward from rear end) increase during jointing and move to heads as they emerge Handbook for Field Crops - 2013 197 Pest Product Rate /acre Comments Cereal Leaf Beetle Baythroid XL

Stuart, Steven J.

302

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

Landis, Doug

303

2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these products. Introduction Petroleum oils have been in use as crop protectants for over a hundred years of petroleum oils have re- sulted in the ability to virtually custom-manufacture effective oil products of vegetable and animal oils to certain crop protection needs. #12;3Agnello--Petroleum-derived spray oils

Agnello, Arthur M.

304

Automatic expert system based on images for accuracy crop row detection in maize fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an automatic expert system for accuracy crop row detection in maize fields based on images acquired from a vision system. Different applications in maize, particularly those based on site specific treatments, require the identification ... Keywords: Crop row detection in maize fields, Expert system, Image segmentation, Image thresholding, Linear regression, Machine vision, Theil-Sen estimator

J. M. Guerrero; M. Guijarro; M. Montalvo; J. Romeo; L. Emmi; A. Ribeiro; G. Pajares

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Environmental enchancement using short-rotation tree crops: research results and directions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and perennial grasses used as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber can provide multiple economic and environmental benefits. Site-specific environmental studies are providing information needed to help evaluate the economic and environmental impacts of biomass production at both local and regional scales. Erosion and chemical movement from an annual row crop, switchgrass, and tree crop with and without a groundcover are being compared in the Southeast. Studies of SRWC productivity on the South Carolina coastal plain are comparing surface and subsurface movement of chemicals applied under different fertilization and irrigation regimes, and addressing use of mill and agricultural residues to enhance crop production. Results are helping to assess the effects of biomass crops produced on different principal soil types and to match tree species with appropriate sites to maximize productivity and minimize environmental impacts. Studies are comparing wildlife use of biomass crops to row crops, grasslands, and natural forests. Results to date show that SRWCs support greater bird diversity than row crops, but less than natural forests; switchgrass plantings extend habitat for grasslands birds. Collaboration with an industrial partner on diverse SRWC plantings in the Southeast is addressing the relationship between plantings of different acreage, age, tree species, and landscape context and breeding bird use. Information from wildlife diversity, water, and soil quality studies can be used by the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), researchers, producers, and industry to identify management strategies to maintain productivity While enhancing the environment.

Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field validation of the DNDC model for greenhouse gas emissions in East Asian cropping systems annual variations of greenhouse gas emissions from cropping systems and effects of land management a powerful tool for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. INDEX TERMS: 1610 Global

307

HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Regulations and Basic Information: Safe and Effective Use 1-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& FOREST CROPS 2012 1-16 Regulations and Basic Information: Safe and Effective Use Please observe pesticideHORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Regulations and Basic Information: Safe and Effective Use 1-1 Safe and Effective Use Patricia A. Hipkins, Assistant Coordinator, Virginia Tech Pesticide Programs

Liskiewicz, Maciej

308

Miscanthus: a fastgrowing crop for biofuels and chemicals production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Correspondence to: Nicolas Brosse, Laboratoire d'Etude et de Recherche sur le MAteriau Bois, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université de Lorraine, Bld des Aiguillettes, F-54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. E-mail: Nicolas.Brosse@lermab.uhp-nancy.fr © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd 1 Miscanthus: a fast- growing crop for biofuels and chemicals production Nicolas Brosse, Université de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France Anthony Dufour, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France Xianzhi Meng, Qining Sun, and Arthur Ragauskas, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA Received February 9, 2012; revised April 17, 2012; accepted April 18, 2012 View online at Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com); DOI: 10.1002/bbb.1353;

309

Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Prepared By Terry Brown, Jeffrey Morris, Patrick Richards and Joel Mason Western Research Institute October 1, 2008 to September 1, 2010 DOE Award Number: DE-NT0005681 Report Issued December, 2010 Western Research Institute 365 N 9 th Street Laramie WY 82072 ii DOE DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

310

Crop residues as a fuel for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crop residues could serve as an alternative energy source for producing electric power and heat in agricultural regions of the United States. Nearly 2 quads of residues are estimated to be available as a sustainable annual yield. These can substitute for up to one quad of conventional fuels used to generate electricity and up to an additional quad of petroleum and natural gas currently used for producing heat. The most promising routes to residue conversion appear to be regional generators sized in the megawatt range, and the mixing of residues with coal for burning in coal power plants. Costing farmers from $0.70 to $1.25 per million Btu, to harvest and prepare for use as a fuel, residues can be a competitive renewable energy supply.

Bhagat, N.; Davitian, H.; Pouder, R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cropping Euler factors of modular L-functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjectures, if A/Q is an abelian variety then its L-function must capture substantial part of the arithmetic properties of A. The smallest number field L where A has all its endomorphisms defined must also have a role. This article deals with the relationship between these two objects in the specific case of modular abelian varieties A_f/Q associated to weight 2 newforms for the modular group Gamma_1(N). Specifically, our goal is to relate the order of L(A_f/Q,s) at s = 1 with Euler products cropped by the set of primes that split completely in L. The results we obtain for the case when f has complex multiplication are complete, while in the absence of CM, our results depend on the rate of convergence in Sato-Tate distributions.

Gonzalez, J; Lario, J -C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Changing scenario of micronutrient deficiencies in India during four decades and its impact on crop responses and nutritional health of human and animals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004) Zinc in soils and crop nutrition. IZA Publications.MV (2006) Micronutrients in crops and in soils of India.micronutrients for global crop production. (Ed. BJ Alloway),

Singh, M V; Narwal, R P; G, Bhupal Raj; Patel, K P; Sadana, U S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Universit Aix-Marseille I U.F.R. des Sciences Gographiques et de l'Amnagement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clelland (2005). Rice and red rice interference. II. Rice response to population densities of three red rice Maturity Groups: II. Light Interception and Utilization. Crop Sci. 45:1778-1785. Edwards, J.T., L

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Event Reconstruction and Data Acquisition for the RICE Experiment at the South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The RICE experiment seeks to measure ultra-high energy neutrinos (E(nu)>10 PeV) by detection of the radio wavelength Cherenkov radiation produced by neutrino-ice collisions within Antarctic ice. An array of 16 dipole antennas, buried at depths of 100-400 m, and sensitive over the 100-500 MHz frequency range, has been continuously taking data for the last seven years. We herein describe the design and performance of the RICE experiment's event trigger and data acquisition system, highlighting elements not covered as extensively in previous publications.

I. Kravchenko

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirementsreduced surface water availability can be managed byrequirement and water availability (surface water and

Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Searching for simplified farmers' crop choice models for integrated watershed management in Thailand: A data mining approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study used the C4.5 data mining algorithm to model farmers' crop choice in two watersheds in Thailand. Previous attempts in the Integrated Water Resource Assessment and Management Project to model farmers' crop choice produced large sets of decision ... Keywords: Data mining, Decision support system, Decision trees, Farmers' crop choice

Benchaphun Ekasingh; Kamol Ngamsomsuke

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A spreadsheet-based model for teaching the agronomic, economic, and environmental aspects of bioenergy cropping systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assess and compare the economic and environmental sustainability of newly emerging bioenergy cropping systems, students need a comprehensive computer-based tool for cataloging attributes of various proposed bioenergy feedstock crops. We have ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Biofuel crop, Teaching model

Kurt D. Thelen; Juan Gao; John Hoben; Leilei Qian; Christopher Saffron; Katherine Withers

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (updated 5/1/10)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops in California — 2 GeneralNUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (updated 5/1/10) ALMONDCrops ..

Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Multisensor Fusion of Ground-based and Airborne Remote Sensing Data for Crop Condition Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the performances of the optical sensors and instruments carried on both ground-based and airborne platforms were evaluated for monitoring crop growing status, detecting the vegetation response to aerial applied herbicides, and identifying crop nitrogen status. Geostatistical analysis on remotely sensed data was conducted to investigate spatial structure of crop canopy normalized difference vegetation index and multispectral imagery. A computerized crop monitoring system was developed that combined sensors and instruments that measured crop structure and spectral data with a global positioning system. The integrated crop monitoring system was able to collect real-time, multi-source, multi-form, and crop related data simultaneously as the tractor-mounted system moved through the field. This study firstly used remotely sensed data to evaluate glyphosate efficacy on weeds applied with conventional and emerging aerial spray nozzles. A weedy field was In this study, the performances of the optical sensors and instruments carried on both ground-based and airborne platforms were evaluated for monitoring crop growing status, detecting the vegetation response to aerial applied herbicides, and identifying crop nitrogen status. Geostatistical analysis on remotely sensed data was conducted to investigate spatial structure of crop canopy normalized difference vegetation index and multispectral imagery. A computerized crop monitoring system was developed that combined sensors and instruments that measured crop structure and spectral data with a global positioning system. The integrated crop monitoring system was able to collect real-time, multi-source, multi-form, and crop related data simultaneously as the tractor-mounted system moved through the field. This study firstly used remotely sensed data to evaluate glyphosate efficacy on weeds applied with conventional and emerging aerial spray nozzles. A weedy field was set up in three blocks and four aerial spray technology treatments were tested. Spectral reflectance measurements were taken using ground-based sensors from all the plots at 1, 8, and 17 days after treatment. The results indicated that the differences among the treatments could be detected with spectral data. This study could provide applicators with guidance equipment configurations that can result in herbicide savings and optimized applications in other crops. The main focus of this research was to apply sensor fusion technology to ground-based and airborne imagery data. Experimental plots cropped with cotton and soybean plants were set up with different nitrogen application rates. The multispectral imagery was acquired by an airborne imaging system over crop field; at the same period, leaf chlorophyll content and spectral reflectance measurements were gathered with chlorophyll meter and spectroradiometer at canopy level on the ground, respectively. Statistical analyses were applied on the data from individual sensor for discrimination with respect to the nitrogen treatment levels. Multisensor data fusion was performed at data level. The results showed that the data fusion of airborne imagery with ground-based data were capable of improving the performance of remote sensing data on detection of crop nitrogen status. The method may be extended to other types of data, and data fusion can be performed at feature or decision level.

Zhang, Huihui

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hardwood energy crops and wildlife diversity: Investigating potential benefits for breeding birds and small mammals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hardwood energy crops have the potential to provide a profit to growers as well as environmental benefits (for water quality, soil stabilization, chemical runoff, and wildlife habitat). Environmental considerations are important for both sustainable development of bioenergy technologies on agricultural lands, and for public support. The Environmental Task of the US DOE`s Biofuels feedstock Development Program (BFDP) is working with industry, universities and others to determine how to plant, manage and harvest these crops to maximize environmental advantages and minimize impacts while economically meeting production needs. One research objective is to define and improve wildlife habitat value of these energy crops by exploring how breeding birds and small mammals use them. The authors have found increased diversity of birds in tree plantings compared to row crops. However, fewer bird and small mammal species use the tree plantings than use natural forest. Bird species composition on hardwood crops studied to date is a mixture of openland and forest bird species. Restricted research site availability to date has limited research to small acreage sites of several years of age, or to a few larger acreage but young (1--2 year) plantings. Through industry collaboration, research began this season on bird use of diverse hardwood plantings (different ages, acreages, tree species) in the southeast. Together with results of previous studies, this research will help define practical energy crop guidelines to integrate native wildlife benefits with productive energy crops.

Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States); Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The environmental benefits of cellulosic energy crops at a landscape scale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to present a broad overview of the potential environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops--particularly the cellulosic energy crops current under development. For this discussion, the term energy crop refers to a crop grown primarily to create feedstock for either making biofuels such as ethanol or burning in a heat or electricity generation facility. Cellulosic energy crops are designed to be used in cellulose-based ethanol conversion processes (as opposed to starch or sugar-based ethanol conversion processes). As more cellulose can be produced per hectare of land than can sugar or starch, the cellulose-based ethanol conversion process is a more efficient sue of land for ethanol production. Assessing the environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops is complex because the environmental impact of using biomass for energy must be considered in the context of alternative energy options while the environmental impact of producing biomass from energy crops must be considered in the context of alternative land-uses. Using biomass-derived energy can reduce greenhouse gas emissions or increase them; growing biomass energy crops can enhance soil fertility or degrade it. Without knowing the context of the biomass energy, one can say little about its specific environmental impacts. The primary focus of this paper is an evaluation of the environmental impacts of growing cellulosic energy crops especially at the landscape or regional scale. However, to set the stage for this discussion, the authors begin by comparing the environmental advantages and disadvantages of biomass-derived energy relative to other energy alternatives such as coal, hydropower, nuclear power, oil/gasoline, natural gas and photovoltaics.

Graham, R.L.; Liu, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, B.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. of Agriculture

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

The role of short-rotation woody crops in sustainable development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One answer to increase wood production is by increasing management intensity on existing timberland, especially in plantation forests. Another is to convert land currently in agriculture to timberland. Short-rotation woody crops can be used in both cases. But, what are the environmental consequences? Short-rotation woody crops can provide a net improvement in environmental quality at both local and global scales. Conversion of agricultural land to short-rotation woody crops can provide the most environmental quality enhancement by reducing erosion, improving soil quality, decreasing runoff, improving groundwater quality, and providing better wildlife habitat. Forest products companies can use increased production from intensively managed short-rotation woody crop systems to offset decreased yield from the portion of their timberland that is managed less intensively, e.g. streamside management zones and other ecologically sensitive or unique areas. At the global scale, use of short-rotation woody crops for bioenergy is part of the solution to reduce greenhouse gases produced by burning fossil fuels. Incorporating short-rotation woody crops into the agricultural landscape also increases storage of carbon in the soil, thus reducing atmospheric concentrations. In addition, use of wood instead of alternatives such as steel, concrete, and plastics generally consumes less energy and produces less greenhouse gases. Cooperative research can be used to achieve energy, fiber, and environmental goals. This paper will highlight several examples of ongoing cooperative research projects that seek to enhance the environmental aspects of short-rotation woody crop systems. Government, industry, and academia are conducting research to study soil quality, use of mill residuals, nutrients in runoff and groundwater, and wildlife use of short-rotation woody crop systems in order to assure the role of short-rotation crops as a sustainable way of meeting society`s needs.

