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1

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the "RH-TRU 72-B cask") and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

RH_SRS_Shipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Trucks Delivering First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste WIPP Trucks Delivering First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste from the Savannah River Site CARLSBAD, N.M., June 11, 2012- Photo caption: On June 7, 2012, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) trucks approach the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico, with the first shipment of defense- related remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. TRU waste consists of materials contaminated with radioactive elements that have atomic numbers greater than uranium, including tools, rags, protective clothing, sludge and soil. That shipment and two contact- handled TRU waste shipments were released by SRS at the same time The three shipments consisted of (left to right) a TRUPACT-III, a RH-72B and one with

6

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. The C of C states: ''...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, ''Operating Procedures,'' of the application.'' It further states: ''...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, ''Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR {section} 71.11, ''Deliberate Misconduct.'' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARP. This document is available on the Internet at: ttp://www.ws/library/t2omi/t2omi.htm. Users are responsible for ensuring they are using the current revision and change notices. Sites may prepare their own document using the word-for-word steps in th is document, in sequence, including Notes and cautions. Site specific information may be included as necessary. The document, and revisions, must then be submitted to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval. A copy of the approval letter from CBFO shall be available for audit purposes. Users may develop site-specific procedures addressing preoperational activities, quality assurance (QA), hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used with the instructions contained in this document. Users may recommend changes to this document by submitting their recommendations (in writing) to the WIPP M&O Contractor RH Packaging Maintenance Engineer for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by ALL users. Before first use and every 12 months after, user sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance. They will also be audited within one year from the effective date of revisions to this document.

Washington TRU Solutions, LLC

2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

IPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 200 millirem per hour or less; this waste can be safely handled directly by personnel. Remote-handled (RH) TRU waste has a radiation dose rate at a package surface of 200...

10

ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements 2000.01.01 - 2005.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92).

11

Opening the Doors at WIPP to RH TRU Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On October 16, 2006, the Governor of New Mexico and Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) jointly approved a hazardous waste permit modification allowing the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to manage, store, and dispose of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. RH TRU mixed waste is TRU waste that requires shielding for safe handling. Accordingly, some equipment and operations that are used to handle contact-handled (CH) TRU waste were not adequate to safely handle the RH TRU waste. Changes were needed at WIPP to accommodate the expanded waste envelope. To evaluate facility readiness to handle RH TRU waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters performed an operational readiness review (ORR). But even before the DOE planned the ORR, Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the Managing and Operating Contractor (MOC) for the WIPP, performed its own Line Management Assessment (LMA) and Contractor ORR. Upon successful completion of the RH LMA, line management affirmed to the WTS general manager that they were ready to proceed with the Contractor ORR. A team of independent subject matter experts from around the nation gathered to formally assess whether the MOC was indeed ready to receive, manage, store, and dispose of RH TRU waste at the WIPP. The Contractor ORR evaluated in detail, seven guiding principles set forth in DOE Order for Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities considering the DOE Standard for Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews. Through DOE Headquarters, the DOE gathered its own team of subject matter experts to assess the WIPP's readiness for RH TRU waste operations. Upon completion of the DOE RH ORR the DOE Team reported back to Headquarters and made the recommendation that WIPP proceed with RH TRU waste operations. (author)

Kehrman, R.F.; Most, W.A. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980. [Pt/Rh, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ni/Rh, Rh/Re, Ni  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalysts are being screened to steam reform hydrocarbons in an autothermal reformer (STR). Twenty-one samples have been screened in a 1-in.-diam (ATR) reactor using No. 2 oil as the hydrocarbon feed. A series of platinum-rhodium catalysts were evaluated to study the effect of varying compositions. A sample containing 1.7% Pt/0.3% Rh was most active but the difference among the samples was within the range of test variability. Development of a more realistic test has been started. The effect of O/sub 2//C level on the gas composition leaving the catalytic partial oxidation section has been determined. The amount of unreacted oil increases as O/sub 2//C level decreases. The unreacted oil is more aromatic than the feedstock. The gas composition contains considerably more olefins as the O/sub 2//C level decreases. Post-run catalyst characterization indicates that the catalyst carrier does not deteriorate in the ATR test. A drastic decrease in CO chemisorption is noted on the Pt/Rh samples. This decline in CO chemisorption could either be due to metal sintering or to carbon deposition on the metal. Other analysis are required to determine which is causing the decline in CO chemisorption. Very low coke levels were found on Pt, Rh, and Pt/Rh samples. Addition of Rh to nickel reduces the coke level over that observed for nickel catalysts.

Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Matter Matters: Unphysical Properties of the Rh = ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally agreed that there is matter in the universe and, in this paper, we show that the existence of matter is extremely problematic for the proposed Rh = ct universe. Considering a dark energy component with an equation of state of w=-1/3, it is shown that the presence of matter destroys the strict expansion properties that define the evolution of Rh = ct cosmologies, distorting the observational properties that are touted as its success. We further examine whether an evolving dark energy component can save this form of cosmological expansion in the presence of matter by resulting in an expansion consistent with a mean value of = -1/3, finding that the presence of mass requires unphysical forms of the dark energy component in the early universe. We conclude that matter in the universe significantly limits the fundamental properties of the Rh = ct cosmology, and that novel, and unphysical, evolution of the matter component would be required to save it. Given this, Rh = ct cosmology is not simpler or...

Lewis, Geraint F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Chirality in odd-$A$ Rh isotopes within triaxial particle rotor model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adopting the fully quantal triaxial particle rotor model, the candidate chiral doublet bands in odd-$A$ nuclei $^{103}$Rh and $^{105}$Rh with $\\pi g_{9/2}^{-1}\\otimes\

B. Qi; S. Q. Zhang; S. Y. Wang; J. Meng; T. Koike

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

RH-TRU Waste Inventory Characterization by AK and Proposed WIPP RH-TRU Waste Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has developed draft documentation to present the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) remote-handled (RH-) transuranic (TRU) waste characterization program to its regulators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department. Compliance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 191 and 194; the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579); and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, as well as the Certificates of Compliance for the 72-B and 10-160B Casks, requires that specific waste parameter limits be imposed on DOE sites disposing of TRU waste at WIPP. The DOE-CBFO must control the sites' compliance with the limits by specifying allowable characterization methods. As with the established WIPP contact handled TRU waste characterization program, the DOE-CBFO has proposed a Remote-Handled TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria (RH-WAC) document consolidating the requirements from various regulatory drivers and proposed allowable characterization methods. These criteria are consistent with the recommendation of a recent National Academy Sciences/National Research Council to develop an RH-TRU waste characterization approach that removes current self imposed requirements that lack a legal or safety basis. As proposed in the draft RH-WAC and other preliminary documents, the DOE-CBFO RH-TRU waste characterization program proposes the use of acceptable knowledge (AK) as the primary method for obtaining required characterization information. The use of AK involves applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or processes used to generate the waste. Documentation, records, or processes providing information about various attributes of a waste stream, such as chemical, physical, and radiological properties, may be used as AK and may be applied to individual waste containers either independently or in conjunction with radiography, visual examination, assay, and other sampling and analytical data. RH-TRU waste cannot be shipped to WIPP on the basis of AK alone if documentation demonstrating that all of the prescribed limits in the RH-WAC are met is not available, discrepancies exist among AK source documents describing the same waste stream and the most conservative assumptions regarding those documents indicates that a limit will not be met, or all required data are not available for a given waste stream.

Most, W. A.; Kehrman, R.; Gist, C.; Biedscheid, J.; Devarakonda, J.; Whitworth, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mn Monolayer Modified Rh for Syngas-to-Ethanol Conversion: A First-Principles Study  

SciTech Connect

Rh is unique in its ability to convert syngas to ethanol with the help of promoters. We performed systematic first-principles computations to examine the catalytic performance of pure and Mn modified Rh(100) surfaces for ethanol formation from syngas. CO dissociation on the surface as well as CO insertion between the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} and the surface are the two key steps. The CO dissociation barrier on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is remarkably lowered by {approx}1.5 eV compared to that on Rh(100). Moreover, the reaction barrier of CO insertion into the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} group on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is 0.34 eV lower than that of methane formation. Thus the present work provides new mechanistic insight into the role of Mn promoters in improving Rh's selectivity to convert syngas to ethanol.

Li, Fengyu [University of Puerto Rico; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Zeng, X.C. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chen, Zhongfang [University of Puerto Rico

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Selectivity, activity, and metal-support interactions of Rh bimetallic catalysts. Progress report, 15 November 1981-15 August 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on a detailed investigation of the effect of TiO/sub 2/ support on Rh-Ag interaction as exhibited in catalytic activity. The temporal evolution of activity over Rh-Ag/TiO/sub 2/ for ethane hydrogenolysis and hydrogen chemisorption as a function of temperature, Ag to Rh ratio, the Rh particle size, Rh loading, and ambient gas were studied. Preliminary extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of Rh/TiO/sub 2/ catalysts indicate that 100% exposed (dispersed) catalyst prepared by ion exchange may be atomically dispersed after low temperature reduction. 7 figures, 1 table.

Haller, G L

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Adsorption studies of gases on Pt-Rh bimetallic catalysts by reversed-flow gas chromatography  

SciTech Connect

In the present work, the relatively new technique of reversed-flow gas chromatography was applied for the study of adsorption of carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide on Pt-Rh bimetallic catalysts. Using suitable mathematical analysis, equations were derived by means of which rate constants for adsorption, desorption, and disproportionation reaction were calculated. From the variation of these rate constants with temperature and the nature of the catalyst (Pt content), as well as from the finding that the CO adsorption is a dissociative process, useful conclusions concerning the mechanism for the CO oxidation reaction over Pt-Rh bimetallic catalysts were extracted. The catalytic fractional conversions for the CO disproportionation reaction were found to be higher for the Pt-RH bimetallic catalysts than those for the pure Pt catalyst, indicating the presence of beneficial Pt-Rh synergism.

Gavril, D.; Koliadima, A.; Karaiskakis, G. [Univ. of Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

Feasibility analysis of the use of TRUPACT-II for transport of RH-TRU waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research indicated the feasibility of utilizing existing TRUPACT-II casks for transporting RH-TRU waste. This could be achieved with an off-the-shelf TRUPACT-II (without modifications). The only added feature would be a removable impact-limiting assembly, preferably made of aluminum-honeycomb to minimize mass and thermal resistance. The assembly would be required because the volume of the RH-TRU cargo is much smaller than the standard 14-drum CH-TRU cargo. The TRUPACT-II has the potential to be an economical alternative to the 72B cask or any other RH-TRU design; it is certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and sufficient specimens exist to allow for fast proof of concept. Potentially significant savings could be achieved by using the TRUPACT-II instead of designing, developing, and testing a separate RH-TRU cask.

Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Model for the Prediction of the Hydriding Thermodynamics of Pd-Rh-Co Ternary Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A dilute solution model (with respect to the substitutional alloying elements) has been developed, which accurately predicts the hydride formation and decomposition thermodynamics and the storage capacities of dilute ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The effect of varying the rhodium and cobalt compositions on the thermodynamics of hydride formation and decomposition and hydrogen capacity of several palladium-rhodium-cobalt ternary alloys has been investigated using pressure-composition (PC) isotherms. Alloying in the dilute regime (<10 at.%) causes the enthalpy for hydride formation to linearly decrease with increasing alloying content. Cobalt has a stronger effect on the reduction in enthalpy than rhodium for equivalent alloying amounts. Also, cobalt reduces the hydrogen storage capacity with increasing alloying content. The plateau thermodynamics are strongly linked to the lattice parameters of the alloys. A near-linear dependence of the enthalpy of hydride formation on the lattice parameter was observed for both the binary Pd-Rh and Pd-Co alloys, as well as for the ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The Pd-5Rh-3Co (at. %) alloy was found to have similar plateau thermodynamics as a Pd-10Rh alloy, however, this ternary alloy had a diminished hydrogen storage capacity relative to Pd-10Rh.

Teter, D.F.; Thoma, D.J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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21

EXAFS and FT-IR Characterization of Mn and Li Promoted Titania-Supported Rh Catalysts for CO Hydrogenation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of Li and Mn promoters on the structure and selectivity of supported Rh catalysts for CO hydrogenation reaction was examined. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray absorption were used to investigate the adsorption of reactants and local structure of Rh. These techniques were used in combination with reactivity, H{sub 2} chemisorption, and temperature programmed studies to correlate structural characteristics with activity and selectivity during CO hydrogenation of unpromoted Rh/TiO{sub 2} and three promoted Rh catalysts: Rh-Li/TiO{sub 2}, Rh-Mn/TiO{sub 2}, and Rh-Li-Mn/TiO{sub 2}. The presence of a promoter slightly decreases the Rh clusters size; however, no evidence for an electronic effect induced by the presence of Li and Mn was found. Higher turnover frequencies were found for the promoted catalysts, which also showed the lower dispersion. The Li promoter introduces a weakened CO adsorption site that appears to enhance the selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates. The selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates varies inversely with the reducibility of Rh metal, that is, the lower the Rh reducibility, the higher the selectivity.

V Schwartz; A Campos; A Egbebi; J Spivey; S Overbury

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Understanding of Ethanol Decomposition on Rh(111) From Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reaction mechanisms of ethanol decomposition on Rh(1 1 1) were elucidated by means of periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. We propose that the most probable reaction pathway is via CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* on the basis of our mechanistic study: CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. In contrast, the contribution from the pathway via CH{sub 3}CHOH* is relatively small, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHOH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 3}CO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. According to our calculations, one of the slow steps is the formation of the oxametallacycle CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* species, which leads to the production of CHCO*, the precursor for C-C bond breaking. Finally, the decomposition of ethanol leads to the production of C and CO. Our calculations, for ethanol combustion on Rh, the major obstacle is not C-C bond cleavage, but the C contamination on Rh(1 1 1). The strong C-Rh interaction may deactivate the Rh catalyst. The formation of Rh alloys with Pt and Pd weakens the C-Rh interaction, easing the removal of C, and, as expected, in accordance with the experimental findings, facilitating ethanol combustion.

Liu, P.; Choi, Y.M.

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Cooling effect in emissions of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear characteristic emissions of K alpha, K beta and gamma with a significant triplet splitting at room temperature are observed from the long-lived nuclear state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung irradiation. A pronounced phase-transition-like narrowing of the emission profiles occurs immediately after the sample is cooled down to 77 K. The room temperature profiles reappear again abruptly and almost reversibly as the temperature drifts freely back to approximately the ice point after the filling of liquid nitrogen is stopped. These emission properties at 300 K and at low temperature may indicate that the 103mRh nuclei are in collective states.

Yao Cheng; Bing Xia; Chinping Chen

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Rh-Based Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts: Characterization and Computational Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting a program focused on developing a process for the conversion of biomass to bio-based fuels and co-products. Biomass-derived syngas is converted thermochemically within a temperature range of 240 to 330°C and at elevated pressure (e.g., 1200 psig) over a catalyst. Ethanol is the desired reaction product, although other side compounds are produced, including C3 to C5 alcohols; higher (i.e., greater than C1) oxygenates such as methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, acetic acid and acetaldehyde; and higher hydrocarbon gases such as methane, ethane/ethene, propane/propene, etc. Saturated hydrocarbon gases (especially methane) are undesirable because they represent a diminished yield of carbon to the desired ethanol product and represent compounds that must be steam reformed at high energy cost to reproduce CO and H2. Ethanol produced by the thermochemical reaction of syngas could be separated and blended directly with gasoline to produce a liquid transportation fuel. Additionally, higher oxygenates and unsaturated hydrocarbon side products such as olefins also could be further processed to liquid fuels. The goal of the current project is the development of a Rh-based catalyst with high activity and selectivity to C2+ oxygenates. This report chronicles an effort to characterize numerous supports and catalysts to identify particular traits that could be correlated with the most active and/or selective catalysts. Carbon and silica supports and catalysts were analyzed. Generally, analyses provided guidance in the selection of acceptable catalyst supports. For example, supports with high surface areas due to a high number of micropores were generally found to be poor at producing oxygenates, possibly because of mass transfer limitations of the products formed out of the micropores. To probe fundamental aspects of the complicated reaction network of CO with H2, a computational/ theoretical investigation using quantum mechanical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations was initiated in 2009. Computational investigations were performed first to elucidate understanding of the nature of the catalytically active site. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that Mn likely exists as a metallic alloy with Rh in Rh-rich environments under reducing conditions at the temperatures of interest. After determining that reduced Rh-Mn alloy metal clusters were in a reduced state, the activation energy barriers of numerous transition state species on the catalytically active metal particles were calculated to compute the activation barriers of several reaction pathways that are possible on the catalyst surface. Comparison of calculations with a Rh nanoparticle versus a Rh-Mn nanoparticle revealed that the presence of Mn enabled the reaction pathway of CH with CO to form an adsorbed CHCO species, which was a precursor to C2+ oxygenates. The presence of Mn did not have a significant effect on the rate of CH4 production. Ir was observed during empirical catalyst screening experiments to improve the activity and selectivity of Rh-Mn catalysts. Thus, the addition of Ir to the Rh-Mn nanoparticles also was probed computationally. Simulations of Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles revealed that, with sufficient Ir concentrations, the Rh, Mn and Ir presumably would be well mixed within a nanoparticle. Activation barriers were calculated for Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles for several C-, H-, and O-containing transitional species on the nanoparticle surface. It was found that the presence of Ir opened yet another reactive pathway whereby HCO is formed and may undergo insertion with CHx surface moieties. The reaction pathway opened by the presence of Ir is in addition to the CO + CH pathway opened by the presence of Mn. Similar to Mn, the presence of Ir was not found to not affect the rate of CH4 production.

Albrecht, Karl O.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Varga, Tamas; Colby, Robert J.; Jaffe, John E.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Mei, Donghai; Windisch, Charles F.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Gray, Michel J.; Hart, Todd R.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH. The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere, and the wind speed and direction.

Coulter,Richard; Ritsche,Michael

26

Catalytic partial oxidation of n-tetradecane on Rh and Sr substituted pyrochlores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalyst deactivation by high levels of sulfur and aromatics limits the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of diesel fuel into a H2-rich stream for fuel cells. These species poison traditional supported metal catalysts because they adsorb strongly to electron dense metal clusters and promote the formation of carbon on the surface. In this work, Rh + Sr are substituted into lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlore (La2Zr2O7) to give an La(2-x)SrxRhyZr(2-y)O(7- î) (LSRZ) catalyst. The resistance to deactivation and carbon formation were examined by the CPOX of a mixture of 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene + 1000 ppmw dibenzothiophene in n-tetradecane. The results were compared to a commercial Rh/ă-Al2O3 catalyst. In the presence of these contaminants, the activity of the LSRZ was only kinetically inhibited, which is thought to be attributable to the oxygen-ion conductivity that results from Sr substitution into the pyrochlore structure. Rh/ă-Al2O3 was deactivated, likely due to significant carbon accumulation on/near the Rh metal

Haynes, D.J.; Berry, D.A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Gardner, T.H.; Spivey, J.J.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Disordered surface structure of an ultra-thin tin oxide film on Rh(100)  

SciTech Connect

The composition and structure of an ultra-thin tin oxide film on Rh(100), prepared by the deposition of a submonolayer of tin followed by annealing in an O{sub 2} atmosphere, were examined by a combination of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). Although the LEED pattern exhibited c(2 x 8) spots clearly, a uniform periodicity of the c(2 x 8) unit cell was not observed in the STM images. The bright dots that were observed periodically in the STM image were similar to those of the ultra-thin Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} film on Rh(111) and formed a zigzag arrangement with the numerous point and line defects. The XPS study revealed that the Sn 3d{sub 5/2} peak of the tin oxide film on Rh(100) showed a metallic state as well as an oxide state that was between the SnO{sub 2} and SnO states. The structural models, which were based on the Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure on Rh(111), were determined using DFT total energy calculations. The simulated STM images of the two slightly different honeycomb-chain models well reproduced the zigzag arrangement in the STM image. The STM image and XPS spectrum were interpreted using a combination of the two models.

Zenkyu, R.; Tajima, D.; Yuhara, J. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Rhodium dihydride (RhH[subscript 2]) with high volumetric hydrogen density  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials with very high hydrogen density have attracted considerable interest due to a range of motivations, including the search for chemically precompressed metallic hydrogen and hydrogen storage applications. Using high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique and theoretical calculations, we have discovered a new rhodium dihydride (RhH{sub 2}) with high volumetric hydrogen density (163.7 g/L). Compressing rhodium in fluid hydrogen at ambient temperature, the fcc rhodium metal absorbs hydrogen and expands unit-cell volume by two discrete steps to form NaCl-typed fcc rhodium monohydride at 4 GPa and fluorite-typed fcc RhH{sub 2} at 8 GPa. RhH{sub 2} is the first dihydride discovered in the platinum group metals under high pressure. Our low-temperature experiments show that RhH{sub 2} is recoverable after releasing pressure cryogenically to 1 bar and is capable of retaining hydrogen up to 150 K for minutes and 77 K for an indefinite length of time.

Li, Bing; Ding, Yang; Kim, Duck Young; Ahuja, Rajeev; Zou, Guangtian; Mao, Ho-Kwang (Jilin); (Uppsala); (Cambridge); (CIW)

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

30

RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Note on Non-parametric and Semi-parametric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Note on Non-parametric and Semi-parametric Modeling for comparative purposes in order to assess the predictive performance of the Burning Index. 1 Department including the Burning Index (BI) at each of various Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) in the United

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

31

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

32

Determination of the proton separation energy of {sup 93}Rh from mass measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed {nu}p process, which occurs in the early time proton-rich neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae, has the potential to resolve the long-standing uncertainty in the production of the light p-nuclei {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. A recent study incorporating this {nu}p process has indicated that the proton separation energy S{sub p} of {sup 93}Rh is especially important in determining the relative production of these two isotopes. To reproduce the observed solar {sup 92}Mo/{sup 94}Mo abundance ratio of 1.57 a S{sub p} value for {sup 93}Rh of 1.64{+-}0.1 MeV is required. The previously unknown masses of {sup 92}Ru and {sup 93}Rh have been measured with the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer resulting in an experimental value for S{sub p}({sup 93}Rh) of 2.007{+-}0.009 MeV. This implies that with our current understanding of the conditions in core-collapse supernova explosions the {nu}p process is not solely responsible for the observed solar {sup 92}Mo/{sup 94}Mo abundance ratio.

Fallis, J.; Russell, S.; Vorst, M. Scholte van de; Sharma, H.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Clark, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Sharma, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Savard, G.; Caldwell, S.; Sternberg, M.; Schelt, J. Van [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J. E.; Gulick, S.; Lee, J. K. P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Deibel, C. M.; Wrede, C. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Fisker, J. L. [Physical Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hecht, A. A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] (and others)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental interest in that they add to a growing body of evidence indicating that certain, appropriately ligated, coordinatively unsaturated, subnanometer M4 transition-metal clusters can be relatively robust catalysts. Also demonstrated herein is that Rh4 clusters are poisoned by Hg(0), demonstrating for the first time that the classic Hg(0) poisoning test of 'homogeneous' vs 'heterogeneous'catalysts cannot distinguish Rh4-based subnanometer catalysts from Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysts, at least for the present examples of these two specific, Rh-based catalysts.

Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

Catalytic partial oxidation of n-tetradecane using Rh and Sr substituted pyrochlores: Effects of sulfur  

SciTech Connect

The presence of high levels of organosulfur compounds hinders the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of logistic fuels into a H2-rich gas stream for fuel cells. These species poison traditional supported metal catalysts because the sulfur adsorbs strongly to electron dense metal clusters and promotes the formation of carbon on the surface. To minimize deactivation by sulfur, two substituted lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlores (La2Zr2O7), identified in a previous study [D.J. Haynes, D.A. Berry, D. Shekhawat, J.J. Spivey, Catal. Today 136 (2008) 206], were investigated: (a) La–Rh–Zr (LRZ) and La–Sr– Rh–Zr (LSRZ). Using unsubstituted lanthanum zirconate and a conventional 0.5 wt% Rh/g-Al2O3 as comparisons, these four catalysts were exposed to a feed containing 1000 ppmw dibenzothiophene (DBT) in n-tetradecane (TD). DBT rapidly deactivated both the 0.5 wt% Rh/g-Al2O3 and LZ. The LRZ catalyst experienced a gradual deactivation, suggesting that Rh substitution into the pyrochlore structure, by itself, cannot completely eliminate deactivation by sulfur. However, the additional substitution of Sr stabilized yields of H2 and CO in the presence of DBT at levels only slightly below those observed without sulfur in the feed. After sulfur was removed from the feed, each catalyst was able to recover some activity. The recovery appears to be linked to carbon formed on active sites. The 0.5 wt% Rh/g-Al2O3, LZ, and LRZ all had comparable amounts of carbon formed on the surface: 0.90, 0.80 and 0.86 gcarbon/gcat, respectively. Of these three catalysts, only the LRZ was able to recover a significant portion of initial activity, suggesting that the carbon formed indiscriminately on the surface, and not solely on the active sites. LSRZ was able to regain almost its initial activity once sulfur was removed from the feed, and had the least amount of carbon on the surface (0.30 gcarbon/gcat). It is hypothesized that oxygen-ion mobility, which results from Sr substitution, reduces carbon formation and the deactivation by sulfur.

Haynes, D.; Berry, D.; Shekhawat, D. Spivey, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Anisotropic intermediate valence in Yb2M3Ga9 (M = Rh, Ir)  

SciTech Connect

The intermediate valence compounds Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} (M = Rh, Ir) exhibit an anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the temperature dependence of the 4f occupation number, n{sub f}(T), for Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} as well as the magnetic inelastic neutron scattering spectrum S{sub mag}({Delta}E) at 12 and 300 K for Yb{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}. Both n{sub f}(T) and S{sub mag}({Delta}E) were calculated for the Anderson impurity model with crystal field terms within an approach based on the non-crossing approximation. These results corroborate the importance of crystal field effects in these materials; they also suggest that Anderson lattice effects are important to the physics of Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}.