Shepard, J.P. [National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Medford, MA (United States); Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Short rotation woody crops: Using agroforestry technology for energy in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Agroforestry in the United States is being primarily defined as the process of using trees in agricultural systems for conservation purposes and multiple products. The type of agroforestry most commonly practiced in many parts of the world, that is the planting of tree crops in combination with food crops or pasture, is the type least commonly practiced in the United States. One type of agroforestry technique, which is beginning now and anticipated to expand to several million acres in the United States, is the planting of short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) primarily to provide fiber and fuel. Research on SRWC`s and environmental concerns are described.

Wright, L.L.; Ranney, J.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Short rotation woody crops: Using agroforestry technology for energy in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Agroforestry in the United States is being primarily defined as the process of using trees in agricultural systems for conservation purposes and multiple products. The type of agroforestry most commonly practiced in many parts of the world, that is the planting of tree crops in combination with food crops or pasture, is the type least commonly practiced in the United States. One type of agroforestry technique, which is beginning now and anticipated to expand to several million acres in the United States, is the planting of short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) primarily to provide fiber and fuel. Research on SRWC's and environmental concerns are described.

Wright, L.L.; Ranney, J.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Effects of Partial Crop Harvest on Biological Pest Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the effects of periodic partial harvesting of a continuously grown crop on augmentative biological control are analyzed. Partial harvesting can remove a proportion of both pests and biological control agents, so its influence on the control efficiency cannot be a priori neglected. An impulsive model consisting of a general predator-prey model in ODE, augmented by a discrete component to depict releases of biological control agents and the periodic partial harvesting is used. The periods are taken as integer multiples of each other. A stability condition for pest eradication is expressed as the minimal value of the budget per unit time to spend on predators. We consider the partial harvesting period to be fixed by both the plant's physiology and market forces so that the only manipulated variable is the release period. It is shown that varying the release period with respect to the harvest period influences the minimal budget value when the former is carried out more often than the latter and ha...

Nundloll, Sapna; Grognard, Frédéric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Rice University WARPnet: A Platform for Clean-Slate Deployed Wireless  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice University WARPnet: A Platform for Clean-Slate Deployed Wireless Networks by Siddharth Gupta: A Platform for Clean-Slate Deployed Wireless Networks by Siddharth Gupta There has been a recent paradigm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 WARPnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.3 Related Work

328

Integrating remote sensing and GIS for prediction of rice protein contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;1 Integrating remote sensing and GIS for prediction of rice protein contents Chanseok RYU1 harvest was established by remote sensing (RS) and analyzed to select the key management factors the key management factor by the difference in the Field GreenNDVI. Keywords: remote sensing, geographic

Takada, Shoji

329

I. Bread, cereal, rice, and pasta 6-11 servings (aim for 50% whole grain)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cranberry juice Dinner leftovers such as Chicken and veggie stir-fry over Steamed brown rice Low fat yogurt, and cheese (2-3 servings) IV. Fats, oils, and sweets (sparingly) Breakfast Ideas Oatmeal Raisins or dried cranberries Low-fat milk Low-fat mozzarella cheese sticks Whole-grain crackers Mixed dried fruits Low-fat

de la Torre, José R.

330

El Niño–Southern Oscillation Impacts on Rice Production in Luzon, the Philippines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses regression analysis to evaluate the relationships among sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) averaged over the Niño-3.4 region (5°N–5°S, 120°–170°W), rainfall, and rice production, area harvested, and yield in Luzon, the large ...

Martha G. Roberts; David Dawe; Walter P. Falcon; Rosamond L. Naylor

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Miscanthus: A Review of European Experience with a Novel Energy Crop  

SciTech Connect

Miscanthus is a tall perennial grass which has been evaluated in Europe over the past 5-10 years as a new bioenergy crop. The sustained European interest in miscanthus suggests that this novel energy crop deserves serious investigation as a possible candidate biofuel crop for the US alongside switchgrass. To date, no agronomic trials or trial results for miscanthus are known from the conterminous US, so its performance under US conditions is virtually unknown. Speculating from European data, under typical agricultural practices over large areas, an average of about 8t/ha (3t/acre dry weight) may be expected at harvest time. As with most of the new bioenergy crops, there seems to be a steep ''learning curve.'' Establishment costs appear to be fairly high at present (a wide range is reported from different European countries), although these may be expected to fall as improved management techniques are developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse-gas flux for bioenergy crop- ping systems. EcolMediterranean region. Biomass Bioenergy [CalClim] Californiafor biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:198–206. Heaton E,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Prediction of County-Level Corn Yields Using an Energy-Crop Growth Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather conditions significantly affect corn yields. while weather remains as the major uncontrolled variable in crop production, an understanding of the influence of weather on yields can aid in early and accurate assessment of the impact of ...

Jeffrey A. Andresen; Robert F. Dale; Jerald J. Fletcher; Paul V. Preckel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact August 11, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture have awarded 10 grants totaling $12.2 million to spur research into improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of growing biofuel and bioenergy crops. The investments are part of a broader effort by the Obama administration to develop domestic renewable energy and advanced biofuels, providing a more secure future for America's energy needs and creating new opportunities for the American farming industry. "Biofuels, along with other advanced vehicle technologies, hold the

335

An Analysis of the Link between Ethanol, Energy, and Crop Markets Simla Tokgoz and Amani Elobeid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Analysis of the Link between Ethanol, Energy, and Crop Markets Simla Tokgoz and Amani Elobeid that the composition of a country'svehiclefleetdeterminesthedirectionoftheresponseofethanolconsumptionto changes in the sugar market affect the competing ethanol market. Keywords: agricultural markets, energy, ethanol

Beresnev, Igor

336

Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

Gueneau, Arthur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Effects of Natural Climatic Fluctuations on the Temporal and Spatial Variation in Crop Yields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was made of variations in corn and soybean yields resulting from natural fluctuations in weather conditions between years in a five-state area in the Midwest. Analyses were performed for crop districts within each state and for ...

Floyd A. Huff; James C. Neill

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Associations between Grain Crop Yields in Central-Eastern Argentina and El Niño–Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Associations are investigated between yields of major crops in the Argentine Pampas (central-eastern Argentina) and El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase. For maize and sorghum, higher (lower) yield anomalies occur more frequently than ...

Guillermo P. Podestá; Carlos D. Messina; Martín O. Grondona; Graciela O. Magrin

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Design and control of autonomous crop tracking robotic weeder : GreenWeeder.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis reports the design and control of the ?GreenWeeder?, a non-herbicidal autonomous weeding robot, in order to autonomously track crop rows for weeding through… (more)

Dang, Kim Son

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Miscanthus: A Review of European Experience with a Novel Energy Crop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Miscanthus is a tall perennial grass which has been evaluated in Europe over the past 5-10 years as a new bioenergy crop. The sustained European interest in miscanthus suggests that this novel energy crop deserves serious investigation as a possible candidate biofuel crop for the US alongside switchgrass. To date, no agronomic trials or trial results for miscanthus are known from the conterminous US, so its performance under US conditions is virtually unknown. Speculating from European data, under typical agricultural practices over large areas, an average of about 8t/ha (3t/acre dry weight) may be expected at harvest time. As with most of the new bioenergy crops, there seems to be a steep ''learning curve.'' Establishment costs appear to be fairly high at present (a wide range is reported from different European countries), although these may be expected to fall as improved management techniques are developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An Integration and Analysis Pipeline for Systems Biology in Crop Plant Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To advance the comprehension of complex biological processes occurring in crop plants (e.g. for improvement of growth or yield) it is of high interest to reconstruct and analyse detailed metabolic models. Therefore, we established a pipeline combining ...

Stephan Weise; Christian Colmsee; Eva Grafahrend-Belau; Björn Junker; Christian Klukas; Matthias Lange; Uwe Scholz; Falk Schreiber

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Potential Impacts of Shifts in Climate on the Crop Insurance Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several studies have estimated the possible impacts and adjustments in U.S. agriculture resulting from a future change in climate. This paper examines how these adjustments and shifting climate conditions could affect the nation's crop weather ...

E. Ray Fosse; Stanley A. Changnon

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Observational Evidences of Double Cropping Impacts on the Climate in the Northern China Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of harvested cropland in the double cropping region (DCR) of the northern China plains (NCP) on the regional climate are examined using surface meteorological data and the satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) ...

C.-H. Ho; S.-J. Park; S.-J. Jeong; J. Kim; J.-G. Jhun

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An Overview of Crop Hail Damage and Evaluation of Hail Suppression Efficiency in Bulgaria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The space?time distribution of the crop hail loss-to-risk ratio over the whole. Bulgarian territory has been ascertained using the rank approach. The relationships between hailfall characteristics (sizes and kinetic energy) and the percentage of ...

Petio Simeonov

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Effects of Weather Variability and Soil Parameter Uncertainty on the Soil-Crop-Climate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of crop and soil states due to uncertain climatic inputs and soil properties is quantified using a mathematical representation of the physiological, biochemical, hydrological, and physical processes related to plant growth. The ...

Angelos L. Protopapas; Rafael L. Bras

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Synoptic Decomposition of Cool-Season Rainfall in the Southeastern Australian Cropping Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily rainfall during the April–October growing season in a major cropping region of southeastern Australia has been related to particular types of synoptic weather systems over a period of 33 yr. The analysis reveals that cutoff lows were ...

Michael J. Pook; Peter C. McIntosh; Gary A. Meyers

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Toward a Combined Seasonal Weather and Crop Productivity Forecasting System: Determination of the Working Spatial Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology is presented for the development of a combined seasonal weather and crop productivity forecasting system. The first stage of the methodology is the determination of the spatial scale(s) on which the system could operate; this ...

A. J. Challinor; J. M. Slingo; T. R. Wheeler; P. Q. Craufurd; D. I. F. Grimes

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Remote sensing classification of grass seed cropping practices in western Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our primary objective was extending knowledge of major crop rotations and stand establishment conditions present in 4800 grass seed fields surveyed over three years in western Oregon to the entire Willamette Valley through classification of multiband ...

George W. Mueller-Warrant; Gerald W. Whittaker; Stephen M. Griffith; Gary M. Banowetz; Bruce D. Dugger; Tiffany S. Garcia; Guillermo Giannico; Kathryn L. Boyer; Brenda C. McComb

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop Production and Spur Economic Impact August 11, 2011 - 3:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture have awarded 10 grants totaling $12.2 million to spur research into improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of growing biofuel and bioenergy crops. The investments are part of a broader effort by the Obama administration to develop domestic renewable energy and advanced biofuels, providing a more secure future for America's energy needs and creating new opportunities for the American farming industry. "Biofuels, along with other advanced vehicle technologies, hold the

350

Switchgrass selection as a "model" bioenergy crop: A history of the process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of several publications of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program and final reports from the herbaceous crop screening trials show that technology, environmental, and funding issues influenced the decision to focus on a single herbaceous model crop species. Screening trials funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in the late 1980s to early 1990s assessed thirty-four herbaceous species on a wide range of soil types at thirty-one different sites spread over seven states in crop producing regions of the U.S. Several species, including sorghums, reed canarygrass, wheatgrasses, and other crops, were identified as having merit for further development. Six of the seven institutions performing the screening included switchgrass among the species recommended for further development in their region and all recommended that perennial grasses be given high research priority. Reasons for the selection of switchgrass included demonstration of relatively high, reliable productivity across a wide geographical range, suitability for marginal quality land, low water and nutrient requirements, and other positive environmental attributes. Crop screening results, economic and environmental assessments by the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program staff, and Department of Energy funding limitations all contributed to the decision to further develop only switchgrass as a model or prototype species in 1991. The following ten year focus on development of switchgrass as a bioenergy crop proved the value of focusing on a single model herbaceous crop. The advancements and attention gained were sufficient to give government leaders, policymakers, farmers, and biofuel industry developers the confidence that lignocellulosic crops could support an economically viable and environmentally sustainable biofuel industry in the U.S.

Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick- stemmed species. Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering- economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or truck.

Turhollow, A.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Butler, J. [Butler (James), Tifton, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Exposure of a food crop to trichloroethylene from a contaminated aquifer. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research developed a methodology for assessment of the exposure of a mature corn crop to trichloroethylene from a contaminated aquifer. The methodology was then applied to the case of Hill AFB to determine the ability of the methodology to provide information about a specific exposure. Current procedures sample for food contamination but do not attempt to predict exposure problems. A review of the potential exposure pathways from the aquifer to the crop was conducted. Based on this review, the exposures due to soil gas and irrigation were modeled. Empirical estimated were used to approximate the expected flux of soil gas vaporizing directly from the aquifer. On the basis of this approximation, the exposure the air of the crop canopy was mathematically estimated. Analytical models were developed to simulate the amount of the contaminant reaching the crop from two different means of irrigation. The subsequent exposure once the contaminated irrigation water had reached the crop was modeled both in the air of the crop canopy and the soil phase near the root system. The methodology provided insights into which exposure pathways are more important than others and which environmental parameters most influence the amount of exposure.

Baringer, R.G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical Framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

A global energy crop productivity model that provides geospatially explicit quantitative details on biomass potential and factors affecting sustainability would be useful, but does not exist now. This study describes a modeling platform capable of meeting many challenges associated with global-scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed an analytical framework for bioenergy crops consisting of six major components: (i) standardized natural resources datasets, (ii) global field-trial data and crop management practices, (iii) simulation units and management scenarios, (iv) model calibration and validation, (v) high-performance computing (HPC) simulation, and (vi) simulation output processing and analysis. The HPC-Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (HPC-EPIC) model simulated a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), estimating feedstock production potentials and effects across the globe. This modeling platform can assess soil C sequestration, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, nonpoint source pollution (e.g., nutrient and pesticide loss), and energy exchange with the atmosphere. It can be expanded to include additional bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus, energy cane, and agave) and food crops under different management scenarios. The platform and switchgrass field-trial dataset are available to support global analysis of biomass feedstock production potential and corresponding metrics of sustainability.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

AquaData and AquaGIS: Two computer utilities for temporal and spatial simulations of water-limited yield with AquaCrop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crop simulation model AquaCrop, recently developed by FAO can be used for a wide range of purposes. However, in its present form, its use over large areas or for applications that require a large number of simulations runs (e.g., long-term analysis), ... Keywords: AquaCrop, Crop simulation model, Geographic information system, Software tool, Spatial aggregation

I. J. Lorite, M. GarcíA-Vila, C. Santos, M. Ruiz-Ramos, E. Fereres

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

In silico analysis of motifs in promoters of Differentially Expressed Genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under anoxia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to characterise the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) in rice coleoptiles under anoxia by identifying motifs that are common in the promoter region of co-regulated ... Keywords: AREs, DEGs, Oryza sativa, anaerobic response elements, anoxia, bioinformatics, consensus promoter motif, differentially expressed genes, eukaryotic promoters, gene promoters, in silico motifs, in-silico motifs, microarrays, molecular mechanisms, motif detection, promoter motifs, rice, transcriptional regulation

Ashutosh Kumar; Shuchi Smita; Neeti Sahu; Vivekanand Sharma; Shankaracharya; Ambarish S. Vidyarthi; Dev Mani Pandey

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Sources of methane in China: A program to estimate emissions from rice paddy fields, bio-gas pits, and urban areas: Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are measuring methane from rice paddy fields and bio-gas pits. The project has produced new results that we are using to sharply focus the present study. We measured ambient concentrations at Minqin, Beijing, and Chendu. We obtained flux measurements from bio-gas pits, and flux measurements from rice paddy fields. Minqin is a background site with no large local sources of methane such as rice fields or urban areas. It serves as control for the experiment. Beijing is representative of a large industrialized Chinese city not affected by rice agriculture but heavily dependent on burning coal for cooking and heating. Chendu is in the heart of the rice producing areas of China where rice paddies cover millions of acres and methane from bio-gas pits is an important source of energy. Further progress was impeded by a lack of a formal agreement between the US and PRC, which was not signed until August 1987. 9 figs.

Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Assessment of soil and water conservation methods applied to the cultivated steeplands of southern Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Erosion associated with burning and cultivating steepland fields is a common problem throughout Central America. Quantifying the magnitude of effectiveness of soil and water conservation practices such as vetiver grass hedgerows and mulching and the impact associated with the traditional practice of burning fields prior to planting were evaluated using a paired runoff catchment study design. Runoff, soil, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus loss observations from three steepland field catchments were measured for storm event(s) over a three-year period (1993-1995). The 0.2 ha field catchments with 60% slopes were monitored in the community of Los Espabeles near Choluteca, Honduras. During the calibration period (1993), all three catchments were managed the same with mulch only. During the treatment period (1994-1995), one catchment combined mulch management with contour vetiver grass hedgerows, one catchment was burned prior to planting, and one catchment served as the control with mulch only. Combining vetiver grass hedgerows with mulching significantly (pcultivated steepland fields in Los Espabeles, Honduras. The predicted annual soil losses from the two models were then compared to the observed average annual soil losses measured at the same location for various size plots. In general, both models tended to over predict. However, annual soil loss predictions by RUSLE were fairly close to the observed annual soil losses. USLE predicted annual soil losses 9 times higher than RUSLE. Both USLE and RUSLE tend to over estimate on steep slopes because they are based on soil losses from gentle to rolling slopes under low to moderate rainfall energies.

Smith, James E

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Research to develop improved production methods for woody and herbaceous biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) has led the nation in developing short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and herbaceous energy crops (HEC) as feedstocks for renewable energy. Over the past 15 years, the BFDP has examined the performance of 154 woody species and 35 herbaceous species in field trials across the US. One result of this effort to date has been the prescription of silvicultural systems for hybrid poplars and hybrid willows and agricultural systems for switchgrass. Selected clones of woody species are producing dry weight yields in research plots on agricultural land that are 3 to 7 times greater than those obtained from mixed species stands on forest land, and at least 2 times the yields of southern plantation pines. Selected switchgrass varieties are producing dry weight yields 2 to 7 times greater than average forage grass yields on similar sites. Crop development research is continuing efforts to translate this potential, in a sustainable manner, to larger, more geographically diverse acreage. Research on environmental aspects of biomass crop production are aimed at developing sustainable systems that will contribute to the biodiversity of agricultural landscapes. Systems integration aims to understand all factors affecting bringing the crop to market. Factors affecting price and potential supplies of biomass crops are being evaluated at regional and national scales. Scale-up studies, feasibility analysis and demonstrations are establishing actual costs and facilitating the commercialization of integrated biomass systems. Information management and dissemination activities are facilitating the communication of results among a community of researchers, policymakers, and potential users and producers of energy crops.

Ferrell, J.E. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biofuels Systems Div.; Wright, L.L.; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Evaluation of Salmonella disinfection strategies for pre-slaughter broiler crop decontamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the following studies was to evaluate selected potential decontamination methods for ability to reduce the incidence of Salmonella recovery from broiler crops during pre-slaughter feed withdrawal. The efficacy of prolonged lactose administration in drinking water was evaluated with regard to ability to inhibit ,Salmonella persistence in the broiler crop prior to pre-slaughter feed withdrawal. Several candidate disinfectants were evaluated for potential to disinfect Salmonella in the presence of organic material, simulating the environment of the broiler crop. In this study, an apparent synergistic combination of citric acid and d-Limonene was discovered and further evaluated for ability to remove Salmonella from broiler crops prior to feed withdrawal. Lactose (2.5%) was administered in drinking water for 5-11 d, in 7 separate experiments. A significant reduction (P crops following feed withdrawal was detected in only 1 experiment. Additionally, the incidence of Salmonella recovery from the ceca was not significantly impacted. Consistent with previously published reports, Salmonella recovery was reduced in broilers not subjected to feed withdrawal. Employing a rapid assay system containing high amounts of organic material, selected candidate disinfectants were screened for Salmonella reduction efficacy. The combination of citric acid and d-Limonene at relatively low concentrations displayed marked killing ability in this assay system. When the two compounds were encapsulated, market age broilers voluntarily consumed the capsules readily. Voluntary ingestion of these capsules by adult broilers during the final 45 min of an 8 h feed withdrawal resulted in a significantly (P crops, suggesting that ante mortem crop disinfection for improving food safety is

Barnhart, Eric Thomas

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Environmental effects of planting energy crops at larger scales on agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing from research-scale to larger-scale plantings of herbaceous and short rotation woody crops on agricultural land in the United States has raised questions about the positive and negative environmental effects of farmland conversion. Research currently underway at experimental plot scales enables us examine runoff quality and quantity, erosion, and changes in soil characteristics associated with these energy crops compared to conventional row crops. A study of the fate of chemicals applied to the different crop types will enhance our knowledge of uptake, release, and off-site movement of nutrients and pesticides. Ongoing biodiversity studies in the North Central US allow us to compare differences in scale of plantings on bird and small mammal populations and habitat use. Plantings of 50--100 or more contiguous acres are needed to allow both researchers and producers to determine the benefits of including temporal energy crop rotations in the landscape. Results from these larger-scale plantings will help identify (1) the monitoring requirements needed to determine environmental effects of larger-scale plantings, (2) the best methods to determine the environmental effects of rotation length and the best crop management strategies for full-scale production. Because of the variations in soils, temperature, rainfall and other climatic conditions, as well as differences in the types of energy crops most suited for different regions, monitoring of large-scale plantings in these different regions of the US will be required to predict the environmental effects of regional agricultural land-use shifts for full-scale plantings.

Tolbert, V.R.; Downing, M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Environmental effects of planting biomass crops at larger scales on agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing from research-scale to larger-scale plantings of herbaceous. and short rotation woody crops on agricultural land in the United States has raised questions about the positive and negative environmental effects of farmland conversion. Research currently underway at experimental plot scales enables us examine runoff quality and quantity, erosion, and changes in soil characteristics associated with these energy crops compared to conventional row crops. A study of the fate of chemicals applied to the different crop types will enhance our knowledge of uptake, release, and off-site movement of nutrients and pesticides. Ongoing biodiversity studies in the North Central US allow us to compare differences in scale of plantings on bird and small mammal populations and habitat use. Plantings of 50--100 or more contiguous acres are needed to allow both researchers and producers to determine the benefits of including temporal energy crop rotations in the landscape. Results from these larger-scale plantings will help identify (1) the monitoring requirements needed to determine environmental effects of larger-scale plantings, (2) the best methods to determine the environmental effects of rotation length and the best crop management strategies for full-scale production. Because of the variations in soils, temperature, rainfall and other climatic conditions, as well as differences in the types of energy crops most suited for different regions, monitoring of large-scale plantings in these different regions of the US will be required to predict the environmental effects of regional agricultural land-use shifts for full-scale plantings.

Tolbert, V.R.; Downing, M.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.7374001°, -100.7514845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.7374001,"lon":-100.7514845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

363

Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Anaerobic High-Throughput Cultivation Method for Isolation of Thermophiles Using Biomass-Derived Substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow cytometry (FCM) techniques have been developed for sorting mesophilic organisms, but the difficulty increases if the target microbes are thermophilic anaerobes. We demonstrate a reliable, high-throughput method of screening thermophilic anaerobic organisms using FCM and 96-well plates for growth on biomass-relevant substrates. The method was tested using the cellulolytic thermophiles Clostridium ther- mocellum (Topt = 55 C), Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis (Topt = 78 C) and the fermentative hyperthermo- philes, Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt = 100 C) and Thermotoga maritima (Topt = 80 C). Multi-well plates were incubated at various temperatures for approximately 72 120 h and then tested for growth. Positive growth resulting from single cells sorted into individual wells containing an anaerobic medium was verified by OD600. Depending on the growth substrate, up to 80 % of the wells contained viable cultures, which could be transferred to fresh media. This method was used to isolate thermophilic microbes from Rabbit Creek, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming. Substrates for enrichment cultures including crystalline cellulose (Avicel), xylan (from Birchwood), pretreated switchgrass and Populus were used to cultivate organisms that may be of interest to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Feasibility and Treatment of Oil and Gas Produced Water as a Medium for Nannochloropsis Salina cultivation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of value exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laur, Paul A. [Eldorado Biofuels; Visolay, Alfonz [VM Technologies

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

Microsoft Word - CX-RiceFlatsSiteMaintenanceFY12_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2012 12, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Steve Lowder Project Manager - TESM-AMPN-2 Proposed Action: Rice Flats Electrode Site Maintenance and Inspection Project Budget Information: Work Order #00219387 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: The proposed project area is approximately seven miles southeast of The Dalles,

367

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ag’s ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hemicellulolytic organisms in the particle-associated microbiota of the hoatzin crop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) is a South American herbivorous bird, that has an enlarged crop analogous to the rumen, where foregut microbes degrade the otherwise indigestible plant materials, providing energy to the host. The crop harbors an impressive array of microorganisms with potentially novel cellulolytic enzymes. Thie study describes the composition ofthe particle-associated microbiota in the hoatzin crop, combining a survey of 16S rRNA genes in 7 adult birds and metagenome sequencing of two animals. The pyrotag survey demonstrates that Prevotellaceae, are the most abundant and ubiquitous taxa, suggesting that the degradation of hemicellulose is an important activity in the crop. Nonetheless, preliminary results from the metagnome of the particle-associated microbiota of two adult birds show that the crop microbiome contains a high number of genes encoding cellulases (such as GH5) more abundant than those of the termite gut, as well as genes encoding hemicellulases. These preliminary results show that the carbohydate-active enzyme genes in the cropmetagenome could be a source of biochemical catalysts able to deconstruct plant biomass.

Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Malfatti, Stephanie; Garcia-Amado, Maria A.; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Tringe, Susannah

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Regulating the Regulators: The Increased Role for the Federal Judiciary in Monitoring the Debate over Genetically Modified Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crops: soy, corn, and canola. 5 1 In 1996, three millionall soy, corn, cotton, and canola sold in the United States

Denton, Blake

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tillage and Crop Rotation Tillage and Crop Rotation Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.002 PDF file Full text Soil Science Society of America Journal 66:1930-1946 (2002) CSITE image Tristram O. West and Wilfred M. Post DOE Center for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6290 U.S.A. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Abstract Global map Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil

373

Review Switchgrass- practical issues in developing a fuel crop CAB Reviews 2012 7, No. 037  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biomass-based energy sector will play an important role in our drive towards renewable energy. Switchgrass has been identified as one of the candidate-dedicated energy crops in the USA because of its various desirable traits. However, many challenges still exist in ensuring a commercially viable switchgrass crop that is sustainable and techno-economically feasible. This article reviews the existing literature to highlight those challenges and potential solutions and recommendations to address those in the future. Various stages in the switchgrass-based biofuel system, namely crop production, provision and logistics, and conversion, are analysed. For each of these stages, the important challenges as reported in the literature are mentioned, and research gaps are identified. The systems-level issues as well as the challenges associated with the practical implementation of switchgrass production are also highlighted. The review illustrates that although switchgrass is a viable biofuel feedstock, considerable progress is necessary to achieve large-scale practical success.

Yogendra N. Shastri; Alan C. Hansen; Luis F. Rodriguez; K. C. Ting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops May 24, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis The self-propelled baler collects and packages bales of feedstock on-site that can be immediately loaded and sent to a biorefinery for use. | Photo courtesy of Antares Group. The self-propelled baler collects and packages bales of feedstock on-site that can be immediately loaded and sent to a biorefinery for use. | Photo courtesy of Antares Group. The bale picking truck follows the self-propelled baler, picking up and packaging the bales into packs before transferring them to an attached flatbed. | Photo courtesy of Antares Group. The bale picking truck follows the self-propelled baler, picking up and packaging the bales into packs before transferring them to an attached

375

Development of a farm-firm modelling system for evaluation of herbaceous energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A complete analysis is performed to simulate biomass production incorporated into a realistic whole farm situation, including or replacing a typical crop mix. Representative farms are constructed to accommodate such simulation. Four management systems are simulated for each firm, with each simulation depicting a different crop mix and/or use of different farming technologies and production methods. The first simulation was a base farm plan in which the operator would maintain the historical crop mix for the area, participate in all price support programs, and not participate in either a conservative reserve or a biomass production program. In the second simulation, the operator would again maintain the historical crop mix, would not participate in a conservation reserve or biomass production program, and would be ineligible to participate in any price support system. The third simulation introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and included participation in all price support programs. The fourth simulation introduced a biomass crop production enterprise (switchgrass) as an alternative to enrolling highly erodible cropland in the CRP and allowed participation in price support programs. Simulations were made for three farms, two in West Tennessee and on in South Georgia. Results indicate that erosion is likely to be reduced more by the diversion of cropland to permanent vegetative cover on farms similar to the more highly erodible West Tennessee farms than on the less erodible Tift County, Georgia farm. Equivalent reductions in erosion rates result from entering highly erodible cropland in the CRP and from production of switchgrass as a biomass energy crop. Both switchgrass and CRP farm plans result in decreased net returns from the base plan, although the biomass farm plans are, in general, more profitable than the CRP plans.