Christianson, A.D.; Lawrence, J.M.; Lobos, A.M.; Aligia, A.A.; Bauer, E.D.; Moreno, N.O.; Booth, C.H.; Goremychkin, E.A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Batista, C.D.; Trouw, F.R.; Hehlen, M.P.

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rh and Co-based catalyst performance was compared for steam reforming of ethanol under conditions suitable for industrial hydrogen production. The reaction conditions were varied to elucidate the differences in reaction pathways on both catalysts. On Co/ZnO, CH4 is a secondary product formed through the methanation reaction, while it is produced directly by ethanol decomposition on Rh. The difference in the reaction mechanism is shown to favor Co-based catalysts for selective hydrogen production under elevated system pressures (up to 15 bar) of industrial importance. The carbon deposition rate was also studied, and we show that Co is more prone to coking and catalyst failure. However, the Co/ZnO catalyst can be regenerated, by mild oxidation, despite the high carbon deposition rate. We conclude that Co/ZnO is a more suitable catalyst system for steam reforming of ethanol due to the low methane selectivity, low cost and possibility of regeneration with mild oxidation.

Karim, Ayman M.; Su, Yu; Sun, Junming; Yang, Cheng; Strohm, James J.; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Properties of Encapsulated CIGS Cells in 85 degrees C/85%RH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper concerns studies of encapsulated cells subjected to an environment of 85șC and 85%RH (85/85). Cells are encapsulated with PNNL multi-layer coatings (referred to as PML coatings) utilizing alternating layers of Al2O3, and an advanced polymer. The new polymer has been determined to withstand the 85/85 environment. Two types of cells were used for these studies, namely, SSI mini-modules (which are actually CIGSS devices) and CIGS cells provided by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC). Cells were coated and stressed at 85/85 in an environmental chamber. Current-voltage characteristics were acquired before and after coating, and periodically after being subjected to the 85/85 environment. Whereas coated SSI modules were determined to last 1000 hours when stressed at 60șC/90%RH without degradation, the efficiency of these modules degrade to a level of 60% of the beginning-of-life value when stressed at 85/85. Encapsulated IEC cells, however, have exhibited extraordinary results. The efficiency of several encapsulated cells did not decrease for 1500 hours in an 85șC/85%RH environment. This results establishes a benchmark for stressed, encapsulated CIGS cells.

Olsen, Larry C.; Gross, Mark E.; Kundu, Sambhu N.; Shafaman, William N.

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Adequacy of a Small Quantity Site RH-TRU Waste Program in Meeting Proposed WIPP Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The first remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste is expected to be permanently disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The first RH-TRU waste shipments are scheduled from the Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) to WIPP in order to facilitate compliance with BCL Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) milestones. Milestones requiring RH-TRU waste containerization and removal from the site by 2004 in order to meet a 2006 site closure goal, established by Congress in the Defense Facilities Closure Projects account, necessitated the establishment and implementation of a site-specific program to direct the packaging of BCLDP RH-TRU waste prior to the finalization of WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements. The program was designed to collect waste data, including audio and videotape records of waste packaging, such that upon completion of waste packaging, comprehensive data records exist from which compliance with final WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements can be demonstrated. With the BCLDP data records generated to date and the development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) of preliminary documents proposing the WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization program, it is possible to evaluate the adequacy of the BCLDP program with respect to meeting proposed characterization objectives. The BCLDP characterization program uses primarily acceptable knowledge (AK) and visual examination (VE) during waste packaging to characterize RH-TRU waste. These methods are used to estimate physical waste parameters, including weight percentages of metals, cellulosics, plastics, and rubber in the waste, and to determine the absence of prohibited items, including free liquids. AK combined with computer modeling is used to estimate radiological waste parameters, including total activity on a waste container basis, for the majority of BCLDP RH-TRU waste. AK combined with direct analysis is used to characterize radiological parameters for the small populations of the RH-TRU waste generated by the BCLDP. All characterization based on AK is verified. Per its design for comprehensive waste data collection, the BCLDP characterization program using AK and waste packaging procedures, including VE during packaging, meets the proposed WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization objectives. The conservative program design implemented generates certification data that will be adequate to meet any additional program requirements that may be imposed by the CBFO.

Biedscheid, J.; Stahl, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Peters, K.; Eide, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Catalytic Partial oxidation of n-Tetradecane Using Pyrochlores: Effect of Rh and Sr Substitution  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of transportation fuels into synthesis gas (H2 + CO) for fuel cells is complicated by the large quantities of aromatics and sulfur-containing compounds commonly found in these fuels. Traditional supported metal catalysts are easily poisoned by these species which adsorb strongly onto the electron-rich metal clusters. The use of noble metal and/or oxide based catalyst systems may offer higher activity and stability, but only if the metal can be bound into a thermally stable structure. To that end, Rh metal was substituted into the structure of a lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlore to give La2RhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j,) (LRZ) to produce a strongly bound, well-dispersed metal which is active for CPOX. A second catalyst was prepared in which Sr was substituted for a portion of La in the LRZ structure, producing La(2#2;x)SrxRhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j) (LSRZ). Each of these pyrochlore catalysts, including the unsubstituted LZ, were characterized and screened for activity in the CPOX of ntetradecane (TD), which is a surrogate for linear paraffins typical of diesel fuel. Results were compared to a commercial Rh/g-Al2O3 catalyst. X-ray diffraction patterns of both the LZ and LRZ showed that each had the cubic unit-cell pyrochlore structure. However, substitution of Sr resulted in a binary perovskite-pyrochlore phase with a defect SrZrO3 phase. Hydrogen pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction studies confirmed that Rh metal was substituted into the structure of the LRZ and LSRZ, and was reducible. Activity screening with the CPOX of TD showed that the Rh substituted in both LRZ and LSRZ is able to retain activity-producing essentially equilibrium synthesis gas yields, as was the Rh/g-Al2O3. Temperature programmed oxidation experiments performed after the CPOX of TD demonstrated that the amount of carbon was quantitatively similar for each catalyst (roughly 0.3 gcarbon/gcatalyst after each run), with the exception of LSRZ, which had significantly less carbon (0.17 gcarbon/gcatalyst). It is speculated that improved oxygen ion mobility in the LSRZ material, which resulted from Sr substitution, was responsible for the reduction in carbon formation on the surface.

Haynes, D.J.; Berry, D.A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Spivey, J.J.

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Catalytic partial oxidation of n-tetradecane using pyrochlores: Effect of Rh and Sr substitution  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of transportation fuels into synthesis gas (H2 + CO) for fuel cells is complicated by the large quantities of aromatics and sulfur-containing compounds commonly found in these fuels. Traditional supported metal catalysts are easily poisoned by these species which adsorb strongly onto the electron-rich metal clusters. The use of noble metal and/or oxide based catalyst systems may offer higher activity and stability, but only if the metal can be bound into a thermally stable structure. To that end, Rh metal was substituted into the structure of a lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlore to give La2RhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j,) (LRZ) to produce a strongly bound, well-dispersed metal which is active for CPOX. A second catalyst was prepared in which Sr was substituted for a portion of La in the LRZ structure, producing La(2#2;x)SrxRhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j) (LSRZ). Each of these pyrochlore catalysts, including the unsubstituted LZ, were characterized and screened for activity in the CPOX of ntetradecane (TD), which is a surrogate for linear paraffins typical of diesel fuel. Results were compared to a commercial Rh/g-Al2O3 catalyst. X-ray diffraction patterns of both the LZ and LRZ showed that each had the cubic unit-cell pyrochlore structure. However, substitution of Sr resulted in a binary perovskite-pyrochlore phase with a defect SrZrO3 phase. Hydrogen pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction studies confirmed that Rh metal was substituted into the structure of the LRZ and LSRZ, and was reducible. Activity screening with the CPOX of TD showed that the Rh substituted in both LRZ and LSRZ is able to retain activity-producing essentially equilibrium synthesis gas yields, as was the Rh/g-Al2O3. Temperature programmed oxidation experiments performed after the CPOX of TD demonstrated that the amount of carbon was quantitatively similar for each catalyst (roughly 0.3 gcarbon/gcatalyst after each run), with the exception of LSRZ, which had significantly less carbon (0.17 gcarbon/gcatalyst). It is speculated that improved oxygen ion mobility in the LSRZ material, which resulted from Sr substitution, was responsible for the reduction in carbon formation on the surface.

Haynes, D.; Berry, D.; Shekhawat, D.; Spivey, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste - General Presentation Modular Hot Cell Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Murray Paul Murray Oak Ridge, TN July 29, 2009 Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste- GENERAL PRESENTATION MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AREVA Worldwide Nuclear Lifecycle Transmission & Distribution Renewable Energy AREVA US Nuclear Fuel Services Nuclear Engineering Services AREVA Federal Services, LLC. (AFS) Federal Services Major Projects * MOX-MFFF * Yucca Mountain Project * DUF6 * Plateau Remediation Contract * Washington River Closure Project * SRS Liquid Waste AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AFS Technology Provider

42

Mid- and Far-Infrared Reflection/Absorption Spectroscopy (IRAS) Studies of NO on Rh Single Crystal Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NO/CO reaction over Rh metal in automobile catalytic converters is critical to the control of emissions of these pollutant molecules. As part of a program to determine the elementary mechanism(s) of this reaction, we have been performing mid- and far-infrared reflection/absorption spectroscopic (IRAS) measurements of the adsorption and co-adsorption and co-adsorption of NO and CO on Rh single crystal surfaces. Of particular interest is the low-frequency range of the IRAS spectra where we hoped to observe features due to metal-N stretching and/or bending vibrational motions. In particular, we hoped to obtain information regarding the site-requirements for the dissociation of the NO molecule on various Rh single crystal surfaces. An important result from our earlier work is that the selectivity of the reaction for the two nitrogen-containing products, N2 and N2O, is a strong function of the Rh surface structure. On the basis of ancillary data, we suggested that the location of adsorbed NO and N-atoms (formed from dissociation of adsorbed NO) on various Rh surfaces could, perhaps account for the selectivity differences.

Peden, Charles HF; He, Ting; Pilling, M.; Hirschmugl, Carol J.; Gardner, P.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fast-neutron interaction with the fission product {sup 103}Rh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron total and differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of {sup 103}Rh are measured from {approximately} 0.7 to 4.5 MeV (totals) and from {approximately} 1.5 to 10 MeV (scattering) with sufficient detail to define the energy-averaged behavior of the neutron processes. Neutrons corresponding to excitations of groups of levels at 334 {plus_minus} 13, 536 {plus_minus} 10, 648 {plus_minus} 25, 796 {plus_minus} 20, 864 {plus_minus} 22, 1120 {plus_minus} 22, 1279 {plus_minus} 60, 1481 {plus_minus} 27 and 1683 {plus_minus} 39 keV were observed. Additional groups at 1840 {plus_minus} 79 and 1991 {plus_minus} 71 key were tentatively identified. Assuming the target is a collective nucleus reasonably approximated by a simple one-phonon vibrator, spherical-optical, dispersive-optical, and coupled-channels models were developed from the data base with attention to the parameterization of the large inelastic-scattering cross sections. The physical properties of these models are compared with theoretical predictions and the systematics of similar model parameterizations in this mass region. In particular, it is shown that the inelastic-scattering cross section of the {sup 103}Rh fission product is large at the relatively low energies of applied interest.

Smith, A.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Guenther, P.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF PROCESSING DATA FROM THE RH RU HG MATRIX STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of the statistical significance of Rh, Ru, and Hg on DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle catalytic hydrogen generation and process chemistry was conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a full-factorial experimental design. This test design can identify significant interactions between these three species in addition to individual effects. Statistical modeling of data from the Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study has been completed. Preliminary data and conclusions were given in an earlier report. This final report concludes the work on the Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study. Modeling results are summarized below. Rhodium was found to: Promote increased total hydrogen mass; Promote an increase in the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Promote an increase in the hydrogen generation rate shortly after acid addition; Shorten the elapsed time between acid addition and the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Increase formate loss; Inhibit NO{sub 2} and total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation; and Reduce nitrite-to-nitrate conversion. Ruthenium was found to: Promote increased total hydrogen mass; Promote an increase in the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Promote an increase in the hydrogen generation rate in the second half of the SRAT cycle; Promote an increase in total CO{sub 2} generated; Increase formate loss; Promote NO{sub 2} and total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation; and Reduce nitrite-to-nitrate conversion. Mercury was found to: Inhibit total hydrogen mass produced; Promote an increase in total CO{sub 2} generated; Promote NO{sub 2} off-gas species formation; and Inhibit total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation. Results confirmed qualitative observations that Rh was activating before Ru for hydrogen generation. An interaction between Rh and Ru was present in the model for the total hydrogen generated during the SRAT, perhaps because the total combined contributions from two separate episodes of hydrogen generation. The first episode was dominated by Rh and the second by Ru. Consequently, the linear statistical model was asked to explain more than one phenomenon and included more terms. Mercury did not significantly impact hydrogen generated by either Rh or Ru in models in this study (all tests had Hg {ge} 0.5 wt% in total solids), whereas tests in Sludge Batches 3 and 4 (SB3 and SB4) with and without Hg showed a very significant negative impact from adding Hg. The conclusion is that once a small quantity of Hg is present, the primary inhibiting effect of Hg is in place, and hydrogen generation is relatively insensitive to further increases in total Hg. Any secondary Hg effects were difficult to quantify and model. Mercury was found to be statistically significant, however, as an inhibiting factor for hydrogen generation when modeling was based on the logarithm of the hydrogen generation rate. Only limited statistical evidence was found for non-linearity and quadratic dependence of other SRAT process measures, such as formate loss or total NO{sub x} generation, on the three matrix variables. The interaction term for Ru with Hg, however, appeared in models for total CO{sub 2}, total NO{sub 2}, and total moles of nitrogen-derived off-gas species. A single interaction between Ru and Hg during nitrite destruction could explain all three of these effects in the observed responses. Catalytic decomposition of nitrite ion by formic acid produces CO{sub 2} plus either NO or N{sub 2}O. The vast majority of the NO produced is converted to NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub 2} is the major fraction of the total moles of nitrogen in the off-gas species. Future experimental work related to catalytic hydrogen generation control is expected with regard to minimizing formic acid use through alternative reductants as well as in pursuing mesoporous media for sequestering the catalytically active noble metals to inhibit catalytic hydrogen generation. Two alternative stoichiometric acid equations are also under development. A summary document is in draft form that provides an overview of progress made in understanding ca

Koopman, D

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

ETME 422 -REFRIGERATION & HVAC SYSTEMS FALL 2011 LEC -10:00 -10:50am M W F RH 312  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10/31/2011 ETME 422 - REFRIGERATION & HVAC SYSTEMS FALL 2011 LEC - 10:00 - 10:50am M W F RH 312 Catalog Description ETME 422 PRINCIPLES OF HVAC I F 3 cr. LEC 3 PREREQUISITE: EMEC 320 or EGEN 324. -- Refrigeration and heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) for comfort and industrial applications

Dyer, Bill

46

Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon supports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon synthesis other than grain fermentation, e.g. from syngas, because syngas can be conveniently manufactured we first undertake a brief overview of the catalyst development for syngas conversion to C2

Bao, Xinhe

47

?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GE 1 GE 1 ;" qr)-1 s?llq ' p raspy.. c" ifa K. mris I talked with Hr. Wllllm cIF(Iy, Metrllurgist, Wnlon CarbId@ Nuclear cOrp8ny, 08k B&t&$@, Tenne66ee, on April 26, 1961. He informed me th&t the #rtioMl Northern birislon, Ame~ic6.n ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8, la pePfopn1~ lo8lve forming studier for the. ilnion olo)w Wuolem Conpmy "p l7?JHa). The work at National Northern l#rirc.- alon ir under the 6upenl6lon of Ehsll Phillpohuc4~, v of Spealrl Prcbduots. The @ox& to data ha8 been pwfonwd wlth 430 strlnle66 rteel and urma%um metal - both hot snb 0018 wor4c have been performed at pr688u~r fmm 100,000 to 900,000 prl. The shape of the pleu88 na not dlrolored. In 6<lon work ha6 been done with

48

Fabrication of [001]L1{sub 0}-FePtRh ferro-antiferromagnetic pattern by flat-patterning method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flat-patterning method that exploits the ferromagnetic (FM) - antiferromagnetic (AF) transition in [001]-oriented L1{sub 0} FePt{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x} films was investigated. FM-AF patterns with dot diameters between 15 and 1000 nm were fabricated by locally diffusing a small percentage of FePt atoms onto the FePt{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x} film. The geometric and magnetic properties of the patterns were analyzed in detail. Only the area whose composition crossed the FM-AF threshold underwent a magnetic phase change to the FM phase. FM dots with single-domain structures were observed in the AF matrix in the range of 15-100 nm by magnetic force microscopy.

Hasegawa, T.; Tomioka, T.; Ishio, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata Gakuen-machi, Akita (Japan); Kondo, Y.; Yamane, H. [Akita Industrial Technology Center (AIT), 4-11 Sanuki Araya, Akita (Japan)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

Smith, R.J.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates  

SciTech Connect

Transition metal modified Rh-catalysts can be used for converting syngas (CO+H2) into C2+ oxygenates. It has been found that Mn has a favorable effect in the selectivity towards oxygenates, while addition of Ir to the binary Rh-Mn catalysts significantly increases the space-time yield of C2+ oxygenates. In this paper, we use quantum mechanical calculations to investigate the distribution of promoter sites within Rh rich nanoparticles and their role in the conversion of syngas towards ethanol. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated by Battelle for the DOE under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. A portion of the research was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national science user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at PNNL.

Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Jaffe, John E.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Mei, Donghai; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gray, Michel J.; Gerber, Mark A.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

51

Band or Polaron: The Hole Conduction Mechanism in the p-Type Spinel Rh 2ZnO4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Given the emerging role of oxide spinels as hole conductors, we discuss in this article the traditional vs. new methodologies of determining the type of conduction mechanism at play - localized polaronic vs. band-like transport. Applying (i) traditional small polaron analysis to our in-situ high temperature four-point conductivity and thermopower measurements, we previously found an activated mobility, which is indicative of the small polaron mechanism. However, (ii) employing the recent developments in correcting density functional methodologies for hole localization, we predict that the self-trapped hole is unstable and that Rh{sub 2}ZnO{sub 4} is instead a band conductor with a large effective mass. The hole mobility measured by high-field room temperature Hall effect also suggests band rather than polaron conduction. The apparent contradiction between the conclusion of the traditional procedure (i) and first-principles theory (ii) is resolved by taking into account in the previous transport analysis the temperature dependence of the effective density of states, which leads to the result that the mobility is actually temperature-independent in Rh{sub 2}ZnO{sub 4}. Our case study on Rh{sub 2}ZnO{sub 4} illustrates the range of experimental and theoretical approaches at hand to determine whether the transport mechanism of a semiconductor is band or small polaron conduction.

Nagaraja, A. R.; Perry, N. H.; Mason, T. O.; Tang, Y.; Grayson, M.; Paudel, T. R.; Lany, S.; Zunger, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Role of Al on the Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Absorption/Desorption by Some Ternary Pd-M-Al Alloys where M=Rh, Ni, Pt, Cr, Ag.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solution of hydrogen and hydride formation in FCC substitutional solid solution Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys have been examined. In contrast to some other Pd ternary alloys, a linear relation does not obtain between the H capacity and x for the Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys investigated here where the H capacity of the alloys is estimated from the H content of the steeply rising part of the isotherms in the hydride phase regions. A linear increase of the dilute phase H solubility with x for these Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys does, however, obtain for these alloys. Although Pd-Rh binary alloys have broader plateaux than does Pd itself, small amounts of Al substituted into Pd0.85Rh0.15 or Pd0.80Rh0.20 alloys can reduce or eliminate the two phase regions, the plateaux; there is, however, not much effect on the dilute phase solubilities. For example, small amounts of Al substituted into the Pd0.85Rh0.15 or Pd0.80Rh0.20 alloys eliminate the plateaux. On the other hand, alloying Pd with Al to form binary alloys with Xal equals 0.015 or 0.030 does not eliminate the plateaux which are present in these binary alloys up to Xal equals 0.075 (298 K). Small amounts of Al substitution do not have such a dramatic effect on the plateau widths of the Pd0.90Ni0.10 and Pd0.80Ni0.20 alloys and similarly substitution of Al into Pd-Cr and Pd-Ag alloys does not introduce any anomalous effects into the isotherms.

Shanahan, K.L.

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Location of hydrogen adsorbed on Rh(111) studied by low-energy electron diffraction and nuclear reaction analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structures of clean and hydrogen-adsorbed Rh(111) surfaces were investigated by dynamical low-energy electron-diffraction (LEED) analysis. Exposure of D{sub 2} induced no additional LEED patterns except for (1x1). Surface-layer relaxation occurs vertically on both clean and D-saturated surfaces. On the clean surface, the interlayer distance between the first and second layers (d{sub 12}) is smaller by 1.2({+-}0.6)% than the corresponding bulk distance of 2.194 A. On the other hand, the contraction of d{sub 12} is removed on the D-saturated surface. Detailed LEED analysis demonstrates that the D atoms are adsorbed on the fcc threefold hollow sites. The absolute saturation coverage of H on Rh(111) was determined to be 0.84 ML by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Moreover, the zero-point vibrational energy of H was derived from the analysis of the NRA resonance profile, which is discussed in comparison with the results of high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy.

Fukuoka, Masayuki; Okada, Michio; Matsumoto, Masuaki; Ogura, Shouhei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043, Japan and PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 156-8505, Japan and CREST-JST, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 156-8505 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Tank waste consolidation analysis for transfer of ORNL RH-TRU tank sludges to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate the schedule and technical issues associated with consolidation of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs). This work supports the DOE Transuranic Waste (TRU) Program plans for private sector treatment of all ORNL TRU sludges for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Transfer of these sludges must be completed in FY 2000 to meet the required schedule for beginning shipment of treated sludges to the WIPP by 2002. This study was performed to (1) evaluate the sludge transfer schedule, (2) evaluate the ability of existing tank systems to contain and manage the sludges and liquids generated during the transfers, and (3) evaluate the costs and schedules of different solid/liquid separation and solids-monitoring methods used during sludge transfer for management of sluice waters.

Kent, T.E.; DePaoli, S.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has submitted a planned change request to use shielded containers for emplacement of selected remote-handled (RH) transuranic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shielded containers for emplacement of selected remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste streams, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM. DOE. 2007. First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Shipment arrives for transportation and handling and will prevent releases under the most severe accident conditions. The design

56

Selective Production of H2 from Ethanol at Low Temperatures over Rh/ZrO2-CeO2 Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of Rh catalysts on various supports have been applied to H2 production from the bio-ethanol steam reforming reaction. Support plays a very important role on product selectivity at low temperatures (below 450°C). Acidic or basic supports favor ethanol dehydration, while ethanol dehydrogenation is favored over neutral supports at low temperatures. Among the catalysts evaluated in this study, the Rh/Ce-ZrO2 catalyst exhibited the highest H2 yield at 450 °C, which is possibly due to the high oxygen storage capacity of Ce-ZrO2 resulting in efficient transfer of mobile oxygen species from the H2O molecule to the reaction intermediate.

Roh, Hyun-Seog; Wang, Yong; King, David L.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Reactive Oxide Overlayer on Rh Nanoparticles during CO Oxidation and Its Size Dependence Studied by in Situ Ambient Pressure XPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CO oxidation is one of the most studied heterogeneous reactions, being scientifically and industrially important, particularly for removal of CO from exhaust streams and preferential oxidation for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. The precious metals Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, and Au are most commonly used for this reaction because of their high activity and stability. Despite the wealth of experimental and theoretical data, it remains unclear what is the active surface for CO oxidation under catalytic conditions for these metals. In this communication, we utilize in situ synchrotron ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) to monitor the oxidation state at the surface of Rh nanoparticles during CO oxidation and demonstrate that the active catalyst is a surface oxide, the formation of which is dependent on particle size. The amount of oxide formed and the reaction rate both increase with decreasing particle size.

Grass, Michael E.; Zhang, Yawen; Butcher, Derek R.; Park, Jeong Y.; Li, Yimin; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Zhang, Tianfu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979. [Pt/Rh, Ni/Rh, Ni/Pt/Rh, Ni, Ni/Ru, Ni/Pt, Ni/Co  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twelve steam reforming catalysts were evaluated using an autothermal reforming screening unit. Duplicate tests were run with two samples to determine test variability. The samples tested contained either base metals, precious metals, or combinations of base and precious metals. The test was capable of distinguishing among samples where gross variations in composition are the main factor; for example, catalysts containing 2% by weight precious metals are more active than catalysts containing 15% by weight nickel. The results show a decrease in hydrocarbon breakthrough as the weight of nickel charged to the constant volume reactor increases. A commercial nickel catalyst, G90C, appears slightly better than some Engelhard prepared samples of equal nickel concentrations due to the higher density of G90C. Visual observation of the used catalysts show that samples containing only precious metals (Pt/Rh) did not coke during the run. The samples containing only base metals (nickel, cobalt) were coked and were magnetic. Samples containing 14.5% nickel by weight with 0.5% precious metals by weight added were not coked, were not magnetic, and had a blue colored core as compared to the black core of the virgin samples. Some speculation about deactivation mechanisms based on these observations are made.

Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S; Mayer, C P

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Monodisperse rhodium (Rh) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as small as {approx}1 nm were synthesized within a fourth generation polyaminoamide (PAMAM) dendrimer, a hyperbranched polymer, in aqueous solution and immobilized by depositing onto a high-surface-area SBA-15 mesoporous support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the as-synthesized Rh and Pt nanoparticles were mostly oxidized. Catalytic activity of the SBA-15 supported Rh and Pt nanoparticles was studied with ethylene hydrogenation at 273 and 293 K in 10 torr of ethylene and 100 torr of H{sub 2} after reduction (76 torr of H{sub 2} mixed with 690 torr of He) at different temperatures. Catalysts were active without removing the dendrimer capping but reached their highest activity after hydrogen reduction at a moderate temperature (423 K). When treated at a higher temperature (473, 573, and 673 K) in hydrogen, catalytic activity decreased. By using the same treatment that led to maximum ethylene hydrogenation activity, catalytic activity was also evaluated for pyrrole hydrogenation.