English, B.C.; Alexander, R.R.; Loewen, K.H.; Coady, S.A.; Cole, G.V.; Goodman, W.R. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Relating United States crop land use to natural resources and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop land-use regression models for estimating crop area indices (CAIs)-the percent of land used for corn, soybean, wheat, and sorghum production-are presented. Inputs to the models include available water-holding capacity of the soil, percent of land available for rain-fed agricultural production, annual precipitation, and annual temperature. The total variance of CAI explained by the models ranged from 78% from wheat to 87% for sorghum, and the root-mean-square errors ranged from 1.74% for sorghum to 4.24% for corn. The introduction of additional climatic variables to the models did not significantly improve their performance. The crop land-use models were used to predict the CAI for every crop reporting district in the United States for the current climatic condition and for possible future climate change scenarios (various combinations of temperature and precipitation changes over a range of -3{degrees} to +6{degrees}C and -20% to +20% respectively). The magnitude of climatic warming suggested by GCMs (GISS and GFDL) is from 3.5{degrees} to 5.9{degrees}C for regions of the United States. For this magnitude of warming, the model suggests corn and soybean production areas may decline while wheat and sorghum production areas may expand. If the warming is accompanied by a decrease in annual precipitation from 1% to 10%, then the areas used for corn and soybean production could decrease by as much as 20% and 40%, respectively. The area for sorghum and wheat under these conditions would increase by as much as 80% and 70%, respectively; the exact amount depending strongly on the change in precipitation. 15 refs., 6 figs.

Flores-Mendoza, F.J.; Hubbard, K.G. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Furrow Diking Technology for Agricultural Water Conservation and its Impact on Crop Yields in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furrow diking is a practical, efficient and low-cost technique to conserve water and increase crop yields. Improvements in diker design and the increased use of herbicides have resulted in the rapid spread of furrow diking in the Texas High Plains and other regions. To quantify the long-term effects of diking on crop yields, a computer simulation approach was used. Three crop models for sorghum, corn and cotton were combined with surface runoff hydrology algorithms, based on the USDA-SCS curve number methodology. The combination models called SORDIKE, CORDIKE and COTDIKE were run to determine the effects of conserving the runoff (by diking) on crop yields. Three scenarios of not diking, diking in the growing season, and diking all year were simulated. Daily weather data for 25 years from five Texas regions were used for the analyses. Depending on the location, furrow diking in the growing season increased average annual sorghum yields by 320 to 570 kg/ha, corn yields by 180 to 570 kg/ha, and cotton lint yields by 10 to 20 kg/ha. Diking the land throughout the year increased mean annual yields by 440 to 1080 kg/ha of sorghum, 210 to 800 kg/ha of corn and 10 to 30 kg/ha of cotton lint. The study indicated that furrow diking can be a valuable management practice for about 3.4 million ha of cropped area in the semi-arid and sub-humid regions of Texas. The practice may be useful in other areas also, to mitigate the effects of short duration moisture stress on crop yields.

Krishna, J. Hari; Arkin, Gerald F.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Analysis of the impact of energy crops on water quality. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report consists of two separate papers. The first, ``The potential use of agricultural simulation models in predicting the fate of nitrogen and pesticides applied to switchgrass and poplars,`` describes three models (CREAMS, GLEAMS, and EPIC) for the evaluation of the relationships which determine water quality in the agroecosystem. Case studies are presented which demonstrate the utility of these models in evaluating the potential impact of alternative crop management practices. The second paper, ``Energy crops as part of a sustainable landscape,`` discusses concepts of landscape management and the linkage among agricultural practices and environmental quality.

Hatfield, J.L.; Gale, W.J.

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluation of crop yield and soil water estimates using the EPIC model for the Loess Plateau of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2000, a database of crop and soil parameters, and meteorological data and so on, has been set up for the EPIC model, based on long-term experimental data and on-the-spot investigated data. The model parameters have been repeatedly revised and verified ... Keywords: Crop yield, EPIC model, Evaluation, Loess Plateau, Soil water

Xue Chun Wang; Jun Li

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Software, Data and Modelling News: A web-based database on methanogenic potential of crops and wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Methanogenic Potential Database (BMP Database) provides engineers and scientists with specific and standardized information on the chemical composition and biochemical methane potential of crops, manures, wastes, as well as of mixed substrates. Currently, ... Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, Bioenergy, Crop, Manure, Waste

Mario Alberto Luna Del Risco; Henri-Charles Dubourguier

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many ornamentals grown in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vegetable crops. Horticultural oil sprays can help to control some aphids on fruit trees and ornamentalsAphids Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many tissue and remove the sap. Aphids can easily be distinguished by the two tube like appendages (cornicles

New Hampshire, University of

382

High level expression of Acidothermus cellulolyticus ?-1, 4-endoglucanase in transgenic rice enhances the hydrolysis of its straw by cultured cow gastric fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale production of effective cellulose hydrolytic enzymes is the key to the bioconversion of agricultural residues to ethanol. The goal of this study was to develop a rice plant as a bioreactor for the large-scale production of cellulose hydrolytic enzymes via genetic transformation, and to simultaneously improve rice straw as an efficient biomass feedstock for conversion of cellulose to glucose. In this study, the cellulose hydrolytic enzyme {beta}-1, 4-endoglucanase (E1) from the thermophilic bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus was overexpressed in rice through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The expression of the bacterial gene in rice was driven by the constitutive Mac promoter, a hybrid promoter of Ti plasmid mannopine synthetase promoter and cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enhancer with the signal peptide of tobacco pathogenesis-related protein for targeting the protein to the apoplastic compartment for storage. A total of 52 transgenic rice plants from six independent lines expressing the bacterial enzyme were obtained, which expressed the gene at high levels with a normal phenotype. The specific activities of E1 in the leaves of the highest expressing transgenic rice lines were about 20 fold higher than those of various transgenic plants obtained in previous studies and the protein amounts accounted for up to 6.1% of the total leaf soluble protein. Zymogram and temperature-dependent activity analyses demonstrated the thermostability of the enzyme and its substrate specificity against cellulose, and a simple heat treatment can be used to purify the protein. In addition, hydrolysis of transgenic rice straw with cultured cow gastric fluid yielded almost twice more reducing sugars than wild type straw. Taken together, these data suggest that transgenic rice can effectively serve as a bioreactor for large-scale production of active, thermostable cellulose hydrolytic enzymes. As a feedstock, direct expression of large amount of cellulases in transgenic rice may also facilitate saccharification of cellulose in rice straw and significantly reduce the costs for hydrolytic enzymes.

Chou, Hong L.; Dai, Ziyu; Hsieh, Chia W.; Ku, Maurice S.

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

ii The Economic Impacts of Bioenergy Crop Production on U.S. Agriculture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cover: Soil scientists Harry Pionke (left) and Ron Schnabel examine a switchgrass stand. If switchgrass were to become a major crop, it could add up to $5 billion to farmers ' income and contribute to the reduction of the United States ' dependence on oil imports.

Daniel G. De; La Torre Ugarte; Marie E. Walsh; Hosein Shapouri; Stephen P. Slinsky; G. De; La Torre Ugarte; Marie E. Walsh; Hosein Shapouri

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Healthful LipidsChapter 20 Genetic Enhancement and Modification of Oil-Bearing Crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Healthful Lipids Chapter 20 Genetic Enhancement and Modification of Oil-Bearing Crops Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press 3F7B34ACED1D751D3E77973E19BEAD62 AOCS Press ...

385

Monitoring peanut contamination in Mali (Africa) using AVHRR satellite data and a crop simulation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is the main legume crop of Mali, West Africa. It can be contaminated by aflatoxin, a natural toxin that can develop because of drought conditions at pre-harvest stage or because of temperature-and humidity-related factors ...

V. K. Boken; G. Hoogenboom†; J. H. Williams; B. Diarra; S. Dione; G. L. Easson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Soil & Tillage Research 71 (2003) 3347 Soil water and nitrogen dynamics in dryland cropping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water content was measured using 30 cm long, two-rod waveguides connected to a transmission line oscilla at Palouse and Touchet. Precip- itation and air temperature were measured at standard heights controlled at random locations be- tween crop rows and composited according to depth increments. Sampling started 5

Flury, Markus

387

Optimization-based trade-off analysis of biodiesel crop production for managing an agricultural catchment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Political agendas worldwide include increased production of biofuel, which multiplies the trade-offs among conflicting objectives, including food and fodder production, water quantity, water quality, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Quantification ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Crop rotation schemes, Genetic algorithm, Land use, River basin management, Water quality

Sven Lautenbach, Martin Volk, Michael Strauch, Gerald Whittaker, Ralf Seppelt

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Characterization of forest crops with a range of nutrient and water treatments using AISA Hyperspectral Imagery.  

SciTech Connect

This research examined the utility of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications (AISA) hyperspectral imagery for estimating the biomass of three forest crops---sycamore, sweetgum and loblolly pine--planted in experimental plots with a range of fertilization and irrigation treatments on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

Gong, Binglei; Im, Jungho; Jensen, John, R.; Coleman, Mark; Rhee, Jinyoung; Nelson, Eric

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Modelling the morphogenesis of annual sowthistle, a common weed in crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an architectural model of sowthistle which is an important weed in most crops. The sowthistle model was developed using the Lindenmayer systems formalism and parameterised according to measurements of structure of several sowthistle ... Keywords: L-systems, Plant architecture, Quantitative plant modelling, Sonchus oleraceus, Sowthistle

S-Zahra-Hosseini Cici; Steve Adkins; Jim Hanan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the methodologies used to estimate the soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production is presented. Estimates of excess residue are developed for wheat in north-central Oklahoma and for corn and soybeans in central Iowa. These sample farming situations are analyzed in other research in the Analysis Division of the Solar Energy Research Institute.

Flaim, S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effect of cropping strategies on the irrigation water productivity of durum wheat Khaledian, MRa, b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate with water deficiency. Author-produced version of the article published in Plant Soil Environ results in significant water savings. The highest irrigation water Author-produced version of the articleEffect of cropping strategies on the irrigation water productivity of durum wheat Khaledian, MRa, b

392

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

393

Review: Simulation models applied to crops with potential for biodiesel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the rapid decline in crude oil reserves, the use of vegetable oils as diesel fuels has been promoted in many countries. Biodiesel has attracted considerable attention due to its environmental benefits and the fact that it comes from renewable ... Keywords: Biofuel, Oleaginous crops, Simulation models

Daniela de Carvalho Lopes; Antonio José Steidle Neto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest New Crop (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop is a trifold brochure that strives to educate rural landowners and rural co-op utilities about the benefits of wind power development. It provides examples of rural utilities that have successful wind energy projects and supportive statements from industry members.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Industrial oil crops-when will they finally deliver on their promise ?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, worldwide-traded oil production from crop plants was almost 130 million metric tons (MMT), mostly used as edible vegetable oil. The proportion of plant oils used for nonedible or industrial purposes has fluctuated as petroleum and coal feedstocks

396

Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting and mitigating the net greenhouse gas emissions of crop rotations in Western Europe gases (GHG) con- tributing to net greenhouse gas balance of agro-ecosystems. Evaluating the impact to the final greenhouse gas balance. One experimental site (involving a maize-wheat-barley-mustard rotation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

DeLucia, Evan H.

398

Development of sweet sorghum as an energy crop. Volume III. Integration concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 3 years, Battelle's Columbus Division and several co-investigators have conducted interregional investigations related to biomass and sugar production for conversion to alcohol and other fuels. These investigations have emphasized primarily the production of sweet sorghum and sugarcane due to their ability to produce high biomass and readily fermentable sugars' yields which allow a highly favorable energy balance when converted to ethanol. The primary goal of the 1979 research program was to determine the agronomic and economic feasibility of developing sweet sorghum, sweet sorghum hybrids, and sugarcane as energy-producing crops in selected geographic regions of the United States. The objectives of the research include the following: (1) to conduct a prefeasibility analysis of the potential for integrating sugarcane and sugar beet production/processing with sweet sorghum; and (2) to formulate an analytical approach to estimate the economic impact of growing sweet sorghum as an energy crop upon the US agricultural system. This volume is comprised of two separate investigations pertaining to potential integration of sweet sorghum into US agriculture. The first investigation entitled, Economic Potential for Integrating Alcohol Fuels Production from Sweet Sorghum with Other Carbohydrate Crops conducted independently, looks at integration of sweet sorghum from a microeconomic viewpoint, i.e., what would be the effects of combining sweet sorghum with other sugar crops to produce alcohol in terms of plant investment and operating costs.

Scantland, D.A.; Riddle, W.E.; McClure, T.A.; Woodford, P.G.; Honton, E.J.; Lipinsky, E.S.

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Parameter sensitivity analysis of crop growth models based on the extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensitivity analysis (SA) has become a basic tool for the understanding, application and development of models. However, in the past, little attention has been paid to the effects of the parameter sample size and parameter variation range on the parameter ... Keywords: Extended FAST, Multivariable output, Parameter variation range, Sample size, Time-dependent properties, WOFOST crop growth models

Jing Wang, Xin Li, Ling Lu, Feng Fang

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

IVIP --- A Scientific Workflow System to Support Experts in Spatial Planning of Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decision making for crop production planning is essentially driven by location-based or more precisely by space-oriented information. Therefore, farmers and regional experts in the field mostly rely on new spatial-data-oriented decision making tools. ... Keywords: Agriculture, Forecast, GIS, Kepler, Scientific data integration, Scientific workflow models, Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS), WSDL, Web Service, Workflow Management System (WMS)

Christopher J. Tuot; Michael Sintek; Andreas R. Dengel

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Review: Sensors for product characterization and quality of specialty crops-A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review covers developments in non-invasive techniques for quality analysis and inspection of specialty crops, mainly fresh fruits and vegetables, over the past decade up to the year 2010. Presented and discussed in this review are advanced sensing ... Keywords: Magnetic resonance, Near-infrared, Non-invasive, Optical, Spectroscopy, Vision

M. Ruiz-Altisent; L. Ruiz-Garcia; G. P. Moreda; Renfu Lu; N. Hernandez-Sanchez; E. C. Correa; B. Diezma; B. Nicolaï; J. García-Ramos

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Response of Peanuts to Irrigation Management at Different Crop Growth Stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past irrigation research on peanuts has shown that when the plant is exposed to soil moisture stress at different crop growth stages, different responses seem to exist between the Spanish and the Florunner peanut varieties. The Spanish peanuts appear more susceptible to soil moisture stress during the blooming and pegging stage, while the Florunners seem more susceptible during the late maturation stage. The objective of this experiment was to determine the optimum irrigation schedule for peanuts at different crop growth stages for the Spanish and the Florunner varieties. The yield of the two varieties was evaluated under seven different irrigation treatments including a "no stress" check treatment and a dryland treatment. Each treatment had a different schedule of either irrigating or stressing the peanut plant during one or more of three crop growth stages. The three crop growth stages were: (1) pegging; (2) early maturation; and (3) late maturation. Rainfall during the vegetative and blooming stage ensured adequate moisture for both of the crop growth stages. Evapotranspiration was monitored throughout the life cycle for both peanut varieties. The evapotranspiration was determined using a soil moisture balance equation. Plant growth in the form of dry matter accumulation and leaf area index was also studied for the Spanish variety. No significant differences in the leaf area index existed between the treatments. The dry matter growth analysis showed that an irrigation during the pegging stage resulted in a faster pod weight accumulation during the early maturation stage than if no irrigation occurred during that stage. The yield and evapotranspiration results showed that differences existed between the two peanut varieties. First, for the Spanish variety, the results indicated that soil moisture is needed during the pegging stage to obtain near maximum yields. Treatments with an irrigation during the pegging stage had a greater evapotranspiration and larger yields, than the treatments without an irrigation during this stage. Second, if an irrigation is made during the pegging stage, an additional irrigation during the early maturation stage is unnecessary. Third, an irrigation during the late maturation stage will increase yield if dry climatic conditions normally exist during this stage. In the case of the Florunner variety, the yield results indicated that moisture stress should occur in no more than one of the crop growth stages if yield reductions are to be minimized. Also, an adequate supply of soil moisture during the late maturation stage is absolutely necessary in order to obtain maximum yields for Florunner peanuts. Treatments which had an irrigation during the late maturation stage had a steady evapotranspiration rate during this crop growth stage and had near maximum yields. Treatments which showed a decrease in the evapotranspiration rate during the late maturation stage produced a significantly lower yield.

Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Dahmen, P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Investigating the Effect of Seasonal Plant Growth and Development in Three-Dimensional Atmospheric Simulations. Part II: Atmospheric Response to Crop Growth and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the effect of seasonal crop development and growth on the atmospheric boundary layer in the warm season over the central Great Plains region of North America. They introduced daily crop development and growth functions into ...

Elena A. Tsvetsinskaya; Linda O. Mearns; William E. Easterling

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Key words: serology/sedimentation/virus group~maize stripe virus/rice stripe virus Relationship Between Maize Stripe Virus and Rice Stripe Virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maize stripe virus (MStpV) and rice stripe virus (RSV) were compared serologically, chemically and physically. Cross-reactions in agar gel double-diffusion and microprecipitin tests, and neutralization of MStpV infectivity by antiserum to either virus showed that MStpV and RSV are serologically related. Both viruses sedimented slowly and in a heterodisperse manner in rate-zonal sucrose gradients, and both had similar buoyant densities in CsC1. Large amounts of a low molecular weight non-capsid protein were found in plants infected with either virus. Only limited maize-to-maize transmission of RSV was obtained with Peregrinus maidis (Ashmead), the MStpV vector. This transmission, however, resulted in symptoms similar to those induced by MStpV. MStpV and RSV appear to be members of the same virus group.

E. Gingery; Lowell R. Nault; Shuichi Yamashita

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Integrated model shows that atmospheric brown clouds and greenhouse gases have reduced rice harvests in India  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have found that atmospheric brown clouds partially offset the warming effects of greenhouse gases. This finding suggests a tradeoff between the impacts of reducing emissions of aerosols and greenhouse gases. Results from a statistical model of historical rice harvests in India, coupled with regional climate scenarios from a parallel climate model, indicate that joint reductions in brown clouds and greenhouse gases would in fact have complementary, positive impacts on harvests. The results also imply that adverse climate change due to brown clouds and greenhouse gases contributed to the slowdown in harvest growth that occurred during the past two decades.

Auffhammer, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Agricultural and Resource Economics; Ramanathan, V. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States); Vincent, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies

2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Responses of High Biomass Rice (Oryza sativa L.) to Various Abiotic Stresses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice produces a lot of biomass which is an important trait in increasing grain yield and it is a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. High biomass rice is important to meet the growing demands of grains and biomass for food, fodder and bio-fuel industries. Limited studies have been conducted to determine its response to unfavorable conditions. The main objectives of this study were to determine the response of selected high biomass rice to drought, rainfed and flooded conditions and identify best genotypes that can be grown in unfavorable areas. Two experiments were conducted in summer 2009 to evaluate biomass yield and agronomic traits of selected high biomass genotypes. A greenhouse study had genotypes grown under drought condition - different field capacity (FC) i.e. 100 percent, 75 percent and 50 percent FC, while the field study had rainfed and flooded environments. Most of the genotypes performed well under fully saturated soil conditions but some were less affected by drought. Limited water delayed first tiller emergence and reduced tiller count, rate of tiller production, plant height, rate of increase in height, shoot and root weight, root:shoot (R:S) ratio, percent dry matter (percent DM) and total biomass. The plant height, tiller plant-1, and total biomass at maturity were lower under rainfed conditions and their flowering was delayed compared to flooded conditions. Majority of these traits were correlated with high biomass yield. Genotype 11 which is tall and late maturing produced the highest number of tillers plant-1 and tillers/ 750 cm2 and had the highest biomass yield under both rainfed and flooded conditions. It performed equally well under drought conditions particularly in root and R:S ratio, but genotype 12 was the best in most parameters measured in the greenhouse. Although it was the shortest genotype, it was highest in biomass yield, earliest to tiller, had the highest shoot weight and tiller count, and had the fastest tiller production. The high biomass genotypes like conventional rice were affected by drought and performed better under flooded conditions. However, these two genotypes can produce optimum results under limited availability of water and hence be used for biomass production under stressed environments.

Kondhia, Aditi Nitinkumar

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Root Morphological and Physiological Bases to Understand Genotypic Control of Mineral Acquisition in Rice Grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) supports half of the human population. However, predominant rice consumption leads to malnutrition due to mineral deficiencies. The research goal was to support identification of genes responsible for the uptake/accumulation of potassium (K), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and molybdenum (Mo), thus promoting the breeding for rice with high grain concentrations of these elements. Prior studies identified rice genotypes with high grain-K, -Fe, -Zn or -Mo concentrations that were hypothesized to be due to differences in root traits. The research objective was to identify root traits associated with these elements. These traits could be bases for identifying genes. The first study determined if these genotypes showed similar accumulation patterns in leaves as in grains, which would hint at influences of the roots and enable identifying distinct root traits and possible genes in vegetative growth stages. The second study determined if root traits of high grain-Mo genotypes displayed an acid-tolerance mechanism as these genotypes originated from Malaysia where acidic soils strongly adsorb Mo making it unavailable for plants. The third study identified root trait differences of high grain-K, -Fe, -Zn and -Mo genotypes in hydroponics media, while the fourth determined root trait differences in these genotypes in sand-culture media including a 1-Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA) seed treatment for perturbation. The first study identified several high grain-Mo genotypes with similar Mo accumulation patterns in V4 to V6 stage-leaves as in grains, suggestive of a root influence. The second study established that gross morphological and physiological root traits of a high grain-Mo genotype were not part of an acid-tolerance mechanism. Neither the third nor fourth study identified root traits related to shoot K, Fe, Zn or Mo concentration, however positive associations of seedling vigor traits with several beneficial elements, including K, and negative associations with numerous toxic elements were established. Lack of correlation with root traits suggests other mechanisms (e.g. active uptake transporters) instead control the observed grain accumulation differences. Based on the fourth study, either direct effects of NAA on element uptake/transfer or indirect effects on soil pH and redox potential altered tissue Fe and Zn levels.

Chittoori, Ratnaprabha 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants are potential sources of valuable recombinant and native proteins that can be purified for pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and food applications. Transgenic rice and corn germ were evaluated for the production of novel protein products. This dissertation addresses: 1) the extraction and purification of the recombinant protein, human lysozyme (HuLZ), from transgenic rice and 2) the processing of dry-milled corn germ for the production of high protein germ and corn protein concentrate (CPC). The factors affecting the extraction and purification of HuLZ from rice were evaluated. Ionic strength and pH was used to optimize HuLZ extraction and cation exchange purification. The selected conditions, pH 4.5 with 50 mM NaCl, were a compromise between HuLZ extractability and binding capacity, resulting in 90% purity. Process simulation was used to assess the HuLZ purification efficiency and showed that the processing costs were comparable to native lysozyme purification from egg-white, the current predominant lysozyme source. Higher purity HuLZ (95%) could be achieved using pH 4.5 extraction followed by pH 6 adsorption, but the binding capacity was unexpectedly reduced by 80%. The rice impurity, phytic acid, was identified as the potential cause of the unacceptably low capacity. Enzymatic (phytase) treatment prior to adsorption improved purification, implicating phytic acid as the primary culprit. Two processing methods were proposed to reduce this interference: 1) pH 10 extraction followed by pH 4.5 precipitation and pH 6 adsorption and 2) pH 4.5 extraction and pH 6 adsorption in the presence of TRIS counter-ions. Both methods improved the binding capacity from 8.6 mg/mL to >25 mg/mL and maintained HuLZ purity. Processing of dry-milled corn germ to increase protein and oil content was evaluated using germ wet milling. In this novel method, dry-milled germ is soaked and wet processed to produce higher value protein products. Lab-scale and pilot-scale experiments identified soaking conditions that reduced germ starch content, enhanced protein and oil content, and maintained germ PDI (protein dispersibility index). Soaking at neutral pH and 25 degrees C maintained germ PDI and improved CPC yield from defatted germ flour. CPC with greater than 75% protein purity was produced using protein precipitation or membrane filtration.

Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Diel Variation of Methane Emission from a Subtropical Paddy Field of South China in the Second Crop Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rice paddy has been identified as one of the important sources of the atmospheric methane and has large variability in emission estimates. This study was conducted to evaluate CH4 emission from a subtropical paddy field of south China with closed static ... Keywords: Diel variation, paddy field, methane, greenhouse gas

Hui Liu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ENERGY CHANGES IN STRESSED BODIES DUE TO VOID AND CRACK J. R. Rice** and D. C. Drucker***  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the mechanical aspects of stress corrosion cracking are discussed. INTRODUCTION A comparison is made firstENERGY CHANGES IN STRESSED BODIES DUE TO VOID AND CRACK GROWTH* J. R. Rice** and D. C. Drucker materials, and for the mechanical aspects of stress corrosion. The authors acknowledge with thei~ respective

411

Free Lunch: Exploiting Renewable Energy For Computing Sherif Akoush, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice, Andrew W. Moore and Andy Hopper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Lunch: Exploiting Renewable Energy For Computing Sherif Akoush, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice renewable en- ergy by (i) colocating datacentres with these remote energy sources, (ii) connecting them over that period. In anticipation of this growth, our industry is begin- ning to explore renewable energy

Haddadi, Hamed

412

Chemical and physical property of rice straw waste and hospital sewage sludge in turned windrow aeration system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most sewage sludge from hospital wastewater treatment plants in Northern Thailand are also being to incinerator and agricultural fields. Land application of hospital sewage sludge has serious effects on environmental. The main goal of this investigation ... Keywords: co-composting, hospital sewage sludge, rice straw waste, turned windrow aeration

Khajornsak Sopajaree; Apisit Sancom

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Studies of marine macroalgae: saline desert water cultivation and effects of environmental stress on proximate composition. Final subcontract report. [Gracilaria tikvahiae; Ulva lactuca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results presented in this report address the growth potential of marine macroalgae cultivated in desert saline waters, and the effects of certain environmental stresses (e.g., nitrogen, salinity, and temperature) on the proximate composition of several marine macroalgae. Two major desert saline water types were assayed for their ability to support the growth of Gracilaria, Ulva, and Caulerpa. Both water types supported short term growth, but long term growth was not supported. Carbohydrate levels in Gracilaria were increased by cultivation under conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and low nitrogen and phosphorous availability. Data suggests that it may be possible to maximize production of useful proximate constituents by cultivating the algae under optimum conditions for growth, and then holding the resulting biomass under the environmental conditions which favor tissue accumulation of the desired storage products. 16 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Peterson, J.E.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending May 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress of twenty projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period March 1 through May 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major project activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending August 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress of twenty-one projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period June 1 through August 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major program activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Soil physical and hydrological properties under three biofuel crops in Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While biofuel crops are widely studied and compared for their energy and carbon footprints, less is known about their effects on other soil properties, particularly hydrologic characteristics. Soils under three biofuel crops, corn (Zea mays), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and willow (Salix spp.), were analyzed seven years after establishment to assess the effects on soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), penetration resistance (PR), water-holding capacity, and infiltration characteristics. The PR was the highest under corn, along with the lowest associated water content, while PR was 50-60% lower under switchgrass. In accordance with PR data, surface (0-10 cm) bulk density also tended to be lower under switchgrass. Both water infiltration rates and cumulative infiltration amounts varied widely among and within the three crops. Because the Philip model did not fit the data, results were analyzed using the Kostiakov model instead. Switchgrass plots had an average cumulative infiltration of 69 cm over 3 hours with a constant infiltration rate of 0.28 cm min{sup -1}, compared with 37 cm and 0.11 cm min{sup -1} for corn, and 26 cm and 0.06 cm min{sup -1} for willow, respectively. Results suggest that significant changes in soil physical and hydrologic properties may require more time to develop. Soils under switchgrass may have lower surface bulk density, higher field water capacity, and a more rapid water infiltration rate than those under corn or willow.

Bonin, Catherine [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University; Schmitz, Matthias [Rheinsche Friedrich/Wilhelms Universitaet Boon; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Illinois biomass resources: annual crops and residues; canning and food-processing wastes. Preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Illinois, a major agricultural and food-processing state, produces vast amounts of renewable plant material having potential for energy production. This biomass, in the form of annual crops, crop residues, and food-processing wastes, can be converted to alternative fuels (such as ethanol) and industrial chemicals (such as furfural, ethylene, and xylene). The present study provides a preliminary assessment of these Illinois biomass resources, including (a) an appraisal of the effects of their use on both agriculture and industry; (b) an analysis of biomass conversion systems; and (c) an environmental and economic evaluation of products that could be generated from biomass. It is estimated that, of the 39 x 10/sup 6/ tons of residues generated in 1978 in Illinois from seven main crops, about 85% was collectible. The thermal energy equivalent of this material is 658 x 10/sup 6/ Btu, or 0.66 quad. And by fermenting 10% of the corn grain grown in Illinois, some 323 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in 1978. Another 3 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in the same year from wastes generated by the state's food-processing establishments. Clearly, Illinois can strengthen its economy substantially by the development of industries that produce biomass-derived fuels and chemicals. In addition, a thorough evaluation should be made of the potential for using the state's less-exploitable land for the growing of additional biomass.