Huang, Wenyu; Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Zhang, Yawen; Habas, Susan E.; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermodynamic Studies of [H2Rh(diphosphine)2]+ and [HRh(diphosphine)2(CH3CN)]2+ Complexes in Acetonitrile  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermodynamic studies of a series of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ and [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes have been carried out in acetonitrile. Seven different diphosphine (PP) ligands were selected to allow variation of the electronic properties of the ligand substituents, the cone angles, and the natural bite angles (NBAs). Oxidative addition of H2 to [Rh(PP)2]+ complexes is favored by diphosphine ligands with large NBAs, small cone angles, and electron donating substituents, with the NBA being the dominant factor. Large pKa values for [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes are favored by small ligand cone angles, small NBAs, and electron donating substituents with the cone angles playing a major role. The hydride donor abilities of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ complexes increase as the NBAs decrease, the cone angles decrease, and the electron donor abilities of the substituents increase. These results indicate that if solvent coordination is involved in hydride transfer or proton transfer reactions, the observed trends can be understood in terms of a combination of two different steric effects, NBAs and cone angles, and electron-donor effects of the ligand substituents.

Aaron D. Wilson; Alexander J. M. Miller; Daniel L. DuBois; Jay A. Labinger; John E. Bercaw

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reactions of electrophiles with a metal-hydride complex. Reduction of CS{sub 2} by Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} to produce the bridging methanedithiolate complex Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})(SCH{sub 2}S)  

SciTech Connect

The title complex Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})(SCH{sub 2}S) (3) was prepared by the reaction of Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} with Cs{sub 2}. No reaction was observed with CO{sub 2} at ambient or elevated temperatures and pressures. Reaction with OCS gave the known compounds Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})(CO) (4) and Cp*Rh(CO){sub 2} (5) plus S{double_bond}PMe{sub 3}. Kinetic measurements show a first-order dependence on [CS{sub 2}] and a small dependence on solvent polarity. Activation parameters for the reaction with CS{sub 2} were also measured, consistent with an associative transition state. The molecular structure of 3 was determined by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. 3 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n with a = 8.594 (5) {Angstrom}, b = 21.546 (7) {Angstrom}, c = 9.050 (4) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 95.73 (4){degrees}, and Z = 4. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Jones, W.D.; Selmeczy, A.D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Microsoft Word - SRS RH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24, 2009 For Immediate Release REMOTE-HANDLED TRU WASTE SHIPMENTS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ARRIVE SAFELY AT WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad...

63

Microsoft Word - ORNL RH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSURANIC WASTE SHIPMENT ARRIVES SAFELY AT WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT IN NEW MEXICO Energy Department meets regulatory milestone OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department...

64

Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

/sup 11/B study of spin dynamics in Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. [RE = Gd, Er  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been intense interest in re-entrance and coexistence in ternary rare earth magnetic superconductors of the form RE Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. Of particular interest in this investigation is the effect of the superconducting state on the RKKY (Yosida, 1957) coupling between RE ions. Since one expects the conduction electron spin susceptibility chi/sup e/(q) to be cut off for q < 1/xi in the superconducting state, a depression f the RKKY coupling should follow. Such an effect would both depress the magnetic ordering temperature and result in slower relaxation rates tau/sub m//sup -1/ for the RE moments in the superconducting state. This paper reports on the spin dynamics of the RE ions using the /sup 11/B nuclear magnetic relaxation rate T/sub 1//sup -1/ in dilute Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/ (RE = Gd and Er).

Kumagai, K.; Fradin, F.Y.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

{sup 45}Sc Solid State NMR studies of the silicides ScTSi (T=Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt)  

SciTech Connect

The silicides ScTSi (T=Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt) were synthesized by arc-melting and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. The structures of ScCoSi, ScRuSi, ScPdSi, and ScIrSi were refined from single crystal diffractometer data. These silicides crystallize with the TiNiSi type, space group Pnma. No systematic influences of the {sup 45}Sc isotropic magnetic shift and nuclear electric quadrupolar coupling parameters on various structural distortion parameters calculated from the crystal structure data can be detected. {sup 45}Sc MAS-NMR data suggest systematic trends in the local electronic structure probed by the scandium atoms: both the electric field gradients and the isotropic magnetic shifts relative to a 0.2 M aqueous Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution decrease with increasing valence electron concentration and within each T group the isotropic magnetic shift decreases monotonically with increasing atomic number. The {sup 45}Sc nuclear electric quadrupolar coupling constants are generally well reproduced by quantum mechanical electric field gradient calculations using the WIEN2k code. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arc-melting synthesis of silicides ScTSi. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal X-ray data of ScCoSi, ScRuSi, ScPdSi, and ScIrSi. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 45}Sc solid state NMR of silicides ScTSi.

Harmening, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Eckert, Hellmut, E-mail: eckerth@uni-muenster.de [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Fehse, Constanze M. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Sebastian, C. Peter, E-mail: sebastiancp@jncasr.ac.in [New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560064 (India); Poettgen, Rainer, E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.de [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Transmission of broad W/Rh and W/Al (target/filter) x-ray beams operated at 25-49 kVp through common shielding materials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To provide transmission data for broad 25-39 kVp (kilovolt peak) W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al (target/filter, W-tungsten, Rh-rhodium, and Al-aluminum) x-ray beams through common shielding materials, such as lead, concrete, gypsum wallboard, wood, steel, and plate glass. Methods: The unfiltered W-target x-ray spectra measured on a Selenia Dimensions system (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA) set at 20-49 kVp were, respectively, filtered using 50-{mu}m Rh and 700-{mu}m Al, and were subsequently used for Monte Carlo calculations. The transmission of broad x-ray beams through shielding materials was simulated using Geant4 low energy electromagnetic physics package with photon- and electron-processes above 250 eV, including photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, and Rayleigh scattering. The calculated transmission data were fitted using Archer equation with a robust fitting algorithm. Results: The transmission of broad x-ray beams through the above-mentioned shielding materials was calculated down to about 10{sup -5} for 25-39 kVp W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al. The fitted results of {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} in Archer equation were provided. The {alpha} values of kVp Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 40 were approximately consistent with those of NCRP Report No. 147. Conclusions: These data provide inputs for the shielding designs of x-ray imaging facilities with W-anode x-ray beams, such as from Selenia Dimensions.

Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

High Hydrogen Concentrations Detected In The Underground Vaults For RH-TRU Waste At INEEL Compared With Calculated Values Using The INEEL-Developed Computer Code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

About 700 remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste drums are stored in about 144 underground vaults at the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory’s (INEEL’s) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These drums were shipped to the INEEL from 1976 through 1996. During recent monitoring, concentrations of hydrogen were found to be in excess of lower explosive limits. The hydrogen concentration in one vault was detected to be as high as 18% (by volume). This condition required evaluation of the safety basis for the facility. The INEEL has developed a computer program to estimate the hydrogen gas generation as a function of time and diffusion through a series of layers (volumes), with a maximum five layers plus a sink/environment. The program solves the first-order diffusion equations as a function of time. The current version of the code is more flexible in terms of user input. The program allows the user to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the different layers of a configuration and then change the configuration after a given time; e.g.; installation of a filter on an unvented drum or placed in a vault or in a shipping cask. The code has been used to predict vault concentrations and to identify potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. The code has generally predicted higher hydrogen concentrations than the measured values, particularly for the drums older than 20 year, which could be due to uncertainty and conservative assumptions in drum age, heat generation rate, hydrogen generation rate, Geff, and diffusion rates through the layers.

Rajiv Bhatt; Soli Khericha

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

DOE/EIS-0026-SA-4: Supplement Analysis for Use of the 10-160B Transportation Cask for RH-TRU Waste Shipments to WIPP (12/17/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH 1-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH ID,5052347038 PAGE 3/15 [TX/RX NO 6044] 141003 08/31/2004 TOE 15:22 PAGE 4/15 IC,5052347038 AUG-31-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH PAGE 1 of 9 Supplement Analysis for USE OF THE IO-160B TRANSPORTATION CASK FOR RH-TRUWASTE SHIPMENTS TO WIPP 1.0 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is propo~ing to use the CNS lO-160B, Type B Shipping Cask (referred to in this document simply as the lO-160B) to transport remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE originally examined the impacts ofWlPP operations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-OO26-S-2, (SEIS~II). This Supplement Analysis (SA) discusses environmental impacts associated with

70

Microsoft Word - MPUR_Feb2011_final_rh.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11 11 1 February 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 February 8, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. WTI crude oil spot prices averaged $89 per barrel in January, about the same as the December average, while over the same time period the estimated average cost of all crude oil to U.S. refineries increased by about $1 per barrel. Growing volumes of Canadian crude oil imported into the United States contributed to record-high storage levels at Cushing, Oklahoma, and a price discount for WTI compared with similar quality world crudes such as Brent crude oil. Projected WTI spot prices rise to an average of $95 per barrel in December 2011 and continue to increase to $99 per barrel by the

71

141 Numerical Simulation on Influence of Parameters of RH on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Also the rate of decarburization will increase by adding the lift gas flow. ... of Alumina Matrix Multifunctional Composites for Energy Efficient Sliding Systems .... 186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies ... 230 Improving Pump Efficiency and Lowering Life Cycle Cost through Enhanced Ceramic Coatings.

72

WIPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Notice To Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the United States of America. Use of NTP WWW server is intended only for the retrieval of information available through NTP WWW documents. Only authorized WIPP...

73

System Gd–Rh–O: Thermodynamics and Phase Relations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A13: Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery ... A26; Effect of Atomic Layer Deposited Thin TiO2 Layers on the Performance of ...

74

Platinum-Rhodium Alloys(3.5 to 40% Rh)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Typical properties of platinum-rhodium alloys...strength Elongation (a) , % Hardness, HB Density Electrical resistivity (b) , nΩ · m Temperature coefficient (c) , per °C MPa ksi g/cm 3 lb/in. 3 3.5% annealed 170 25 35 60 20.90 0.755 166 0.0022 3.5% hard (d) 415 60 � 120 5.0% annealed 205 30 35 70 20.65 0.746 175 0.0020 5.0% hard (d) 485 70 � 130 10%...

75

Geologic Overview By J.R. Hatch and R.H. Affolter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Yang R., Gao Y., and Chen X. 2006. Factors facilitating or limiting the use of AVO for coal-bed methane of coals, enhance the production of coalbed methane and improve the characterization of coal reservoirs by a mixture of brine and methane in coalbeds from the Corbett Field. In this area, we select two coal seams

76

The Interaction of Dissolved H with Internally Oxidized Pd-Rh Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Binary Pd-M alloys containing small amounts of readily oxidizable solute metals such as M equals Al, Mg, or Zr, can be internally oxidized to form essentially pure Pd matrices containing a second phase of nano-sized oxide precipitates. During internal oxidation Pd atoms are transported to the surface forming Pd nodules while vacancies are transported from the surface to the metal/oxide interface relieving the compressive stress which develops within the alloy due to the expanding metal oxide precipitates. The Pd alloys that have been studied contain that form very stable oxides.

Shanahan, K.L.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Density functional theory study of CHx ,,x=13... adsorption on clean and CO precovered Rh,,111... surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to its high selectivity and activity for methane partial oxidation or steam reforming to synthesis gas American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2751155 I. INTRODUCTION Methane dissociation and activation

Li, Weixue

78

Microsoft Word - 06-1532dsm ltr to Zappe INL-CCP RH A-07-16 Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the results of the certification audit performed for Summary Category Groups S5000 (debris waste). The audit was conducted November 16 - 17, 2006. An electronic version of audit...

79

Applied reaction dynamics: Efficient synthesis gas production via single collision partial oxidation of methane to CO on Rh,,111...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the synthetic fuels examined in the journal paper, namely Fischer-Tropsch fuels (diesel and gasoline blendstocks processes included in our analysis. 2 Synthetic Fuels Included in the Analysis 2.1 Fischer-Tropsch Fuels The product of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis is a mixture of straight-chain hydrocarbons (olefins

Sibener, Steven

80

RH-LLW Disposal Facility Project CD-2/3 to Design/Build Proposal Reconciliation Report  

SciTech Connect

A reconciliation plan was developed and implemented to address potential gaps and responses to gaps between the design/build vendor proposals and the Critical Decision-2/3 approval request package for the Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Project. The plan and results of the plan implementation included development of a reconciliation team comprised of subject matter experts from Battelle Energy Alliance and the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office, identification of reconciliation questions, reconciliation by the team, identification of unresolved/remaining issues, and identification of follow-up actions and subsequent approvals of responses. The plan addressed the potential for gaps to exist in the following areas: • Department of Energy Order 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” requirements, including the performance assessment, composite analysis, monitoring plan, performance assessment/composite analysis maintenance plan, and closure plan • Environmental assessment supporting the National Environmental Policy Act • Nuclear safety • Safeguards and security • Emplacement operations • Requirements for commissioning • General project implementation. The reconciliation plan and results of the plan implementation are provided in a business-sensitive project file. This report provides the reconciliation plan and non-business sensitive summary responses to identified gaps.