Antonopoulos, A A

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

SWAT UNGAUGED: HYDROLOGICAL BUDGET AND CROP YIELD PREDICTIONS IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physically based, distributed hydrologic models are increasingly used in assessments of water resources, best management practices, and climate and land use changes. Model performance evaluation in ungauged basins is an important research topic. In this study, we propose a framework for developing Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) input data, including hydrography, terrain, land use, soil, tile, weather, and management practices, for the Upper Mississippi River basin (UMRB). We also present a performance evaluation of SWAT hydrologic budget and crop yield simulations in the UMRB without calibration. The uncalibrated SWAT model ably predicts annual streamflow at 11 USGS gauges and crop yield at a four?digit hydrologic unit code (HUC) scale. For monthly streamflow simulation, the performance of SWAT is marginally poor compared with that of annual flow, which may be due to incomplete information about reservoirs and dams within the UMRB. Further validation shows that SWAT can predict base flow contribution ratio reasonably well. Compared with three calibrated SWAT models developed in previous studies of the entire UMRB, the uncalibrated SWAT model presented here can provide similar results. Overall, the SWAT model can provide satisfactory predictions on hydrologic budget and crop yield in the UMRB without calibration. The results emphasize the importance and prospects of using accurate spatial input data for the physically based SWAT model. This study also examines biofuel?biomass production by simulating all agricultural lands with switchgrass, producing satisfactory results in estimating biomass availability for biofuel production.

Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Arnold, J. G.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred to as flexibility restraints for major crop acreages in subregions of the Texas High Plains for use in a LP model that was developed to derive water and other input demand. Alternative estimating models for establishing acreage flexibility restraints were developed using methodology and model formulation presented in the literature. The results of these models in estimating flexibility restraints were evaluated using statistical measures and subjective analysis. Models which were analyzed ranged from a simple linear regression model in which the current year's acreage is expressed as a function of last year's acreage to a multiple regression model in which economic and climatological variables were considered. The multiple regression model as formulated and estimated did not provide satisfactory results. However, as in many of the earlier studies the simpler models did provide acceptable performance. From among the simpler models one was selected based on statistical measures and a prioria expectations. The model was used to calculate crop acreage flexibility restraints for three subregions of the Texas High Plains.

Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Enhanced frequency pattern of the 2-D Hartley transform for a new crop-resilient image transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, some modifications are introduced to the Original Hartley Transform (OHT) in an attempt to increase the resistance of the OHT against the cropping attack. The unique frequency pattern of the OHT triggered the proposed modifications, where ...

Ayman M. T. Ahmed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Remote Sensing of Thermal Radiation from an Aircraft—An Analysis and Evaluation of Crop-Freeze Protection Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal images from an aircraft-mounted scanner are used to evaluate the effectiveness of crop-freeze protection devices. Data from flights made while using fuel oil heaters, a wind machine and an undercanopy irrigation system are compared. ...

R. A. Sutherland; H. E. Hannah; A. F. Cook; J. D. Martsolf

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

Reilly, John M.

424

The green manure value of seven clover species grown as annual crops on low and high fertility temperate soils.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Annual and perennial clover species may differ in green manure value. Seven clover (Trifolium) species were grown as annual crops on low fertility (Breton) and high fertility 15 (Edmonton) soils in Alberta

Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; O'Donovan, John T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Efficacy and Timing of Fungicides, Bactericides, and Biologicals for Decidous Tree Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Topguard Abound Cabrio Flint/Gem Sovran Adament DistinguishND ND NR ND ND NR NR NR Flint/Gem 5 Funginex 4 Indar/Enableonly on pome fruit crops. Flint is registered on pome fruit

Adaskaveg, Jim; Gubler, Doug; Michailides, Themis; Holtz, Brent

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A crop model and fuzzy rule based approach for optimizing maize planting dates in Burkina Faso, West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Sub-Saharan Africa with high rainfall variability and little irrigation options, the crop planting date is a crucial tactical decision for farmers and therefore a major concern in agricultural decision making. To support decision making in ...

Moussa Waongo; Patrick Laux; Seydou B. Traoré; Moussa Sanon; Harald Kunstmann

427

An Exploratory Analysis of Crop Hail Insurance Data for Evidence of Cloud Seeding Effects in North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basis for the cloud seeding operations of the North Dakota Cloud Modification Project (NDCMP) is first outlined. Then the multiresponse permutation procedures are applied in an analysis of crop hail insurance data for the NDCMP target area ...

Paul L. Smith; L. Ronald Johnson; David L. Priegnitz; Bruce A. Boe; Paul W. Mielke Jr.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Seasonal Prediction of Air Temperature Associated with the Growing-Season Start of Warm-Season Crops across Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal prediction of growing-season start of warm-season crops (GSSWC) is an important task for the agriculture sector to identify risks and opportunities in advance. On the basis of observational daily surface air temperature at 210 stations ...

Zhiwei Wu; Hai Lin; Ted O’Brien

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Seasonal Prediction of Killing-Frost Frequency in South-Central Canada during the Cool/Overwintering-Crop Growing Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal killing-frost frequency (KFF) during the cool/overwintering-crop growing season is important for the Canadian agricultural sector to prepare and respond to such extreme agrometeorological events. On the basis of observed daily surface air ...

Zhiwei Wu; Hai Lin; Yun Li; Youmin Tang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Economics of biomass fuels for electricity production: a case study with crop residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the United Sates and around the world, electric power plants are among the biggest sources of greenhouse gas emissions which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change argued was the main cause of climate change and global warming. This dissertation explores the factors which may induce electricity producers to use biomass fuels for power generation and thereby mitigate the impact of greenhouse gas emissions. Analyses in this dissertation suggest that there are two important factors which will play a major role in determining the future degree of bioelectricity production: the price of coal and the future price of carbon emissions. Using The Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model—Green House Gas version (FASOMGHG) in a case study examining the competitiveness of crop residues, this dissertation finds that crop residues currently cost much more than coal as an electricity generation feedstock because they have lower heat content and higher production /hauling costs. For them to become cost competitive with coal, the combined costs of production and hauling must be cut by more than half or the coal price needs to rise. In particular, for crop residues to have any role in electricity generation either the price of coal has to increase to about $43 per ton or the carbon equivalent price must rise to about $15 per ton. The simulation results also show that crop residues with higher heat content such as wheat residues will have greater opportunities in bioelectricity production than the residues with lower heat content. In addition, the analysis shows that improvements in crop yield do not have much impact on bioelectricity production. However, the energy recovery efficiency does have significant positive impact on the bioelectricity desirability but again only if the carbon equivalent price rises substantially. The analysis also shows the desirability of cofiring biomass as opposed to 100% replacement because this reduces haling costs and increases the efficiency of heat recovery. In terms of policy implications, imposing carbon emission restrictions could be an important step in inducing electric power producers to include biofuels in their fuelmix power generation portfolios and achieve significant greenhouse gas emission reductions.

Maung, Thein Aye

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Measurements of Aerodynamic Roughness, Bowen Ratio, and Atmospheric Surface Layer Height by Eddy Covariance and Tethersonde Systems Simultaneously over a Heterogeneous Rice Paddy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aerodynamic roughness, Bowen ratio, and friction velocity were measured over a rice paddy using tethersonde and eddy covariance (EC) systems. In addition, the height ranges of the atmospheric inertial sublayer (ISL) were derived using the ...

Jeng-Lin Tsai; Ben-Jei Tsuang; Po-Sheng Lu; Ken-Hui Chang; Ming-Hwi Yao; Yuan Shen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Diagnostics of Climate Model Biases in Summer Temperature and Warm-Season Insolation for the Simulation of Regional Paddy Rice Yield in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study quantifies the ranges of climate model biases in surface air temperature for July and August (summer temperature) and daily total insolation for May–October (warm-season insolation) that can give simulated regional paddy rice yields ...

Toshichika Iizumi; Motoki Nishimori; Masayuki Yokozawa

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Predicting Success of IndicalJaponica Crosses in Rice, Based on a PCR Markerfor the S-5n Allele at a Hybrid-Sterility Locus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crosses in Rice, Based on a PCR Marker for the S-5n Allele1995). This report describes a PCR-based marker derived fromvisible on seedlings. The PCR primers were de- signed from

William, Christie E; Yanagihara, Seiji; McCouch, Susan R; Mackill, David J; Ronald, P C

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Parental Investment of First-Generation African American Rural College Graduates in Cultivating College Student Success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This basic qualitative study examines the parental investment strategies of first-generation African American rural college graduates in cultivating college student success. Extant literature has demonstrated that the role of the family is necessary to support the college student and that the investment of the parent is paramount to student college completion. Although educational attainment is an important goal for African American rural residents, research detailing strategies that cultivated student college completion among this population is needed to fill the gaps in the literature. The objectives were to discuss communication, involvement, and factors of influence to determine how these parents transferred their educational beliefs to their children and supported them through college graduation. These stories of success were told through the eyes of first-generation parents and their second-generation adult offspring. Research detailing the parental investment strategies toward college completion is necessary to inform parents, educational institutions, and rural college student completion in postsecondary institutions of the strategies necessary to ensure college success in this population. Lieberman’s transgenerational theory, along with concepts extracted from parental investment as it relates to education, provided the conceptual lens for the study. Data collected through interviews and documents were analyzed utilizing content analysis. Ten semistructured interviews were conducted with parents and their adult offspring. Interviews gleaned the lived experiences of the participants. Data analysis revealed six themes: (a) Catch Them Early, (b) Set the Tone, (c) Keep Them Busy, (d) Don’t Let Them “Break Rank,” (e) Encourage Advancement, and (f) Tell the Generations. The findings support the importance of developing a family investment team, how a return on parental investment occurs, making use of rural extracurricular programming, and transferring positive beliefs regarding higher education.

Allen, Crystal Joi

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Forage Crops.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports of Cooperating Stockmen and Farmers from 71 Counties - Alfalfa - Japan Clover - Crimson Clover - White Clover - Velvet Bean - Beggar Weed - Cow Peas - Rescue Grass - Kaffir Corn - Field Corn - Chufas

Unknown author

1901-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Katie Rice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2011). Grand prize at the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) poster competition (2011). Graduate Assistance ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

438

An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effects of No-Till on Yields as Influenced by Crop and Environmental Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Th is research evaluated diff erences in yields and associated downside risk from using no-till and tillage practices. Yields from 442 paired tillage experiments across the United States were evaluated with respect to six crops and environmental factors including geographic location, annual precipitation, soil texture, and time since conversion from tillage to no-till. Results indicated that mean yields for sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with no-till were greater than with tillage. In addition, no-till tended to produce similar or greater mean yields than tillage for crops grown on loamy soils in the Southern Seaboard and Mississippi Portal regions. A warmer and more humid climate and warmer soils in these regions relative to the Heartland, Basin and Range, and Fruitful Rim regions appear to favor no-till on loamy soils. With the exception of corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Southern Seaboard region, no-till performed poorly on sandy soils. Crops grown in the Southern Seaboard were less likely to have lower no-till yields than tillage yields on loamy soils and thus had lower downside yield risk than other farm resource regions. Consistent with mean yield results, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and wheat grown on sandy soils in the Southern Seaboard region using no-till had larger downside yield risks than when produced with no-till on loamy soils. Th e key fi ndings of this study support the hypothesis that soil and climate factors impact no-till yields relative to tillage yields and may be an important factor infl uencing risk and expected return and the adoption of the practice by farmers.

Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; West, Tristram O.

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze into biologically active compounds. Jatropha curcas SM does not contain glucosinolates but contains curcin, a known phytotoxin (toxalbumin). A 14-d greenhouse study was conducted to determine how Sinapis alba (white mustard, WM), Brassica juncea (Indian mustard, IM), Camelina sativa (camelina) and Jatropha curcas (jatropha) applied to soil at varying application rates and incubation times affected seed germination and seedling survival of cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.)], sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Seed meals were analyzed for the presence of glucosinolates, and were applied at 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 percent (w/w) to Darco fine sand soil and incubated for 1, 7 or 14 d prior to planting. With the weed species, germination and survival was most reduced by 2.5 percent WM SM incubated 1d for Johnsongrass and 14 d for redroot pigweed. Cotton and sorghum seedlings showed strong negative responses to WM SM applications of 2.5 percent at any incubation time. All crops and weed species were most inhibited by 2.5 percent application with any SM, but incubation days varied. Seed meals of each species showed negative results dependent on the incubation day, but overall, WM and camelina SMs were most detrimental compared to IM and jatropha. A second greenhouse study was conducted to determine the availability of nutrients in SMs (WM and IM) to cotton and sorghum compared to inorganic fertilization. Seed meals were applied at 1.0 and 2.5 percent (w/w) and initially incubated for 35 days prior to planting. Emergence of both species was so poor that treatments were incubated for an additional 21 d and replanted. Application rates of 2.5 percent WM and IM SMs reduced sorghum heights and biomass, but only WM had a negative effect on cotton yield. However, the higher of the SM application rates provided greater levels of nutrients compared to the fertilized treatment and control. Results suggested that the type, rate, and timing of SM applications should be considered before land-applying SMs in organic cropping systems in order to successfully manage weeds while producing a profitable crop.

Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Assessing Natural Isothiocyanate Air Emissions after Field Incorporation of Mustard Cover Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional air assessment was performed to characterize volatile natural isothiocyanate (NITC) compounds in air during soil incorporation of mustard cover crops in Washington State. Field air sampling and analytical methods were developed specific to three NITCs known to be present in air at appreciable concentrations during/after field incorporation. The maximum observed concentrations in air for the allyl, benzyl, and phenethyl isothiocyanates were respectively 188, 6.1, and 0.7 lg m-3 during mustard incorporation. Based on limited inhalation toxicity information, airborne NITC concentrations did not appear to pose an acute human inhalation exposure concern to field operators and bystanders.