Annette L. Schafer

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mesoporous Silica-Supported Metal Oxide-Promoted Rh Nanocatalyst for Selective Production of Ethanol from Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop a process that will convert synthesis gas from coal into ethanol and then transform the ethanol into hydrogen. Principal investigators from Iowa State University include Dr. George Kraus, Dr. Victor Lin, Marek Pruski, and Dr. Robert Brown. Task 1 involves catalyst development and catalyst scale up. Mesoporous manganese silicate mixed oxide materials will be synthesized, characterized and evaluated. The first-and secondgeneration catalysts have been prepared and scaled up for use in Task 2. The construction of a high-pressure reactor system for producing synthetic liquid fuel from simulated synthesis gas stream has been completed as the first step in Task 2. Using the first- and second generation catalysts, the reactor has demonstrated the production of synthetic liquid fuel from a simulated synthesis gas stream.

George Kraus

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Role of metal-support interactions on the activity of Pt and Rh catalysts for reforming methane and butane.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For residential fuel cell systems, reforming of natural gas is one option being considered for providing the H{sub 2} necessary for the fuel cell to operate. Industrially, natural gas is reformed using Ni-based catalysts supported on an alumina substrate, which has been modified to inhibit coke formation. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed a new family of catalysts derived from solid oxide fuel cell technology for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to generate H{sub 2}. These catalysts consist of a transition metal supported on an oxide-ion-conducting substrate, such as ceria, that has been doped with a small amount of a non-reducible element, such as gadolinium, samarium, or zirconium. Unlike alumina, the oxide-ion-conducting substrate has been shown to induce strong metal-support interactions. Metal-support interactions are known to play an important role in influencing the catalytic activity of many metals supported on oxide supports. Based on results from temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation and kinetic reaction studies, this paper discusses the role of the metal and the substrate in the metal-support interactions, and how these interactions influence the activity and the selectivity of the catalyst in reforming methane and butane to hydrogen for use in fuel cell power systems.

Rossignol, C.; Krause, T.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

In vitro Study of Herves Transposable Element of Anopheles gambiae and Use of RNA Interference (RNAi) in Culex quinquefasciatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Plasterk, R.H. (1994). Tcl transposase of Caenorhabditisand Plasterk, R.H. (1994). Tcl transposase of Caenorhabditisand Plasterk, R.H. (1994). Tcl transposase of Caenorhabditis

Kahlon, Amandeep Singh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower RH upper RH UPS Waste Heat Humid- ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electriclower RH upper RH UPS Waste Heat Humid- ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing theHbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product. Keywords:phenols to corresponding catechols (4b) (Figure 2) [9]. The

Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Direct DNA Photocleavage by a New Intercalating Dirhodium(II/II) Complex: Comparison to Rh2(-O2CCH3)4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.; Akiyama, S.-I.; Pommier, Y. Mol. Cancer Ther. 2002, 1, 1327- 1334. (b) Sodet, O.; Khan, Q. A.; Kohn, K. W-Cancer Agents 2002, 2, 387-401. (3) (a) Kanzaki, A.; Takebayashi, Y.; Ren, X.-Q.; Miyashita, H.; Mori, S of Chemistry, The Ohio State UniVersity, Columbus, Ohio 43210, and Texas A&M UniVersity, College Station, Texas

Turro, Claudia

87

Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperatures, data not shown). Butane was also observed as ainteractions. 47 Secondly, butane formation was reported to

Huang, Wenyu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Assessment of coal and graphite electrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electroplated carbon fiber electrodes with noble metals (Pt, Rh, Pt-Rh, Pt-Ir, and Pt-Ir-Rh) are evaluated on a sandwich configuration coal electrolytic cell (CEC) for the… (more)

Sathe, Nilesh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Accelerated Laboratory Testing of PV Polymers using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... More district lamellar structures observed on the exposed samples indicate ... 85°C, 85% RH (Damp Heat) 3. NIST SPHERE: UV, 55°C, 0% RH ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Graphic1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo A radiological control technician checks the RH-72B cask before the waste handling process. The RH safety basis document went through changes under the new DSA...

91

Reactivity of Bis(amino)cyclopropenylidenes (BACs) and Cyclic(alkyl)(amino)carbenes (CAACs):  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s catalyst Unexpected formation of [(BAC) 2 Rh(COD)][(COD)RhCl 2 ] Synthesisof (BAC) 2 Ni(COD) Rapid Exchange of ?-coordinated COD

Kuchenbeiser, Glenn Richard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 pages. Lasseter, R.H. 2007. “Microgrids and Distributed3 pages. Lasseter, R.H. 2007. “Microgrids and Distributed2006. Autonomous Control of Microgrids. IEEE PES Meeting,

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Air pollutant penetration through airflow leaks into buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aluminum, brick, concrete, plywood, redwood lumber, pinelaboratory. Mounted in a plywood panel, the finished windowsheet 8% RH 70% RH Plywood f Plate glass f Aluminum f

Liu, De-Ling

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development of electron beam pumped KrF Lasers for fusion energy J. D. Sethian, M. Friedman, J. Giuliani, R.H. Lehmberg, M. Myers, S.P. Obenschain,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant study showed a KrF based system could lead to an economically attractive power plant [3]. In view drive targets; their short wavelength (248 nm), which mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities and transport; KrF kinetics and laser propagation; and pulsed power. The work will be cast in context of the two

95

R.H. Williams, Decarbonized fossil energy carriers and their energy technological competitors, prepared for the IPCC Workshop on Carbon Capture and Storage, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, 18-21 November 2002 (1/22/03).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or enhanced coal bed methane recovery) using the recovered CO2. Such possibilities were neglected such policies "to preserve the coal option." Technology blind climate- 22 For power generation, an NGCC emits benefits arise with coal H2 only if the CO2 is captured/stored (Ogden et al., 2003a). 23 Excluding methane

96

Characterization and Correction of Relative Humidity Measurements from Vaisala RS80-A Radiosondes at Cold Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiosonde relative humidity (RH) measurements are known to be unreliable at cold temperatures. This study characterizes radiosonde RH measurements from Vaisala RS80-A thin-film capacitive sensors in the temperature range 0° to ?70°C. Sources of ...

Larry M. Miloshevich; Holger Vömel; Ari Paukkunen; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Samuel J. Oltmans

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The role of the right cerebral hemisphere in processing novel metaphoric expressions: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous research suggests that the right hemisphere (RH) may contribute uniquely to the processing of metaphoric language. However, causal relationships between local brain activity in the RH and metaphors comprehension were never established. In addition, ...

Gorana Pobric; Nira Mashal; Miriam Faust; Michal Lavidor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

An Evaluation of Problems Affecting the Measurement of Low Relative Humidity on the United States Radiosonde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the low-humidity problem that has plagued the radiosonde hygristor for nearly 30 years and that makes the hygristor appear to become insensitive at relative humidities (RH) below about 20% RH. The problem led the National ...

Charles G. Wade

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An introduction section discusses aspects of the basic design of the CRBPP that are criticized by Rangno and Hobbs (RH). Individual sections reply to the following five aspects of our analysis discussed by RH: diffusion of seeding agent, ...

Robert D. Elliott; Russell W. Shaffer; Arnold Court; Jack F. Hannaford

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Note on Temperature and Relative Humidity Corrections for Humidity Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A widely used relative humidity (RH) sensor in atmospheric science is based upon a capacitive device that outputs voltage as a linear function of RH and then is corrected by an empirically determined polynomial expression, which is only a ...

Rex J. Fleming

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION REPORT OF INCLUSION SURVEY...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SCREENING DATA BACKGROUND EXPOSURE RATE: 9 pRh BACKGROUND + 1 STANDARD DEVIATION: 12 jARh BACKGROUND EXPOSURE RATE RANGE: 8-10 pRh EXPOSURE RATE RANGE IN CONTAMINATED...

102

English-Lahu Lexicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N). 4. grind; reduce (N rh + RRC). to powder: m? (V). 5. toclause v.t. transitive verb RRC right- relative clause (l? ? a -l? (N). ve (N rh + RRC). 4. bench (“long stool”): 2.

Matisoff, James A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The salivary gland transcriptome of the neotropical malaria vector Anopheles darlingi reveals accelerated evolution of genes relevant to hematophagy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sali- vary peroxidase/catechol oxidase of the mosquitoNussenzveig RH: The salivary catechol oxidase/ peroxidase

Calvo, Eric; Pham, Van M; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Andersen, John F; Ribeiro, José M C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The salivary gland transcriptome of the neotropical malaria vector Anopheles darlingi reveals accelerated evolution of genes relevant to hematophagy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sali- vary peroxidase/catechol oxidase of the mosquitoNussenzveig RH: The salivary catechol oxidase/ peroxidase

Calvo, Eric; Pham, Van M; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Andersen, John F; Ribeiro, José M C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal resistance value  RH    relative humidity    S    solar gain, shading    SEER    seasonal energy efficiency 

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

c . .. . [1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a drift chamber simulation program. [7] R.H. Fowler, L. Nordheim. Electron Emission in Intense Electric

107

Contact: Dr. Michael Pishko at mpishko@tamu.edu or 979.845.3348. Also, visit che.tamu.edu/people/faculty Note from the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid Pt/Rh nets 1940 Catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons (gasoline) Pt/Al2O3 1940 Benzene hydrogenation

Tomberlin, Jeff

108

Contact: Dr. Charles Glover at c-glover@tamu.edu.edu or 979.845.3389. Also, visit che.tamu.edu/people/faculty Faculty Index -2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid Pt/Rh nets 1940 Catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons (gasoline) Pt/Al2O3 1940 Benzene hydrogenation

Tomberlin, Jeff

109

Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1. HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid Pt/Rh nets 1940 Catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons (gasoline) Pt/Al2O3 1940 Benzene hydrogenation

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

110

Search advanced Past issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and performance of materials in coal gasification environments ASM, page! 709 (1980). j R.H. JONES and S

111

NIST Workshop 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in large concrete pours ($$$$; Liquid nitrogen cooling; Use phase ... measured at 93 % RH (potassium nitrate saturated salt solution) via ...

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Total Synthesis of Galbulimima Alkaloid (+/-) G. B. 13 and the Development of an Anomalous Heck Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miura (see eq 25). 91 O [RhCl(cod)] 2 , o-xylene NaBPh 4 R Rcyclization studies using [Rh(cod)(OH)] 2 with dppbenz inthe more active catalyst [Rh(cod)(MeCN) 2 ] + BF 4? , whose

Larson, Kimberly Katherine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

sp2 Carbon-Hydrogen Bond (C-H) Functionalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 (p-NMe 2 )PhPMe 2 [IrCl(cod)] 2 PCy 3 a 5 mol % ligand (1:RhCl(coe) 2 ] 2 and [RhCl(cod)] 2 precatalysts gave goodwe elected to use [RhCl(cod)] 2 for all subsequent studies

Yotphan, Sirilata

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Design of Cruzain Inhibitors for the Treatment of Chagas Disease AND Development and Application of Methods for the Asymmetric Synthesis of ?-Branched Amines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available and air-stable precatalysts, Rh[(cod)(Cl)] 2and Rh[(OH)(cod)] 2 were found to be highly effective asTable 3.1, entries 4-5). Rh[(cod)(OH)] 2 was the most active

Brak, Katrien

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ylides: Stabilization of Novel, Low Valent Carbon-Based Ligands with Applications in Catalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Dipp NBS N PBr 3 Dipp N Ni(COD) 2 Dipp N X PPh 3 Br PPh 39 P Ph 2 Li(thf) x P 8 Ph 2 [RhCl(COD)] 2 Dipp N Rh -LiCl10 P Ph 2 CO -COD Dipp CO N Rh CO 11 P Ph 2 Scheme 2.4.

Asay, Matt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Synthesis of Novel Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles with Applications Towards Catalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the rhodium source [(COD)Rh(NCCH 3 ) 2 ]BF 4 , and theof the reactants [(COD)Rh(NCCH 3 ) 2 ] BF 4 , (Bu 4 N) 2 HPOThe rhodium precursor chosen was [(COD)RhCl] 2 (COD = 1,5-

McMurdo, Meredith Joanne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Paul Thomas, TOFE, Nashville, August 2012 Page 1 The Impact of Burning Plasma on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ personnel dose rates · Remote Handling · Blanket and Divertor · Diagnostics · Dust and tritium control must be handled and maintained using remote handling methods. by Blanket RH System by Divertor RH Remote Handling ­ ITER RH philosophy #12;Page 15Paul Thomas, TOFE, Nashville, August 2012 Transfer Casks

118

TTW 9-29-09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2009 9, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 9-28-09) 7,844 Shipments received since opening (7,563 CH and 281 RH) 62,866 Cubic meters of waste disposed (62,733 CH and 133 RH) 121,401 Containers disposed in the underground (121,125 CH and 276 RH) WIPP receives first RH shipment from Vallecitos Nuclear Center File photo The Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) has officially shipped to WIPP. The first shipment of remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) from GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy's VNC safely arrived at WIPP early in the morning on September 18. About 30-40 shipments of RH-TRU waste will be made to WIPP from VNC, which is located near Sunol, Calif. Shipments are slated to be completed in mid-November. As of mid-September, 79

119

TeamWorks - A publication of the U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2013 September 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 9-29-13) 11,629 Shipments received since opening (10,924 CH and 705 RH) 88,852 Cubic meters of waste disposed (88,500 CH and 352 RH) 169,339 Containers disposed in the underground (168,627 CH and 712 RH) *CH - Contact-handled transuranic waste RH - Remote-handled transuranic waste File Photo WIPP receives 700th remote-handled transuranic waste shipment On Sept. 12, the 700th shipment of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste reached the gate at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The milestone shipment was transported to WIPP in an RH-72B shipping package that originated from the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) program at DOE's Idaho site. "Safety is the most important aspect of every shipment," said EM

120

Microsoft Word - ICP-12-010webpost.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-004 2-004 SECTION A. Project Title: INTEC - Suspect RH-TRU (AMWTP) SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action involves transferring suspect remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste containers from the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The suspect containers will be opened and inspected for RH-TRU. All non-RH-TRU (i.e. low level waste, Contact Handled (CH)-TRU, secondary waste, etc.) materials will be returned to AMWTP. The identified RH-TRU waste will be repackaged as necessary and made ready for characterization and shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The specific steps are:  Transfer suspect RH-TRU waste containers from Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to INTEC for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Growth and structure of water on SiO2 films on Si investigated byKelvin probe microscopy and in situ X-ray Spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect

The growth of water on thin SiO{sub 2} films on Si wafers at vapor pressures between 1.5 and 4 torr and temperatures between -10 and 21 C has been studied in situ using Kelvin Probe Microscopy and X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopies. From 0 to 75% relative humidity (RH) water adsorbs forming a uniform film 4-5 layers thick. The surface potential increases in that RH range by about 400 mV and remains constant upon further increase of the RH. Above 75% RH the water film grows rapidly, reaching 6-7 monolayers at around 90% RH and forming a macroscopic drop near 100%. The O K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectrum around 75% RH is similar to that of liquid water (imperfect H-bonding coordination) at temperatures above 0 C and ice-like below 0 C.

Verdaguer, A.; Weis, C.; Oncins, G.; Ketteler, G.; Bluhm, H.; Salmeron, M.

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

Development of colored alumilite dosimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor, which are installed in the vacuum vessel of the ITER, are maintained by remote handling equipment (RH equipment). The RH equipment for maintenance is operated under sever environmental conditions, such as high temperature (50 approx 100 degC), high gamma-ray radiation (approx 1 kGy/h) in an atmosphere of inert gas or vacuum; therefore many components of the RH equipment must have a suitable radiation resistance efficiency for long time operation (10 approx 100 MGy). Typical components of the RH equipment have been extensively tested under an intensive gamma-ray radiation. Monitoring of the radiation dose of the components of the RH equipment is essential to control the operation period of the RH equipment considering radiation resistance. However, the maximum measurable radiation dose of the conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chamber, liquid, glass and plastic dosimeters are limited to b...

Obara, K; Yagi, T; Yokoo, N

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

TRU TeamWorks 7-7-11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2011 7, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 7-6-11) 9,730 Shipments received since opening (9,234 CH and 496 RH) 75,969 Cubic meters of waste disposed (75,717 CH and 252 RH) 147,852 Containers disposed in the underground (147,357 CH and 495 RH) DOE completes cleanup at New York, California sites "Cleanup of these two sites represents important and continued progress in the

124

Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst. Seventh quarterly report, February 7, 1992--May 7, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to explore the secondary dehydration of methanol over {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support and over bimetallic Rh-Mo/{gamma}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a new series of K-doped Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts was synthesized. Work on synthesis of bimetallic Rh-Mo clusters is reported.

Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

1992-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

125

Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to explore the secondary dehydration of methanol over [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] support and over bimetallic Rh-Mo/[gamma]- Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], a new series of K-doped Rh-Mo/[gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts was synthesized. Work on synthesis of bimetallic Rh-Mo clusters is reported.

Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

1992-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel Based Remote Handled TRU Waste Stored at INEEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

Soli T. Khericha; Rajiv N. Bhatt; Kevin Liekhus

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel-Based Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Stored at the INEEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

Khericha, S.; Bhatt, R.; Liekhus, K.

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Draft TTW 5-8-12.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2012 8, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 5-7-12) 10,483 Shipments received since opening (9,938 CH and 545 RH) 81,340 Cubic meters of waste disposed (81,067 CH and 273 RH) 159,068 Containers disposed in the underground (158,526 CH and 542 RH) Sandia National Laboratories Cleanup a Big Deal for New Mexico New Mexico reached an important cleanup milestone with the final shipments of legacy TRU waste from

129

Corrosion Control and Lay-up of the Crystal River-3 Steam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Corrosion Control and Lay-up of the Crystal River-3 Steam Generators and Secondary Plant during an Extended Outage by R.H. Thompson ...

130

CO HYDROGENATION OVER CLEAN AND OXIDIZED RHODIUM FOIL AND SINGLE CRYSTAL CATALYSTS. CORRELATIONS OF CATALYST ACTIVITY, SELECTIVITY AND SURFACE COMPOSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND OXIDIZED RHODIUM FOIL AND SINGLE CRYSTAL CATALYSTS.CORRELATIONS OF CATALYST ACTIVITY, SELECTIVITY AND SURFACEobserved over the clean Rh catalysts during the catalyzed

Castner, D.G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Outside Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vecchia, DF, Caldwell, GA, Tryon, PV and Jones, RH (1980). "Logistic regression for solar flare probability forecasting," Solar-Terrestrial Predictions ...

132

Microsoft PowerPoint - EM SSAB Chairs Webinar - Marcinowski Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from the Moab project to Crescent Junction for disposal * Idaho: Start treatment of sodium bearing waste, continue CH and RH TRU projects * Los Alamos: Work toward completion...

133

CX-009632: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

INTEC – Suspect RH-TRU (AMWTP) CX(s) Applied: NO CX GIVEN Date: 11/23/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

134

Field Monitoring Protocol: Mini-Split Heat Pumps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperatures, relative humidity (RH), and air flows. This report focuses on methods to cost-effectively estimate these parameters, particularly indoor head air flow. Data points...

135

VOL. 60, NO. 10 15 MAY 2003J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2003 American Meteorological Society 1201  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Teixeira 2001): 1 a . (21)cl K qer sat 1 (1 RH) D q ,cl The cloud cover profile based on (21) is also

Bretherton, Chris

136

Printed on Recycled Paper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The shipment, which originated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL),...

137

Microsoft Word - Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

audit performed for remote-handled (RH) Summary Category Group (SCG) S5000 debris waste. The audit was conducted August 5 - 7, 2008. An electronic version of audit...

138

Practical estimation of veering effects on high-rise structures: a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Teshigawara, M. (2001), Structural design principles (chapter 6 ... RH and Lappe, UO (1964), “Wind and temperature ... on a 1400 ft tower”, J. Appl. ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Planned Change Request for Shielded Containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as presented in the HalfPACT Safety Analysis Report (SAR), RH-TRU 72-B SAR and the TRUPACT II SAR. The tests

140

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(TRU) Wastes (soils and debris) and RH TRU sludge at the TRU Waste Processing Center (TWPC). This activity includes the coordination, receipt, and storage of legacy and newly...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implemented at relatively low cost. References [1] Averch,Departures from Marginal Cost Pricing,” American EconomicCoase, R.H. , “The Marginal Cost Controversy. ” Economica,

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Microsoft Word - Final Annual TRU Waste Inventory Report-2009...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Conservation and Recovery Act rem Roentgen equivalent man RFETS Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site RH Remote-handled RN Radionuclide SNL-A Sandia National Laboratories -...

143

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radius (um) Temperature (degree Celsius) Case 2 Heavy pollution Typical summer monsoon rain belt TMI Rainfall PR Rainfall Area Rainnon-Rain Discrepancy RH Cloud top T A...

144

Sinusoidal heart rate pattern: Reappraisal of its definition and clinical significance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fetal jeopardy. In 1974, Bas- kett and Koh 9 reported aseverely Rh sensitized fetuses. Bas- ket and Koh 9 suggested

Modanlou, Houchang D; Murata, Y

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Templated CDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of test and validation, this is critical as it provides an organic, single, and ... Dolin RH, Alschuler L, Boyer S, Beebe C, Behlen FM, Biron PV, Shabo A ...

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS - July 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EAST TECHNICAL UNIV. ARGONNE NAT. LAB. AUSTRALIAN NATIONALPasadena, CA 91125 USA C.E.W. Ward Argonne NationalLaboratory Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA R.H. Phillips

Kelly, R.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EAST TECHNICAL UNIV. ARGONNE NAT. LAB. AUSTRALIAN NATIONALPasadena, CA 91125 USA C.E.W. Ward Argonne NationalLaboratory Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA R.H. Phillips

Kelly, R.L.; Particle Data Group

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Impact of Commercial Building Envelope Airtightness on HVAC Energy Use. ... Seem, JE; House, JM; Monroe, RH; Optimization of Finned-Tube ...

149

Self-contained Kondo effect in single molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data were collected at the SSRL, a national user facilityRadiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a Rh-coated mirror to

Booth, Corwin H.; Walter, Marc D.; Daniel, Million; Lukens, Wayne W.; Andersen, Richard A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ARM - Datastreams - sashenir  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Si CCD optical bench degC benchtemperaturespectrometernir ( time ) Spectrometer chiller internal dew point degC chillerdewpoint ( time ) Spectrometer chiller internal RH %...

151

Energy Systems and Population Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RH, Woods J. 1993. Biomass for Energy: Supply Prospects. In56). The supply is dominated by traditional biomass, mostlya sustainable supply of wood or an alternative biomass

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RH, Breaker RR: Comparative genomics reveals 104 candidateof transporters. BMC Genomics 2008, 9:330. 16. Green NJ,in proteobacteria: comparative genomics analysis. FEMS

Sun, Eric I; Leyn, Semen A; Kazanov, Marat D; Saier, Milton H; Novichkov, Pavel S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

simulation calculation on calciotherimic reduction of titanium dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of Reducer and Slag Concentrations in the Iron-carbon Nuggets ... Factors Affecting the Mixing Characteristics of Molten Steel in the RH Refining Process.

154

Static Model for Converter Steelmaking by Using Limestone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A partition model for carbon dioxide reacting with [C], [Si], [Mn] and [Fe] is established .... Factors Affecting the Mixing Characteristics of Molten Steel in the RH ...

155

NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-147b IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE GREAT LAKES ECOSYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

homeless people. Clin Infect Dis. 2002;35:684­9. 7. Kosek M, Lavarello R, Gilman RH, Delgado J, Manguina C

156

Enabling Sustainability through Metal Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013... nanoparticles derived from rice husk (RH) biomass as the starting ... Furthermore the state of the art process is a very expensive solution and ...

157

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control and Design of Microgrid Components. January. 257R.H. 2007. “CERTS Microgrid. ” International Conference onValidation of the CERTS Microgrid Concept: The CEC/CERTS

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOE N 435.1, Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Packaging  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Provides specific instructions for packaging and/or repackaging contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) and remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste in a manner ...

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Lead Research and Development Activity for DOEs High Temperature...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane and MEA durability (C) Performance: High MEA performance at low relative humidity (RH) and high temperature Technical Targets FSEC plays a supporting role to the six...

160

EXPERIMENTAL METHODS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Laboratory Equipment - Dickson TH550 Humidity Meter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dickson TH550 Humidity Meter. Description: ... Temperature: -30 °C to 50 °C; Humidity: 0% to 95% RH (no-condensing); Dew Point: -30 °C to 50 °C; ...

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effect of Humidity on the Composition of Isoprene Photooxidation Secondary Organic Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of relative humidity (RH) on the composition and concentrations of gas-phase products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the photooxidation of isoprene under high-NOx conditions was investigated. The yields of most gas-phase products were the same regardless of initial water vapor concentration with exception of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde, which were considerably affected by RH. A significant change was observed in the SOA composition, with many unique condensed-phase products formed under humid (90% RH) vs. dry (<2% RH) conditions, without any observable effect on the rate and extent of the SOA mass growth.

Nguyen, Tran B.; Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Permit PMR Permit Modification Request RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act RH Remote-Handled TRU transuranic TSDF Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facility VHS Vent Hood...

164

DOE-CBFO-09-3441 FRAM REV 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of an integrated, streamlined regulatory framework for contact- handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) waste receipt, handling, and disposal. * Ensure worker safety and...