Trott, Donna M.; LePage, Jane; Hebert, Vincent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Limits on the Transient Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Flux from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) Derived from RICE Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present limits on ultra-high energy (UHE; E(nu)>1 PeV) neutrino fluxes from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on recently presented data, limits, and simulations from the RICE experiment. We use data from five recorded transients with sufficient photon spectral shape and redshift information to derive an expected neutrino flux, assuming that the observed photons are linked to neutrino production through pion decay via the well-known 'Waxman-Bahcall' prescription. Knowing the declination of the observed burst, as well as the RICE sensitivity as a function of polar angle and the previously published non-observation of any neutrino events allows an estimate of the sensitivity to a given neutrino flux. Although several orders of magnitude weaker than the expected fluxes, our GRB neutrino flux limits are nevertheless the first in the PeV--EeV energy regime. For completeness, we also provide a listing of other bursts, recorded at times when the RICE experiment was active, but requiring some assumptions regarding luminosity and redshift to permit estimates of the neutrino flux.

D. Besson; S. Razzaque; J. Adams; P. Harris

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

The effects of previous-year corn hybrid and cropping system on current-year corn hybrids in second year corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grain yields decrease when corn (Zea mays L.) follows corn compared to corn grown in rotation with other crops. The factors that decrease grain yield… (more)

Kent, Wade Adam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Engineering Plants for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses by Overexpression of AtSAP13 Protein and Optimization of Crambe abyssinica as a Biofuel Crop in Western Massachusetts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abiotic stresses such as drought, salt and exposure to toxic metals adversely affect the growth and productivity of crop plants and are serious threats to… (more)

Vaine, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Effect of coal fly ash-amended organic compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired electric power plants generate large quantities of fly ash as a byproduct. In continuation of previous studies on the utilization of fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for use as a manure for agricultural crops, the authors have now determined the effects of this manure on the yield and uptake of selected elements by several plants including collard green, corn, mustard green, bell pepper, egg plant, and climbing beans. An amended compost containing 30-40% fly ash with a compost:soil ratio of 1:3 was found to be most effective to enhance the yield and nutrient uptake of most of the plants. At 20% fly ash level, no increase in yield of any of the above crops was observed. The uptake of K, Mg, Mn, and P was increased in most plants. Boron which is known to be detrimental to the growth of plants above certain level was also found to be increased in plants nourished with the manure.

Ghuman, G.S.; Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Chandra, K.; Sajwan, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Conservation Reserve Program as a Means to Subsidize Bioenergy Crop Prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), enacted in the 1985 Farm Bill, removes environmentally sensitive cropland from production in exchange for annual rental payments from the federal government. To reduce the cost of the program, economic use of CRP acres in exchange for reduced rental payments were proposed, but not implemented in the 1995 Farm Bill. This paper examines the potential impact an economic use policy would have on the market prices of bioenergy crops if they were permitted to be harvested from CRP acres. The analysis shows that at average yields of 11.25 dry Mg/ha/yr (5 dry tons/ac/yr) and total production of 9.1 million dry Mg (10 million dry tons) subsidized farmgate prices of as low as $16.5/dry Mg ($15/dry ton) for switchgrass and $24.2/dry Mg ($22/dry ton) for short-rotation woody crops can be achieved. Furthermore, the government can reduce the cost of the CRP resulting in a potential win-win situation.

Walsh, M.E.; Becker, D.; Graham, R.L.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Down-regulation of four putative arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes from family PF02458 reduces ester-linked ferulate content in rice cell walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell wall in grasses. Keywords Biofuels Á Digestibility Áa broader adaptation of biofuels. One of the limitations foryield and composition for biofuels. Crop Sci 47:2211–2227

Piston, Fernando; Uauy, Cristobal; Fu, Lianhai; Langston, James; Labavitch, John; Dubcovsky, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

An Economic Feasibility Study of Irrigated Crop Production in the Pecos Valley of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public concern over the potential effects of energy price increases on the U.S. food and fiber system has been dramatically justified in the Trans Pecos region of Texas where a 450 percent increase in the price of natural gas was followed by the idling of thousands of irrigated acres and the departure of many of the farmers. This study was conducted to provide the answers to two questions: (l) Can an irrigated farm survive in the Trans Pecos? and (2) If it survives, how profitable will it be? Coyanosa, one of the irrigated areas of the Trans Pecos, was selected as a study area, and the St. Lawrence area of the Edwards Plateau was selected to provide comparative estimates of survival and profitability. A modified MOTAD linear programming-simulation model was developed to generate estimates of survival and profitability by recursive simulation of multiple time periods, as follows: (l) development of a farm plan, (2) generation of stochastic prices and yields, (3) simulation and evaluation of the farm plan in operation, and (4) update of the planning situation to reflect adjustments in expected prices, expected yields, and credit restrictions. The model then returns to step l for simulation of the next time period. The model was applied to the Coyanosa and St. Lawrence regions under alternative future scenarios for inflation rates, energy prices, crop prices, and interest rates. The Coyanosa model was also applied under most likely scenario conditions to analyze the effects of alternative levels of risk-aversion and alternative tenure situations. Each application included 20 simulations of a 1O year planning horizon to develop a distribution of outcome. The Coyanosa farm survived about 8 years under the optimistic scenario and 5 years under all other scenarios. The most likely rate of survival was 20-30 percent with a range of 1O percent to 65 percent for other scenarios. The average life and rate of survival was higher for the St. Lawrence farm under all scenarios. The internal rate of return on equity capital for the Coyanosa farm was 36.8 percent under the optimistic scenario and negative under all other scenarios. The rate of return for St. Lawrence was not significantly different for the optimistic scenario; however, it was higher than Coyanosa for all other scenarios. The level of risk-aversion described by the baseline model appears to be relatively high compared to other studies, but there are indications that it may be relatively low for the St. Lawrence area. Both rate of return and survival increased in response to decreased levels of risk-aversion, however, the latter result may be related to the specification of the risk restraint. Land purchase provided higher estimates of survival and profitability than rental or combined rental and purchase. These results seem to relate to the finding that traditional crop share rental arrangements are unsatisfactory for the Coyanosa area. It was concluded from this study that (l) survival and profitability of irrigated crop production in the Coyanosa area will depend greatly upon future levels of inflation, energy prices, crop prices, and interest rates, (2) survival and profitability for Coyanosa will most likely be lower than St. Lawrence, and (3) land purchase provides greater potential survival and profitability than traditional crop share rental arrangements. These conclusions were limited by need for additional research regarding the effects of beginning equity levels and consideration of risk in farm planning. Conclusions were also limited by the data and assumptions utilized in the study.

Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Lindsey, K.; Whitson, R. E.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Development of a farm-firm modelling system for evaluation of herbaceous energy crops. Final project report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A complete analysis is performed to simulate biomass production incorporated into a realistic whole farm situation, including or replacing a typical crop mix. Representative farms are constructed to accommodate such simulation. Four management systems are simulated for each firm, with each simulation depicting a different crop mix and/or use of different farming technologies and production methods. The first simulation was a base farm plan in which the operator would maintain the historical crop mix for the area, participate in all price support programs, and not participate in either a conservative reserve or a biomass production program. In the second simulation, the operator would again maintain the historical crop mix, would not participate in a conservation reserve or biomass production program, and would be ineligible to participate in any price support system. The third simulation introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and included participation in all price support programs. The fourth simulation introduced a biomass crop production enterprise (switchgrass) as an alternative to enrolling highly erodible cropland in the CRP and allowed participation in price support programs. Simulations were made for three farms, two in West Tennessee and on in South Georgia. Results indicate that erosion is likely to be reduced more by the diversion of cropland to permanent vegetative cover on farms similar to the more highly erodible West Tennessee farms than on the less erodible Tift County, Georgia farm. Equivalent reductions in erosion rates result from entering highly erodible cropland in the CRP and from production of switchgrass as a biomass energy crop. Both switchgrass and CRP farm plans result in decreased net returns from the base plan, although the biomass farm plans are, in general, more profitable than the CRP plans.

English, B.C.; Alexander, R.R.; Loewen, K.H.; Coady, S.A.; Cole, G.V.; Goodman, W.R. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Soil-to-Crop Transfer Factors of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Stable Elements for Long-Term Dose Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A soil-to-crop transfer factor, TF, is a key parameter that directly affects the internal dose assessment for the ingestion pathway, however, obtaining TFs of various long-lived radionuclides occurred during operation of nuclear power plants is difficult because most of them could not be found in natural environments. In this study, therefore, we collected crops and their associated soils throughout Japan and measured more than 50 elements to obtain TFs under equilibrium conditions. The TFs were calculated for 42 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tl, Pb, Th and U) from their concentrations in both crop and soil samples. The TF is defined as the concentration of an isotope in a crop (in Bq/kg or mg/kg dry weight) divided by the concentration of the isotope in soil (in Bq.kg or mg/kg dry weight). Probability distributions of TFs for 62 upland field crops were usually log-normal type so that geometric means (GMs) were calculated. The values for the elements of interest from the viewpoint of long-term dose assessment were 2.5E-02 for Se, 7.9E-02 for Sr, 3.1E-03 for Cs, 4.2E-04 for Th and 4.6E-04 for U. Leafy vegetable showed the highest TFs for all the elements among the crop groups. It was clear that these data were usually within the 95% confidence limits of TFs compiled by IAEA in Technical Report Series 364. (authors)

Uchida, S.; Tagami, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention is being focused on water quality in rivers, lakes and streams. One of the contributors of pollution to rivers, lakes and streams is runoff from agriculture in the form of nutrients, pesticides and suspended solids. This study was designed to look at the amount of these substances produced in subwatersheds from corn, grain sorghum and cotton farming along the Colorado River in Travis and Bastrop counties. The study also looked at rangeland and row cropped familand to estimate which land use type produced more runoff and pollution to receiving streams. Best management practices were also looked at as a means of limiting the amount of runoff and pollution transport from row cropped areas. Three automated sampling sites were set up to collect water samples after rainfall events. Two of the sites were set up to sample from streams that drained subwatersheds of a tributary to the Colorado River. The land use at one subwatershed consisted primarily of rangeland and pastureland while the land use at the other site consisted mainly of row cropped farmland. The third site was set up to sample on a row cropped farm that employed certain best management practices. The accepted convention is that rangeland produces less runoff @ row cropped areas and therefore contributes less pollutants to receiving waters. The findings from this project generally support this. Additionally, it was found, through computer modeling, that best management practices in the form of terracing, contour plowing and filter strips significantly reduced the amount of runoff and pollutants that move off site from row cropped areas during rainfall events. The implications of these findings are that, where possible, efforts should be made to implement best management practices to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution to receiving waters. Producers also need to be educated as to how to implement and maintain best management practices to obtain optimal benefits.

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

STUDY OF GENE SILENCING IN RICE: A ROOT PREFERENTIAL GENE RCG2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The RCg2 promoter was identified in a search for root-specific genes to combat the rice water weevil (RWW) but expressed at low frequency (~10%). Spatial expression of RCg2 was investigated using two reporter constructs YXA (RCg2-gus-ocs) and YXB (RCg2-gus-RCg2) that included 1.6 kb of the RCg2 5' sequence fused to the ?-glucuronidase (gus) coding region. YXB plants were generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation but only 8 of 158 plants analyzed showed strong GUS activity despite the presence of an intact construct. Reactivation of RCg2 gene in rice was investigated by treatment of R0 and R1 of YXB transgenic plants with 5-azacytidine. Reactivation of RCg2-gus was observed in some transgenic plants indicating different mechanisms involved in the gene silencing of the YXB lines. DNA methylation analysis, northern blotting, RT-PCR and small RNA analysis supported the conclusion that PTGS and TGS are present in the silenced plants. Promoter analysis in silico and using promoter deletion assays predicted that the RCg2 promoter contains a complex region that includes miRNA homologs, MITEs and repetitive sequences. The high frequency of promoter-related silencing suggests functional interactions of these elements of the transgene and the homologous endogenous gene. To identify key elements contributing to the root-preferential expression of RCg2 and the high frequency of silencing observed in transgenic (YXB) lines, several RCg2 promoter deletion constructs were designed. These include 5' deletions MC1, MC2, MC4, MC7 and MC8 and internal deletions MC5, MC11, MC12 and MC13. The frequency with which silencing was encountered in populations of the deletion mutants was used to characterize the effects of various promoter elements. Deletion of the region from -406 to -208 (compared MC11 to YXB, and MC13 to MC1) revealed that region contains a negative element. Among 36 independent transformants, 33% with MC11 expressed GUS and 85% with MC13 showed GUS expression. Comparing MC7 transgenic plants to MC1 revealed that the region ?888 to ?729 is another negative regulatory element, and comparing MC11 to MC12, the proportion of expression of transgenic plants indicated the region ?729 to ?406 is a positive regulatory element.

Shi, Xiangyu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Characterization and genetic analysis of a very high tillering and dwarf rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focused on characterizing and determining the inheritance pattern of very high tillering and dwarf traits of a rice mutant. To characterize the new mutant, field phenotyping studies, and response of two mutant lines (M-13662 & M-13684) to three levels of nitrogen (179, 202, 224 kg ha-1) and five planting densities (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 plants hill-1) in greenhouse conditions were conducted. A separate study was carried out to determine the response of the two mutant lines to gibberellic acid (GA) application. The mutants were 50-55 cm tall and produced 89-121 tillers plant-1 at harvest. Dwarfness of the mutants was due to average shortening of the top four internodes as well as compression of 2-3 basal internodes. The first tiller emerged at the 4th leaf stage whereas no tiller was observed in semi-dwarf rice cultivar, Cocodrie. Results showed that the production of high tiller numbers was the result of the release of axillary buds from a dormant stage rather than the initiation of additional axillary buds. The mutants were late maturing than controls (Cocodrie & Zhe733). The panicles were very short (10-12 cm) and had 25-30 small grains. The majority of tillers of the mutants followed the dn-type dwarf pattern based on Takeda’s classification, but a few plants had a different dwarfing pattern not included in the classification. Both mutant lines were found to have similar agronomic traits but were significantly different from controls. The tillering ability of the mutants was affected by the five different planting densities as well as the three nitrogen levels. Mutants produced more tillers, both productive and non-productive, at the lowest plant density. The longest and shortest panicles were observed at 202 kg ha-1 and 179 kg ha-1, respectively. Variations in other agronomic traits were found not significant. The response of the mutant to GA application was similar to Cocodrie, and thus was considered GA responsive. Preliminary DNA data using SSR markers supported the presumed origin of the mutants and the genetic analysis indicated that one recessive gene controlled both the dwarfing and very high tillering traits.

Mani, Dhananjay

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The feasibility and profitability of short season corn and sorghum cropping systems on the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of experimental cropping systems were conducted at the TAES-USDA Conservation and Production Research Field at Bushland, TX and at the North Plains Research Field near Etter, TX. The study at Bushland was fully irrigated using flood irrigation in level plots with raised borders. The study at Etter was conducted as limited irrigation using sprinkler irrigation equipped with a low energy precision application (LEPA) system. The four experimental cropping systems utilized a 98-day short season corn cultivar (SSC), a 100-day short season sorghum cultivar (SSS), and winter wheat grazed-grain (Wht Grz-Grn) and grain only. The cropping systems were evaluated in terms of attainable yields, irrigation water use, profitability, and feasibility. Conventional cropping systems of continuous full season corn (FSC), continuous full season sorghum (FSS), and continuous wheat grazed-grain and grain only were also included in the study. Compared to conventional cropping systems, the experimental cropping systems did not reduce irrigation, but profitability was increased. The rotation of SSC/Wht/SSS with wheat grazed or non-grazed, was consistently the most profitable rotation under full and limited irrigation. Profitability was obtained by increasing total revenue through improved yields of SSC in rotation with wheat and sorghum when compared to yields of SSC in continuous rotation, by obtaining higher market prices for early harvested SSC, and by realizing the opportunity to graze and obtain grain from wheat planted after SSC. Input costs were reduced by decreased fertilizer, insecticide, and irrigation applications and by reduced to no-tillage operations. Peak irrigation demands were spread more evenly throughout the year, and irrigation scheduling became less critical for optimum yields. Experimental rotations increased management and labor requirements. A greater diversity of machinery was also necessary. Timing of harvesting one crop and planting the next became critical in determining whether a rotation was profitable. The experimental rotation SSC/Wht Grz was not profitable and used the greatest amount of irrigation water. Conventional cropping systems of continuous FSS and continuous Wht Grz-Grn reduced irrigation compared to continuous FSC and all experimental rotations while maintaining profitability.

Vagts, Todd Anthony

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Comments welcome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deforestation, shifting cultivation, and tree crops in Indonesia: nationwide patterns of smallholder agriculture at the forest frontier

Kenneth M. Chomitz; Charles Griffiths; K. Chomitz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Long-term tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management practices that may increase soil organic matter (SOM) storage include conservation tillage, especially no till (NT), enhanced cropping intensity, and fertilization. My objectives were to evaluate management effects on labile [soil microbial biomass (SMB) and mineralizable, particulate organic matter (POM), and hydrolyzable SOM] and slow (mineral-associated and resistant organic) C and N pools and turnover in continuous sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.], wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], sorghum-wheat/soybean, and wheat/soybean sequences under convent ional tillage (CT) and NT with and without N fertilization. A Weswood silty clay loam (fine, mixed, thermic Fluventic Ustochepts) in southern central Texas was sampled at three depth increments to a 30-cm depth after wheat, sorghum, and soybean harvesting. Soil organic C and total N showed similar responses to tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization following wheat, sorghum, and soybean. Most effects were observed in surface soils. NT significantly increased SOC. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased SOC only under NT. Compared to NT or N addition, enhanced cropping intensity only slightly increased SOC. Estimates of C sequestration rates under NT indicated that SOC would reach a new equilibrium after 20 yr or less of imposition of this treatment. Labile pools were all significantly greater with NT than CT at 0 to 5 cm and decreased with depth. SMB, mineralizable C and N, POM, and hydrolyzable C were highly correlated with each other and SOC, but their slopes were significantly different, being lowest in mineralizable C and highest in hydrolyzable C. These results indicated that different methods determined various fractions of total SOC. Results from soil physical fractionation and 13C concentrations further supported these observations. Carbon turnover rates increased in the sequence: ROC < silt- and clayassociated C < microaggregate-C < POM-C. Long-term incubation showed that 4 to 5% of SOC was in active pools with mean residence time (MRT) of about 50 days, 50% of SOC was in slow pools with an average MRT of 12 years, and the remainder was in resistant pools with an assumed MRT of over 500 years.

Dou, Fugen

457

Culture-independent analysis of bacterial fuel contamination provides insight into the level of concordance with the standard industry practice of aerobis cultivation.  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by 'JW') was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas.

White, J.; Gilbert, J. A.; Hill, G.; Hill, E.; Huse, S. M.; Weightman, A. J.; Mahenthiralingam, E. (CLS-CI); (Organisms and Environment Division, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University); (ECHA Microbiology Ltd.); (Josephine Bay Paul Centre for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Mite-y Genomic Resources For Bioenergy Crop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23, 2011 23, 2011 Mite-y Genomic Resources For Bioenergy Crop Protection WALNUT CREEK/BERKELEY, Calif.-For a pest that isn't quite the size of a comma on a keyboard, the two-spotted spider mite can do a disproportionate amount of damage. These web-spinners extract the nutrients they need from leaves of more than a thousand different plant species, including bioenergy feedstocks and food staples. The cost of chemically controlling spider mites to counteract reduced harvest yields hovers around $1 billion annually, reflecting their significant economic impact. spider mite Photo: The web-spinning two-spotted spider mite was sequenced at the DOE JGI. (M. Grbic) With a 90-million nucleotide genome, the smallest of those that belong to the group of animals with external skeletons or arthropods, the two-spotted

459

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rice cultivation crop" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Enhanced Carbon Concentration in Camelina: Development of a Dedicated, High-value Biofuels Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: UMass is developing an enhanced, biofuels-producing variant of Camelina, a drought-resistant, cold-tolerant oilseed crop that can be grown in many places other plants cannot. The team is working to incorporate several genetic traits into Camelina that increases its natural ability to produce oils and add the production of energy-dense terpene molecules that can be easily converted into liquid fuels. UMass is also experimenting with translating a component common in algae to Camelina that should allow the plants to absorb higher levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), which aids in enhancing photosynthesis and fuel conversion. The process will first be demonstrated in tobacco before being applied in Camelina.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hyperspectral remote sensing analysis of short rotation woody crops grown with controlled nutrient and irrigation treatments.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the three techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.

Im, Jungho; Jensen, John R.; Coleman, Mark; Nelson, Eric

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

GROW1: a crop growth model for assessing impacts of gaseous pollutants from geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary model of photosynthesis and growth of field crops was developed to assess the effects of gaseous pollutants, particularly airborne sulfur compounds, resulting from energy production from geothermal resources. The model simulates photosynthesis as a function of such variables as irradiance, CO/sub 2/ diffusion resistances, and internal biochemical processes. The model allocates the products of photosynthesis to structural (leaf, stem, root, and fruit) and storage compartments of the plant. The simulations encompass the entire growing season from germination to senescence. The model is described conceptually and mathematically and examples of model output are provided for various levels of pollutant stress. Also, future developments that would improve this preliminary model are outlined and its applications are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

464

EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHEC). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000 acres). This PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of such confined field trials in the southeastern United States. DOE’s proposed action under this PEIS will be limited to the states of Alabama, Florida (excluding the Everglades/Southern Florida coastal plain ecoregion), Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

465

Use of geothermal heat for crop drying and related agricultural applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Observations led to the selection of the alfalfa dehydration industry for in-depth analysis of the application of moderate-temperature geothermal heat. Six geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A low-temperature conveyor dryer using geothermal water to supply all required heat was chosen for site-specific analysis, the retrofitting of a large alfalfa dehydration plant within the Heber KGRA in the Imperial Valley, California. Even in the most favorable scenario--sharing a geothermal pipeline with the neighboring fertilizer plant--geothermal retrofitting would increase the price of the alfalfa ''dehy'' about 40 percent. The geothermal brine is estimated to cost $2.58/million Btu's compared with a 1977 natural gas cost of $1.15. Capital cost for heat exchangers and the new dryers is estimated at $3.3 million. The Heber plant appeared to offer the only good opportunity for geothermal retrofitting of an existing alfalfa dehydration plant. Construction of new plants at geothermal resource sites cannot be justified due to the uncertain state of the ''dehy'' industry. Use of geothermal heat for drying other crops may be much more promising. The potato dehydration industry, which is concentrated in the geothermal-rich Snake River Valley of Idaho, appears to offer good potential for geothermal retrofitting; about 4.7 x 10{sup 12}Btu's are used annually by plants within 50 miles of resources. Drying together at the geothermal wellhead several crops that have interlocking processing seasons and drying-temperature requirements may be quite attractive. The best ''multicrop drying center'' site identified was at Power Ranch Wells, Arizona; 34 other sites were defined. Agricultural processing applications other than drying were investigated briefly.

Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update covers the first year of a three-year-long EPRI research project entitled Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production. The report provides a project overview and explains the preliminary results yielded from the first year of on-farm research.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Evaluation of an ecosystem model for a wheat-maize double cropping system over the North China Plain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process-based ecosystem model (Vegetation-atmosphere Interface Processes (VIP) model) is expanded, and then validated against three years' biometric, soil moisture and eddy-covariance fluxes data over a winter wheat-summer maize cropping system in ... Keywords: Eddy covariance, Evapotranspiration, Net ecosystem production, Uncertainty, VIP model

Xingguo Mo; Suxia Liu; Zhonghui Lin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Integrated-Omics: A Powerful Approach to Understanding the Heterogeneous Lignification of Fibre Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Lignin and cellulose represent the two main components of plant secondary walls and the most abundant polymers on Earth. Quantitatively one of the principal products of the phenylpropanoid pathway, lignin confers high mechanical strength and hydrophobicity to plant walls, thus enabling erect growth and high-pressure water transport in the vessels. Lignin is characterized by a high natural heterogeneity in its composition and abundance in plant secondary cell walls, even in the different tissues of the same plant. A typical example is the stem of fibre crops, which shows a lignified core enveloped by a cellulosic, lignin-poor cortex. Despite the great value of fibre crops for humanity, however, still little is known on the mechanisms controlling their cell wall biogenesis, and particularly, what regulates their spatially-defined lignification pattern. Given the chemical complexity and the heterogeneous composition of fibre crops ’ secondary walls, only the use of multidisciplinary approaches can convey an integrated picture and provide exhaustive information covering different levels of biological complexity. The present review highlights the importance of combining high throughput-omics approaches to get a complete understanding of the factors regulating the lignification heterogeneity typical of fibre crops.

Guerriero Gea; Sergeant Kjell; Hausman Jean-françois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Application note: A low-cost microcontroller-based system to monitor crop temperature and water status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype system was developed and constructed for automating the measurement and recording of canopy-, soil-, and air temperature, and soil moisture status in cropped fields. The system consists of a microcontroller-based circuit with solid-state ... Keywords: Air temperature, Datalogging, Infrared thermometer, Microcontrollers, Sensors, Soil moisture, Soil temperature

Daniel K. Fisher; Hirut Kebede

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Soil and Crop Response to Power Line Construction Traffic and Shallow and Deep Tillage in New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large percentage of New York State is agricultural land. In many instances, electric transmission lines must be constructed on or across agricultural lands to provide electric service. This study was commissioned by member utilities of the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) to determine the effect of electric transmission construction traffic on agricultural lands and crops.

1999-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

Historical Perspective on How and Why Switchgrass was Selected as a "Model" High-Potential Energy Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of several publications of the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program, and final reports from the herbaceous crop screening trials suggests that there were several technical and non-technical factors that influenced the decision to focus on one herbaceous "model" crop species. The screening trials funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in the late 1980's to early 1990's assessed a wide range of about 34 species with trials being conducted on a wide range of soil types in 31 different sites spread over seven states in crop producing regions of the U.S. While several species, including sorghums, reed canarygrass and other crops, were identified as having merit for further development, the majority of institutions involved in the herbaceous species screening studies identified switchgrass as having high priority for further development. Six of the seven institutions included switchgrass among the species recommended for further development in their region and all institutions recommended that perennial grasses be given high research priority. Reasons for the selection of switchgrass included the demonstration of relatively high, reliable productivity across a wide geographical range, suitability for marginal quality land, low water and nutrient requirements, and positive environmental attributes. Economic and environmental assessments by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program staff together with the screening project results, and funding limitations lead to making the decision to further develop only switchgrass as a "model" or "prototype" species in about 1990. This paper describes the conditions under which the herbaceous species were screened, summarizes results from those trials, discusses the various factors which influenced the selection of switchgrass, and provides a brief evaluation of switchgrass with respect to criteria that should be considered when selecting and developing a crop for biofuels and bioproducts.

Wright, Lynn L [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Characterization of Rice NADPH Oxidase Genes and Their Expression under Various Environmental Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Plasma membrane NADPH oxidases (Noxs) are key producers of reactive oxygen species under both normal and stress conditions in plants. We demonstrate that at least eleven genes in the genome of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were predicted to encode Nox proteins, including nine genes (OsNox1–9) that encode typical Noxs and two that encode ancient Nox forms (ferric reduction oxidase 1 and 7, OsFRO1 and OsFRO7). Phylogenetic analysis divided the Noxs from nine plant species into six subfamilies, with rice Nox genes distributed among subfamilies I to V. Gene expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR indicated that the expression of rice Nox genes depends on organs and environmental conditions. Exogenous calcium strongly stimulated the expression of OsNox3, OsNox5, OsNox7, and OsNox8, but depressed the expression of OsFRO1. Drought stress substantially upregulated the expression of OsNox1–3, OsNox5, OsNox9, and OsFRO1, but downregulated OsNox6. High temperature upregulated OsNox5–9, but significantly downregulated OsNox1–3 and OsFRO1. NaCl treatment increased the expression of OsNox2, OsNox8, OsFRO1, and OsFRO7, but decreased that of OsNox1, OsNox3, OsNox5, and OsNox6. These results suggest that the expression profilesInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14 9441

Gang-feng Wang; Wen-qiang Li; Wen-yan Li; Guo-li Wu; Cong-yi Zhou; Kun-ming Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres 117, no. D24 (2012). Jeong,...

475

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres 117, no. D24 (2012). Sudderth, Erika...

476

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres 117, no. D24 (2012). Newman, Sally,...

477

Root-induced changes to cadmium speciation in the rhizosphere of two rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes  

SciTech Connect

Our aim was to investigate rhizosphere effects on the chemical behavior of Cd. This was done in a glasshouse experiment, where two rice cultivars (Zhenong54 and Sixizhan) were g