165

Reevaluation of the Coding Potential and Proteomic Analysis of the BAC Derived Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Strain 68-1  

SciTech Connect

Cytomegaloviruses are highly host restricted resulting in co-speciation with their hosts. As a natural pathogen of rhesus macaques (RM), Rhesus Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) has therefore emerged as a highly relevant experimental model for pathogenesis and vaccine development due to its close evolutionary relationship to human CMV (HCMV). To date, most in vivo experiments performed with RhCMV employed strain 68-1 cloned as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). However, the complete genome sequence of the 68-1 BAC has not been determined. Furthermore, the gene content of the RhCMV genome is unknown and previous open reading frame (ORF) predictions relied solely on uninterrupted ORFs with an arbitrary cutoff of 300bp. To obtain a more precise picture of the actual proteins encoded by the most commonly used molecular clone of RhCMV we re-evaluated the RhCMV 68-1 BAC-genome by whole genome shotgun sequencing and determined the protein content of the resulting RhCMV virions by proteomics. By additionally comparing the RhCMV genome to that of several closely related Old World Monkey (OWM) CMVs we were able to filter out many unlikely ORFs and obtain a simplified map of the RhCMV genome. This comparative genomics analysis eliminated many genes previously characterized as RhCMV-specific while consolidating a high conservation of ORFs among OWM-CMVs and between RhCMV and HCMV. Moreover, virion proteomics independently validated the revised ORF predictions since only proteins encoded by predicted ORFs could be detected. Taken together these data suggest a much higher conservation of genome and virion structure between CMVs of humans, apes and OWMs than previously assumed. Remarkably, BAC-derived RhCMV is able to establish and maintain persistent infection despite the lack of multiple genes homologous to HCMV genes involved in tissue tropism.

Malouli, Daniel; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Camp, David G.; Chang, W. L.; Barry, Peter A.; Smith, Richard D.; Fruh, Klaus

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

TTW 11-10-10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2010 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 11-9-10) 9,150 Shipments received since opening (8,715 CH and 435 RH) 71,990 Cubic meters of waste disposed (71,768 CH and 222 RH) 139,143...

167

TTW 6-16-10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2010 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 6-15-10) 8,643 Shipments received since opening (8,272 CH and 371 RH) 68,296 Cubic meters of waste disposed (68,109 CH and 187 RH) 133,440...

168

Reforming of methane with carbon dioxide to synthesize gas over supported rhodium catalysts: II. A steady-state tracing analysis: Mechanistic aspects of the carbon and oxygen reaction pathways to form CO  

SciTech Connect

Steady-state tracing techniques have been applied to investigate mechanistic aspects of the CH{sub 4} reforming reaction over CO{sub 2} over Rh supported on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as catalysts. It was found that the surface coverage of active carbon-containing species, which are found in the reaction pathway to CO formation, is of the order of 0.2 over the Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, while it is very small ({theta}{sub c}, < 0.02) over Rh/YSZ. The surface coverage of active oxygen-containing species which lead to the formation of CO is found to be very small over both Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Rh/YSZ catalysts. However, over the Rh/YSZ catalyst it was found that there exists a large reservoir of lattice oxygen species of the carrier which interact reversibly with gaseous CO{sub 2} under reforming reaction conditions. A spillover of these lattice oxygen species onto the Rh surface seems to occur, contributing to the formation of CO and H{sub 2}O. This reaction route proceeds in parallel with the reforming reaction on the Rh surface. 27 refs., 12 figs.

Efstathiou, A.M.; Kladi, A.; Tsipouriari, V.A. [Univ. of Patras (Greece)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction. Progress report, April 1992--March 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dynamics of the H + RH {r_arrow} H{sub 2} + R (RH=CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, CHCl{sub 3}) were studied.

Valentini, J.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Relationship between Relative Humidity and the Dewpoint Temperature in Moist Air: A Simple Conversion and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative humidity (RH) and the dewpoint temperature (td) are two widely used indicators of the amount of moisture in air. The exact conversion from RH to td, as well as highly accurate approximations, are too complex to be done easily without ...

Mark G. Lawrence

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Recommended strategy for the disposal of remote-handled transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

The current baseline plan for RH TRU (remote-handled transuranic) waste disposal is to package the waste in special canisters for emplacement in the walls of the waste disposal rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The RH waste must be emplaced before the disposal rooms are filled by contact-handled waste. Issues which must be resolved for this plan to be successful include: (1) construction of RH waste preparation and packaging facilities at large-quantity sites; (2) finding methods to get small-quantity site RH waste packaged and certified for disposal; (3) developing transportation systems and characterization facilities for RH TRU waste; (4) meeting lag storage needs; and (5) gaining public acceptance for the RH TRU waste program. Failure to resolve these issues in time to permit disposal according to the WIPP baseline plan will force either modification to the plan, or disposal or long-term storage of RH TRU waste at non-WIPP sites. The recommended strategy is to recognize, and take the needed actions to resolve, the open issues preventing disposal of RH TRU waste at WIPP on schedule. It is also recommended that the baseline plan be upgraded by adopting enhancements such as revised canister emplacement strategies and a more flexible waste transport system.

Bild, R.W. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Program Integration Dept.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

??? ???????? ? ? ???? ??! " #??$"% & '? ()? & 0 1"??2%3 &?546 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B2CDFE@GIH5PQGSRUT GVP W)XYE`R Hba cdDFeXFf f)XgRhDdEpidq rfsa@ HtE`RhDvu. fwXsRxiby?Tv ! Rhc?i isP?R?Xd?dy GVPvc?i?? Epiby?G' ...

173

TRU TeamWorks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 3-26-13, 6 a.m.) 11,1159 Shipments received since opening (10,521 CH and 638 RH) 85,719 Cubic meters of waste disposed (85,403 CH and 316 RH)...

174

Idaho Cleanup Project Contract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Infrastructure 28 KB C.8-11 RH-TRU Waste 114 KB C.8-12 LLWMLLW 87 KB C.8-13 RH TRU Hot Cell Equipment Upgrades 33 KB The following Section C Exhibits apply to the contract...

175

TRU TeamWorks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 4-28-13) 11,241 Shipments received since opening (10,592 CH and 649 RH) 86,337 Cubic meters of waste disposed (86,013 CH and 324 RH) 166,243...

176

Power Handling in ITER: Divertor and Blanket Design and R&D M. Merola 1), D. Loesser 2), R. Raffray 1) on behalf of the ITER Organization, ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that can be handled via the Remote Handling ports and still have an integer number of cassettes per sector operation. Therefore the divertor is allocated a Remote Handling (RH) Maintenance Class 1. Divertor holes in the FW panels for the RH of the SB, and to minimize the space requirement in the Hot Cell. 3

Raffray, A. René

177

X:\ARM_19~1\P273-281.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RH RH c ) RH c RH c RH c Session Papers 273 Evaluation of Cloud Prediction and Determination of Critical Relative Humidity for a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model N. L. Seaman, Z. Guo, and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Predictions of cloud occurrence and vertical location from the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) were evaluated statistically using cloud observations obtained at Coffeyville, Kansas, as part of the Second International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment campaign. Seventeen cases were selected for simulation during a November-December 1991 field study. MM5 was used to produce two sets of

178

Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

Quinlan, M.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

Washington TRU Solutions

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh rh rh" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Unresolved issues for the disposal of remote-handled transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to dispose of 176,000 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by the defense activities of the US Government. The envisioned inventory contains approximately 6 million cubic feet of contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste and 250,000 cubic feet of remote handled transuranic (RH TRU) waste. CH TRU emits less than 0.2 rem/hr at the container surface. Of the 250,000 cubic feet of RH TRU waste, 5% by volume can emit up to 1,000 rem/hr at the container surface. The remainder of RH TRU waste must emit less than 100 rem/hr. These are major unresolved problems with the intended disposal of RH TRU waste in the WIPP. (1) The WIPP design requires the canisters of RH TRU waste to be emplaced in the walls (ribs) of each repository room. Each room will then be filled with drums of CH TRU waste. However, the RH TRU waste will not be available for shipment and disposal until after several rooms have already been filled with drums of CH TRU waste. RH TRU disposal capacity will be loss for each room that is first filled with CH TRU waste. (2) Complete RH TRU waste characterization data will not be available for performance assessment because the facilities needed for waste handling, waste treatment, waste packaging, and waste characterization do not yet exist. (3) The DOE does not have a transportation cask for RH TRU waste certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These issues are discussed along with possible solutions and consequences from these solutions. 46 refs.

Silva, M.K.; Neill, R.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

TTW 9-1-11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2011 1, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 8-31-11) 9,922 Shipments received since opening (9,412 CH and 510 RH) 77,352 Cubic meters of waste disposed (77,095 CH and 257 RH) 150,976 Containers disposed in the underground (150,466 CH and 510 RH) WIPP receives first TRUPACT-III shipment The TRUPACT-III shipping package arrives at the WIPP site. The first TRUPACT-III waste-shippi ng package has arrived at WIPP.

183

TTW 5-26-11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26, 2011 26, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 5-25-11) 9,598 Shipments received since opening (9,114 CH and 484 RH) 75,076 Cubic meters of waste disposed (74,829 CH and 247 RH) 145,613 Containers disposed in the underground (145,129 CH and 484 RH) CBFO assists with Department of Energy public meetings Carlsbad Mayor Dale Janway signs in at the Greater-Than-Class-C meeting held in Carlsbad, NM in April. Two more m eetings were held throughout New Mexico

184

TTW 4-19-11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2011 19, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 4-18-11) 9,453 Shipments received since opening (8,983 CH and 470 RH) 74,022 Cubic meters of waste disposed (73,781 CH and 241 RH) 143,240 Containers disposed in the underground (142,772 CH and 468 RH) WIPP reaches 12 years of safe operations It's hard to believe, but it has now been a dozen years since WIPP received its first shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste. The underground repository marked its 12-year

185

The Remote-Handled TRU Waste Program  

SciTech Connect

RH TRU Waste is radioactive waste that requires shielding in addition to that provided by the container to protect people nearby from radiation exposure. By definition, the radiation dose rate at the outer surface of the container is greater than 200 millirem per hour and less than 1,000 rem per hour. The DOE is proposing a process for the characterization of RH TRU waste planned for disposal in the WIPP. This characterization process represents a performance-driven approach that satisfies the requirements of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations for WIPP long-term performance, the transportation requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Department of Transportation, as well as the technical safety requirements of RH TRU waste handling. The transportation, management and disposal of RH TRU waste is regulated by external government agencies as well as by the DOE itself. Externally, the characterization of RH-TRU waste for disposal at the WIPP is regulated by 20.4.1.500 New Mexico Administrative Code (incorporating 40 CFR 261.13) for the hazardous constituents and 40 CFR 194.24 for the radioactive constituents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission certifies the shipping casks and the transportation system must meet DOT regulations. Internally, the DOE evaluates the environmental impacts of RH TRU waste transportation, handling and disposal through its National Environmental Policy Act program. The operational safety is assessed in the RH TRU Waste Safety Analysis Report, to be approved by the DOE. The WIPP has prepared a modification request to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit that includes modifications to the WIPP facility for the safe receipt and handling of RH TRU waste and the addition of an RH TRU waste analysis plan. Modifications to the facility include systems and equipment for safe handling of RHTRU containers. Two shipping casks are to be used to optimize RH TRU was te throughput: the RH-72B and the CNS 10-160B transportation casks. Additionally, a draft Notification of Proposed Change to the EPA 40 CFR 194 Certification of the WIPP has been prepared, which contains a proposal for the RH TRU characterization program for compliance with the EPA requirements.

Gist, C. S.; Plum, H. L.; Wu, C. F.; Most, W. A.; Burrington, T. P.; Spangler, L. R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely identifies the generated waste and provides a system for tracking theprocess and packaging history. Each content code begins with a two-letter site abbreviation thatindicates the shipper of the RH-TRU waste. The site-specific letter designations for each of the|DOE sites are provided in Table 1. Not all of the sites listed in Table 1 have generated/stored RH-|TRU waste.

Washington TRU Solutions

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Humidity response of the Eberline model PAC-7 alpha instrument  

SciTech Connect

Response of the Eberline Model PAC-7 alpha instrument under varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions was studied in an environmental chamber. Electric discharges resulting in spurious counts or in instrument paralysis occurred at 35 to 50% RH. Improvement in the RH level tolerated by the PAC-7 alpha instrument was obtained by conformal coating of the high-voltage region of the printed circuit (PC) board. Following this treatment, electric discharges occurred only at relatively high humidity levels and then as a result of high-voltage breakdown within the AC-24C probe rather than within the PC board.

McAtee, J.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

HUMIDITY MEASUREMENTS OF BUILDING SITES BY MEANS OF NEUTRON INDUCED RADIOACTIVITY  

SciTech Connect

The use of BF/sub 3/ counting tubes measuring humidity by the activation of certain nuclides, has the advantages of reproducibility and simple equipment. Thin Rh foils are used as activation indicators, and 10 mC Ra/sup 226/ + Be is used as the neutron source. The assembly of source and Rh foil is placed either in a water-filled container or in a paraffin block surrounded by a layer of borax. The degree of activation of Rh is inversely proportional to the humidity. (P.C.H.)

Gibert, A.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Determining the Behavior of RuO(x) Nanoparticles in Mixed-Metal Oxides:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanism of Ethanol Synthesis from Syngas on Rh(111) Understanding of Mechanism of Ethanol Synthesis from Syngas on Rh(111) Understanding of ethanol decomposition on Rh(1 1 1) from density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations Theoretical perspective of alcohol decomposition and synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation