National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rh rh rh

  1. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-12

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the "RH-TRU 72-B cask") and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

  2. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

  3. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-11-07

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

  4. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-05-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

  5. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    2008-01-15

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  6. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-07-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

  7. Check for chirality in {sup 102}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Yavahchova, M. S.; Petkov, P.; Angelis, G. de; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Marinov, Ts. K.; Brant, S.

    2012-10-20

    Excited states in {sup 102}Rh, populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 94}Zr({sup 11}B,3n){sup 102}Rh at a beam energy of 36 MeV, were studied using the INGA spectrometer at IUAC, New Delhi. The angular correlations and the electromagnetic character of some of the gamma-ray transitions observed were investigated in details. A new chiral candidate sister band was found in the level-scheme of {sup 102}Rh. Lifetimes of exited states in {sup 102}Rh were measured by means of the Doppler-shift attenuation technique. The experimental results do not support the presence of static chirality in {sup 102}Rh.

  8. Hybridized Nature of Pseudogap in Kondo Insulators CeRhSb and CeRhAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumigashira, H.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshii, S.; Kasaya, M.

    2001-08-06

    We studied the electronic structure of Kondo insulators CeRhSb and CeRhAs using high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy. We found that the 4f -derived density of states shows a depletion (pseudogap) at E{sub F} in contrast to metallic Kondo materials. It was found that the size of the f pseudogap is smaller than that of conduction electrons (c pseudogap) while both scale well with the Kondo temperature. The present results indicate that the hybridization between 4f and conduction electrons near E{sub F} is essential for the Kondo gap in the Ce-based compounds.

  9. Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste - General Presentation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste- GENERAL PRESENTATION MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL ...

  10. ARM: AOS: Scanning-Mobility Particle Sizer; temperature and RH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AOS: Scanning-Mobility Particle Sizer; temperature and RH output Authors: Derek Hageman ; Bill Behrens ; Janek Uin ; Robert Bullard ; Cynthia Salwen ; Cynthia Salwen ; Annette ...

  11. Chemical and Morphological Evolution of Nanoporous Pd/Rh Alloy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Chemical and Morphological Evolution of Nanoporous PdRh Alloy Particles for ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  12. ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements Corrections for inaccuracy...

  13. Ethanol Oxidation on the Ternary PtRhSnO2/C Electrocatalysts with Varied Pt:Rh:Sn ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, R.R.; Li, M.; Kowal, A.; Sasaki, K.; Marinkovic, N.; Su, D.; Korach, E.; Liu, P.

    2010-05-30

    Ternary Pt-Rh-SnO{sub 2}/C electrocatalysts with the atomic ratio Pt:Rh:Sn = 3:1:x, where x varies from 2 to 6, were synthesized using the modified polyol method followed by thermal treatment. Several techniques used to characterize these electrocatalysts showed they were composed of homogeneous PtRh alloy and SnO{sub 2}, having all three constituents coexisting in single nanoparticles with the average particle size around 1.4 nm and a narrow size distribution. While all the electrocatalysts investigated exhibited high catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation, the most active one had the composition with the Pt:Rh:Sn = 3:1:4 atomic ratio. These ternary-electrocatalysts effectively split the C-C bond in ethanol at room temperature in acidic solutions, which is verified using the in situ IRRAS technique.

  14. The Nature of the First Order Isostructural Transition in GdRhSn...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Nature of the First Order Isostructural Transition in GdRhSn Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nature of the First Order Isostructural Transition in GdRhSn...

  15. Superconductivity versus structural phase transition in the closely related Bi2Rh3.5S2 and Bi2Rh3S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Xie, Weiwei; Lin, Qisheng; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Miller, Gordon J.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-05-19

    Single crystals of Bi2Rh3S2 and Bi2Rh3.5S2 were synthesized by solution growth, and the crystal structures and thermodynamic and transport properties of both compounds were studied. In the case of Bi2Rh3S2, a structural first-order transition at around 165 K is identified by single-crystal diffraction experiments, with clear signatures visible in resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat data. No superconducting transition for Bi2Rh3S2 was observed down to 0.5 K. In contrast, no structural phase transition at high temperature was observed for Bi2Rh3.5S2; however, bulk superconductivity with a critical temperature, Tc ≈ 1.7 K, was observed. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ and the Debye temperaturemore » (ΘD) were found to be 9.41 mJ mol–1K–2 and 209 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3S2, and 22 mJ mol–1K–2 and 196 K, respectively, for Bi2Rh3.5S2. As a result, the study of the specific heat in the superconducting state of Bi2Rh3.5S2 suggests that Bi2Rh3.5S2 is a weakly coupled, BCS superconductor.« less

  16. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Direct Arylation of Pyridines and Quinolines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, Ashley; Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-07-29

    The pyridine and quinoline nuclei are privileged scaffolds that occupy a central role in many medicinally relevant compounds. Consequently, methods for their expeditious functionalization are of immediate interest. However, despite the immense importance of transition-metal catalyzed cross-coupling for the functionalization of aromatic scaffolds, general solutions for coupling 2-pyridyl organometallics with aryl halides have only recently been presented. Direct arylation at the ortho position of pyridine would constitute an even more efficient approach because it eliminates the need for the stoichiometric preparation and isolation of 2-pyridyl organometallics. Progress towards this goal has been achieved by activation of the pyridine nucleus for arylation via conversion to the corresponding pyridine N-oxide or N-iminopyridinium ylide. However, this approach necessitates two additional steps: activation of the pyridine or quinoline starting material, and then unmasking the arylated product. The use of pyridines directly would clearly represent the ideal situation both in terms of cost and simplicity. We now wish to document our efforts in this vein, culminating in an operationally simple Rh(I)-catalyzed direct arylation of pyridines and quinolines. We recently developed an electron-rich Rh(I) system for catalytic alkylation at the ortho position of pyridines and quinolines with alkenes. Therefore, we initially focused our attention on the use of similarly electron-rich Rh(I) catalysts for the proposed direct arylation. After screening an array of electron-rich phosphine ligands and Rh(I) salts, only marginal yields (<20%) of the desired product were obtained. Much more efficient was an electron-poor Rh(I) system with [RhCl(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2} as precatalyst (Table 1). For the direct arylation of picoline with 3,5-dimethyl-bromobenzene, addition of P(OiPr){sub 3} afforded a promising 40% yield of the cross coupled product 1a (entry 1). The exclusion of phosphite additive proved even more effective, with the yield of 1a improving to 61% (entry 2). Further enhancement in yield was not observed upon the inclusion of other additives such as MgO (entry 3), various organic bases (entries 4, 5), or a protic acid source (entry 6). Absolute concentration proved very important, with the best results being obtained at relatively high concentrations of the aryl bromide (compare entries 7 and 8). A marginal improvement was observed upon running the reaction with 6 equivalents of 2-methyl pyridine (entry 9). The reaction temperature could also be increased to 175 or 190 C while maintaining reaction yield, to enable the reaction time to be reduced to 24 h (entries 10 and 11). In summary, we have developed a Rh(I)-catalyzed strategy for the direct arylation of pyridines and quinolines. The heterocycle is used without the need for prefunctionalization, and all reaction components are inexpensive and readily available. The strategy represents an expeditious route to an important class of bis(hetero)aryls and should be of broad utility.

  17. Electronic structure and magnetism of the Rh[l brace]001[r brace] surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, S.C. Physics Department, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ); Garrison, K. ); Begley, A.M.; Jona, F. ); Johnson, P.D. )

    1994-05-15

    Spin-polarized-photoemission experiments on clean Rh[l brace]001[r brace] show that the surface resonance at the [ital [bar M

  18. Quantitative EDS Analysis of Nanometer-Scale Core/Shell Pd/Rh...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Nanometer-Scale CoreShell PdRh Structures. Authors: Sugar, Joshua Daniel ; Kotula, Paul Gabriel 1 ; Robinson, David ; Cappillino, Patrick + Show Author Affiliations (Sandia...

  19. Microwave Synthesis of Au?Rh Core?Shell Nanoparticles and Implications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microwave Synthesis of Au?Rh Core?Shell Nanoparticles and Implications of the Shell Thickness in Hydrogenation Catalysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microwave ...

  20. Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-05-15

    Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

  1. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austad, Stephanie Lee

    2015-09-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  2. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austad, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  3. Towards tailoring the magnetocaloric response in FeRh-based ternary compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barua, Radhika Jiménez-Villacorta, Félix; Lewis, L. H.

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we demonstrate that the magnetocaloric response of FeRh-based compounds may be tailored for potential magnetic refrigeration applications by chemical modification of the FeRh lattice. Alloys of composition Fe(Rh{sub 1−x}A{sub x}) or (Fe{sub 1−x}B{sub x})Rh (A = Cu, Pd; B = Ni; 0 < x < 0.06) were synthesized via arc-melting and subsequent annealing in vacuum at 1000 °C for 48 h. The magnetocaloric properties of the FeRh-based systems were determined using isothermal M(H) curves measured in the vicinity of the magnetostructural temperature (T{sub t}). It is found that the FeRh working temperature range (δT{sub FWHM}) may be chemically tuned over a wide temperature range, 100 K ≤ T ≤ 400 K. While elemental substitution consistently decreases the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub mag}) of the FeRh-based ternary alloys from that of the parent FeRh compound (ΔS{sub mag},{sub FeRh} ∼ 17 J/kg K; ΔS{sub mag,FeRh-ternary =} 7–14 J/kg K at H{sub app} = 2 T), the net refrigeration capacity (RC), defined as the amount of heat that can be transferred during one magnetic refrigeration cycle, of the modified systems is significantly higher (RC{sub FeRh} ∼ 150 J/kg; RC{sub FeRh-ternary =} 170–210 J/kg at H{sub app} = 2 T). These results are attributed to stoichiometry-induced changes in the FeRh electronic band structure and beneficial broadening of the magnetostructural transition due to local chemical disorder.

  4. The effect of Fe-Rh alloying on CO hydrogenation to C2+ oxygenates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palomino, Robert; Magee, Joseph W.; Llorca, Jordi; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.

    2015-05-20

    A combination of reactivity and structural studies using X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair distribution function (PDF), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify the active phases of Fe-modified Rh/TiO2 catalysts for the synthesis of ethanol and other C2+ oxygenates from CO hydrogenation. XRD and TEM confirm the existence of Fe–Rh alloys for catalyst with 1–7 wt% Fe and ~2 wt% Rh. Rietveld refinements show that FeRh alloy content increases with Fe loading up to ~4 wt%, beyond which segregation to metallic Fe becomes favored over alloy formation. Catalysts that contain Fe metal after reduction exhibit some carburization as evidencedmore »by the formation of small amounts of Fe3C during CO hydrogenation. Analysis of the total Fe content of the catalysts also suggests the presence of FeOx also increased under reaction conditions. Reactivity studies show that enhancement of ethanol selectivity with Fe loading is accompanied by a significant drop in CO conversion. Comparison of the XRD phase analyses with selectivity suggests that higher ethanol selectivity is correlated with the presence of Fe–Rh alloy phases. As a result, the interface between Fe and Rh serves to enhance the selectivity of ethanol, but suppresses the activity of the catalyst which is attributed to the blocking or modifying of Rh active sites.« less

  5. Decomposition pathways of C2 oxygenates on Rh-modified tungsten carbide surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Thomas G.; Ren, Hui; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-03-27

    Ethanol decomposition on tungsten monocarbide (WC) and Rh-modified WC was investigated using ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface science experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations indicated that the binding energies of ethanol and its decomposition intermediates on WC(0001) were modified by Rh, with Rh/WC(0001) showing similar values to those on Rh(111). Through temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on polycrystalline WC and Rh-modified WC, it was shown that the selectivity for ethanol decomposition was different on these surfaces. On WC, the C-O bond of ethanol was preferentially broken to produce ethylene; on Rh-modified WC, the C-C bond was broken to produce carbon monoxide and methane. In addition, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to determine likely surface intermediates. On Rh-modified WC, ethanol first formed ethoxy through O-H scission, then reacted through an aldehyde intermediate to form the C1 products.

  6. The effect of Fe-Rh alloying on CO hydrogenation to C2+ oxygenates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palomino, Robert; Magee, Joseph W.; Llorca, Jordi; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.

    2015-05-20

    A combination of reactivity and structural studies using X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair distribution function (PDF), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify the active phases of Fe-modified Rh/TiO2 catalysts for the synthesis of ethanol and other C2+ oxygenates from CO hydrogenation. XRD and TEM confirm the existence of Fe–Rh alloys for catalyst with 1–7 wt% Fe and ~2 wt% Rh. Rietveld refinements show that FeRh alloy content increases with Fe loading up to ~4 wt%, beyond which segregation to metallic Fe becomes favored over alloy formation. Catalysts that contain Fe metal after reduction exhibit some carburization as evidencedmore » by the formation of small amounts of Fe3C during CO hydrogenation. Analysis of the total Fe content of the catalysts also suggests the presence of FeOx also increased under reaction conditions. Reactivity studies show that enhancement of ethanol selectivity with Fe loading is accompanied by a significant drop in CO conversion. Comparison of the XRD phase analyses with selectivity suggests that higher ethanol selectivity is correlated with the presence of Fe–Rh alloy phases. As a result, the interface between Fe and Rh serves to enhance the selectivity of ethanol, but suppresses the activity of the catalyst which is attributed to the blocking or modifying of Rh active sites.« less

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of Rh-based lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores for higher alcohol synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelsayed, Victor; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Poston, James A., Jr.; Spivey, James J.

    2013-05-01

    Two lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}; LZ) were prepared by Pechini method and tested for higher alcohols selectivity. In one, Rh was substituted into the pyrochlore lattice (LRZ, 1.7 wt%) while for the second, Rh was supported on an unsubstituted La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R/LZ, 1.8 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results show that the surface reducibility depends on whether the Rh is in (or supported on) the LZ pyrochlore. Rhodium in the LRZ is more reducible than rhodium supported on the R/LZ pyrochlore, likely due to the presence of a perovskite phase (LaRhO{sub 3}; identified by XRD), in which rhodium is more reducible. The formation of the perovskite accompanies that of the pyrochlore. CO hydrogenation results show higher ethanol selectivity for R/LZ than LRZ, possibly due to the strong interaction between Rh and LZ on the R/LZ, forming atomically close Rh{sup +}/Rh{sup 0} sites, which have been suggested to favor ethanol production.

  8. Decomposition pathways of C2 oxygenates on Rh-modified tungsten carbide surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kelly, Thomas G.; Ren, Hui; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-03-27

    Ethanol decomposition on tungsten monocarbide (WC) and Rh-modified WC was investigated using ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface science experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations indicated that the binding energies of ethanol and its decomposition intermediates on WC(0001) were modified by Rh, with Rh/WC(0001) showing similar values to those on Rh(111). Through temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on polycrystalline WC and Rh-modified WC, it was shown that the selectivity for ethanol decomposition was different on these surfaces. On WC, the C-O bond of ethanol was preferentially broken to produce ethylene; on Rh-modified WC, the C-C bond was broken to producemore » carbon monoxide and methane. In addition, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to determine likely surface intermediates. On Rh-modified WC, ethanol first formed ethoxy through O-H scission, then reacted through an aldehyde intermediate to form the C1 products.« less

  9. The nature of the first order isostructural transition in GdRhSn (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The nature of the first order isostructural transition in GdRhSn Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The nature of the first order isostructural transition in GdRhSn We present structural, magnetic, thermal, magnetocaloric, and electrical transport properties of polycrystalline GdRhSn. Magnetization data show that it orders antiferromagnetically at TN = 16.2 K. The compound has the ZrNiAl type hexagonal crystal

  10. Magnitude of the magnetic exchange interaction in the heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Pinaki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lin, S. -Z. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ghimire, N.? J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Huang, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Ronning, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bauer, E.? D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thompson, J.? D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Batista, C.? D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ehlers, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Janoschek, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We have used high-resolution neutron spectroscopy experiments to determine the complete spin wave spectrum of the heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn?. The spin wave dispersion can be quantitatively reproduced with a simple frustrated J??J? model that also naturally explains the magnetic spin-spiral ground state of CeRhIn? and yields a dominant in-plane nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange constant J?=0.74(3)??meV. Our results pave the way to a quantitative understanding of the rich low-temperature phase diagram of the prominent CeTIn? (T = Co, Rh, Ir) class of heavy-fermion materials.

  11. W.T.; Rainey, R.H. 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS;...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thorium fuel reprocessing experience Brooksbank, R.E.; McDuffee, W.T.; Rainey, R.H. 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; NUCLEAR MATERIALS DIVERSION; SAFEGUARDS; SPENT FUELS;...

  12. Summary of EXAFS results on Cd-doped PuRhIn5 (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of EXAFS results on Cd-doped PuRhIn5 Authors: Booth, C H ; Bauer, E D ; Tobin, J G Publication Date: 2014-06-12 OSTI Identifier: ...

  13. Model for the Prediction of the Hydriding Thermodynamics of Pd-Rh-Co Ternary Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teter, D.F.; Thoma, D.J.

    1999-03-01

    A dilute solution model (with respect to the substitutional alloying elements) has been developed, which accurately predicts the hydride formation and decomposition thermodynamics and the storage capacities of dilute ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The effect of varying the rhodium and cobalt compositions on the thermodynamics of hydride formation and decomposition and hydrogen capacity of several palladium-rhodium-cobalt ternary alloys has been investigated using pressure-composition (PC) isotherms. Alloying in the dilute regime (<10 at.%) causes the enthalpy for hydride formation to linearly decrease with increasing alloying content. Cobalt has a stronger effect on the reduction in enthalpy than rhodium for equivalent alloying amounts. Also, cobalt reduces the hydrogen storage capacity with increasing alloying content. The plateau thermodynamics are strongly linked to the lattice parameters of the alloys. A near-linear dependence of the enthalpy of hydride formation on the lattice parameter was observed for both the binary Pd-Rh and Pd-Co alloys, as well as for the ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The Pd-5Rh-3Co (at. %) alloy was found to have similar plateau thermodynamics as a Pd-10Rh alloy, however, this ternary alloy had a diminished hydrogen storage capacity relative to Pd-10Rh.

  14. Electronic band structure and Kondo coupling in YbRh2Si2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigger, G.A.

    2010-04-15

    The electronic band structure of YbRh2Si2 is calculated in a relativistic framework including correlation corrections and magnetization of the Yb ion and compared to detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectra. The photoemission spectra for LuRh2Si2 are used as reference to identify electronic bands with no f symmetry. The calculated band structure manifests a 4f13 spin-polarized configuration leaving the unoccupied state at 1.4eV above the Fermi energy. At the band theory level, the 4f bands are located far below the Fermi level and the anisotropic Coulomb interaction within the 4f shell spreads the multilevel into broader 4f complexes below -2.5eV . The photoemission spectra obtained on YbRh2Si2 show a clear f -multilevel splitting into j=7/2 and 5/2 excitations. The interaction of the 4f7/2 levels close to the Fermi energy with two conduction bands shows visible hybridization gaps of 45 and 80meV, respectively. We discuss the origin of these excitations and provide an analysis according to Anderson's single-impurity model with parameters suggested by the band-structure calculation and the photoemission spectra. Both experiment and theory indicate nearly identical Fermi surfaces for LuRh2Si2 and YbRh2Si2 . The valency of Yb in YbRh2Si2 is estimated to be close to +3.

  15. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matthew D.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-01

    In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850?C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR activity on the supported highly dispersed Rh catalyst can be rationalized by the thermodynamic limitation for the very first C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst. The C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst is highly endothermic although the barrier is competitive with the barriers of both the C-C and the C-H bond-breakings on the small Rh50 catalyst. The calculations also imply that, for the supported Rh catalysts the C-C and C-H bond scissions are competitive, independently of the Rh cluster sizes. After the initial dissociation step via either the C-C or the C-H bond scission, the C-H bond breaking seems to be more favorable rather than the C-C bond breaking on the larger Rh terrace surface. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energys Office of Biomass Programs. Computing time was granted by a user project at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  16. Behavior of trace and companion elements of ULC-IF steel grades during RH-treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungreithmeier, A.; Viertauer, A.; Presslinger, H.

    1996-12-31

    A large number of metallurgical reactions are caused by lowering the partial pressure during vacuum treatment. One of these reactions is the volatilization of elements with high vapor pressure. The concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment mostly changes because of cooling scrap, deoxidation agents and ferro-alloy additions, slag/metal reactions, vaporization and also because of reactions with the RH-vessel lining. These changes in the concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment are exemplified for ULC-IF (ultra low carbon--interstitial free) steel grades. The elements which are considered are chromium, nickel, molybdenum, copper, vanadium, tin, zinc, lead, phosphorus, sulfur and nitrogen. Calculations of the theoretical equilibrium solubility using thermodynamic data--in dependence of pressure and temperature--correspond well with the values obtained during steel production operations. 67 refs.

  17. Origin of the smaller conductances of Rh, Pb, and Co atomic junctions in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xue; Chen, Mingyan; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yi-qun; Ke, San-huang

    2015-02-14

    We study theoretically the structural and electronic origins of the smaller conductances (one conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, and smaller) of Rh, Pb, and Co metal atomic junctions (MAJs) in a hydrogen environment, as were measured in recent experiments. For the Rh MAJs, the 1G{sub 0} conductance is attributed to a stable contact bridged by a single hydrogen molecule whose antibonding state provides a single transport channel. For the Pb and Co MAJs the 1G{sub 0} conductance is, however, ascribed to a linear atomic chain adsorbing two dissociated H atoms, which largely reduces the density of states at the Fermi energy with respect to the pure ones. On the other hand, the small conductances of 0.3G{sub 0} (Rh) and 0.2G{sub 0} (Co) are due to H-decorated atomic chains connected to electrodes by a H atom.

  18. Electronic Band Structure And Kondo Coupling in YbRh(2)Si(2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigger, G.A.; Baumberger, F.; Shen, Z.X.; Yin, Z.P.; Pickett, W.E.; Maquilon, S.; Fisk, Z.; /UC, Davis

    2007-09-26

    The electronic band structure of YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is calculated in a relativistic framework including correlation corrections and magnetization of the Yb ion and compared to detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectra. The photoemission spectra for LuRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are used as reference to identify electronic bands with no f symmetry. The calculated band structure manifests a 4f{sup 13} spin-polarized configuration leaving the unoccupied state at 1.4 eV above the Fermi energy. At the band theory level, the 4f bands are located far below the Fermi level and the anisotropic Coulomb interaction within the 4f shell spreads the multilevel into broader 4f complexes below -2.5 eV. The photoemission spectra obtained on YbRh2Si2 show a clear f-multilevel splitting into j=7/2 and 5/2 excitations. The interaction of the 4f{sub 7/2} levels close to the Fermi energy with two conduction bands shows visible hybridization gaps of 45 and 80 meV, respectively. We discuss the origin of these excitations and provide an analysis according to Anderson's single-impurity model with parameters suggested by the band-structure calculation and the photoemission spectra. Both experiment and theory indicate nearly identical Fermi surfaces for LuRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. The valency of Yb in YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is estimated to be close to +3.

  19. Rh-Based Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts: Characterization and Computational Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Karl O.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Varga, Tamas; Colby, Robert J.; Jaffe, John E.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Mei, Donghai; Windisch, Charles F.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Gray, Michel J.; Hart, Todd R.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting a program focused on developing a process for the conversion of biomass to bio-based fuels and co-products. Biomass-derived syngas is converted thermochemically within a temperature range of 240 to 330C and at elevated pressure (e.g., 1200 psig) over a catalyst. Ethanol is the desired reaction product, although other side compounds are produced, including C3 to C5 alcohols; higher (i.e., greater than C1) oxygenates such as methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, acetic acid and acetaldehyde; and higher hydrocarbon gases such as methane, ethane/ethene, propane/propene, etc. Saturated hydrocarbon gases (especially methane) are undesirable because they represent a diminished yield of carbon to the desired ethanol product and represent compounds that must be steam reformed at high energy cost to reproduce CO and H2. Ethanol produced by the thermochemical reaction of syngas could be separated and blended directly with gasoline to produce a liquid transportation fuel. Additionally, higher oxygenates and unsaturated hydrocarbon side products such as olefins also could be further processed to liquid fuels. The goal of the current project is the development of a Rh-based catalyst with high activity and selectivity to C2+ oxygenates. This report chronicles an effort to characterize numerous supports and catalysts to identify particular traits that could be correlated with the most active and/or selective catalysts. Carbon and silica supports and catalysts were analyzed. Generally, analyses provided guidance in the selection of acceptable catalyst supports. For example, supports with high surface areas due to a high number of micropores were generally found to be poor at producing oxygenates, possibly because of mass transfer limitations of the products formed out of the micropores. To probe fundamental aspects of the complicated reaction network of CO with H2, a computational/ theoretical investigation using quantum mechanical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations was initiated in 2009. Computational investigations were performed first to elucidate understanding of the nature of the catalytically active site. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that Mn likely exists as a metallic alloy with Rh in Rh-rich environments under reducing conditions at the temperatures of interest. After determining that reduced Rh-Mn alloy metal clusters were in a reduced state, the activation energy barriers of numerous transition state species on the catalytically active metal particles were calculated to compute the activation barriers of several reaction pathways that are possible on the catalyst surface. Comparison of calculations with a Rh nanoparticle versus a Rh-Mn nanoparticle revealed that the presence of Mn enabled the reaction pathway of CH with CO to form an adsorbed CHCO species, which was a precursor to C2+ oxygenates. The presence of Mn did not have a significant effect on the rate of CH4 production. Ir was observed during empirical catalyst screening experiments to improve the activity and selectivity of Rh-Mn catalysts. Thus, the addition of Ir to the Rh-Mn nanoparticles also was probed computationally. Simulations of Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles revealed that, with sufficient Ir concentrations, the Rh, Mn and Ir presumably would be well mixed within a nanoparticle. Activation barriers were calculated for Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles for several C-, H-, and O-containing transitional species on the nanoparticle surface. It was found that the presence of Ir opened yet another reactive pathway whereby HCO is formed and may undergo insertion with CHx surface moieties. The reaction pathway opened by the presence of Ir is in addition to the CO + CH pathway opened by the presence of Mn. Similar to Mn, the presence of Ir was not found to not affect the rate of CH4 production.

  20. Impact of Materials Processing on Microstructural Evolution and Hydrogen Isotope Storage Properties of Pd-Rh Alloy Powders.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, Joshua K

    2015-02-01

    Cryomilled Pd - 10Rh was investiga ted as potential solid - state storage material of hydrogen. Pd - 10Rh was first atomized, and then subsequently cryomilled. The cryomilled Pd - 10Rh was then examined using microstructural characterization techniques including op tical microscopy, electron microscopy, and X - ray diffraction. Pd - 10Rh particles were significantly flattened, increasing the apparent surface area. Microstructural refinement was observed in the cryomilled Pd - 10Rh, generating grains at the nanom etric scale through dislocation - based activity. Hydrogen sorption properties were also characterized, generating both capacity as well as kinetics measurements. It was found that the microstructural refinement due to cryomilling did not play a significant role on hyd rogen sorption properties until the smallest grain size (on the order of %7E25 nm) was achieved. Additionally, the increased surface area and other changes in particle morphology were associated with cryomilling changed the kinetics of hydrogen absorption.

  1. Thermodynamics and superconductivity of Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James L; Lashley, Jason C; Volz, Heather M; Fisher, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Expanding the temperature range of previous specific-heat measurements on the Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system, we measure the effect of transition-metal substitution on total entropy (S{sub 298 k}), electronic specific heat ({gamma}), and Debye temperature ({Theta}D). In addition we measure the pressure dependence, up to 10 kbar, of the superconducting transition.

  2. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlir, Vojtech; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-03

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry breaking induced at themore » Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.« less

  3. Antiferromagnetic ordering in the doped Kondo insulator CeRhSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, L.; Malik, S.K.

    1997-06-01

    CeRhSb, the so-called {open_quotes}Kondo insulator,{close_quotes} is a mixed-valent compound showing a gap formation in the electronic density of states. On the other hand, CePdSb is ferromagnetically ordered with a Curie temperature of {approximately}17 K. We have carried out magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity measurements on CeRh{sub 1{minus}x}Pd{sub x}Sb (0{le}x{le}1.0), to study the ground-state properties of this system. For small Pd doping in CeRhSb, up to 20{percent}, the gap continually diminishes and no magnetic ordering is observed down to 2 K. In the region 0.3{le}x{le}0.4, as soon as the gap is suppressed, an antiferromagnetic ground state is observed. In the region 0.5{le}x{lt}0.7, the compounds are not single phase. At the CePdSb end, in the region 0.7{le}x{le}1, the ground state is ferromagnetic. The observation of an antiferromagnetic phase in the phase diagram of CeRh{sub 1{minus}x}Pd{sub x}Sb, where neither end is antiferromagnetic, is interesting and is discussed in the light of some recent theoretical models. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

    1993-04-01

    The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

  5. Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

    2011-11-23

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental interest in that they add to a growing body of evidence indicating that certain, appropriately ligated, coordinatively unsaturated, subnanometer M4 transition-metal clusters can be relatively robust catalysts. Also demonstrated herein is that Rh4 clusters are poisoned by Hg(0), demonstrating for the first time that the classic Hg(0) poisoning test of 'homogeneous' vs 'heterogeneous'catalysts cannot distinguish Rh4-based subnanometer catalysts from Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysts, at least for the present examples of these two specific, Rh-based catalysts.

  6. The effect of Fe-Rh alloying on CO hydrogenation to C2+ oxygenates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomino, Robert; Magee, Joseph W.; Llorca, Jordi; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.

    2015-05-20

    A combination of reactivity and structural studies using X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair distribution function (PDF), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify the active phases of Fe-modified Rh/TiO2 catalysts for the synthesis of ethanol and other C2+ oxygenates from CO hydrogenation. XRD and TEM confirm the existence of Fe–Rh alloys for catalyst with 1–7 wt% Fe and ~2 wt% Rh. Rietveld refinements show that FeRh alloy content increases with Fe loading up to ~4 wt%, beyond which segregation to metallic Fe becomes favored over alloy formation. Catalysts that contain Fe metal after reduction exhibit some carburization as evidenced by the formation of small amounts of Fe3C during CO hydrogenation. Analysis of the total Fe content of the catalysts also suggests the presence of FeOx also increased under reaction conditions. Reactivity studies show that enhancement of ethanol selectivity with Fe loading is accompanied by a significant drop in CO conversion. Comparison of the XRD phase analyses with selectivity suggests that higher ethanol selectivity is correlated with the presence of Fe–Rh alloy phases. As a result, the interface between Fe and Rh serves to enhance the selectivity of ethanol, but suppresses the activity of the catalyst which is attributed to the blocking or modifying of Rh active sites.

  7. Synthesis of few-walled carbon nanotube-Rh nanoparticles by arc discharge: Effect of selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yanfeng

    2012-06-15

    Highly crystalline rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were prepared by selective oxidation method. Carbon nanotubes and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in hydrogen arc plasma. The as-grown nanomaterials can be purified by heat treatment in open air and by soaking in HCl. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction results reveal that as-grown FeRh nanoparticles have a typical chemical CsCl-type structure which can be transformed into a face-centered cubic structure by thermal annealing in the purification process. The purification process is selective toward the removal of the amorphous carbon coating the nanoparticles, and transforms Fe to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be easily dissolved in hydrochloric acid, leaving carbon nanotubes-Rh nanoparticles. Rh nanoparticles with diameters of 2-60 nm are deposited uniformly on the surface of the carbon nanotube bundles. This simple and selective chemistry offers a new process for synthesizing and controlling Fe content in carbon nanotube-FeRh nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-crystallinity CNTs and FeRh nanoparticles were simultaneously generated in arc plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The diameter distribution of CNTs depends on different gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment in open air and soaking in HCl can convert CNTs-FeRh to CNTs-Rh. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The selective oxidation mechanisms of metal nanoparticles and carbon materials differ.

  8. Magnitude of the magnetic exchange interaction in the heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Pinaki; Lin, S. -Z.; Ghimire, N. J.; Huang, K.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Batista, C. D.; Ehlers, G.; Janoschek, M.

    2014-12-08

    We have used high-resolution neutron spectroscopy experiments to determine the complete spin wave spectrum of the heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn?. The spin wave dispersion can be quantitatively reproduced with a simple frustrated J?-J? model that also naturally explains the magnetic spin-spiral ground state of CeRhIn? and yields a dominant in-plane nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange constant J?=0.74(3) meV. Our results lead the way to a quantitative understanding of the rich low-temperature phase diagram of the prominent CeTIn? (T = Co, Rh, Ir) class of heavy-fermion materials.

  9. Magnitude of the magnetic exchange interaction in the heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Pinaki; Lin, S. -Z.; Ghimire, N. J.; Huang, K.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Batista, C. D.; Ehlers, G.; Janoschek, M.

    2014-12-08

    We have used high-resolution neutron spectroscopy experiments to determine the complete spin wave spectrum of the heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn₅. The spin wave dispersion can be quantitatively reproduced with a simple frustrated J₁-J₂ model that also naturally explains the magnetic spin-spiral ground state of CeRhIn₅ and yields a dominant in-plane nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange constant J₀=0.74(3) meV. Our results lead the way to a quantitative understanding of the rich low-temperature phase diagram of the prominent CeTIn₅ (T = Co, Rh, Ir) class of heavy-fermion materials.

  10. Magnetism and superconductivity in U2PtxRh1?xC2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-09

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Nel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. Additionally, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. Themorereduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.less

  11. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of heterocycles, including azoles, azolines, dihydroquinazolines, pyridines, and quinolines, with a wide range of functionalized olefins. They demonstrated the utility of this methodology in the synthesis of natural products, drug candidates, and other biologically active molecules. In addition, they developed conditions to directly arylate these heterocycles with aryl halides. The initial conditions that used PCy{sub 3} as a ligand were successful only for aryl iodides. However, efforts designed to avoid catalyst decomposition led to the development of ligands based on 9-phosphabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane (Phoban) that also facilitated the coupling of aryl bromides. They then replicated the unique coordination environment, stability, and catalytic activity of this complex using the much simpler tetrahydrophosphepine ligands and developed conditions that coupled aryl bromides bearing diverse functional groups without the use of a glovebox or purified reagents. With further mechanistic inquiry, they anticipate that researchers will better understand the details of the aforementioned Rh-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization reactions, resulting in the design of more efficient and robust catalysts, expanded substrate scope, and new transformations.

  12. Magnetism and superconductivity in U?PtxRh(1x)C?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Nel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. In addition, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x.moreThe reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.less

  13. Syntheses and characterization of the cubic uranium chalcogenides Rh2U6S15,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cs2Ti2U6Se15, Cs2Cr2U6Se15, and Cs2Ti2U6Te15 (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES DOE PAGES Search Results Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Syntheses and characterization of the cubic uranium chalcogenides Rh2U6S15, Cs2Ti2U6Se15, Cs2Cr2U6Se15, and Cs2Ti2U6Te15 This content will become publicly available on July 11, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Syntheses and characterization of the cubic uranium chalcogenides Rh2U6S15, Cs2Ti2U6Se15, Cs2Cr2U6Se15, and Cs2Ti2U6Te15 Authors: Ward, Matthew D. ; Oh,

  14. Electronic structure of U2PtC2 and U2RhC2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ronning, F.; Zhu, J. -X.

    2015-03-18

    In this study, we present density functional theory calculations within the generalized gradient approximation of U2RhC2 and U2PtC2. We find the calculated density of states are significantly less than that measured by specific heat indicating the need for electronic correlations. The mass enhancement found for U2PtC2 is m*/mband ≈ 4.

  15. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  16. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less thanmore » 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the α-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.« less

  17. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd10Rh processed by cryomilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less than 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the ?-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.

  18. The valence band structure of Ag{sub x}Rh{sub 1–x} alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Anli; Sakata, Osami; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yayama, Tomoe; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Koyama, Michihisa; and others

    2014-10-13

    The valence band (VB) structures of face-centered-cubic Ag-Rh alloy nanoparticles (NPs), which are known to have excellent hydrogen-storage properties, were investigated using bulk-sensitive hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed VB spectra profiles of the Ag-Rh alloy NPs do not resemble simple linear combinations of the VB spectra of Ag and Rh NPs. The observed VB hybridization was qualitatively reproduced via a first-principles calculation. The electronic structure of the Ag{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 0.5} alloy NPs near the Fermi edge was strikingly similar to that of Pd NPs, whose superior hydrogen-storage properties are well known.

  19. Colloidally Synthesized Monodisperse Rh Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Size- and Pretreatment-Dependent Studies of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grass, Michael E.; Joo, Sang Hoon; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-02-12

    A particle size dependence for CO oxidation over rhodium nanoparticles of 1.9-11.3 nm has been investigated and determined to be modified by the existence of the capping agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). The particles were prepared using a polyol reduction procedure with PVP as the capping agent. The Rh nanoparticles were subsequently supported on SBA-15 during hydrothermal synthesis to produce Rh/SBA-15 supported catalysts for size-dependent catalytic studies. CO oxidation by O{sub 2} at 40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2} was investigated over two series of Rh/SBA-15 catalysts: as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15 covering the full range of Rh sizes and the same set of catalysts after high temperature calcination and reduction. The turnover frequency at 443 K increases from 0.4 to 1.7 s{sup -1} as the particle size decreases from 11.3 to 1.9 nm for the as-synthesized catalysts. After calcination and reduction, the turnover frequency is between 0.1 and 0.4 s{sup -1} with no particle size dependence. The apparent activation energy for all catalysts is {approx}30 kcal mol{sup -1} and is independent of particle size and thermal treatment. Infrared spectroscopy of CO on the Rh nanoparticles indicates that the heat treatments used influence the mode of CO adsorption. As a result, the particle size dependence for CO oxidation is altered after calcination and reduction of the catalysts. CO adsorbs at two distinct bridge sites on as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15, attributable to metallic Rh(0) and oxidized Rh(I) bridge sites. After calcination and reduction, however, CO adsorbs only at Rh(0) atop sites. The change in adsorption geometry and oxidation activity may be attributable to the interaction between PVP and the Rh surface. This capping agent affect may open new possibilities for the tailoring of metal catalysts using solution nanoparticle synthesis methods.

  20. Fundamental Bulk/Surface Structure Photoactivity Relationships of Supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Roberts, Charles; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst was examined as a model nitride photocatalyst system to assist in the development of fundamental structure photoactivity relationships for UV activated water splitting. Surface characterization of the outermost surface layers by High Sensitivity-LEIS and High Resolution-XPS revealed for the first time that the GaN support consists of a GaOx outermost surface layer and a thin film of GaOxNy in the surface region. HR-XPS also demonstrates that the supported (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide nanoparticles (NPs) exclusively consist of Cr+3 and Rh+3 cations and are surface enriched for the supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst. Bulk analysis by Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy show that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of the GaN support are not perturbed by the deposition of the (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide NPs. The function of the GaN bulk lattice is to generate photoexcited electrons/holes, with the electrons harnessed by the surface Rh+3 sites for evolution of H2 and the holes trapped at the Ga oxide/oxynitride surface sites for splitting of water and evolving O2. These new structure-photoactivity relationships for supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN also extend to the best performing visible light activated supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/(Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) photocatalyst.

  1. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have notmore » been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.« less

  2. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic -more » oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria« less

  3. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic - oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria

  4. The structure and reactivity of adsorbates on stepped Rh and Pt surfaces investigated by LEED, HREELS, TPD, XPS and STM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batteas, J.D. |

    1995-06-01

    Defects on surfaces such as steps play an important role in surface chemistry. In order to obtain an understanding of the influence of steps in surface chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of small molecules (O{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}S, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) on atomically stepped surfaces of RH and Pt have been investigated. The detailed structures of CO and oxygen bonded to the Rh(110) surface were determined. The CO molecules bond near the short bridge sites with the CO molecular axis tilted approximately 24{degree} from the surface normal. Oxygen atoms are bound asymmetrically in the 3-fold fcc hollow-sites to the (111) facets of the steps. The interactions of CO and oxygen on the Rh(311) surface were examined. The reaction of CO with the ordered phases of O shows two distinct reaction channels, a low temperature reaction limited channel (200 K) and a high temperature diffusion limited channel (350 K). Models of the reaction geometry and dynamics are proposed. The thermal decomposition of ethylene was examined on the Rh(311) surface. The stable decomposition species (C{sub 2}H, CH and C{sub 2}) are formed near 300 K, approximately 100 K lower on the stepped Rh(311) than on the flatter Rh(111) surface. The formation of these species at lower temperatures is attributed to the stepped nature of the surface. Finally, in situ STM was used to examine surface structural changes of a stepped Pt(111) crystal under coadsorption of sulfur and CO. This is the first direct evidence for a new mechanism by which a surface covered with an unreactive, strongly chemisorbed overlayer can form new sites, for bonding and reactions to occur, by massive surface restructuring at the step edges. This new surface phenomenon answers some of the puzzles of metal surface catalysis and its implications are described. 278 refs.

  5. Synthesis, NMR spectra, and structure of rhodium hydride complexes with Rh-Sn bonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krut'ko, B.P.; Permin, A.B.; Petrosyan, V.S.; Reutov, O.A.

    1985-06-20

    The authors study the hydride complexes using Sn 119 and H 1 NMR spectroscopy. The spectra were taken in a pulse mode on a Varian FT-80A spectrometer equipped with a wideband system at 29.66 and 79.54 MHz. The Sn 119 and H 1 NMR spectral parameters for a solution of the complex (Bu/sub 4/N)/sub 3/ (HRh(SnCl/sub 3/)/sub 5/) in CD/sub 3/CN are shown, the spectra show that the (HRh(SnCl/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sup 3 -/ anion has octahedral structure with four equatorial and one axial Rh-Sn bonds. New rhodium hydride complexes with general formula (R/sub 4/N)/sub 3/(HRh(SnCl/sub 3/)/sub 5/) were synthesized.

  6. Magnetism and superconductivity in U2PtxRh1-xC2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-09

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U₂PtxRh(1–x)C₂, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Néel temperature of U₂Rh₂C₂ of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. Additionally, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ≥ 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. Themore » reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.« less

  7. Single to Multiquasiparticle Excitations in the Itinerant Helical Magnet CeRhIn5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stock, C.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Schmalzl, K.; Rodriguez, E. E.; Stunault, A.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-06-19

    Neutron scattering is used to measure the quantum spin fluctuations in CeRhIn5 - the parent material of the eXIn5 superconducting series. Out-of-plane spin fluctuations are gapped and localized in momentum, similar to the spin excitons in CeCoIn5. The in-plane fluctuations consist of sharp spin-wave excitations parameterized by a nearest neighbor exchange JRKKY =0.88 ± 0.05 meV that crossover to a temporally and spatially broad multiparticle spectrum with energies of ~ 2 × JRKKY . This continuum represents composite fluctuations that illustrate the breakdown of single magnons originating from the delicate energy balance between localized 4f and itinerant behavior in amore » heavy metal. The experiment therefore shows how quasiparticle behavior is changed by the close proximity of quantum criticality.« less

  8. Single to Multiquasiparticle Excitations in the Itinerant Helical Magnet CeRhIn5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stock, C.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Schmalzl, K.; Rodriguez, E. E.; Stunault, A.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-06-19

    Neutron scattering is used to measure the quantum spin fluctuations in CeRhIn5 - the parent material of the eXIn5 superconducting series. Out-of-plane spin fluctuations are gapped and localized in momentum, similar to the spin excitons in CeCoIn5. The in-plane fluctuations consist of sharp spin-wave excitations parameterized by a nearest neighbor exchange JRKKY =0.88 ± 0.05 meV that crossover to a temporally and spatially broad multiparticle spectrum with energies of ~ 2 × JRKKY . This continuum represents composite fluctuations that illustrate the breakdown of single magnons originating from the delicate energy balance between localized 4f and itinerant behavior in a heavy metal. The experiment therefore shows how quasiparticle behavior is changed by the close proximity of quantum criticality.

  9. Superconducting properties of Rh9In4S4 single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Lin, Qisheng; Xie, Weiwei; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Miller, Gordon J.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2016-03-28

    The synthesis and crystallographic, thermodynamic, and transport properties of single crystalline Rh9In4S4 were studied. The resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements all clearly indicate bulk superconductivity with a critical temperature, Tc~2.25 K. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ and the Debye temperature (ΘD) were found to be 34 mJ mol–1 K–2 and 217 K, respectively. The observed specific heat jump, ΔC/γTc=1.66, is larger than the expected BCS weak coupling value of 1.43. Ginzburg-Landau (GL) ratio of the low-temperature GL-penetration depth, λGL≈5750 Å, to the GL-coherence length, ξGL≈94 Å, is large: κ ~60. However, we observed a peak effect in the resistivity measurementmore » as a function of both temperature and magnetic field.« less

  10. ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GE 1 ;" qr)-1 s?llq ' p raspy.. c" ifa K. mris I talked with Hr. Wllllm cIF(Iy, Metrllurgist, Wnlon CarbId@ Nuclear cOrp8ny, 08k B&t&$@, Tenne66ee, on April 26, 1961. He informed me th&t the #rtioMl Northern birislon, Ame~ic6.n ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8, la pePfopn1~ lo8lve forming studier for the. ilnion olo)w Wuolem Conpmy "p l7?JHa). The work at National Northern l#rirc.- alon ir under the 6upenl6lon of Ehsll Phillpohuc4~, v of

  11. Mechanistic aspects of [Rh(nbd)CI][sub 2]initiated oligomerization of new acetylenic monomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Densmore, C.G. (Crystal G); Rasmussen, P.G. (Paul G.)

    2004-01-01

    Although a number of papers report the use of rhodium-based initiators, very little has been said about the mechanism of acetylene polymerizations. Kishimoto and coworkers recently proposed an insertion mechanism for the rhodium-initiated polymerization of phenylacetylenes. The initiator consisted of the tetracoordinate rhodium complex, Rh(C{triple_bond}CC{sub 6}H{sub 5})(nbd)(PPh{sub 3}) with 4-(dimethylamino)-pyidine. The product was found to be stereoregular poly(phenylacety1ene) with a cis-transoidal backbone microstructure. Gorman and coworkers found palladium and nickel-based catalysts to be successful in the polymerization of cyanoacetylene. Zhan and Yang addressed the polymerization mechanism of acetylenes using palladium and nickel acetylide catalysts. They propose that the initial activation step, and also the rate-determining step, involve coordination of a nickel or palladium acetylide catalyst with an acetylene. Based on NMR and elemental analysis, we propose a more complete mechanistic picture of acetylene polymerizations, especially those with electron-withdrawing substituents.

  12. Ternary Pt/Rh/SnO2 Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowal, A.; Li, M; Shao, M; Sasaki, K; Vukmirovic, M; Zhang, J; Marinkovic, N; Liu, P; Frenkel, A; Adzic, R

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol, with its high energy density, likely production from renewable sources and ease of storage and transportation, is almost the ideal combustible for fuel cells wherein its chemical energy can be converted directly into electrical energy. However, commercialization of direct ethanol fuel cells has been impeded by ethanol's slow, inefficient oxidation even at the best electrocatalysts1, 2. We synthesized a ternary PtRhSnO2/C electrocatalyst by depositing platinum and rhodium atoms on carbon-supported tin dioxide nanoparticles that is capable of oxidizing ethanol with high efficiency and holds great promise for resolving the impediments to developing practical direct ethanol fuel cells. This electrocatalyst effectively splits the C-C bond in ethanol at room temperature in acid solutions, facilitating its oxidation at low potentials to CO2, which has not been achieved with existing catalysts. Our experiments and density functional theory calculations indicate that the electrocatalyst's activity is due to the specific property of each of its constituents, induced by their interactions. These findings help explain the high activity of Pt-Ru for methanol oxidation and the lack of it for ethanol oxidation, and point to the way to accomplishing the C-C bond splitting in other catalytic processes.

  13. Ternary Pt/Rh/SnO2 Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, R.R.; Kowal, A.; Li, M.; Shao, M.; Sasaki, K.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhang, J.; Marinkovic, N.S. Liu, P.; Frenkel, A.I.

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol, with its high energy density, likely production from renewable sources and ease of storage and transportation, is almost the ideal combustible for fuel cells wherein its chemical energy can be converted directly into electrical energy. However, commercialization of direct ethanol fuel cells has been impeded by ethanol's slow, inefficient oxidation even at the best electrocatalysts. We synthesized a ternary PtRhSnO{sub 2}/C electrocatalyst by depositing platinum and rhodium atoms on carbon-supported tin dioxide nanoparticles that is capable of oxidizing ethanol with high efficiency and holds great promise for resolving the impediments to developing practical direct ethanol fuel cells. This electrocatalyst effectively splits the C-C bond in ethanol at room temperature in acid solutions, facilitating its oxidation at low potentials to CO{sub 2}, which has not been achieved with existing catalysts. Our experiments and density functional theory calculations indicate that the electrocatalyst's activity is due to the specific property of each of its constituents, induced by their interactions. These findings help explain the high activity of Pt-Ru for methanol oxidation and the lack of it for ethanol oxidation, and point to the way to accomplishing the C-C bond splitting in other catalytic processes.

  14. Magnetism and superconductivity in U?PtxRh(1x)C?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Nel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. In addition, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. The reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.

  15. Synthesis and crystal structure of two new cerium rhodium oxides: Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.12) with Ce mixed valency and Ce{sup 4+}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Zakharov, L.N.; Bhuvanesh, N.S.P.; Sleight, A.W.; Subramanian, M.A.

    2011-06-15

    The new compounds Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.11-0.14) and CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been prepared. Their structures were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Electrical and magnetic properties were also evaluated. Based on the structural analysis and physical properties, oxidation states for CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be assigned as Ce{sup 4+}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 5}. A small variation in x was detected for Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} indicating a formula ranging from Ce{sup 3.64+}{sub 0.55}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4} to Ce{sup 3.81+}{sub 0.525}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: The new compounds Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.11-0.14) and CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been prepared and their structures were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Electrical and magnetic properties were also evaluated. Highlights: > The new compounds CeRh{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ce{sub 2/3-x}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x{approx}0.11-0.14) have been prepared. > Their structures were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. > Valence picture is Ce{sup 4+}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ce{sup 3.64+}{sub 0.55}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4} to Ce{sup 3.81+}{sub 0.525}Rh{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  16. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.J.

    1998-03-31

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

  17. Excited states in {sup 115}Pd populated in the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 115}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurpeta, J.; Plochocki, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Urban, W. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Rissanen, J.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilae, H.; Saastamoinen, A.; Weber, C.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Elomaa, V.-V. [Turku PET Centre, Accelerator Laboratory, Abo Akademi University, FIN-20500 Turku (Finland); Rahaman, S. [Physics Division, P-23, Mail Stop H803, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sonoda, T. [Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Szerypo, J. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Excited states in {sup 115}Pd, populated following the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 115}Rh have been studied by means of {gamma} spectroscopy after the Penning-trap station at the IGISOL facility, University of Jyvaeskylae. The 1/2{sup +} spin and parity assignment of the ground state of {sup 115}Pd, confirmed in this work, may indicate a transition to an oblate shape in Pd isotopes at high neutron number.

  18. Investigation of the physical properties of the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Ronning, F.; Williams, D. J.; Scott, B. L.; Luo, Yongkang; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.

    2014-12-15

    The synthesis, crystal structure and physical properties studied by means of x-ray diffraction, magnetic, thermal and transport measurements of CeMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt) are reported, along with the electronic structure calculations for LaMAl4Si2 (M = Rh, Ir, Pt). These materials adopt a tetragonal crystal structure (space group P4/mmm) comprised of BaAl4 blocks, separated by MAl2 units, stacked along the c-axis. Both CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 order antiferromagnetically below TN1 = 14 and 16 K, respectively, and undergo a second antiferromagnetic transitition at lower temperature (TN2 = 9 and 14 K, respectively). CePtAl4Si2 orders ferromagnetically below TC = 3 Kmore » with an ordered moment of μsat = 0.8 μB for a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the c-axis. Electronic structure calculations reveal quasi-2D character of the Fermi surface.« less

  19. Features of conduction mechanisms in n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with a Rh acceptor impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaka, V. A.; Rogl, P.; Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Romaka, V. V.; Hlil, E. K.; Krajovskii, V. Ya.; Horyn, A. M.

    2013-09-15

    The crystal structure and electron-density distribution, as well as the energy, kinetic, and magnetic characteristics of n-HfNiSn intermetallic semiconductor heavily doped with a Rh acceptor impurity in the temperature range T = 80-400 K, in the acceptor-concentration range N{sub A}{sup Rh} Almost-Equal-To 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}-1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} (x = 0.005-0.10), and in magnetic fields H {<=} 10 kG are investigated. It is established that doping is accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in concentration, the elimination of donor-type structural defects (to x Almost-Equal-To 0.02), and an increase in the concentration of acceptor-type structural defects (0 < x {<=} 0.10). The dependence of the degree of semiconductor compensation on temperature is revealed. A model of the spatial arrangement of atoms in HfNi{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}Sn is proposed, and the results of calculating the electron structure based on this model agree with the results of investigations of the kinetic and magnetic characteristics of the semiconductor. The results are discussed within the context of the Shklovskii-Efros model for a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  20. Spin-orbit tuned metal-insulator transitions in single-crystal Sr?Ir1xRhxO? (0?x?1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, T. F.; Korneta, O. B.; Li, L.; Butrouna, K.; Cao, V. S.; Wan, Xiangang; Schlottmann, P.; Kaul, R. K.; Cao, G.

    2012-09-06

    Sr?IrO? is a magnetic insulator driven by spin-orbit interaction (SOI) whereas the isoelectronic and isostructural Sr?RhO? is a paramagnetic metal. The contrasting ground states have been shown to result from the critical role of the strong SOI in the iridate. Our investigation of structural, transport, magnetic, and thermal properties reveals that substituting 4d Rh?? (4d?) ions for 5d Ir?? (5d?) ions in Sr?IrO? directly reduces the SOI and rebalances the competing energies so profoundly that it generates a rich phase diagram for Sr?Ir1xRhxO? featuring two major effects: (1) Light Rh doping (0 ? x ? 0.16) prompts a simultaneous and precipitous drop in both the electrical resistivity and the magnetic ordering temperature TC, which is suppressed to zero at x = 0.16 from 240 K at x = 0. (2) However, with heavier Rh doping [0.24 < x < 0.85 (0.05)] disorder scattering leads to localized states and a return to an insulating state with spin frustration and exotic magnetic behavior that only disappears near x = 1. The intricacy of Sr?Ir1xRhxO? is further highlighted by comparison with Sr?Ir1xRuxO? where Ru?? (4d?) drives a direct crossover from the insulating to metallic states.

  1. Measurements of structural and chemical order in Zr80Pt20 and Zr77Rh23 liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, M. L.; Blodgett, M. E.; Lokshin, K. A.; Mauro, N. A.; Neuefeind, J.; Pueblo, C.; Quirinale, D. G.; Vogt, A. J.; Egami, T.; Goldman, A. I.; et al

    2016-02-03

    In this study, the short-range order (SRO) and medium-range order of electrostatically levitated Zr80Pt20 and Zr77Rh23 liquids are presented founded on a combination of high-energy x-ray diffraction and time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies. The atomic structures of the Zr80Pt20 liquids were determined as a function of temperature from constrained reverse Monte Carlo simulations using x-ray and elastic neutron scattering measurements and two partial pair-distribution functions obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  2. Kondo lattice and antiferromagnetic behavior in quaternary CeTAl4Si2 (T = Rh, Ir) single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maurya, Arvind; Kulkarni, Ruta; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Paudyal, Durga; Dhar, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-02-26

    Here, we have explored in detail the anisotropic magnetic properties of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2, which undergo two antiferromagnetic transitions, at TN1 = 12.6 and 15.5 K, followed by a second transition at TN2 = 9.4 and 13.8 K, respectively, with the [001]-axis as the relatively easy axis of magnetization. The electrical resistivity at ambient and applied pressure provides evidence of Kondo interaction in both compounds, further supported by a reduced value of the entropy associated with the magnetic ordering. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ is inferred to be 195.6 and 49.4 mJ/(mol K2) for CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2, respectively, classifying these materialsmore » as moderate heavy-fermion compounds. The crystal electric field energy levels are derived from the peak seen in the Schottky heat capacity. Furthermore, we have also performed electronic structure calculations by using the local spin density approximation + U [LSDA+U] approach, which provide physical insights on the observed magnetic behavior of these two compounds.« less

  3. Perovskite LaRhO{sub 3} as a p-type active layer in oxide photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Masao Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Fujioka, Jun; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-02-16

    Perovskite-type transition-metal oxides have a wide variety of physical properties and triggered intensive research on functional devices in the form of heteroepitaxial junctions. However, there is a missing component that is a p-type conventional band semiconductor. LaRhO{sub 3} (LRO) is one of very few promising candidates having its bandgap between filled t{sub 2g} and empty e{sub g} of Rh in low-spin state, but there has been no report on the synthesis of large-size single crystals or thin films. Here, we report on the junction properties of single-crystalline thin films of LRO grown on (110) oriented Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. The external quantum efficiency of the photo-electron conversion exceeds 1% in the visible-light region due to the wide depletion layer and long diffusion length of minority carriers in LRO. Clear indication of p-type band semiconducting character in a perovskite oxide of LRO will pave a way to explore oxide electronics of perovskite heterostructures.

  4. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masud, Jahangir; Nguyena, Trung V.; Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric; Ikenberry, Myles; Hohn, Keith; Pan, Chun-Jern; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2015-01-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600C to 850C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchange current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.

  5. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Kovarik, Libor; Wan, Haiying; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gerber, Mark A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2014-07-01

    In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of stable MgAl2O4 spinel-supported Rh and Ir catalysts for the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Firstly, catalytic performance for a series of noble metal catalysts supported on MgAl2O4 spinel was evaluated for SMR at 600-850C. Turnover rate at 850C follows the order: Pd > Pt > Ir > Rh > Ru > Ni. However, Rh and Ir were found to have the best combination of activity and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed ~2 nm Rh and ~1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the MgAl2O4 spinel support. Scanning Transition Electron Microscopy (STEM) images show that excellent dispersion was maintained even under challenging high temperature conditions (e.g. at 850C in the presence of steam) while Ir and Rh catalysts supported on Al2O3 were observed to sinter at increased rates under the same conditions. These observations were further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations which find that ~1 nm Rh and Ir particles (50-atom cluster) bind strongly to the MgAl2O4 surfaces via a redox process leading to a strong metal-support interaction, thus helping anchor the metal clusters and reduce the tendency to sinter. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that these supported smaller Rh and Ir particles have a lower work function than larger more bulk-like ones, which enables them to activate both water and methane more effectively than larger particles, yet have a minimal influence on the relative stability of coke precursors. In addition, theoretical mechanistic studies were used to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. Consistent with the experimental observations, our theoretical modeling results also suggest that the small spinel-supported Ir particle catalyst is more active than the counterpart of Rh catalyst for SMR. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute. Computing time was granted by a user proposal at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) located at PNNL. Part of the computational time was provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  6. Effect of magnetic fields on the Kondo insulator CeRhSb: Magnetoresistance and high-field heat capacity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, S.K.; Menon, L.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The compound CeRhSb is a mixed valent Ce-based compound which shows a gap in the electronic density of states at low temperatures. The gap manifests by a rise in electrical resistivity{emdash}below about 8 K from which the gap energy is estimated to be about 4 K. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on this compound in various applied fields up to 9.85 T. The magnetic contribution to the heat capacity, {Delta}C, is found to have a maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T at 10 K, below which {Delta}C/T is linear with T. This is attributed to the fact that below this temperature, in the gapped state, the electronic density of states decreases linearly with decreasing temperature. On application of a magnetic field, the electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} in the gapped state increases by {approximately}4mJ/molK{sup 2}. The maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T is observed in all fields, which shifts to lower temperatures {approximately}1K at 5.32 T and raises again at 9.85 T to about the same values as at H=0T. This suggests that the gap exists for all fields up to 9.85 T. Above 10 K, in the mixed-valent state, {Delta}C/T vs T decreases with increasing temperature in zero field. There is hardly any effect of application of field in the mixed-valent state. We have also carried out magnetoresistance measurements on CeRhSb up to fields of 5.5 T at 2, 4.5, 10, 20, and 30 K. The magnetoresistance in CeRhSb is positive at temperatures of 4.5 K and above, in applied fields up to 5.5 T. At 5.5 T, the magnetoresistance is maximum at 4.5 K (6{percent}) and decreases with increasing temperature. The observation of the maximum is consistent with the observation of a maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T and is due to a change in the density of states. At a temperature of 2 K, a negative magnetoresistance is observed for magnetic fields greater than {approximately}3.5T which suggests reduction in the gap. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Systematics of the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity in Ba(Fe1-xMx)₂As₂ (M=Co, Rh, Ni, and Pd)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tanatar, M. A.; Ni, N.; Thaler, A.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Prozorov, R.

    2011-07-27

    Temperature-dependent interplane resistivity ρc(T) was measured systematically as a function of transition-metal substitution in the iron-arsenide superconductors Ba(Fe1-xMx)₂As₂, M=Ni, Pd, Rh. The data are compared with the behavior found in Ba(Fe1-xCox)₂As₂, revealing resistive signatures of pseudogap. In all compounds we find resistivity crossover at a characteristic pseudogap temperature T* from nonmetallic to metallic temperature dependence on cooling. Suppression of T* proceeds very similarly in cases of Ni and Pd doping and much faster than in similar cases of Co and Rh doping. In cases of Co and Rh doping an additional minimum in the temperature-dependent ρc emerges for high dopings,more » when superconductivity is completely suppressed. These features are consistent with the existence of a charge gap covering part of the Fermi surface. The part of the Fermi surface affected by this gap is notably larger for Ni- and Pd-doped compositions than in Co- and Rh-doped compounds.« less

  8. Tuning the Curie temperature of L1{sub 0} ordered FePt thin films through site-specific substitution of Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Dongbin; Sun, Cheng-Jun E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Heald, Steve M.; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, Gan Moog E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Zhou, Tie-Jun; Bergman, Anders; Sanyal, Biplab

    2014-10-14

    In structurally ordered magnetic thin films, the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of ferromagnetic films depends on the exchange integral of the short range ordered neighboring atoms. The exchange integral may be adjusted by controlling the elemental substitutional concentration at the lattice site of interest. We show how to control the T{sub C} in high anisotropy L1{sub 0} Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} magnetic thin films by substituting Rh into the Pt site. Rh substitution in L1{sub 0} FePt modified the local atomic environment and the corresponding electronic properties, while retaining the ordered L1{sub 0} phase. The analysis of extended x-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra shows that Rh uniformly substitutes for Pt in L1{sub 0} FePt. A model of antiferromagnetic defects caused by controlled Rh substitution of the Pt site, reducing the T{sub C,} is proposed to interpret this phenomenon and its validity is further examined by ab initio density functional calculations.

  9. Cell death mechanisms in GT1-7 GnRH cells exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls PCB74, PCB118, and PCB153

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Guevara, Esperanza; Woller, Michael J.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes functional deficits in neuroendocrine systems. We used an immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line, which synthesizes the neuroendocrine peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), to examine the neurotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects of PCBs and their mechanisms of action. Cells were treated for 1, 4, 8, or 24 h with a range of doses of a representative PCB from each of three classes: coplanar (2,4,4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl: PCB74), dioxin-like coplanar (2',3,4,4',5' pentachlorobiphenyl: PCB118), non-coplanar (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl: PCB153), or their combination. GnRH peptide concentrations, cell viability, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and caspase activation were quantified. In general, GnRH peptide levels were suppressed by high doses and longer durations of PCBs, and elevated at low doses and shorter timepoints. The suppression of GnRH peptide levels was partially reversed in cultures co-treated with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. All PCBs reduced viability and increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Although the effects for the three classes of PCBs were often similar, subtle differences in responses, together with evidence that the combination of PCBs acted slightly different from individual PCBs, suggest that the three tested PCB compounds may act via slightly different or more than one mechanism. These results provide evidence that PCB congeners have endocrine disrupting and/or neurotoxic effects on the hypothalamic GnRH cell line, a finding that has implications for environmental endocrine disruption in animals.

  10. Synthesis, structural and magnetic studies of the CuCr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}O{sub 2} delafossite solid solution with 0 {<=} x {<=} 0.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amami, M.; Jlaiel, F.; Strobel, P.; Ben Salah, A.

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Rh non-magnetic replacement of the Cr in the magnetic frustrated delafossite CuCrO{sub 2}. {yields} Delafossite solid solution is maintained up to 0.2 in this system. {yields} Strain generated by Rh substitution is strongly anisotropic. {yields} M{sup 3+}-O bond strength is affected. {yields} High temperature paramagnetic behavior and weak ferromagnetism at low temperature. -- Abstract: The CuCr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}O{sub 2} series is investigated by X-ray diffraction, magnetization measurements and Raman spectroscopy on ceramic samples. It is found that a delafossite solid solution is maintained up to x = 0.2 in CuCr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}O{sub 2}. The small observed variation in cell parameters is consistent with the small difference between the ionic radii of Cr{sup 3+} and Rh{sup 3+}. A significant broadening of X-ray reflections is observed and when analyzed using the Williamson-Hall relationship showed that the strain generated by Rh substitution is strongly anisotropic, affecting mainly (Cr,Rh)-O bonds in the ab plane. Room temperature Raman spectra displayed three main Raman active modes. All modes shift to lower frequency and undergo significant changes in intensity with increasing Rh content, showing the effect of Rh atoms on the M{sup 3+}-O bond strength. The magnetic behavior of CuCr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}O{sub 2} samples was investigated as a function of temperature and applied field. At high temperature paramagnetic behavior, and at low temperature, evidence for weak ferromagnetism, reinforced by a hysteresis loop at 4 K is observed. The magnetic behavior of CuCr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}O{sub 2} is attributed to the disorder of Cr and Rh in octahedral sites resulting in short-range Cr-O-Cr and Cr-O-Rh interactions, which give rise to short-range weak ferromagnetism.

  11. Optimization of preparation of Rh-105 labeled (B72.3) MOAB using an amine oxime ligand and comparison of its biodistribution with I-131 labeled B72.3 MOAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatesh, M.; Kilcoin, T.T.; Schlemper, E.O.

    1994-05-01

    Propyleneamineoxime ligands with the four N donor atoms form stable complexes with Rh(III). The p-aminobenzylpropyleneamineoxime ligand (L) was made to act as a bifunctional chelating agent to label proteins with Rh-105. This study encompasses the optimization of formation of the Rh-105 complex of L, its purification, activation with thiophosgene, conjugation the B72.3 MOAB, purification by gel filtration, determination of its stability in physiological buffers and in human serum and comparison of the biodistribution Rh-105 labeled antibody with I-131 labeled antibody in normal healthy mice. Rh-105 was complexed with the ligand L by refluxing at pH 5-6 for 45 min. CuCl, was added to form a charged complex and the neutral activated Rh-105 complex extracted into chloroform. Following evaporation of CHC1{sub 3}, the complex was dissolved in 20 {mu}1 of DMF and reconstituted with 0.5 ml of saline. This was then reacted with the B72.3 MOAB in 0.05 M bicarbonate buffer at pH 9 and incubated for 3 h at 37{degrees}C. The complexation yields were generally 95% and the conjugation yields {approximately}60%. The Rh-105 conjugate was stable at room temperature in phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4), bicarbonate buffer saline (pH 8.5) and human serum at 37{degrees}C for 4 days. >95% of the conjugate remained immunoreactive using mucin-bound to sepharose as the antigen. I-131 labeled antibody was prepared by using iodogen as the oxidizing agent. The two labeled antibodies were co-injected into healthy mice and the biodistribution studied at different time intervals. The biodistribution studies show good correlation between I-131 and Rh-105 labeled B72.3 MOAB preparations over 20 h demonstrating good in vivo stability. This ligand may be useful as a bifunctional chelating agent for Rh-105 labeled antibody.

  12. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Ba/Rh NOx Traps for Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Harold; Vemuri Balakotaiah

    2010-05-31

    In this project a combined experimental and theoretical approach was taken to advance our understanding of lean NOx trap (LNT) technology. Fundamental kinetics studies were carried out of model LNT catalysts containing variable loadings of precious metals (Pt, Rh), and storage components (BaO, CeO{sub 2}). The Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor provided transient data under well-characterized conditions for both powder and monolith catalysts, enabling the identification of key reaction pathways and estimation of the corresponding kinetic parameters. The performance of model NOx storage and reduction (NSR) monolith catalysts were evaluated in a bench scale NOx trap using synthetic exhaust, with attention placed on the effect of the pulse timing and composition on the instantaneous and cycle-averaged product distributions. From these experiments we formulated a global model that predicts the main spatio-temporal features of the LNT and a mechanistic-based microkinetic models that incorporates a detailed understanding of the chemistry and predicts more detailed selectivity features of the LNT. The NOx trap models were used to determine its ability to simulate bench-scale data and ultimately to evaluate alternative LNT designs and operating strategies. The four-year project led to the training of several doctoral students and the dissemination of the findings as 47 presentations in conferences, catalysis societies, and academic departments as well 23 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals. A condensed review of NOx storage and reduction was published in an encyclopedia of technology.

  13. Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compounds CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Calder, S.; Janoschek, M.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we have investigated the magnetic ground state of the antiferromagnetic Kondo-lattice compounds CeMAl4Si2(M = Rh, Ir) using neutron powder diffraction. Although both of these compounds show two magnetic transitions TN1 and TN2 in the bulk properties measurements, evidence for magnetic long-range order was only found below the lower transition TN2. Analysis of the diffraction profiles reveals a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector k = (0, 0, 1/2). The magnetic moment in the ordered state of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 were determined to be 1.14(2) and 1.41(3) μB/Ce, respectively, and are parallel to the crystallographic c-axis inmore » agreement with magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  14. Steam reforming of fast pyrolysis-derived aqueous phase oxygenates over Co, Ni, and Rh metals supported on MgAl2O4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xing, Rong; Dagle, Vanessa Lebarbier; Flake, Matthew; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Deshmane, Chinmay; Dagle, Robert A.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper we examine the feasibility of steam reforming the mixed oxygenate aqueous fraction derived from fast pyrolysis bio-oils. Catalysts selective towards hydrogen formation and resistant to carbon formation utilizing feeds with relatively low steam-to-carbon (S/C) ratios are desired. Rh (5 wt%), Pt (5 wt%), Ru (5 wt%), Ir (5 wt%), Ni (15 wt%), and Co (15 wt%) metals supported on MgAl2O4 were evaluated for catalytic performance at 500 °C and 1 atm using a complex feed mixture comprising acids, polyols, cycloalkanes, and phenolic compounds. The Rh catalyst was found to be the most active and resistant to carbonmore » formation. The Ni and Co catalysts were found to be more active than the other noble metal catalysts investigated (Pt, Ru, and Ir).« less

  15. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Feng; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Jinchen; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.; Cao, Gang

    2015-11-23

    We use single-crystal neutron diffraction to determine the crystal structure symmetry and to study the magnetic evolution in the rhodium doped iridates Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16). Throughout this doping range, the crystal structure retains a tetragonal symmetry (space group I41/a) with two distinct magnetic Ir sites in the unit cell forming staggered IrO6 rotation. Upon Rh doping, the magnetic order is suppressed and the magnetic moment of Ir4+ is reduced from 0.21 μB/Ir for x = 0 to 0.18 μB/Ir for x = 0.12. As a result, the magnetic structure at x = 0.12 is different from that of the parent compound while the moments remain in the basal plane.

  16. Asymmetric “melting” and “freezing” kinetics of the magnetostructural phase transition in B2-ordered FeRh epilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vries, M. A. de; Loving, M.; Lewis, L. H.; McLaren, M.; Brydson, R. M. D.; Liu, X.; Langridge, S.; Marrows, C. H.

    2014-06-09

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to study the phase transformation processes during the magnetostructural transition in a B2-ordered FeRh (001)-oriented epilayer grown on MgO by sputtering. Out-of-plane lattice constant measurements within the hysteretic regime of the transition reveal a microstructure consistent with the coexistence of lattice-expanded and contracted phases in spatially distinct regions. It was found that the phase separation is more pronounced during cooling than heating. Furthermore, whilst lattice-expanded domains that span the height of the film can be undercooled by several kelvins, there is no equivalent superheating. This asymmetry between the cooling and heating processes in FeRh is consistent with the difference in the kinetics of generic freezing and melting transitions.

  17. Wiedemann-Franz law and nonvanishing temperature scale across the field-tuned quantum critical point of YbRh2Si2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, J.-Ph.; Tanatar, Makariy; Daou, R.; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, C.; Taillefer, Louis

    2014-01-23

    The in-plane thermal conductivity kappa and electrical resistivity rho of the heavy-fermion metal YbRh2Si2 were measured down to 50 mK for magnetic fields H parallel and perpendicular to the tetragonal c axis, through the field-tuned quantum critical point H-c, at which antiferromagnetic order ends. The thermal and electrical resistivities, w L0T/kappa and rho, show a linear temperature dependence below 1 K, typical of the non-Fermi-liquid behavior found near antiferromagnetic quantum critical points, but this dependence does not persist down to T = 0. Below a characteristic temperature T-star similar or equal to 0.35 K, which depends weakly on H, w(T) and rho(T) both deviate downward and converge as T -> 0. We propose that T-star marks the onset of short-range magnetic correlations, persisting beyond H-c. By comparing samples of different purity, we conclude that the Wiedemann-Franz law holds in YbRh2Si2, even at H-c, implying that no fundamental breakdown of quasiparticle behavior occurs in this material. The overall phenomenology of heat and charge transport in YbRh2Si2 is similar to that observed in the heavy-fermion metal CeCoIn5, near its own field-tuned quantum critical point.

  18. Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Wenyu; Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Zhang, Yawen; Habas, Susan E.; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-05-09

    Monodisperse rhodium (Rh) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as small as {approx}1 nm were synthesized within a fourth generation polyaminoamide (PAMAM) dendrimer, a hyperbranched polymer, in aqueous solution and immobilized by depositing onto a high-surface-area SBA-15 mesoporous support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the as-synthesized Rh and Pt nanoparticles were mostly oxidized. Catalytic activity of the SBA-15 supported Rh and Pt nanoparticles was studied with ethylene hydrogenation at 273 and 293 K in 10 torr of ethylene and 100 torr of H{sub 2} after reduction (76 torr of H{sub 2} mixed with 690 torr of He) at different temperatures. Catalysts were active without removing the dendrimer capping but reached their highest activity after hydrogen reduction at a moderate temperature (423 K). When treated at a higher temperature (473, 573, and 673 K) in hydrogen, catalytic activity decreased. By using the same treatment that led to maximum ethylene hydrogenation activity, catalytic activity was also evaluated for pyrrole hydrogenation.

  19. RH TRU Waste Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as addressed in WIPP's first environmental impact statement in 1980 and the 1992 federal WIPP ... and NMED must approve the site's procedures for characterization, determining ...

  20. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  1. Microsoft Word - ORNL RH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: March 2, 2009 Roger Nelson, Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7213 Walter Perry, Oak Ridge Office (865) 576-0885 FIRST OAK RIDGE REMOTE-HANDLED TRANSURANIC WASTE SHIPMENT ARRIVES SAFELY AT WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT IN NEW MEXICO Energy Department meets regulatory milestone OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) achieved a major environmental cleanup milestone this week with the first shipment of Remote-Handled Transuranic (TRU) Waste leaving DOE's Oak Ridge

  2. Microsoft Word - SRS RH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Roger Nelson, (575) 234-7213 April 24, 2009 For Immediate Release REMOTE-HANDLED TRU WASTE SHIPMENTS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ARRIVE SAFELY AT WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office announced that the first two shipments of remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina have arrived safely at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition to the initial remote-handled TRU waste

  3. RH_SRS_Shipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Trucks Delivering First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste from the Savannah River Site CARLSBAD, N.M., June 11, 2012- Photo caption: On June 7, 2012, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) trucks approach the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico, with the first shipment of defense- related remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. TRU waste consists of materials contaminated with radioactive elements that have atomic numbers greater

  4. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  5. Electronic structure of Ce?RhIn?: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Rui; Petrovic, C.; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the 2D heavy fermion superconductor, Ce?RhIn?. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q-vector of (0.32, 0.32) ?/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f-electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersion and location of the Fermimoresheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. Our data paves the way for improving the band structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.less

  6. Electronic structure of Ce2 RhIn8: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the two-dimensional (2D) heavy-fermion superconductor, Ce2 RhIn8. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q vector of (0.32, 0.32) π/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band-structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersionmore » and location of the Fermi sheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. Our data paves the way for improving the band-structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.« less

  7. Electronic structure of Ce2RhIn8: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the 2D heavy fermion superconductor, Ce₂RhIn₈. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q-vector of (0.32, 0.32) π/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f-electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersion and location of the Fermimore » sheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. As a result, our data paves the way for improving the band structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.« less

  8. Intermediate valence in single crystals of (Lu{sub 1?x}Y b{sub x}){sub 3}Rh{sub 4}Ge{sub 13} (0 ? x ? 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rai, Binod K.; Morosan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Single crystals of (Lu{sub 1?x}Y b{sub x}){sub 3}Rh{sub 4}Ge{sub 13} were characterized by magnetization, specific heat, and electrical resistivity measurements. Doping Yb into the non-magnetic Lu{sub 3}Rh{sub 4}Ge{sub 13} compound tunes this cubic systems properties from a superconductor with disordered metal normal state (x < 0.05) to a Kondo for 0.05 ? x ?0.2 and intermediate valence at the highest Yb concentrations. The evidence for intermediate Yb valence comes from a broad maximum in the magnetic susceptibility and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, the resistivity displays a local maximum at finite temperatures at intermediate compositions x, followed by apparent metallic behavior closest to the Yb end compound in the series.

  9. Change in magnetic and structural properties of FeRh thin films by gold cluster ion beam irradiation with the energy of 1.67?MeV/atom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koide, T.; Iwase, A. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Saitoh, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakamaki, M.; Amemiya, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matsui, T., E-mail: t-matsui@21c.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Research Organization for the 21st Century, Osaka Prefecture University Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    The effect of energetic cluster ion beam irradiation on magnetic and structural properties of FeRh thin films have been investigated. The cluster ions used in the present studies consist of a few gold atoms with the energy of 1.67?MeV/gold atom. Saturation magnetization of the sample irradiated with Au3 cluster ion beam (280?emu/cc) is larger than that for the irradiated sample with Au1 ion beam (240?emu/cc) for the same irradiation ion fluence. These results can also be confirmed by the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurement; the XMCD signal for Au3 cluster ion irradiation is larger than that for Au1 ion irradiation. Since the ion beam irradiation induced magnetization of FeRh is significantly correlated with the amount of the lattice defects in the samples, cluster ion beam irradiation can be considered to effectively introduce the lattice defects in B2-type FeRh rather than the single ion beam. Consequently, cluster ion irradiation is better than single ion irradiation for the viewpoint of saturation magnetization, even if the same irradiation energy is deposited in the samples.

  10. High Hydrogen Concentrations Detected In The Underground Vaults For RH-TRU Waste At INEEL Compared With Calculated Values Using The INEEL-Developed Computer Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajiv Bhatt; Soli Khericha

    2005-02-01

    About 700 remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste drums are stored in about 144 underground vaults at the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratorys (INEELs) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These drums were shipped to the INEEL from 1976 through 1996. During recent monitoring, concentrations of hydrogen were found to be in excess of lower explosive limits. The hydrogen concentration in one vault was detected to be as high as 18% (by volume). This condition required evaluation of the safety basis for the facility. The INEEL has developed a computer program to estimate the hydrogen gas generation as a function of time and diffusion through a series of layers (volumes), with a maximum five layers plus a sink/environment. The program solves the first-order diffusion equations as a function of time. The current version of the code is more flexible in terms of user input. The program allows the user to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the different layers of a configuration and then change the configuration after a given time; e.g.; installation of a filter on an unvented drum or placed in a vault or in a shipping cask. The code has been used to predict vault concentrations and to identify potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. The code has generally predicted higher hydrogen concentrations than the measured values, particularly for the drums older than 20 year, which could be due to uncertainty and conservative assumptions in drum age, heat generation rate, hydrogen generation rate, Geff, and diffusion rates through the layers.

  11. Synthesis, structure and chemical bonding of CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x=0, 1.32, and 2) and SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlukhyy, Viktor Hoffmann, Andrea V.; Fssler, Thomas F.

    2013-07-15

    The finding of superconductivity in Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} put the attention on the investigation of compounds that crystallize with ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type such as AT{sub 2}X{sub 2} (A=alkali/alkaline earth/rare earth element; T=transition metal and X=element of the 1315th group). In this context the silicides CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, CaFe{sub 0.68(6)}Rh{sub 1.32(6)}Si{sub 2}, CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been synthesized by reaction of the elements under an argon atmosphere. Single crystals were obtained by special heat treatment in welded niobium/tantalum ampoules. The compounds were investigated by means of powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. All compounds crystallize in the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure with space group I4/mmm (No. 139): a=3.939(1) , c=10.185(1) , R{sub 1}=0.045, 85 F{sup 2} values, 8 variable parameters for CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}; a=4.0590(2) , c=9.9390(8) , R{sub 1}=0.030, 90 F{sup 2} values, 10 variable parameters for CaFe{sub 0.68(6)}Rh{sub 1.32(6)}Si{sub 2}; a=4.0695(1) , c=9.9841(3) , R{sub 1}=0.031, 114 F{sup 2} values, 9 variable parameters for CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}; and a=3.974(1) , c=10.395(1) , R{sub 1}=0.036, 95 F{sup 2} values, 8 variable parameters for SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. The structure of SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} contains isolated [Co{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} 2D-layers in the ab-plane whereas in CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} the [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}] layers (T=Fe and Rh) are interconnected along the c-axis via Si3Si bonds resulting in a three-dimentional (3D) [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} polyanions and therefore belong to the so-called collapsed form of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. The SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are isoelectronic to the parent 122 ironpnictide superconductors AeFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (Ae=alkaline earth elements), whereas CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is a full substituted variant (As/Si) of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The crystal chemistry and chemical bonding in the title compounds are discussed in terms of LMTO band structure calculations and a topological analysis using the Electron Localization Function (ELF). - Graphical abstract: The SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x==0, 1.32, and 2) crystallize in the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type. The structure of SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} contains isolated [Co{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} layers in the ab-plane, whereas the [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}] layers in CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} are interconnected along the c-axis via Si3Si bonds resulting in a [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} network. - Highlights: Synthesis and structure of ternary silicides SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x=0, 1.32, and 2). The SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are isoelectronic to the parent 122 ironpnictide superconductors AeFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is a full substituted variant (As/Si) of superconductor CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The title compounds demonstrate the tunable Si3Si distances.

  12. Photoredox degradation of different water pollutants (MO, RhB, MB, and Cr(VI)) using Fe–N–S-tri-doped TiO{sub 2} nanophotocatalyst prepared by novel chemical method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xuyao; Zhou, Xiaosong Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Limei; Ma, Lin; Luo, Jin; Li, Mengjia; Zeng, Lihua

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} was synthesized through simple one-step hydrothermal method. • Photocatalytic activity for degradation of organic dyes and Cr(VI) are investigated. • The synergistic effect is shown in coexistence of MB and Cr(VI). - Abstract: Fe–N–S-tri-doped TiO{sub 2} (FeNS-TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized by a simple one-step hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photocatalytic activities of as-synthesized samples were tested by the oxidation of methyl orange (MO), rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue (MB) and the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) under visible-light (λ > 420 nm) irradiation, and compared with N-dope P25 (N-P25) and the undoped TiO{sub 2}. Besides, the effects of the coexistence of MO, RhB, and MB on FeNS-TiO{sub 2}-mediated photocatalytic reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) were also studied. The results indicated FeNS-TiO{sub 2} displayed higher visible-light-activated photocatalytic activity than N-P25 and the undoped TiO{sub 2}. Otherwise, FeNS-TiO{sub 2} showed the coexistence of MB enhanced the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI), whereas the coexistence of MO and RhB retarded the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) over FeNS-TiO{sub 2}. Moreover, a possible photocatalytic mechanism is discussed.

  13. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  14. Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compounds CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghimire, N. J.; Calder, S.; Janoschek, M.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we have investigated the magnetic ground state of the antiferromagnetic Kondo-lattice compounds CeMAl4Si2(M = Rh, Ir) using neutron powder diffraction. Although both of these compounds show two magnetic transitions TN1 and TN2 in the bulk properties measurements, evidence for magnetic long-range order was only found below the lower transition TN2. Analysis of the diffraction profiles reveals a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector k = (0, 0, 1/2). The magnetic moment in the ordered state of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 were determined to be 1.14(2) and 1.41(3) ?B/Ce, respectively, and are parallel to the crystallographic c-axis in agreement with magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  15. Synthesis, crystal structure investigation and magnetism of the complex metal-rich boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) with Th{sub 7}Fe{sub 3}-type structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misse, Patrick R.N.; Mbarki, Mohammed; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.

    2012-08-15

    Powder samples and single crystals of the new complex boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) have been synthesized by arc-melting the elements under purified argon atmosphere on a water-cooled copper crucible. The products, which have metallic luster, were structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction as well as EDX measurements. Within the whole solid solution range the hexagonal Th{sub 7}Fe{sub 3} structure type (space group P6{sub 3}mc, no. 186, Z=2) was identified. Single-crystal structure refinement results indicate the presence of chromium at two sites (6c and 2b) of the available three metal Wyckoff sites, with a pronounced preference for the 6c site. An unexpected Rh/Ru site preference was found in the Ru-rich region only, leading to two different magnetic behaviors in the solid solution: The Rh-rich region shows a temperature-independent (Pauli) paramagnetism whereas an additional temperature-dependent paramagnetic component is found in the Ru-rich region. - Graphical abstract: The new complex boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) has been synthesized by arc melting the elements under purified argon atmosphere. Beside the 3d/4d site preference within the whole solid solution, an unexpected Rh/Ru site preference was found in the Ru-rich region only, leading to two different magnetic behaviors: The Rh-rich region shows a temperature-independent (Pauli) paramagnetism whereas an additional temperature-dependent paramagnetic component is found in the Ru-rich region. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of a new boride series fulfilling Vegard Acute-Accent s rule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3d/4d site preference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unexpected Ru/Rh site preference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rh-rich region is Pauli paramagnetic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ru-rich region is Pauli and temperature-dependent paramagnetic.

  16. First-principles studies of structural stabilities and enthalpies of formation of refractory intermetallics: TM and TM3 (T = Ti, Zr, Hf; M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Weiwei; Chen, X.; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Y. Y.; Fu, Chong Long; Meschel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Using first-principles local density functional approach, we have calculated the ground-state structural phase stabilities and enthalpies of formation of thirty-six binary transition-metal refractory TM and TM3 compounds formed by Group IV elements T (T = Ti, Zr, Hf) and platinum group elements M (M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt) . We compared our results with the available experimental data and found good agreement between theory and experiment in both the trends of structural stabilities and the magnitudes of formation enthalpies. Moreover, based on our calculated results, an empirical relationship between cohesive energies ( E) and melting temperatures (Tm) was derived as Tm = 0.0292 E/kB (where kB is the Boltzmann constant) for both TM and TM3 compounds.

  17. Role of the reaction intermediates in determining PHIP (parahydrogen induced polarization) effect in the hydrogenation of acetylene dicarboxylic acid with the complex [Rh (dppb)]{sup +} (dppb: 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reineri, F.; Aime, S.; Gobetto, R.; Nervi, C.

    2014-03-07

    This study deals with the parahydrogenation of the symmetric substrate acetylene dicarboxylic acid catalyzed by a Rh(I) complex bearing the chelating diphosphine dppb (1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane). The two magnetically equivalent protons of the product yield a hyperpolarized emission signal in the {sup 1}H-NMR spectrum. Their polarization intensity varies upon changing the reaction solvent from methanol to acetone. A detailed analysis of the hydrogenation pathway is carried out by means of density functional theory calculations to assess the structure of hydrogenation intermediates and their stability in the two solvents. The observed polarization effects have been accounted on the basis of the obtained structures. Insights into the lifetime of a short-lived reaction intermediate are also obtained.

  18. S-H bond activation in H{sub 2}S and thiols by [RhMn(CO){sub 4}(Ph{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}){sub 2}]. Compounds containing terminal or bridging sulfhydryl and thiolato groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li-Sheng Wang; McDonald, R.; Cowie, M. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1994-08-17

    A rhodium-magnesium carbonyl-phosphines reacted with thiols to yield the products of S-H addition. Further reactions result in bridging sulfide can be alkylated or protonated at the sulfur. The compound, [RhMn(CO){sub 4}({mu}-S)(dppm){sub 2}], was structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  19. Dimethyl sulfide substituted mixed-metal clusters: Synthesis, structure, and characterization of HRuCo sub 3 (CO) sub 11 (SMe sub 2 ) and (HRuRh sub 3 (CO) sub 9 ) sub 2 (SMe sub 2 ) sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, S.; Pursianinen, J.; Ahlgren, M.; Pakkanen, T.A. (Univ. of Joensuu (Finland))

    1990-02-01

    Ligand substitution reactions of dimethyl sulfide with mixed-metal clusters are described. The clusters HRuCo{sub 3}(CO){sub 11}(SMe{sub 2}) (1) and (HRuRh{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}){sub 2}(SMe{sub 2}){sub 3} (2) have been prepared by reactions of SMe{sub 2} with the neutral parent clusters. Their crystal structures have been established: 1, monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 11.459 (5) {angstrom}, b = 12.484 (4) {angstrom}, c = 14.384 (4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 96.40 (3){degree}, Z = 4; 2, trigonal, space group R3c, a = 13.181 (7) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 75.54 (5){degree}, Z = 2. Dimethyl sulfide coordinates terminally as a two-electron donor on basal cobalt in 1 and as a bridging four-electron donor causing unusual dimerization of clusters in 2. The carbonyl arrangement of the parent clusters was not changed during the ligand substitution, and hydride ligands bridge the three basal metals in both compounds.

  20. Assignment of the luminescing states of [Au{sup 1}Rh{sup 1}({sup t}BuNC){sub 2}({mu}-dppm){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Striplin, D.R.; Crosby, G.A.

    1995-07-13

    Fluorescence, phosphorescence, and excitation spectra were measured on the title compound. These results were augmented with polarization ratios obtained at 77 K and detailed studies of the temperature dependence of the phosphorescence in the 77-4 K range. The phosphorescence decay rate at K was also recorded as a function of an applied magnetic field. All the results are consistent with a 4d{sub z}Rh{sup 1} {yields} 6p{sub 2}Au{sup 1} orbital promotion leading to emitting {sup 1}A, {sup 3}A{sub 1} terms in pseudo-C{sub 2v} symmetry. The {sup 3}A{sub 1} term is split by spin-orbit coupling into a forbidden A{sub 2} state lying lowest followed by a quasi-degenerate pair, [B{sub 1}(x), B{sub 2}(y)] lying approximately 16 cm{sup -1} higher that decays >500 times faster than the lowest one. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  1. 2.01.16 RH Plasmonics - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... DE-SC0004993). Calculations in this work used the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of ...

  2. IPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary This study was prepared by the Department in fulfillment of a congressional mandate specified in Public Law 102-579, referred to as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act. In addition, the Department considers the preparation of the study to be a prudent element in the compliance certification process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The study includes an analysis of the impact of remote-handled Transuranic waste on the performance assessment of the WIPP and a

  3. 15.11.21 RH Methanol - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide exclusively to methanol Javier, A. et al. Overlayer Au-on-W Near-Surface Alloy for the Selective Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Methanol: Empirical (DEMS) Corroboration of a Computational (DFT) Prediction. Electrocatalysis, DOI: 10.1007/s12678-015-0276-8 (2015). With kind permission from Springer Science+Business Media: Javier, A. et al. Overlayer Au-on-W Near-Surface Alloy for the Selective Electrochemical Reduction of carbon dioxide to

  4. 15.12.03 RH Assembly - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembly and Photocarrier Dynamics of Heterostructured Nanocomposite Photoanodes from Multicomponent Colloidal Nanocrystals Loiudice, A. et al. Assembly and Photocarrier Dynamics of Heterostructured Nanocomposite Photoanodes from Multicomponent Colloidal Nanocrystals. Nano Letters (2015), DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b03871 (2015). Scientific Achievement Multicomponent oxides and their heterostructures were assembled with broad synthetic tunability. A combination of transient absorption

  5. 15.12.04 RH Motifs - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detailed investigation of the role of surface motifs on the behavior of p-wse2 photocathodes Velazquez, J. M. et al. A Scanning Probe Investigation of the Role of Surface Motifs in the Behavior of p-WSe2Photocathodes. Energy & Environmental Science, DOI: 10.1039/C5EE02530C (2015). Scientific Achievement Detailed investigation of microscopic terraces in p-WSe2 single-crystal photocathode revealed these to be major sites of performance losses, challenging the traditionally accepted paradigm

  6. 15.12.04 RH Screening - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How can theory help with rapid screening of promising photocatalysts in solvent? JCAP scientists are developing novel theoretical methods to predict the effect that solvents have on material properties - and consequently the photoelectrochemical performance - inside solar-fuels generators. Inside a working integrated device that uses solar energy to convert carbon dioxide and water into fuels, chemical reactions occur on solid-liquid interfaces, where the solid is a photocatalyst and the liquid

  7. 15.08.28 RH Novel Photoanodes - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... DE-SC0004993). Computational work is supported by the Materials Project Predictive Modeling Center (EDCBEE) through the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, ...

  8. WIPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Notice To Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notice To Users The NTP World Wide Web (WWW) server is provided as a service of the Department of Energy for distribution of publicly available information and is maintained by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). NTP is an agency of the Federal Government of the United States of America. Use of NTP WWW server is intended only for the retrieval of information available through NTP WWW documents. Only authorized WIPP administrators may make changes to the information. This document could not

  9. 16.02.11 RH 10 Device - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Efficient Solar-Driven Hydrogen-generating Device Featuring Protected Photoelectrochemical Assembly with Earth-abundant Catalysts Verlage, E. et al. A Monolithically Integrated, Intrinsically Safe, 10% Efficient, Solar-Driven Water-Splitting

  10. 15.07.10 RH P-type Transparent - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Efficient and Stable Solar Water Oxidation Chen, L. et al. p -Type Transparent Conducting Oxide n-Type Semiconductor Heterojunctions for Efficient and Stable ...

  11. 14.05.14 RH Synchrotron X-ray - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Throughput Synchrotron X-Ray Experimentation for Combinatorial Phase Matching Gregoire, J. M. et al. High-throughput synchrotron X-ray diffraction for combinatorial phase mapping. Journal of Synchrotron Radiation 21, 1262-1268, DOI: 10.1107/s1600577514016488 (2014). Scientific Achievement Development of new synchrotron X-ray diffraction and fluorescence methods for rapid characterization of material libraries. Significance & impact First demonstration of prototype facility capable of

  12. 14.11.05 RH Stabilized Si Microwire - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stabilized Si Microwire Arrays for Solar-Driven H2O Oxidation Shaner, M. R., Hu, S., Sun, K. & Lewis, N. S. Stabilization of Si microwire arrays for solar-driven H2O oxidation to O2(g) in 1.0 M KOH(aq) using conformal coatings of amorphous TiO2. Energy & Environmental Science 8, 203-207, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee03012e (2015). Scientific Achievement Atomic-layer deposition of TiO2combined with sputtering of NiCrOxoxygen-evolution catalyst on Si microwires yields robust microwire-array

  13. 14.12.16 RH Hot Carrier - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hot-Carrier Generation from Plasmon Decay in Energy Conversion Sundararaman , R., Narang, P., Jermyn, A. S., Goddard, W. A. & Atwater, H. A. Theoretical predictions for hot-carrier generation from surface plasmo decay. Nature Communications 5, 8, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6788 (2014). Scientific Achievement First theoretical study combining plasmon modes with density functional theory to predict initial energy distribution of hot carriers in real metals. Significance & impact Understanding the

  14. 15.01.05 RH High OER - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Origin of High OER Activity in Ni/Fe Oxyhydroxides Friebel , D. et al. Identification of highly active Fe sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for electrocatalytic water splitting. Journal of the American Chemical Society 137, 1305-1313, DOI: 10.1021/ja511559d (2015). Scientific Achievement Operando X-ray techniques and density-functional theory (DFT) are used to understand the effect of Fe on the performance of the oxygen-evolving reaction (OER) Ni1-xFexOOH catalysts. Significance & impact With excellent

  15. 15.01.16 RH Perovskite Solar Cells - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fabrication of High Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells Li, Y., Cooper, J. K., Buonsanti, R., Giannini, G., Liu, Y., Toma, F. M. & Sharp, I. D. Fabrication of Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells by Controlled Low-Pressure Vapor Annealing. J. Phys. Chem. Lett ., 6, 493-499, DOI: 10.1021/jz502720a (2015). Scientific Achievement A new synthetic method based on low-pressure and reduced-temperature vapor annealing was developed and demonstrated to yield efficient hybrid halide perovskites

  16. 15.01.21 RH Computational and Experimental ID - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational and Experimental Identification of an Earth-Abundant Light Absorber for Solar Water Splitting Yan, Q. et al. Mn2V2O7: An Earth Abundant Light Absorber for Solar Water Splitting. Advanced Energy Materials, DOI: 10.1002/aenm.201401840 (2015). Scientific Achievement Computation, synthesis, and spectroscopy are used to first identify and then study the earth-abundant Mn2V2O7 as a highly promising light absorber for photocatalytic water splitting. Significance & impact The detailed

  17. 15.02.10 RH Transparent Catalytic - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Catalytic Nickel Oxide Protecting Films for Photoanodes Sun, K. et al. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films. PNAS 112 ( 12), 3612-3617, DOI: 10.1073/ pnas . 1423034112 (2015). Scientific Achievement Reactively sputtered NiOx layer provides a transparent, anti-reflective, conductive, chemically stable, inherently catalytic coating that stabilizes many efficient and technologically important

  18. 15.02.27 RH Unique Nanostructure - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unique Nanostructure Revealed in New OER Electrocatalyst Haber, J. A., Anzenburg, E., Yano, J., Kisielowski, C. & Gregoire, J. M. Multiphase Nanostructure of a Quinary Metal Oxide Electrocatalyst Reveals a New Direction for OER Electrocatalyst Design. Advanced Energy Materials, DOI: 10.1002/aenm.201402307 (2015). Scientific Achievement JCAP discovered a new electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) containing 5 elements: Ni, Fe, Co, Ce, and O. Further detailed investigation

  19. 15.03.03 RH Fe Elecrolyte - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of Fe Electrolyte Composition on Ni ( OH ) 2/NiOOH Structure and Oxygen Evolution Activity Klaus, S., Cai, Y., Louie, M. W., Trotochaud, L. & Bell, A. T. Effects of Fe Electrolyte Impurities on Ni ( OH ) 2/NiOOH Structure and Oxygen Evolution Activity. The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 119 ( 13), 7243-7254, DOI: 10.1021/ acs . jpcc . 5b00105 (2015). Scientific Achievement Electrochemical characterization, in situ Raman spectroscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance measurements

  20. 15.05.29 RH Operando X-ray - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Observation of a Semiconductor/Liquid Junction by Operando X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Lichterman , M. F. et al. Direct Observation of the Energetics at a Semiconductor/Liquid Junction by Operando X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Energy Environ. Sci ., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01014D (2015). Scientific Achievement We demonstrated that the operando XPS technique, applied to a semiconductor/liquid junction, can directly measure the positions of the electronic states of the

  1. 15.07.15 RH Interface Engineering - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interface Engineering for Stable, High-Performance Photoanodes Zhou, X. et al. Interface Engineering of the Photoelectrochemical Performance of Ni-Oxide-Coated n-Si Photoanodes by Atomic-Layer Deposition of Ultrathin Films of Cobalt Oxide. Energy & Environmental Science, DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01687H (2015). Scientific Achievement We demonstrated that interfacial transition-metal oxide layers provide a route to stable, high-performance photoanodes for oxygen evolution in contact with aqueous 1 M

  2. 15.08.07 RH Si Microwire Photoanode - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A High-Performance Si Microwire Photocathode Coupled with Ni-Mo Catalyst Shaner, M. R., McKone, J. R., Gray, H. B. & Lewis, N. S. Functional integration of Ni-Mo electrocatalysts with i microwire array photocathodes to simultaneously achieve high fill factors and light-limited photocurrent densities for solar-driven hydrogen evolution. Energy & Environmental Science, DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01076D (2015). Scientific Achievement We have designed and demonstrated a H2-evolving Si microwire

  3. 15.09.28 RH Bandgap Tunability - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Band Gap Tunability in Sb-Alloyed BiVO4 Quaternary Oxides as Visible-Light Absorbers for Solar Fuel Applications Loiudice, A. et al. Bandgap Tunability in Sb-Alloyed BiVO4 Quaternary Oxides as Visible Light Absorbers for Solar Fuel Applications. Advanced Materials, DOI: 10.1002/adma.201502361 (2015). Scientific Achievement A novel hotoanode material was discovered using a colloidal nanocrystal (NC ) -seeded growth, that is of general applicability for other complex oxides and thus may aid in

  4. 15.10.5 RH ECS Atwater - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JCAP's Harry Atwater on Critical Energy Issues (ECS Podcast) JCAP Director Harry Atwater in conversation with the Electrochemical Society's Executive Director Roque Calvo on the eve of the fifth international ECS Electrochemical Energy Summit. Related Link: ECS Blog (http://www.ecsblog.org/harry-atwater-on-critical-energy-issues/)

  5. 03.01.16 RH Nickel-Gallium - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database CO2 electrochemical reduction catalyzed by bimetallic materials at low overpotential Torelli, D. A., Francis, S.A. et al. Nickel-Gallium-Catalyzed Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Highly Reduced Products at Low Overpotentials. ACS

  6. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Feb2011_final_rh.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11 1 February 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 February 8, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. WTI crude oil spot prices averaged $89 per barrel in January, about the same as the December average, while over the same time period the estimated average cost of all crude oil to U.S. refineries increased by about $1 per barrel. Growing volumes of Canadian crude oil imported into the United States contributed to record-high storage levels at Cushing, Oklahoma, and a

  7. Materials Data on Y(SiRh)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Y2Sn5Rh3 (SG:36) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on YInRh (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Y2Si2Rh (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Y(GeRh)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Summary of EXAFS results on Cd-doped PuRhIn5 (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Booth, C H ; Bauer, E D ; Tobin, J G Publication Date: 2014-06-12 OSTI Identifier: 1149554 Report...

  13. Materials Data on Sc6Te2Rh (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ba(RhPb2)3 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Sr2H5Rh (SG:107) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Microsoft Word - word_39rhNNng8xZUNBezIH2C.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Defect propagation in one-, two-, and three-dimensional compounds doped by magnetic atoms A. Furrer1, A. Podlesnyak2, K.W. Kramer3, and Th. Strassle1 laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland 2Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6473, USA 3Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland Inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed to study

  17. Materials Data on Cd(RhO2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on P3RhO9 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Rh(OF3)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Li4H5Rh (SG:63) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Th3Sn13Rh4 (SG:223) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Th(SiRh)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Th(GeRh)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on U12Rh4Se31 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on HfRh3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on PaRh3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on ZrSnRh (SG:190) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Y6Te2Rh (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. plant systems Hossner, L.R.; Loeppert, R.H.; Newton, R.J. [Texas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    combines the disciplines of plant physiology, soil chemistry, and soil microbiology. Metal hyperaccumulator plants are attracting increasing attention because of their potential...

  10. Materials Data on Cu(RhS2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Cu(RhSe2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on K(AsRh)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on NdB2Rh3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on LaB2Rh3 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on HoIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on LaGe3Rh (SG:107) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-21

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on TbIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on MnAlRh2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on MnSbRh (SG:216) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on CeGe3Rh (SG:107) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on DyIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on H12RhC8NO6 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on ZrSnRh (SG:190) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on H12RhC8NO6 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Sr(As2Rh3)2 (SG:187) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Sr(In4Rh)2 (SG:55) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Sr3Sn13Rh4 (SG:223) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Sr(GeRh)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Sr2In3Rh2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Fe(RhS2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ni(RhO2)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ni(RhSe2)2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on CuSnRh2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on La3Sn13Rh4 (SG:223) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Rh3W (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Hg2Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... eere.energy.gov Field Tests: Wall Assembly General Material Layout Horizontal Cross Section of Wall T, RH T, RH, HF T T, RH, HF T, RH, P T T, RH, P, MP T T, MP General Sensor ...

  18. The effect of fuel sulfur level on the HC, CO and NOX conversion efficiencies of PD/RH, PT/RH, PD-only and tri-metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiCircco, D.M.; Adamczyk, A.A.; Patel, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Due to additional requirements imposed by the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act, automotive emissions systems must perform at high efficiencies for 100,000 miles. However, fuels containing sulfur, can reduce the efficiency of many modern catalyst formulations. Additionally, the Northeast Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) has petitioned the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to require region-wide adaptation of the California Low-Emission Vehicle standards without the application of California`s reformulated gasoline program which is necessary to keep the level of fuel sulfur low. As will be seen, this will result in reduced catalyst activity in the OTC, since typical gasolines contain sulfur levels which vary considerably. Gasolines containing 50ppmS and 500ppmS only represent the 10th and 75th percentile of US commercial summer fuels. As will be shown, these high levels of fuel sulfur will lower the performance of high activity catalyst formulations and may make compliance with LEV/ULEV emissions levels extremely difficult if not impossible without the adaptation of low-sulfur fuels.

  19. Role of metal-support interactions on the activity of Pt and Rh catalysts for reforming methane and butane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossignol, C.; Krause, T.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-11

    For residential fuel cell systems, reforming of natural gas is one option being considered for providing the H{sub 2} necessary for the fuel cell to operate. Industrially, natural gas is reformed using Ni-based catalysts supported on an alumina substrate, which has been modified to inhibit coke formation. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed a new family of catalysts derived from solid oxide fuel cell technology for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to generate H{sub 2}. These catalysts consist of a transition metal supported on an oxide-ion-conducting substrate, such as ceria, that has been doped with a small amount of a non-reducible element, such as gadolinium, samarium, or zirconium. Unlike alumina, the oxide-ion-conducting substrate has been shown to induce strong metal-support interactions. Metal-support interactions are known to play an important role in influencing the catalytic activity of many metals supported on oxide supports. Based on results from temperature-programmed reduction/oxidation and kinetic reaction studies, this paper discusses the role of the metal and the substrate in the metal-support interactions, and how these interactions influence the activity and the selectivity of the catalyst in reforming methane and butane to hydrogen for use in fuel cell power systems.

  20. Materials Data on H22RhC3(N3O4)2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Microsoft Word - 06-1532dsm ltr to Zappe INL-CCP RH A-07-16 Report...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examination) Activities Audit A-07-16. The report contains the results of the certification audit performed for Summary Category Groups S5000 (debris waste). The audit was...

  2. Fabrication Control Plan for ORNL RH-LOCA ATF Test Specimens to be Irradiated in the ATR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. Field; Richard Howard; Michael Teague

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this fabrication plan is (1) to summarize the design of a set of rodlets that will be fabricated and then irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and (2) provide requirements for fabrication and acceptance criteria for inspections of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) – Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) rodlet components. The functional and operational (F&OR) requirements for the ATF program are identified in the ATF Test Plan. The scope of this document only covers fabrication and inspections of rodlet components detailed in drawings 604496 and 604497. It does not cover the assembly of these items to form a completed test irradiation assembly or the inspection of the final assembly, which will be included in a separate INL final test assembly specification/inspection document. The controls support the requirements that the test irradiations must be performed safely and that subsequent examinations must provide valid results.

  3. RH-LLW Disposal Facility Project CD-2/3 to Design/Build Proposal Reconciliation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer

    2012-06-01

    A reconciliation plan was developed and implemented to address potential gaps and responses to gaps between the design/build vendor proposals and the Critical Decision-2/3 approval request package for the Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Project. The plan and results of the plan implementation included development of a reconciliation team comprised of subject matter experts from Battelle Energy Alliance and the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office, identification of reconciliation questions, reconciliation by the team, identification of unresolved/remaining issues, and identification of follow-up actions and subsequent approvals of responses. The plan addressed the potential for gaps to exist in the following areas: • Department of Energy Order 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” requirements, including the performance assessment, composite analysis, monitoring plan, performance assessment/composite analysis maintenance plan, and closure plan • Environmental assessment supporting the National Environmental Policy Act • Nuclear safety • Safeguards and security • Emplacement operations • Requirements for commissioning • General project implementation. The reconciliation plan and results of the plan implementation are provided in a business-sensitive project file. This report provides the reconciliation plan and non-business sensitive summary responses to identified gaps.

  4. Materials Data on H22RhC3(N3O4)2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Rh/Ba NOx Traps for Design and Optimization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  6. Mesoporous Silica-Supported Metal Oxide-Promoted Rh Nanocatalyst for Selective Production of Ethanol from Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Kraus

    2010-09-30

    The objective is to develop a process that will convert synthesis gas from coal into ethanol and then transform the ethanol into hydrogen. Principal investigators from Iowa State University include Dr. George Kraus, Dr. Victor Lin, Marek Pruski, and Dr. Robert Brown. Task 1 involves catalyst development and catalyst scale up. Mesoporous manganese silicate mixed oxide materials will be synthesized, characterized and evaluated. The first-and secondgeneration catalysts have been prepared and scaled up for use in Task 2. The construction of a high-pressure reactor system for producing synthetic liquid fuel from simulated synthesis gas stream has been completed as the first step in Task 2. Using the first- and second generation catalysts, the reactor has demonstrated the production of synthetic liquid fuel from a simulated synthesis gas stream.

  7. Methods for providing bond activation catalysts and related catalysts, systems, and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goddard, III, William A.; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Fu, Ross

    2016-04-12

    Described herein are catalysts for activation of an R--H bond in a R--H substrate and related catalytic matrices, compositions, methods and systems.

  8. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Blackened on the inside) RH 0% to 10% Blackbody Completion Hemisphere (Polished Gold plated) 120 (Horizontally) RH 0% to 10% Wolfgang Thermal Mass Thermistor to...

  9. ORNL/RASA-84/LJ4 Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    11-32 pRh D ' (spotty), D ASPHALT GARAGE o i . E5jp . , I .'.,.. X rj, . i.::ii 11-53 uRh spotty) .' i ::::-::: : i;:i ;": " '" s ca21-53 ,Rh scarange;:: ;.. u.32 9Rh s91...

  10. Structural/magnetic phase transitions and superconductivity in Ba(Fe1-xTMx)2As2 (TM=Co, Ni, Cu, Co/Cu, Rh and Pd) single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Ni

    2009-08-15

    Since its discovery in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the most actively studied fields in condensed matter physics and has attracted immense experimental and theoretical effort. At this point in time, with more and more superconductors discovered in elements, alloys, intermetallic compounds and oxides, it is becoming clear that superconductivity is actually not so rare in nature. Almost half of the elements in the periodic table and hundreds of compounds have been found to be superconducting. Fig. 1.1 shows the milestones in discovering higher T{sub c} superconductors. Among the elemental superconductors, Niobium has the highest superconducting transition temperature, T{sub c}, of 9.5 K. This record held for more than ten years, until the discovery of niobium nitride which superconducts below 16 K. It took another thirty years for T{sub c} to increase from 16 K in niobium nitride to 23 K in niobium germanium.

  11. Ind.Audit Guide June 13_b.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - CAGI (Compressed Air & Gas Institute): - ASME 14.7 psia, 60F, 0% rh (relative humidity) 14.7 psia, 68F, 36% rh Typical dryer dew points: Refrigerated Dryers +35F to...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greater than uranium (transuranic). RH-TRU waste produces a higher dose rate than CH-TRU waste at the surface of the disposal container, but when transported RH- and CH-TRU waste...

  13. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and ...

  14. Investigation of the physical properties of the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2 (M Rh, Ir, Pt) compounds Prev Next Title: Investigation of the physical properties of the tetragonal CeMAl4Si2 (M Rh, Ir, Pt) compounds The ...

  15. X:\ARM_19~1\P273-281.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RH c ) RH c RH c RH c Session Papers 273 Evaluation of Cloud Prediction and Determination of Critical Relative Humidity for a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model N. L. Seaman, Z. Guo, and T. P. Ackerman Pennsylvania State University, Department of Meteorology University Park, Pennsylvania Predictions of cloud occurrence and vertical location from the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) were evaluated statistically

  16. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsdarpprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advective tendency cloudwatertend Atmospheric moisture rh Atmospheric moisture spechumidity Atmospheric temperature temp Advective tendency temptend Horizontal wind uwind...

  17. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsatkpprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advective tendency cloudwatertend Atmospheric moisture rh Atmospheric moisture spechumidity Atmospheric temperature temp Advective tendency temptend Horizontal wind uwind...

  18. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfspprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advective tendency cloudwatertend Atmospheric moisture rh Atmospheric moisture spechumidity Atmospheric temperature temp Advective tendency temptend Horizontal wind uwind...

  19. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsbrwpprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advective tendency cloudwatertend Atmospheric moisture rh Atmospheric moisture spechumidity Atmospheric temperature temp Advective tendency temptend Horizontal wind uwind...

  20. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsmanpprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advective tendency cloudwatertend Atmospheric moisture rh Atmospheric moisture spechumidity Atmospheric temperature temp Advective tendency temptend Horizontal wind uwind...

  1. ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnaupprof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advective tendency cloudwatertend Atmospheric moisture rh Atmospheric moisture spechumidity Atmospheric temperature temp Advective tendency temptend Horizontal wind uwind...

  2. TeamWorks - A publication of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 9-29-13) 11,629 Shipments received since opening (10,924 CH and 705 RH) 88,852 Cubic meters of waste disposed (88,500 CH and 352 RH) 169,339 Containers disposed in the underground (168,627 CH and 712 RH) *CH - Contact-handled transuranic waste RH - Remote-handled transuranic waste File Photo WIPP receives 700th remote-handled transuranic waste shipment On Sept. 12, the 700th shipment of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste reached the gate at the

  3. TTW 5-6-09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 5-5-09) 7,355 Shipments received since opening (7,137 CH and 218 RH) 59,758 Cubic meters of waste disposed (59,665 CH and 93 RH) 112,303 Containers disposed in the underground (112,088 CH and 215 RH) RH waste from Savannah River Site arrives safely at WIPP File photo And the Savannah River Site (SRS) makes four. The first two shipments of remote- handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste from SRS in South Carolina arrived safely at the WIPP on April 24, making it the

  4. TTW 9-29-09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 9-28-09) 7,844 Shipments received since opening (7,563 CH and 281 RH) 62,866 Cubic meters of waste disposed (62,733 CH and 133 RH) 121,401 Containers disposed in the underground (121,125 CH and 276 RH) WIPP receives first RH shipment from Vallecitos Nuclear Center File photo The Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) has officially shipped to WIPP. The first shipment of remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) from GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy's VNC safely arrived at WIPP early

  5. Comparative Study on the Sulfur Tolerance and Carbon Resistance of Supported Noble Metal Catalysts in Steam Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Chao; Chen, Yongsheng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Song, Chunshan

    2012-04-18

    This work was conducted to clarify the influence of the type of metal and support on the sulfur tolerance and carbon resistance of supported noble metal catalysts in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons. Al2O3-supported noble metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, and Pd), Rh catalysts on different supports (Al2O3, CeO2, SiO2, and MgO), and Pt catalyst supported on CeO2 and Al2O3, were examined for steam reforming of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel (Norpar13 from Exxon Mobil) at 800 C for 55 h. The results indicate that (1) Rh/Al2O3 shows higher sulfur tolerance than the Ru, Pt, and Pd catalysts on the same support; (2) both Al2O3 and CeO2 are promising supports for Rh catalyst to process sulfur-containing hydrocarbons; and (3) Pt/CeO2 exhibits better catalytic performance than Pt/Al2O3 in the reaction with sulfur. TEM results demonstrate that the metal particles in Rh/Al2O3 were better dispersed (mostly in 1-3 nm) compared with the other catalysts after reforming the sulfur-containing feed. As revealed by XPS, the binding energy of Rh 3d for Rh/Al2O3 is notably higher than that for Rh/CeO2, implying the formation of electron-deficient Rh particles in the former. The strong sulfur tolerance of Rh/Al2O3 may be related to the formation of well-dispersed electron-deficient Rh particles on the Al2O3 support. Sulfur K-edge XANES illustrates the preferential formation of sulfonate and sulfate on Rh/Al2O3, which is believed to be beneficial for improving its sulfur tolerance as their oxygen-shielded sulfur structure may hinder direct Rh-S interaction. Due to its strong sulfur tolerance, the carbon deposition on Rh/Al2O3 was significantly lower than that on the Al2O3-supported Ru, Pt, and Pd catalysts after the reaction with sulfur. The superior catalytic performance of CeO2-supported Rh and Pt catalysts in the presence of sulfur can be ascribed mainly to the promotion effect of CeO2 on carbon gasification, leading to much lower carbon deposition compared with the Rh/Al2O3, Rh/MgO, Rh/SiO2 and Pt/Al2O3 catalysts.

  6. Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yawen; Grass, Michael E.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-03-15

    Monodisperse sub-10 nm (6.5 nm) sized Rh nanocrystals with (111) and (100) surface structures were synthesized by a seedless polyol reduction in ethylene glycol, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a capping ligand. When using [Rh(Ac){sub 2}]{sub 2} as the metal precursor, (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra containing 76% (111)-twined hexagons (in 2D projection) were obtained; whereas, when employing RhCl{sub 3} as the metal precursor in the presence of alkylammonium bromide, such as tetramethylammonium bromide and trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide, (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were obtained with 85% selectivity. The {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of the Rh nanocrystals are stabilized by chemically adsorbed Br{sup -} ions from alkylammonium bromides, which led to (100)-oriented nanocubes. Monolayer films of the (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra and (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were deposited on silicon wafers in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough to make model 2D nanoarray catalysts. These nanocatalysts were active for CO oxidation by O{sub 2}, and the turnover frequency was independent of nanoparticle shape, consistent with that previously observed for Rh(111) and Rh(100) single crystals.

  7. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spartaru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-12-03

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 order of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  8. Large magneto-optical Kerr effect in noncollinear antiferromagnets Mn 3 X (

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X = Rh , Ir , Pt ) (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Large magneto-optical Kerr effect in noncollinear antiferromagnets Mn 3 X ( X = Rh , Ir , Pt ) Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 25, 2016 Title: Large magneto-optical Kerr effect in noncollinear antiferromagnets Mn 3 X ( X = Rh , Ir , Pt ) Authors: Feng, Wanxiang ; Guo, Guang-Yu ; Zhou, Jian ; Yao, Yugui ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2015-10-26 OSTI Identifier: 1224360

  9. Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel-Based Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Stored at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, S.; Bhatt, R.; Liekhus, K.

    2003-01-14

    The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

  10. Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel Based Remote Handled TRU Waste Stored at INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli T. Khericha; Rajiv N. Bhatt; Kevin Liekhus

    2003-02-01

    The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

  11. WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. Idaho - The Waste Disposition Project Team at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site has continued to keep its commitment to remove remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste out of Idaho, protecting

  12. Geothermometry At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Pearl...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Celcius References R.H. Pearl, J.K. Barrett (1976) Geothermal resources of the Upper San Luis and Arkansas valleys, Colorado Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  13. Wide-range radiation dose monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1986-01-01

    A radiation dose-rate monitor is provided which operates in a conventional linear mode for radiation in the 0 to 0.5 R/h range and utilizes a nonlinear mode of operation for sensing radiation from 0.5 R/h to over 500 R/h. The nonlinear mode is achieved by a feedback circuit which adjusts the high voltage bias of the proportional counter, and hence its gas gain, in accordance with the amount of radiation being monitored. This allows compression of readout onto a single scale over the range of 0 to greater than 500 R/h without scale switching operations.

  14. Wide-range radiation dose monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopp, M.K.

    1984-09-20

    A radiation dose-rate monitor is provided which operates in a conventional linear mode for radiation in the 0 to 0.5 R/h range and utilizes a nonlinear mode of operation for sensing radiation from 0.5 R/h to over 500 R/h. The nonlinear mode is achieved by a feedback circuit which adjusts the high voltage bias of the proportional counter, and hence its gas gain, in accordance with the amount of radiation being monitored. This allows compression of readout onto a single scale over the range of 0 to greater than 500 R/h without scale switching operations.

  15. TeamWorks - A publication of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 10-27-13) 11,689 Shipments received since opening (10,978 CH and 711 RH) 89,359 Cubic meters of waste disposed (89,006 CH and 353 RH) 169,714 Containers disposed in the underground (168,995 CH and 719 RH) *CH - Contact-handled transuranic waste RH - Remote-handled transuranic waste NAMP Webinars Promote Training and Education in Radiochemistry In April 2012, the Department of Energy National Analytical Management Program (NAMP) launched its first series of

  16. TeamWorks - A publication of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 11-21-13) 11,750 Shipments received since opening (11,035 CH and 715 RH) 89,780 Cubic meters of waste disposed (89,425 CH and 355 RH) 170,094 Containers disposed in the underground (169,370 CH and 724 RH) *CH - Contact-handled transuranic waste RH - Remote-handled transuranic waste Veterans Day ceremonies held at WIPP WIPP - A model repository The WIPP underground consists of panels used for the disposal of defense-related transuranic waste. For more than 14

  17. TeamWorks - A publication of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 6-23-13) 11,384 Shipments received since opening (10,712 CH and 672 RH) 87,209 Cubic meters of waste disposed (86,874 CH and 335 RH) 167,525 Containers disposed in the underground (166,857 CH and 668 RH) *CH - Contact-handled transuranic waste; RH - Remote-handled transuranic waste Franco part of senior-level delegation to France WIPP teams demonstrate excellence at mine rescue competition WIPP's mine rescue teams recently competed at the Southwest Regional Mine

  18. TeamWorks - A publication of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 7-28-13) 11,477 Shipments received since opening (10,791 CH and 686 RH) 87,856 Cubic meters of waste disposed (87,513 CH and 343 RH) 168,346 Containers disposed in the underground (167,663 CH and 683 RH) *CH - Contact-handled transuranic waste; RH - Remote-handled transuranic waste WIPP senior managers recognized for support of military service Joe Franco Paul Shoemaker Ned Elkins The New Mexico Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) presented its

  19. TeamWorks - A publication of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 8-26-13) 11,555 Shipments received since opening (10,859 CH and 696 RH) 88,415 Cubic meters of waste disposed (88,069 CH and 346 RH) 168,861 Containers disposed in the underground (168,168 CH and 693 RH) *CH - Contact-handled transuranic waste RH - Remote-handled transuranic waste WIPP panel certified and ready for waste disposal In mid-July 2013, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) approved the use of Panel 7 for disposal of defense-related

  20. Selected Failure Rate Values from ITER Safety Assessment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... spurious change of position Vacuum system Vacuum pumping Vacuum valves isolate vacuum lines valve surface, include operator but not controls intermittent RH Class 2 external ...

  1. DOE Issues Request for Information for Potential WIPP Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (RH) transuranic (TRU) wastes and mixed hazardous constituents, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and asbestos, between various DOE sites across the country and other ...

  2. ISSUED DOE/WIPP-09-3427 Waste Data System User's Manual U.S...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Agency (EPA) Compliance Recertification Decision and approval for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) disposal * The EPA letter of approval of the DOE's RH-TRU Waste ...

  3. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structure of the Quaternary Magnetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EuTAl4Si2 (T = Rh and Ir) Compounds (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structure of the Quaternary Magnetic EuTAl4Si2 (T = Rh and Ir) Compounds Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structure of the Quaternary Magnetic EuTAl4Si2 (T = Rh and Ir) Compounds Single crystals of the quaternary europium compounds EuRhAl4Si2 and EuIrAl4Si2 were synthesized by using the Al-Si binary eutectic as a flux. The structure of the two

  4. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... RH Relative humidity RLY Relay (for data logger) RS Responsivity SHD Shaded test ... SPA Solar position algorithm STD Standard (control) instrument SW Shortwave THM Thermistor ...

  5. miller-er-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Correction for Dry Bias in Vaisala Radiosonde RH Data E. R. Miller, J. Wang, and H. L. Cole National Center for Atmospheric Research Atmospheric Technology Division Boulder,...

  6. TTW 7-28-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 7-27-11) 9,780 Shipments received since opening (9,279 CH and 501 RH) 76,334 Cubic meters of waste disposed (76,081 CH and 253 RH) 148,669 Containers disposed in the underground (148,169 CH and 500 RH) CH-TRU waste can be handled by workers without any other additional shielding than the container itself. RH-TRU waste emits more penetrating radiation than CH waste and must be handled and transported in lead-shielded casks. A Panel consists of seven disposal rooms

  7. Two Phase Transitions Make a High-Temperature Superconductor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Note that various candidate orders for the pseudogap considered in this work give a qualitative agreement with the experiment in varying degrees. Research conducted by: R.-H....

  8. Recovery Act Provides Big Boost with a Nanoscale Focus | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House to Focus on Programmatic Successes Achieved Under ARRA Funding An operator uses robotic manipulators to process RH TRU. WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE...

  9. Lafarge Roofing Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: RH4 1TG Product: Distributes and installs roofing tiles, including photovoltaic ones. Coordinates: 48.231575, -101.134114 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Alternative Fuel Systems Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Place: Slinfold, United Kingdom Zip: RH13 7SZ Product: Supplier and installer of LPG conversions. Also develops Alkaline Fuel Cell systems. Coordinates: 51.069,...

  11. United States Government

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Acquisition Executive AE) Authority for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste RH LL W) Disposal Project TO: Dennis M. Miotla, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear...

  12. Model Verification and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. 5 Myers, R.H., Montgomery, D.C., Response Surface Methodology: Process and Product Optimization Using Designed...

  13. Microsoft Word - Class_1_6_Items_02_10_16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... PM performed every 100 hours of operation, every 500 hours of operation or every 5 Years. Quarterly Engine Emission Test. Annual Electrical Inspection. Annual NDE. RH Bay Waste ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (IA) (United States) USDOE Office of Management and Administration (United States) ... Kondo lattice and antiferromagnetic behavior in quaternary CeTAl4Si2 (T Rh, Ir) single ...

  15. ORNL/RASA-84/LJ2 Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    locations of soil aamples taken at 61 Trudy Drive. . 5 FEET 0 8 " . .... 13-32 HRh 9-11 uRh .:. '.:.- I ix I z WHOUSE 1:.*:::::: T jJ--- 13-15 ,Rh A S PH A LT...

  16. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2006-12-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

  17. Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-03-31

    The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

  18. file://\\troi2\wwwroot\TeamWorks\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 12-11-11) 10,214 Shipments received since opening (9,682 CH and 532 RH) 79,468 Cubic meters of waste disposed (79,200 CH and 268 RH) 155,269 Containers disposed in the underground (154,737 CH and 532 RH) Photo at right: CBFO Interim Manager Ed Ziemianski (far right) presented the awards to several of the participants. Also shown from left to right are Debra Hicks and Randy Pettigrew of Pettigrew & Associates; Owen Lofton of the Bureau of Land Management; Hank

  19. file://\\troi2\wwwroot\TeamWorks\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 2-26-13) 11,112 Shipments received since opening (10,483 CH and 629 RH) 85,498 Cubic meters of waste disposed (85,185 CH and 313 RH) 165,172 Containers disposed in the underground (164,545 CH and 627 RH) WIPP exhibit and truck at Waste Management 2013 The annual Waste Management Conference is scheduled in Phoenix, AZ on February 24 -28. The conference, often referred to as one of the leading international conferences for the management of radioactive material,

  20. file://\\troi2\wwwroot\TeamWorks\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 1-17-12) 10,284 Shipments received since opening (9,748 CH and 536 RH) 79,890 Cubic meters of waste disposed (79,620 CH and 270 RH) 156,539 Containers disposed in the underground (156,003 CH and 536 RH) British Broadcasting Company program features WIPP interview On December 30, 2011, WIPP got a bit of airtime on "the other side of the pond." CBFO Chief Scientist Roger Nelson was interviewed by British Broadcasitng Corporation reporter Julian Keane for

  1. file://\\troi2\wwwroot\TeamWorks\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 12-16-12) 11,061 Shipments received since opening (10,437 CH and 624 RH) 85,057 Cubic meters of waste disposed (84,750 CH and 307 RH) 164,529 Containers disposed in the underground (163,915 CH and 614 RH) An international eye on WIPP: At right, a group of international visitors listens to Ron Parsons of Sandia National Laboratories during a tour of WIPP. A lesson in salt: Frank Hansen (SNL) holds up a piece of rock salt during a discussion with WIPP tour

  2. file://\\troi2\wwwroot\TeamWorks\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 2-27-12) 10,308 Shipments received since opening (9,772 CH and 536 RH) 80,199 Cubic meters of waste disposed (79,919 CH and 280 RH) 157,123 Containers disposed in the underground (156,587 CH and 536 RH) During Week One, CBFO Manager Joe Franco held WIPP All Hands Meetings. Franco shaking hands with Mark Long, Jr. following an all hands meeting with employees. CBFO Manager Joe Franco hits the ground running If you want to catch up with Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  3. file://\\troi2\wwwroot\TeamWorks\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 7-30-12) 10,697 Shipments received since opening (10,128 CH and 569 RH) 82,869 Cubic meters of waste disposed (82,598 CH and 286 RH) 161,142 Containers disposed in the underground (160,576 CH and 566 RH) EPA conducts annual inspection at WIPP The Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation and Indoor Air completed its annual inspection of the WIPP facility on July 17-19. The inspection included a review of the monitoring program, waste emplacement and

  4. TRU TeamWorks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2013 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 1-23-13) 11,112 Shipments received since opening (10,483 CH and 629 RH) 85,498 Cubic meters of waste disposed (85,185 CH and 313 RH) 165,172 Containers disposed in the underground (164,545 CH and 627 RH) WIPP employee honored by American Red Cross WIPP's Bob Walker was among a handful of honorees at the American Red Cross' Southeastern New Mexico Real Heroes Breakfast & Awards held January 10 in Hobbs. The organization awarded Real Heroes in various

  5. TRU TeamWorks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 3-26-13, 6 a.m.) 11,1159 Shipments received since opening (10,521 CH and 638 RH) 85,719 Cubic meters of waste disposed (85,403 CH and 316 RH) 165,362 Containers disposed in the underground (164,731 CH and 631 RH) WIPP Laboratories receives Certificate of Registration WIPP Laboratories has received a Certificate of Registration for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA). The certificate permits the laboratory to conduct radiochemical testing of emergency

  6. TRU TeamWorks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 9-26-12) 10,849 Shipments received since opening (10,252 CH and 597 RH) 83,693 Cubic meters of waste disposed (82,394 CH and 299 RH) 162,472 Containers disposed in the underground (161,882 CH and 590 RH) Photo above right: CBFO Deputy Manager Ed Ziemianski presents a WIPP team with the Green Zia Program Silver Level Award from the New Mexico Environment Department on Aug. 15, 2012 in recognition of environmental initiatives. Shown right of Ziemianski is Farok

  7. TRU TeamWorks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 11-28-12) 11,014 Shipments received since opening (10,395 CH and 619 RH) 84,718 Cubic meters of waste disposed (83,411 CH and 307 RH) 163,960 Containers disposed in the underground (163,347 CH and 613 RH) File Photo WIPP receives 11,000th shipment Shipment Number 1 arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in March 1999 and now, less than 14 years later, the facility has received Number 11,000. The milestone shipment was received at WIPP's main gate at

  8. TRU TeamWorks 7-7-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 7-6-11) 9,730 Shipments received since opening (9,234 CH and 496 RH) 75,969 Cubic meters of waste disposed (75,717 CH and 252 RH) 147,852 Containers disposed in the underground (147,357 CH and 495 RH) DOE completes cleanup at New York, California sites "Cleanup of these two sites represents important and continued progress in the Department of Energy's commitment to reducing the nation's nuclear waste footprint," said Assistant Secretary for

  9. TTW 1-14-09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 1-13-09) 7,068 Shipments received since opening (6,873 CH and 195 RH) 57,873 Cubic meters of waste disposed (57,790 CH and 83 RH) 108,188 Containers disposed in the underground (107,993 CH and 195 RH) WIPP radiological expert helps prep for the inauguration Ron Macaluso will be in Washington for the presidential inauguration, but unfortunately it will be all work and no play. Macaluso, who works in WTS External Emergency Management, will be traveling to the

  10. TTW 1-26-07

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RH Special Edition January 26, 2007 Above: The shipment departing the Idaho National Laboratory. Below: The truck arriving at WIPP. WIPP celebrates the first arrival of RH-TRU waste On Tuesday night, the temperature may have been low, but the spirits were high at WIPP. A crowd of more than 70 people, mo stly employees, braved temperatures in the 30s to welcome the first shipment of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste to WIPP. "This is a great day," said CBFO Manager Dave Moody. The crowd

  11. TTW 10-21-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2010 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 10-20-10) 9,067 Shipments received since opening (8,644 CH and 423 RH) 71,429 Cubic meters of waste disposed (71,211 CH and 218 RH) 138,368 Containers disposed in the underground (137,946 CH and 422 RH) CBFO hires new employees Several key Department of Energy employees previously affiliated with other DOE sites are now bringing their expertise to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The list of DOE employees joining CBFO includes Dr. Abraham (Abe) Van Luik, a

  12. TTW 11-24-09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 11-23-09) 8,079 Shipments received since opening (7,776 CH and 303 RH) 64,467 Cubic meters of waste disposed (64,319 CH and 148 RH) 125,770 Containers disposed in the underground (125,469 CH and 301 RH) Deputy Secretary of Energy Visits WIPP Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman (right) speaks with Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dave Moody and Assistant Secretary of Environmental Management Ines Triay in the underground on their recent visit to WIPP. Poneman

  13. TTW 12-18-08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2008 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 12-17-08) 7,063 Shipments received since opening (6,868 CH and 195 RH) 57,873 Cubic meters of waste disposed (57,790 CH and 83 RH) 108,188 Containers disposed in the underground (107,993 CH and 195 RH) Dr. Steven Chu nominated as Secretary of Energy On December 15, President-Elect Obama announced the nomination of Dr. Steven Chu to be the next Secretary of Energy. Dr. Chu is director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and professor of physics and molecular

  14. TTW 12-20-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2010 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 12-19-10) 9,207 Shipments received since opening (8,761 CH and 446 RH) 72,422 Cubic meters of waste disposed (72,193 CH and 229 RH) 139,545 Containers disposed in the underground (139,099 CH and 446 RH) Stroble takes over NTP for CBFO J.R. Stroble has been selected to direct the National TRU Program (NTP) for the Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). Stroble has been with CBFO since 2007, serving as CBFO's remote- handled waste certification manager.

  15. TTW 2-22-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 2-21-11) 9,245 Shipments received since opening (8,794 CH and 451 RH) 72,663 Cubic meters of waste disposed (72,433 CH and 230 RH) 140,185 Containers disposed in the underground (139,737 CH and 448 RH) Quotes from the BRC public meeting held in Carlsbad: "I have never encountered a project that is so available. WIPP is a tremendous success story." - Jerri McTaggert, Carlsbad businesswoman on her visit to WIPP "Their lives are better because they

  16. TTW 3-17-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 3-16-11) 9,330 Shipments received since opening (8,868 CH and 462 RH) 73,123 Cubic meters of waste disposed (72,887 CH and 236 RH) 141,203 Containers disposed in the underground (140,743 CH and 460 RH) TRUPACT-III quick facts: Made for shipping contact-handled TRU waste Approximate Weight Empty: 43,600 lbs. Overall Dimensions Width: 8.2 feet Height: 8.7 feet Length: 14 feet Road show gives a first look at TRUPACT-III The TRUPACT-III shipping package made its

  17. TTW 3-29-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2010 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 3-28-10) 8,350 Shipments received since opening (8,011 CH and 339 RH) 66,124 Cubic meters of waste disposed (65,958 CH and 166 RH) 129,706 Containers disposed in the underground (129,375 CH and 331 RH) Final Nevada Test Site waste disposed at WIPP File Photo The WIPP Central Characterization Project (CCP) has successfully completed TRU waste removal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The CCP team was deployed to characterize contact-handled TRU waste at NTS to meet

  18. TTW 4-19-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 4-18-11) 9,453 Shipments received since opening (8,983 CH and 470 RH) 74,022 Cubic meters of waste disposed (73,781 CH and 241 RH) 143,240 Containers disposed in the underground (142,772 CH and 468 RH) WIPP reaches 12 years of safe operations It's hard to believe, but it has now been a dozen years since WIPP received its first shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste. The underground repository marked its 12-year anniversary of operations on Saturday, March 26, 2011.

  19. TTW 4-9-09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 3-26-09) 7,255 Shipments received since opening (7,043 CH and 212 RH) 59,114 Cubic meters of waste disposed (59,025 CH and 89 RH) 111,294 Containers disposed in the underground (111,088 CH and 206 RH) 10-Year Timeline 1999 March 26, WIPP receives first shipment from Los Alamos National Laboratory at 4:00 a.m. Hundreds of people gathered at the site to witness the first truck to arrive at the site. First shipment from Idaho National Laboratory arrives at WIPP First

  20. TTW 5-10-07

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2007 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 5-9-07) 5,739 Shipments received since opening 48,035 Cubic meters of waste disposed 89,673 Containers disposed in the underground Going up! Watch for RH-TRU shipments to increase Now that the first shipment of RH-TRU waste has arrived at WIPP and subsequent shipments are arriving regularly, what's the next step? More. Since January, the total number of RH-TRU shipments has climbed to 17, but by the end of 2007, the shipping rate is scheduled to increase from the

  1. TTW 6-16-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2010 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 6-15-10) 8,643 Shipments received since opening (8,272 CH and 371 RH) 68,296 Cubic meters of waste disposed (68,109 CH and 187 RH) 133,440 Containers disposed in the underground (133,073 CH and 367 RH) WTS maintains VPP Star status WIPP's stars are still aligned perfectly. Following an on-site visit and audit of WIPP safety programs, a four-member team from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) recommended that URS

  2. TTW 7-16-09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 7-15-09) 7,583 Shipments received since opening (7,335 CH and 248 RH) 61,184 Cubic meters of waste disposed (61,070CH and 114 RH) 116,765 Containers disposed in the underground (116,523 CH and 242 RH) A special thanks to all those who prepared for and assisted with the EMS audit Hardy Bellows Wes Boatwright Leroy Bostick Tom Fabian Ed Flynn Marty Gonzales Ken Hasten James Hedin Bill Jaco Judy Lanier Tom Lichty Willie Most Parrish Roush Craig Suggs Steve Travis

  3. TTW 9-1-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 8-31-11) 9,922 Shipments received since opening (9,412 CH and 510 RH) 77,352 Cubic meters of waste disposed (77,095 CH and 257 RH) 150,976 Containers disposed in the underground (150,466 CH and 510 RH) WIPP receives first TRUPACT-III shipment The TRUPACT-III shipping package arrives at the WIPP site. The first TRUPACT-III waste-shippi ng package has arrived at WIPP. The shipment, which originated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, S.C., arrived at the

  4. Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR Authors: Mounce, Andrew M. [1] ; Thompson, Joe David [1] ; Bauer, Eric Dietzgen [1] ; Reyes, A. P. [2] ; Kuhns, P. L. [2] + Show Author

  5. Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10_OGREN_ARM_AWG_IAP_200703.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In-situ Aerosol Profiling (IAP) * Objectives - obtain aerosol climatology aloft - determine relevance of surface climatology to vertical column * Measurements Li ht b ti tt i d - Light absorption, scattering, and hemispheric backscattering - RH-dependence of scattering - Temperature and RH Cessna 172XP 3/2000 - 6/2005 Temperature and RH - Flask samples for trace gases (CO 2 ) * Flights - 9 levels 0 5-3 7 km asl (172XP) - 9 levels, 0.5-3.7 km asl (172XP) - 12 levels, 0.5-4.6 km asl (206) -

  7. Graphic1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 8-10-09) 7,653 Shipments received since opening (7,393 CH and 260 RH) 61,696 Cubic meters of waste disposed (61,575 CH and 121 RH) 118,203 Containers disposed in the underground (117,950 CH and 253 RH) Foreign Travel Notice: Please advise by COB August 18, 2009, if you or anyone if your office is planning on going on Foreign Travel for the first half of FY2010 (October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010), please provide all of the information requested below to...

  8. Graphic1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 11-5-09) 8,002 Shipments received since opening (7,702 CH and 300 RH) 63,971 Cubic meters of waste disposed (63,828 CH and 143 RH) 124,386 Containers disposed in the underground (124,093 CH and 293 RH) WIPP receives 8000th TRU waste shipment The 8,000th shipment arrives at WIPP late Wednesday night. The two drivers, Phil Godin, left, and Jack Clayton stand next to the truck as it is inspected by Security. The shipment came to WIPP from Los Alamos National

  9. Graphic1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 9-10-09) 7,762 Shipments received since opening (7,487 CH and 275 RH) 62,351 Cubic meters of waste disposed (62,221 CH and 130 RH) 119,958 Containers disposed in the underground (119,688 CH and 270 RH) CBFO hires five new employees Starting a new job is always exciting and a challenge. Five new DOE Carlsbad Field Office employees know the feeling. CBFO has filled five positions with employees that possess a WIPP trucks surpass 9 million loaded miles File photo With

  10. Untitled-1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2011 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 11-20-11) 10,180 Shipments received since opening (9,648 CH and 532 RH) 79,169 Cubic meters of waste disposed (78,903 CH and 266 RH) 154,336 Containers disposed in the underground (153,808 CH and 528 RH) Joe Franco named CBFO manager The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) Assistant Manager for the River Corridor Joe Franco was selected as Manager for the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), which oversees the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  11. Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 No abstract prepared. Authors: Asbury, John B. ; Ghosh, Hirendra N. ; Yeston, Jake S. ; Bergman, Robert G. ; Lian, Tianquan Publication Date: 1998-03-16 OSTI

  12. Local scrape-off layer control using biased electrodes in NSTX...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to test the theory that biased electrodes can affect the local scrape-off layer (SOL) width by creating a strong radial ExB drift Cohen, R.H. and Ryutov, D.D, Nucl. Fusion...

  13. Ceres Power Holdings Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Holdings Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ceres Power Holdings Plc Place: Crawley, England, United Kingdom Zip: RH10 1SS Product: UK-based product development company...

  14. CX-009632: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    INTEC – Suspect RH-TRU (AMWTP) CX(s) Applied: NO CX GIVEN Date: 11/23/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  15. wang-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 1993 include humidity reports at RH<20% and at temperatures lower than -40 C (Wade 1994). Another purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between water...

  16. CX-009041: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pd-Rh Powder Production Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/09/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  17. Oak Ridge Associated Universities II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Division of Fuel - Cycle and Material Safety II U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission L RADIOLOGICAL ... .A Rh PECK AVE JERSEY CENTRAL POWER SUB STATION t METERS FIGURE 18. ...

  18. ORNL/RASA-84/LT6

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DJr .. 'AIrm H Jfl JAN 3 1989 ii ORNLRASA-84LT6 JAN 3 1 1989 i . OTS I Health and ... Gamma exposure rate levels up to 140 aRh exist on the ground surface of this property. ...

  19. Diverse Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: United Kingdom Zip: RH13 0SZ Product: UK-based manufacturer of module fuel cell systems for remote power requirements. References: Diverse Energy1 This article is a...

  20. Enertech Solutions Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: RH19 4YP Product: UK-based company that markets and sells fuel cell processors & fuel cell systems. Represents ChevronTexaco as its European distribution...

  1. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Factors that would constitute a no-go decision are: 1. Severe weather or icing conditions 2. Low-cloud cover is less than about 10%, and the RH at the top of the BL < 70% 3. ...

  2. Vertax Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RH2 7LD Sector: Wind energy Product: Vertax is a British company that develops vertical axis wind turbines Coordinates: 48.231575, -101.134114 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana-Pillai, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons with a metal complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/H/sub 2/ in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form a hydridoalkyl complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/RH; (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform CHX/sub 3/ at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) CpRhPMe/sub 3/RX; and (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex with halogen -60 to 25/sup 0/C to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  4. X:\\ARM_19~1\\P225-243.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mass scattering efficiency increases with Forecasts RH to computer they obtain the optica l (10% to 30% depending on radius) near zenith to 50% a t the limb. Based on the...

  5. Experimental observation of incoherent-coherent crossover and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Liu, Z. K. ; Yi, M. ; Zhang, Y. ; Hu, J. ; Yu, R. ; Zhu, J.-X. ; He, R.-H. ; Chen, Y. L. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Moore, R. G. ; Mo, S.-K. ; Hussain, Z. ; Si, Q. ; Mao, Z. Q. ; ...

  6. Superconductivity Distorted by the Coexisting Pseudogap in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hashimoto, M. ; He, R.-H. ; Vishik, I.M. ; Schmitt, F. ; Moore, R.G. ; Lu, D.H. ; Yoshida, Y. ; Eisaki, H. ; Hussain, Z. ; Devereaux, T.P. ; Shen, Z.-X. Publication Date: ...

  7. Geothermal resources of Colorado | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal resources of Colorado Author R.H. Pearl Published Colorado Geological Survey Special Publication, 1972 DOI Not Provided...

  8. varble_arm09.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    km Altitude km RH Regime Anom. Pressure hPa Pressure hPa Climatological Context for TWP-ICE Convective Precipitation Features Adam Varble and Ed Zipser Department of...

  9. Milestone Shipment Arrives at WIPP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – On Sept. 12, 2013, the 700th shipment of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste reached the gate at EM’s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  10. Microsoft Word - 07-1090dsm ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-12...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the CH Waste Re-certification and RH Waste Certification Audit Report for the LANLCCP Audit A-07-12 Dear Mr....

  11. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optical characteristics on variations of the relative humidity Rh of air. The particle growth factor, which can be found as the ratio of radii corresponding to the same value of...

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-002.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in the Final Waste Management Programmatic ... Waste: Small amounts (< 2 ft 3 ) of remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste may be generated. Remote-handled low level ...

  13. Geothermal resources of the Upper San Luis and Arkansas valleys...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    resources of the Upper San Luis and Arkansas valleys, Colorado Authors R.H. Pearl and J.K. Barrett Editors Epis, R.C. & Weimer and R.I. Published Colorado School of Mines:...

  14. Charlton Compact Power Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    England, United Kingdom Zip: BA11 2RH Sector: Biomass Product: A joint venture between A. J. Charlton & Sons and Compact Power to develop a 3.6MW to 4.5MW biomass plant in...

  15. Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    must also include its dependency on RH. Based on these results, we can propose a cloudiness parameterization for both cloud regimes as follows: where and p are to be determined. ...

  16. Large magneto-optical Kerr effect in noncollinear antiferromagnets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large magneto-optical Kerr effect in noncollinear antiferromagnets Mn 3 X ( X Rh , Ir , Pt ) Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on...

  17. 01-27-05.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... RH waste, the successful completion of large container NDANDE, the first shipment of waste in a TRUPACT-III and witnessing the cleanup of a major generator site like Rocky Flats. ...

  18. PHYSICAL SCIENCES, Physics Phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SCIENCES, Physics Phase competition in trisected superconducting dome I. M. Vishik, 1, 2 M Hashimoto, 3 R.-H. He, 4 W. S. Lee, 1, 2 F. Schmitt, 1, 2 D. H. Lu, 3 R. G. Moore, 1...

  19. Microsoft Word - VNC Pressrelease final[2].doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The DOE estimates that about 30-40 RH shipments will be sent from VNC to WIPP. The packaging of the waste is ongoing and will continue through October. The characterization,...

  20. Dr.James J.Spivey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D.; Poston, J.; Spivey, J., " Kinetic and mechanistic study of dry (CO2) reforming of methane over Rh-substituted La2Zr2O7 pyrochlores", Journal of Catalysis, 2014, 316, 78-92...

  1. 41737 Final

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Temperatures, SHRH1RH2, F Commission- ing Year Fuel Country Misumi 1000 3568 1112 ... Guard house * Runoff water pump house * Industrial waste treatment building 5.4 Plant ...

  2. I:PRCXFERZYSK9105691056R0F.PDF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... catalysts have also published (Stuhl et al. 1978; Blum et al., 1987; Fish et al., 1985). ... Fish and coworkers (1984, 1985, 1986) discovered that (Ph P) RhCl 3 3 ...

  3. Fuel Cell Control Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Control Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fuel Cell Control Ltd Place: Slinfold, United Kingdom Zip: RH13 0SZ Product: Initially founded to develop fuel cell control systems,...

  4. EIS-0026-SA-04: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Use of the 10-160B Transportation Cask for RH-TRU Waste Shipments to WIPP, Carlsbad Field Office DOE is proposing to use the CNS 10-160B, Type B Shipping Cask (referred in this...

  5. P I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... (RASA) Program, ORNWIU-8600, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge Natl. ... SOIL SAMPLE 0 YlscRuINpoos SAMPLE VUMCC GREEN AP- 7-13pRh FEET 0 5 10 d 013 6 METERS ...

  6. Testing Modules for Potential-Induced Degradation - A Status Update of IEC 62804 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.

    2014-03-01

    Stresses and degradation rates for the 25 degrees C with foil and the 60 degrees C/85% RH damp heat tests are compared, the Illumination factor on PID rate is evaluated, and measurement techniques and stress levels are discussed.

  7. ARM - Datastreams - sondewnpn

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    % rh ( time ) Atmospheric temperature Dry Bulb Temperature C tdry ( time ) Time offset from midnight seconds since 2003-07-07 00:00:00 0:00 time ( time ) Time offset from...

  8. Microsoft Word - ICP-12-010webpost.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) to the ... All non-RH-TRU (i.e. low level waste, Contact Handled ... of meeting the high temperature DOE-ID NEPA CX ...

  9. NUREG/CR-6299 BMI-2184

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... I S UNLIMITED L2r-h" Abstract ABSTRACT This topical ... There were three major conclFions from this work. The first ... Of course, reducing the carbon to those levels causes a ...

  10. Ited States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    in the various property reports indicating the NRC 10 CFR I 20.105 as permitting 60 uRh (about 500 mremyr) continuoos exoosure is not j correct. The exposure rate noted in...

  11. 2010-01 "Disposition of Remote-Handled Waste Buried in 33 Shafts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The intent of this recommendation is to remove the highly radioactive RH-TRU wastes from TA-54 in a safe manner with a minimum of radiation exposure to workers at all levels. ...

  12. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation at fuel cell anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Kowal, Andrzej

    2011-11-02

    In some embodiments a ternary electrocatalyst is provided. The electrocatalyst can be used in an anode for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst may include a noble metal particle having a surface decorated with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh. The noble metal particles may include platinum, palladium, ruthenium, iridium, gold, and combinations thereof. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst includes SnO.sub.2 particles having a surface decorated with clusters of a noble metal and Rh. Some ternary electrocatalysts include noble metal particles with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh at their surfaces. In some embodiments the electrocatalyst particle cores are nanoparticles. Some embodiments of the invention provide a fuel cell including an anode incorporating the ternary electrocatalyst. In some aspects a method of using ternary electrocatalysts of Pt, Rh, and SnO.sub.2 to oxidize an alcohol in a fuel cell is described.

  13. Section 35

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Plains Site: Equipment Installation and Operation R. Leifer, R.H. Knuth, B. Albert and S.F. Guggenheim Environmental Measurements Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy,...

  14. Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Packaging

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-09

    Provides specific instructions for packaging and/or repackaging contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) and remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste in a manner consistent with DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual, CH-TRU and RH-TRU waste transportation requirements, and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) programmatic requirements. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  15. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana-Pillai, Roy A.

    1985-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  16. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  17. Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Meng; Cullen, David A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Marinkovic, N.; More, Karren Leslie; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2013-01-01

    Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

  18. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 ?m to 0.50 ?m on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ? 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ? 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS cell pieces was observed that was not seen on BZO/glass, and a CdS/CIGS sample displayed a small darkening and then flaking feature. Additionally, standard AlNi grid contact was less stable than thin Ni grid contact at T/RH ? 70/70. The edge sealant and moisture-blocking films were effective to block moisture ingress, as evidenced by the good stability of most CIGS solar cells and device components at T/RH = 85/70 for 704 h, and by preservation of the initial blue color on the RH indicator strips. The SSADT experiment is ongoing to be completed at T/RH = 85/85.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION THROUGH DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES AND CERTIFICATION OF REMOTE-HANDLED TRANSURANIC WASTE GENERATOR/STORAGE SITES FOR SHIPMENT TO THE WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, L.R.; Most, Wm.A.; Kehrman, R.F.; Gist, C.S.

    2003-02-27

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is operating to receive and dispose of contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste. The Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is seeking approval from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) of the remote-handled (RH) TRU characterization plan to allow disposal of RH TRU waste in the WIPP repository. In addition, the DOE-CBFO has received approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use two shipping casks for transporting RH TRU waste. Each regulatory agency (i.e., EPA, NMED, and NRC) has different requirements that will have to be met through the use of information collected by characterizing the RH TRU waste. Therefore, the DOE-CBFO has developed a proposed characterization program for obtaining the RH TRU waste information necessary to demonstrate that the waste meets the applicable regulatory requirements. This process involved the development of a comprehensive set of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) comprising the various regulatory requirements. The DOE-CBFO has identified seven DQOs for use in the RH TRU waste characterization program. These DQOs are defense waste determination, TRU waste determination, RH TRU determination, activity determination, RCRA physical and chemical properties, prohibited item determination, and EPA physical and chemical properties. The selection of the DQOs were based on technical, legal and regulatory drivers that assure the health and safety of the workers, the public, to protect the environment, and to comply with the requirements of the regulatory agencies. The DOE-CBFO also has the responsibility for the certification of generator/storage sites to ship RH TRU mixed waste to the WIPP for disposal. Currently, thirteen sites across the DOE complex are generators of RH TRU waste or store the waste at their location for other generators. Generator/storage site certification involves review and approval of site-specific programmatic documents that demonstrate compliance with the WIPP waste characterization and transportation requirements. Additionally, procedures must be developed to implement programmatic requirements and adequacy of those procedures determined. Finally, on-site audits evaluate the technical and administrative implementation and effectiveness of the operating procedures.

  20. Solid-state chemistry of molecular metal oxide clusters. Bis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium(I) carbonyl derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siedle, A.R.; Gleason, W.B.; Newmark, R.A.; Skarjune, R.P.; Lyon, P.A.; Markell, C.G. ); Hodgson, K.O.; Roe, A.L. )

    1990-05-02

    Hydronium salts of the Keggin-type XM{sub 12}O{sub 40} molecular metal oxide cluster anions SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4{minus}}, SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4{minus}}, PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4{minus}}, and PVMo{sub 11}O{sub 40}{sup 4{minus}} react with ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 3}Rh(CO))(HC(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}) in CH{sub 3}CN{minus}C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH to form (trans-(Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Rh(CO)(CH{sub 3}CN)){sub n}XM{sub 12}O{sub 40}. These salts lose CH{sub 3}CN on heating to provide ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Rh(CO)){sub n}XM{sub 12}O{sub 40}, which may also be obtained directly from ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 3}Rh(CO))(HC(SO{sub 2}cF{sub 3}){sub 2}) in pure ethanol. These oxometalates have been characterized by ir, NMR, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy and are considered to contain isolated, lattice-stabilized (Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Rh(CO)-(CH{sub 3}CN){sup +} and (Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Rh(CO){sup +} cations, with the latter being a three-coordinate, 14-electron Rh(I) species. The activity and selectivity of these compounds as catalysts for olefin isomerization and hydroformylation are described. Reaction of ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 3}Rh(CO))(HC(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}) with CH{sub 3}CN produces (trans-(Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Rh(CO)(CH{sub 3}CN))(HC(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}). The crystal structure of the triclinic compound is reported. 41 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Effect of Hydrogen Passivation on the Electronic Structure of Ionic Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, H. X.; Li, S. S.; Li, J. B.; Wei, S. H.

    2012-05-15

    In theoretical studies of thin film and nanostructured semiconductors, pseudohydrogen (PH) is widely used to passivate the surface dangling bonds. Based on these calculations, it is often believed that nanostructured semiconductors, due to quantum confinement, have a larger band gap than their bulk counterparts. Using first-principles band structure theory calculation and comparing systematically the differences between PH-passivated and real-hydrogen-passivated (RH-passivated) semiconductor surfaces and nanocrystals, we show that, unlike PH passivation that always increases the band gap with respect to the bulk value, RH passivation of the nanostructured semiconductors can either increase or decrease the band gap, depending on the ionicity of the nanocompounds. The differences between PH and RH passivations decreases when the covalency of the semiconductor increases and can be explained using a band coupling model. This observation greatly increases the tunability of nanostructured semiconductor properties, especially for wide-gap ionic semiconductors.

  2. Comparative study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transportation alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    WIPP transportation studies in the Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement for WIPP are the baseline for this report. In an attempt to present the most current analysis, this study incorporates the most relevant data available. The following three transportation options are evaluated for the Disposal Phase, which is assumed to be 20 years: Truck shipments, consisting of a tractor and trailer, with three TRUPACT-IIs or one RH-72B; Regular commercial train shipments consisting of up to three railcars carrying up to 18 TRUPACT-IIs or up to six RH-72Bs; Dedicated train shipments consisting of a locomotive, an idle car, railcars carrying 18 TRUPACT-IIs or six RH-72Bs, another idle car, and a caboose or passenger car with an emergency response specialist. No other cargo is carried. This report includes: A consideration of occupational and public risks and exposures, and other environmental impacts; A consideration of emergency response capabilities; and An extimation of comparative costs.

  3. Thermal and non-thermal production of dark matter via Z'-portal(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Mambrini, Yann; Quevillon, Jrmie; Zaldvar, Bryan E-mail: yann.mambrini@th.u-psud.fr E-mail: b.zaldivar.m@csic.es

    2014-01-01

    We study the genesis of dark matter in the primordial Universe for representative classes of Z'-portals models. For weak-scale Z' mediators we compute the range of values of the kinetic mixing allowed by WMAP/PLANCK experiments corresponding to a FIMP regime. We show that very small values of ? (10{sup ?12}?RH}, with a weak-scale coupling g{sub D} to ordinary matter. Relic abundance constraints then impose a direct correlation between T{sub RH} and the effective scale ? of the interactions: ? ? 10{sup 3}?10{sup 5} T{sub RH}. Finally we describe in some detail the process of dark thermalisation and study its consequences on the computation of the relic abundance.

  4. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O'neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  5. Applicability of Density Functional Theory in Reproducing Accurate Vibrational Spectra of Surface Bound Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanovic, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-10-05

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of 22.62 and 21.1% for the NAN stretching and RhAH stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the RhAH and NAN stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schrodinger equation associated with the RhAH, RhAN, and NAN potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for NAN and RhAH stretching modes as 231 cm21 and 277 cm21 at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments.

  6. Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavernia, Enrique J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2011-08-01

    Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

  7. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Masud, Jahangir; Nguyena, Trung V.; Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric; Ikenberry, Myles; Hohn, Keith; Pan, Chun-Jern; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2015-02-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchangemore » current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.« less

  8. TRU TeamWorks - August 14, 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thursday 8-14-03 | LANL Hosts RH Demo | WIPP launches new e-newsletter, TRU TeamWorks. Weekly pu A weekly e-newsletter for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant team August 14, 2003 The Big Story LANL RH Demo a Big Success Topics Characterization News Transportation News Disposal News Safety News Working Smart Announcements Our Team Tools Acronym List Archives WIPP Home Page Links Feedback Contact us with feedback or submit your e-mail address for updates. Click here to e-mail. WIPP Shipments 16

  9. Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Drum Venting - Operational Experience and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Th.L.Jr.; Bhatt, R.N.; Troescher, P.D.; Lattin, W.J.

    2008-07-01

    Remote-handled transuranic (RH TRU) waste drums must be vented to meet transportation and disposal requirement before shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The capability to perform remote venting of drums was developed and implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory. Over 490 drums containing RH TRU waste were successfully vented. Later efforts developed and implemented a long-stem filter to breach inner waste bags, which reduced layers of confinement and mitigated restrictive transportation wattage limits. This paper will provide insight to the technical specifications for the drum venting system, development, and testing activities, startup, operations, and lessons learned. (authors)

  10. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 6 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 Subject: Final Audit Report A-07-24 of the SRS/CCP Battelle Columbus RH Waste Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the final Audit Report for Audit A-07-27 of the Savannah River Site/Central Characterization Project (SRS/CCP) Battelle Columbus Remote Handled (RH) Waste, for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as

  11. Predicting the Performance of Edge Seal Materials for PV (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M.; Panchagade, D.; Dameron, A.; Reese, M.

    2012-03-01

    Edge seal materials were evaluated using a 100-nm film of Ca deposited on glass and laminated to another glass substrate. As moisture penetrates the package it converts the Ca metal to transparent CaOH2 giving a clear indication of the depth to which moisture has entered. Using this method, we have exposed test samples to a variety of temperature and humidity conditions ranging from 45C and 10% RH up to 85C and 85% RH, to ultraviolet radiation and to mechanical stress. We are able to show that edge seal materials are capable of keeping moisture away from sensitive cell materials for the life of a module.

  12. Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Solar Zenith Angle Correction Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Solar Zenith Angle Correction Factor Figure 3: Ratio of MWR TCWV to radiosonde derived TCWV, and the solar zenith angle at the radiosonde launch time (black dots). The dry bias observed in sonde TCWV values is mainly attributable to a dry RH bias near the surface The red dots show the 1000 hPa RH correction factors suggested by Voemel et al for sondes launched near noon (10-30 degree solar zenith angle), and at night time (90 degree zenith

  13. Media Contacts:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy.gov U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation Pilot Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 DOENews For immediate release WIPP Receives 100 th Remote-Handled Waste Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M., January 5, 2008 - Less than a year ago the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received its first shipment of remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste. Today, the 100 th RH-TRU waste shipment safely arrived at the Department of Energy site for permanent disposal. "Years

  14. DWPF CATALYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION PROGRAM - REVIEW OF CURRENT STATUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.

    2009-07-10

    Significant progress has been made in the past two years in improving the understanding of acid consumption and catalytic hydrogen generation during the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processing of waste sludges in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This report reviews issues listed in prior internal reviews, describes progress with respect to the recommendations made by the December 2006 external review panel, and presents a summary of the current understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, are historically known catalysts for the conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Rh, Ru, and Pd are present in the DWPF SRAT feed as by-products of thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U in the original waste. Rhodium appears to become most active for hydrogen as the nitrite ion concentration becomes low (within a factor of ten of the Rh concentration). Prior to hydrogen generation, Rh is definitely active for nitrite destruction to N{sub 2}O and potentially active for nitrite to NO formation. These reactions are all consistent with the presence of a nitro-Rh complex catalyst, although definite proof for the existence of this complex during Savannah River Site (SRS) waste processing does not exist. Ruthenium does not appear to become active for hydrogen generation until nitrite destruction is nearly complete (perhaps less nitrite than Ru in the system). Catalytic activity of Ru during nitrite destruction is significantly lower than that of either Rh or Pd. Ru appears to start activating as Rh is deactivating from its maximum catalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The slow activation of the Ru, as inferred from the slow rate of increase in hydrogen generation that occurs after initiation, may imply that some species (perhaps Ru itself) has some bound nitrite on it. Ru, rather than Rh, is primarily responsible for the hydrogen generation in the SME cycle when the hydrogen levels are high enough to be noteworthy. Mercury has a role in catalytic hydrogen generation. Two potentially distinct roles have been identified. The most dramatic effect of Hg on hydrogen generation occurs between runs with and without any Hg. When a small amount of Hg is present, it has a major inhibiting effect on Rh-catalyzed H{sub 2} generation. The Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study showed that increasing mercury from 0.5 to 2.5 wt% in the SRAT receipt total solids did not improve the inhibiting effect significantly. The next most readily identified role for Hg is the impact it has on accelerating NO production from nitrite ion. This reaction shifts the time that the ideal concentration of nitrite relative to Rh occurs, and consequently causes the most active nitro-Rh species to form sooner. The potential consequences of this shift in timing are expected to be a function of other factors such as amount of excess acid, Rh concentration, etc. Graphical data from the Rh-Ru-Hg study suggested that Hg might also be responsible for partially inhibiting Ru-catalysis initially, but that the inhibition was not sustained through the SRAT and SME cycles. Continued processing led to a subsequent increase in hydrogen generation that was often abrupt and that frequently more than doubled the hydrogen generation rate. This phenomenon may have been a function of the extent of Hg stripping versus the initial Ru concentration in these tests. Palladium is an active catalyst, and activates during (or prior to) nitrite destruction to promote N{sub 2}O formation followed by a very small amount of hydrogen. Pd then appears to deactivate. Data to date indicate that Pd should not be a species of primary concern relative to Rh and Ru for hydrogen generation. Pd was a very mild catalyst for hydrogen generation compared to Rh and Ru in the simulated waste system. Pd was comparable to Rh in enhancing N{sub 2}O production when present at equal concentration. Pd, however, is almost always present at less than a quarter of the Rh concentration in S

  15. Theoretical study of the rhodium dimer interaction with the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, S.; Cruz, A.; Cuan, A.

    1995-12-31

    The C{sub 2v} potential energy surfaces for the end-on and side-on approaches of H{sub 2} to the rhodium dimer were studied through self-consistent-field (SCF) and multiconfigurational SCF calculations, followed by extensive variational plus second-order multireference Moller-Plesset perturbational configuration interaction (CIPSI) calculations. Relativistic effective core potentials were used to replace the core electrons of the rhodium atoms. Together with the Rh{sub 2}-H{sub 2} interaction, the spectroscopic constants for the {sup 5}{summation}{sub g}{sup +}, {sup 1}{summation}{sub g}{sup +}, {sup 3}II{sub {mu}}, and {sup 1}II{sub {mu}} states of Rh{sub 2} are reported. It was found that the potential energy curves of the parallel and the perpendicular Rh{sub 2}({sup 5}{summation}{sub g}) interaction with H{sub 2} show that the rhodium dimer has the ability to capture and break the H{sub 2} molecule. The parallel interaction presents a soft potential barrier of 7.8 kcal/mol, energy necessary to surmount before the capture and breaking of the H-H bond. In the perpendicular interaction, Rh{sub 2} captures and breaks spontaneously H{sub 2}. The potential energy curve of the parallel Rh{sub 2}({sup 1}{summation}{sub g}) + H{sub 2} interaction shows that Rh{sub 2} also captures and breaks spontaneously the H{sub 2}, with a very deep well of 92.7 kcal/mol, while in the perpendicular approach, Rh{sub 2} has to surmount again a soft barrier of 5.2 kcal/mol to capture and break the H{sub 2} molecule. Finally, the energy curves of the parallel Rh{sub 2}({sup 1,3}II{sub {mu}}) + H{sub 2} interactions present capture and breaking with very small barriers. The perpendicular interactions capture and scisse the hydrogen molecule spontaneously. 35 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Aerosol Best Estimate Data Available as Value-Added Product Bookmark and Share Quicklook plots of monthly time series are generated for column AOD, vertical profiles up to 4 km of SSA and g, and for the corresponding RH profile. The optical properties are shown for the nominal green wavelength of 500 nm. Quicklook plots of monthly time series are generated for column AOD, vertical profiles up to 4 km of SSA and g, and for the corresponding RH profile. The optical properties are shown for the

  17. O Ti-tE LOVE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... known as Lhe Niagara Palls .I Chfpical Warfare rl'ant as it wii.'; hvilb by 'E. 1. DuPont first impregnikc Cr%uln was kncwn as RH-195, which was very : IL,was rcyJ,&cd with ...

  18. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  19. 2008-01 "Expedite Planned Change Request for Shielded Containers"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approved July 30, 2008 The intent of this recommendation is to encourage DOE to provide strong support for using shielded containers for removal of RH TRU waste, so that the TRU wastes from the LANL Area G can be removed on schedule.

  20. U & V PLANE MODULE ASSY 127 - S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 . 2 5 . 5 2 . 8 0 1 . 7 2 2.54 R 34.4 2.46 R C L RAD OF GROOVE OF GROOVE RAD .25 .36 REF 1.24 C L 34.4 .32 C L OF FIBER UPPER COMB LH SHOWN, RH IS OPPOSITE - SEE SHT 2 FIBER...

  1. Evolution of Structure-Reactivity Correlations for the Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction by Hydroxyl Radical and Comparison with that by Chlorine Atom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2013-01-01

    A structure-reactivity correlation for the reaction (HO + HCR3 HOH + CR3 ) has been formulated: log k298(per H) = 0.000630 rH2 0.151 rH 1.056 F 1.053 R 21.26 (r2 = 0.885; n = 70; mean unsigned deviation = 0.29 log units), where rH is the reaction enthalpy and F and R represent the dissection of Hammett s para constant into its field/inductive and resonance effects, and compared for the analogous case for Cl (ref 1). Although more exothermic, the dependence of HO on rH is somewhat greater than Cl . However the dependence on F and R is much less, suggestive of less charge separation in the transition state for the less electronegative HO . The range of k(OH) is significantly less than that of Cl , i.e., it is less dependent on substrate structure. Yet a cross-over exists such that k(Cl) > k(HO) predominates for more reactive cases whereas k(Cl) < k(OH) characterizes the less reactive. The Arrhenius parameters reveal that this cross-over results from a change in {E(Cl) E(OH)} from negative to positive. In contrast, whereas the A factors for both increase significantly as reactivity increases, {A(Cl) / A(OH)} always exceeds unity.

  2. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Review of thorium fuel reprocessing experience","Brooksbank, R.E.; McDuffee, W.T.; Rainey, R.H.","1978-01-01T05:00:00Z",5080081,,"CONF-780223-3","W-7405-ENG-26","TRN:...

  3. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNAM 5 (1982) 1 1982DO01 K.G.R. Doss, P.D. Barnes, N. Colella, S.A. Dytman, R.A. Eisenstein, C. Ellegaard, F. Takeutchi, W.R. Wharton, J.F. Amann, R.H. Pehl et al, Phys. Rev....

  4. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  5. Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1984-06-04

    A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

  6. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana, R.A.

    1988-05-24

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R[sub 1]H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R[sub 1] represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R[sub 2])[sub 3

  7. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RHs above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  8. NOAA PMEL Station Chemistry Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Quinn, Patricia

    2008-04-04

    Submicron and supermicron samples are analyzed by ion chromatography for Cl-, NO3-, SO4-2, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca+2. The analysis of MSA-, Br-, and oxalate has been added to some stations. Samples also are analyzed for total mass by gravimetric analysis at 55 +/- 5% RH.

  9. A high-resolution whole genome radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 17q22-q25.3 across the genes for GH and TK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, J.W.; Schafer, A.J.; Critcher, R.

    1996-04-15

    We have constructed a whole genome radiation hybrid (WG-RH) map across a region of human chromosome 17q, from growth hormone (GH) to thymidine kinase (TK). A panel of 128 WG-RH hybrid cell lines generated by X-irradiation and fusion has been tested for the retention of 39 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers by the polymerase chain reaction. This genome mapping technique has allowed the integration of existing VNTR and microsatellite markers with additional new markers and existing STS markers previously mapped to this region by other means. The WG-RH map includes eight expressed sequence tag (EST) and three anonymous markers developed for this study, together with 23 anonymous microsatellites and five existing ESTs. Analysis of these data resulted in a high-density comprehensive map across this region of the genome. A subset of these markers has been used to produce a framework map consisting of 20 loci ordered with odds greater than 1000:1. The markers are of sufficient density to build a YAC contig across this region based on marker content. We have developed sequence tags for both ends of a 2.1-Mb YAC and mapped these using the WG-RH panel, allowing a direct comparison of cRay{sub 6000} to physical distance. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Fireside Corrosion USC Steering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak

    2011-09-07

    Oxy-Fuel Fireside Research goals are: (1) Determine the effect of oxy-fuel combustion on fireside corrosion - (a) Flue gas recycle choice, Staged combustion ramifications, (c) JCOAL Collaboration; and (2) Develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an 'ash corrosivity' measurement - (a) Synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes, (b) Applicable to SH/RH conditions.

  11. Vertical-emitting, ring-geometry, ultra-low threshold and ultra-high-speed quantum-well lasers for optical interconnect. Status report No. 6, Jun-Sep 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittelstein, M.; Bar-Chaim, N.

    1990-09-01

    Emphasis was placed on the following efforts: design and implementation of a test station for vertical emitting lasers; ridge waveguide structure and ring configiuration lasers; refinement of grating fabrication for repeatability; and single quantum well material investigation, Keywords: Ring lasers; Optical waveguides; Lasers (R.H.)

  12. Alcohol synthesis from CO or CO.sub.2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jianli [Kennewick, WA; Dagle, Robert A [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D [Kennewick, WA; Cao, Chunshe [Houston, TX; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; White, James F [Richland, WA; Elliott, Douglas C [Richland, WA; Stevens, Don J [Richland, WA

    2010-12-28

    Methods for producing alcohols from CO or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 utilizing a palladium-zinc on alumina catalyst are described. Methods of synthesizing alcohols over various catalysts in microchannels are also described. Ethanol, higher alcohols, and other C.sub.2+ oxygenates can produced utilizing Rh--Mn or a Fisher-Tropsch catalyst.

  13. WIPP Receives First Remote-Handled Waste Shipment From Sandia Labs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has received the first of eight planned defense-related remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste shipments from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque.

  14. Rhodium Catalysts in the Oxidation of CO by O2 and NO: Shape, Composition, and Hot Electron Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renzas, James R.

    2010-03-08

    It is well known that the activity, selectivity, and deactivation behavior of heterogeneous catalysts are strongly affected by a wide variety of parameters, including but not limited to nanoparticle size, shape, composition, support, pretreatment conditions, oxidation state, and electronic state. Enormous effort has been expended in an attempt to understand the role of these factors on catalytic behavior, but much still remains to be discovered. In this work, we have focused on deepening the present understanding of the role of nanoparticle shape, nanoparticle composition, and hot electrons on heterogeneous catalysis in the oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide. These reactions were chosen because they are important for environmental applications, such as in the catalytic converter, and because there is a wide range of experimental and theoretical insight from previous single crystal work as well as experimental data on nanoparticles obtained using new state-of-the-art techniques that aid greatly in the interpretation of results on complex nanoparticle systems. In particular, the studies presented in this work involve three types of samples: {approx} 6.5 nm Rh nanoparticles of different shapes, {approx} 15 nm Rh1-xPdx core-shell bimetallic polyhedra nanoparticles, and Rh ultra-thin film ({approx} 5 nm) catalytic nanodiodes. The colloidal nanoparticle samples were synthesized using a co-reduction of metal salts in alcohol and supported on silicon wafers using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. This synthetic strategy enables tremendous control of nanoparticle size, shape, and composition. Nanoparticle shape was controlled through the use of different organic polymer capping layers. Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by careful choice of metal salt precursors. Rh/TiO{sub x} and Rh/GaN catalytic nanodiodes were fabricated using a variety of thin film device fabrication techniques, including reactive DC magnetron sputtering, electron beam evaporation, and rapid thermal annealing. The combination of these techniques enabled control of catalytic nanodiode morphology, geometry, and electrical properties.

  15. Instrument uncertainty effect on calculation of absolute humidity using dewpoint, wet-bulb, and relative humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slayzak, S.J.; Ryan, J.P.

    1998-04-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Advanced Desiccant Technology Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is characterizing the state-of-the-art in desiccant dehumidifiers, the key component of desiccant cooling systems. The experimental data will provide industry and end users with independent performance evaluation and help researchers assess the energy savings potential of the technology. Accurate determination of humidity ratio is critical to this work and an understanding of the capabilities of the available instrumentation is central to its proper application. This paper compares the minimum theoretical random error in humidity ratio calculation for three common measurement methods to give a sense of the relative maximum accuracy possible for each method assuming systematic errors can be made negligible. A series of experiments conducted also illustrate the capabilities of relative humidity sensors as compared to dewpoint sensors in measuring the grain depression of desiccant dehumidifiers. These tests support the results of the uncertainty analysis. At generally available instrument accuracies, uncertainty in calculated humidity ratio for dewpoint sensors is determined to be constant at approximately 2%. Wet-bulb sensors range between 2% and 6% above 10 g/kg (4%--15% below), and relative humidity sensors vary between 4% above 90% rh and 15% at 20% rh. Below 20% rh, uncertainty for rh sensors increases dramatically. Highest currently attainable accuracies bring dewpoint instruments down to 1% uncertainty, wet bulb to a range of 1%--3% above 10 g/kg (1.5%--8% below), and rh sensors between 1% and 5%.

  16. The Direct Path To WIPP - 12471

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spoerner, M.T.; Burger, M.J.; Garcia, J. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Humphrey, B.J. [Weston Solutions, Inc. (United States); Rast, D. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Site Office (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM), designated as a small quantity site (SQS) by the National TRU Program (NTP), generated contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste primarily from the decontamination and clean-out of glove boxes at the Hot Cell Facility (HCF) at Technical Area (TA) V. All of the waste required repackaging, with the CH TRU waste being repackaged from late 2007 through 2011. Three shipments of CH were completed in October 2011, which de-inventoried SNL/NM's legacy TRU waste. In FY11, RH TRU waste was repackaged at the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) located in TAV with the support of the Central Characterization Project (CCP). The waste was originally packaged in SNL/NM fabricated casks, cement or lead-lined 55-gallon drums, or 30-gallon drums. The AHCF is a small hot cell, with access only through a roof port which presented challenges for inserting and removing waste from the hot cell. The CCP provided visual examination operators (VEOs) to observe and document each waste item repackaged, removal of prohibited items, and radiological sampling. Dose-to-Curie measurements were calculated by CCP after a radiological report was prepared using scaling factors determined by the analysis of swipe samples. Finally, headspace gas samples were taken and sent to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) for analysis. Despite the challenges, the RH waste is on track to be shipped to WIPP in early FY12. The processes used and procedures developed to conduct the repackaging operations, the issues identified and mitigated were challenging but the cooperation between SNL/NM and the Central Characterization Program (CCP) enabled SNL/NM to complete the repackaging and support the characterization and shipment. An inventory list, identification of the campaigns, discussion of the challenges and mitigations, and the final loading of the RH 72-B casks at TA-V for direct shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be discussed. Lessons learned from the RH campaigns are: - Some containers that were originally identified as HC-3 have been re-evaluated and became < HC-3 due to the conservative estimates made by the original generators - Operators at the AHCF were not accustomed to the detail required by the VE operators. However, they worked well together and the repackaging was completed ahead of schedule. - The AK was not always accurate as was demonstrated by the solid waste found in the drum during the first visit by EPA. That waste has since been determined to be low-level. - Two drums originally thought to be RH turned out to be CH and arrangement for RTR had to be made quickly. - Six of the original RH repacked drums became low level. - Lessons learned from the CH campaigns were helpful in avoiding many issues. The RH repackaging effort has been a success due to the expertise of the AHCF operators, supervisor, and manager, the conscientious attention to detail of the CCP VE operators, the experience of the CCP DTC and headspace gas sampling staff, and the guidance and support from CCP and CBFO. Sometimes schedules had to be adjusted, processes updated, and issues discussed, but the communication between CCP and SNL/NM was good. SNL/NM hopes to have the legacy RH TRU waste shipped off-site by early 2012. (authors)

  17. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively in situ at 467 and 530 nm. Closure modeling with the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) refractive index model was able to capture the increasing absorption trend with RH indicating that the droplets were heterogeneously mixed while containing dispersed insoluble absorbing material within those droplets. Seven other refractive index mixing models including LVA did not adequately describe the measurements for OC. Mixing the biomass OC aerosol with select mass fractions of ammonium sulfate ranging from 25 to 36% and sodium chloride ranging from 21 to 30% resulted in an increase in light scattering and extinction with RH and inorganic mass fraction. However, no detectable difference in light absorption behavior in comparison to pure biomass OC was observed. The main finding of this research is a measured increase in absorption with increasing RH, which is currently not represented in radiative transfer models even though biomass burning produces most of the primary OC aerosol in the atmosphere.

  18. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbenebis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(?4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(?4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(?4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(?4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(?-Cl)(?2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}Rh(?-H)(?-Cl)Rh(?2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(?3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in CH bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis-[Ir](H)(Ph) complex. Alternatively, the rhodium carbonyl 5 or iridium isocyanide {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)CNtBu (15) reacts with PhSiH3 in the dark to form the silyl compound {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (14) or {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(SiH2Ph)CNtBu (17). These examples demonstrate the enhanced thermal reactivity of {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}-supported iridium and rhodium carbonyl compounds in comparison to tris(oxazolinyl)borate, tris(pyrazolyl)borate, and cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds.

  19. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Hung-An

    2012-03-06

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, To{sup R}, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the To{sup R}-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[To{sup R}] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[To{sup M}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} and [Rh({mu}- Cl)(COE)]{sub 2} gives To{sup M}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.2) and To{sup M}RhH({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 8}H{sub 13}) (3.1) respectively while Tl[To{sup P}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} affords To{sup P}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brnsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex To{sup M}Rh(H){sub 2}CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary alcohols have been investigated as well. The proposed mechanism is based on the stochiometric reactions of the possible metal and organic intermediates. Primary amines, hypothesized to undergo a similar reaction pathway, have been verified to give dehydrogenative coupling product, imines. In the end, the well-developed neutral tridentate Tpm coordinates to the rhodium bis(ethylene) dimer in the presence of TlPF{sub 6} to give the cationic complex, [TpmRh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}] (5.1). 5.1 serves as the first example of explicit determination of the solid state hapticity, evidenced by X-ray structure, among all the cationic Tpm{sup R}M(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +} (Tpm{sup R} = Tpm, Tpm*, M = Rh, Ir) derivatives. The substitution chemistry of this compound has been studied by treating with soft and hard donors. The trimethylphosphine-sbustituted complex activates molecular hydrogen to give the dihydride compound.

  20. Synthesis and reactions of Cp-linked phosphine complexes of rhodium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefort, L.; Crane, T.W.; Farwell, M.D.; Baruch, D.M.; Kaeuper, J.A.; Lachicotte, R.J.; Jones, W.D.

    1998-08-31

    The linked Cp ligand [C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}]{sup {minus}} has been used to synthesize several rhodium derivatives. Reaction with [RhClL{sub 2}]{sub 2} where L = C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 8}H{sub 14}, or CO, gives ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})Rh(L) complexes, which have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Reaction of the ethylene complex with CO or PMe{sub 3} gives the carbonyl- and phosphine-substituted derivatives, respectively. Irradiation of the ethylene complex in the presence of hydrogen gives a new binuclear polyhydride, also structurally characterized, in which the chelating ligand spans the two metal centers. Reaction of the ethylene complex with iodine leads to the formation of the diiodide ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})RhI{sub 2}, which in turn can be converted to the dihydride ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})RhH{sub 2} by reaction with NaAl(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3}){sub 2}H{sub 2}. The reactivity of the dihydride toward C-H bond activation has been investigated. While benzene does not give a stable oxidative addition adduct, pentafluorobenzene yields ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})Rh(C{sub 6}F{sub 5})H, which was structurally characterized as its chloro derivative. Reaction of the dihydride with C{sub 6}F{sub 6} gives the {eta}{sup 2} complex ({eta}{sup 5}:{eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2})Rh({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}F{sub 6}), also structurally characterized.

  1. Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydroarylation of Alkenes via Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harada, Hitoshi; Thalji, Reema; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-05-22

    Highly enantioselective catalytic intramolecular ortho-alkylation of aromatic imines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using [RhCl(coe){sub 2}]{sub 2} and chiral phosphoramidite ligands. Cyclization of substrates containing 1,1- and 1,2-disubstituted as well as trisubstituted alkenes were achieved with enantioselectivities >90% ee for each substrate class. Cyclization of substrates with Z-alkene isomers proceeded much more efficiently than substrates with E-alkene isomers. This further enabled the highly stereoselective intramolecular alkylation of certain substrates containing Z/E-alkene mixtures via a Rh-catalyzed alkene isomerization with preferential cyclization of the Z-isomer.

  2. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from Rh to Ru when Ru was at its fission yield ratio to Rh. (4) The inhibiting effect of Hg on hydrogen generation apparently does not require much mercury in terms of moles Hg/mole Rh (or Ru). Once the initial impact is realized, the benefit of additional Hg in reducing the hydrogen generation rate was minimal. Sludge Batch 3 and 4 simulant test data confirm this. (5) Low Hg runs do not necessarily bound high Hg runs for the maximum hydrogen generation rate over the full SRAT-SME cycle. Two of the four Rh-Ru combinations had a cross-over point where the hydrogen generation rate in high Hg run went from always lower to always higher than in the low Hg run. One cross-over was in the SRAT and one was in the SME. Maximum hydrogen generation rates in the high Hg runs could exceed the maximum hydrogen generation rates from the low Hg runs. (6) SME cycle hydrogen generation rates during the first decon canister dewatering period were similar to the rates at the end of the SRAT reflux period. (7) Corrosion of 400 series stainless steel shafts significantly impacted the hydrogen generation rate in two runs. (8) Preliminary data analysis indicates that several additional SRAT runs are needed to replace suspect data in the original set of twelve runs. A more detailed statistical evaluation is expected to occur once replacement run data from several additional SRAT runs has been obtained.

  3. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

    2011-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

  4. Nanoamorphous carbon-based photonic crystal infrared emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norwood, Robert A.; Skotheim, Terje

    2011-12-13

    Provided is a tunable radiation emitting structure comprising: a nanoamorphous carbon structure having a plurality of relief features provided in a periodic spatial configuration, wherein the relief features are separated from each other by adjacent recessed features, and wherein the nanoamorphous carbon comprises a total of from 0 to 60 atomic percent of one or more dopants of the dopant group consisting of: transition metals, lanthanoids, electro-conductive carbides, silicides and nitrides. In one embodiment, a dopant is selected from the group consisting of: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, La and other lanthanides, Hf, Ta, W, Rh, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, and Hg. In one embodiment, a dopant is selected from the group consisting of: electro-conductive carbides (like Mo.sub.2C), silicides (like MoSi.sub.2) and nitrides (like TiN).

  5. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane ceriummore » gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.« less

  6. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    Macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)(2+) (L = L-1 = cyclam and L-2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)(2)OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)(2)(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF(2))(2)(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)(2+). The new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Table of Contents: Accelerating Cleanup, Paths to Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INEEL LANL Site/ TRU Stream Carlsbad Area Office RH TRU Waste Baseline Disposition Map WIPP Disposal Volume Disposed Shipping Dates 1,798m 3 1/06 - 9/31 370m 3 4/07 - 3/13 230m 3 1/03 - 9/33 Waste Processing Disposal 1/03 - 9/15 RH TRU ORNL 1 31m 3 760m 3 10/03 - 12/21 SRS 2 SQS 2,052 m 3 ER, D&D, & Future Missions 1839m 3 FY98 - FY33 1 The remote-handled waste disposal and shipping schedule puts ORNL out of compliance with the September 30, 2002 regulatory agreement. 2 SRS has 31m 3 of

  8. A=16N (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    71AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 16N) GENERAL: See also Table 16.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (EL57B, WI57H, FA59E, RA60B, SH60C, TA60L, BA61D, TA62F, FE64A, LE64, ST64, GI65D, CO66D, CO66L, LE66E, SL66A, TO66B, DI67A, BO69J, HO69F). Reactions involving muons and pions: (CO63, AS64, BA64G, BA64H, CO64F, DE65I, GI65C, JA65F, KI66B, OH66B, WA66K, DE67H, DE67T, RA67B, RH67, RH67B, WA67H, DE69S, GR69D, GR69G, KE69B, MY69, RA70G). Other topics: (LI64I, AR68A,

  9. A novel technique to control high temperature materials degradation in fossil plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Martinez-Villafane, A.

    1995-11-01

    High temperature corrosion of superheater (SH) and, specially, reheater (RH) is strongly dependent on metal temperature. In this work, a way to continuously monitor the metal temperature of SH or RH, elements developed by the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) is described and the effects of operating parameters on metal temperature are evaluated. Also, the effects the steam-generator design and metal temperature on the corrosion rates have been investigated. In some steam generators, corrosion rates were reduced from 0.7 to 0.2 mm/y by changing the tube material and reducing the metal temperature. Also, the effect of metal temperature on the residual life of a 347H tube in a 158MW steam generator is evaluated. It is concluded that metal temperature is the most important parameter in controlling the high-temperature materials behavior in boiler environments.

  10. Ion Segregation and Deliquescence of Alkali Halide Nanocrystals on SiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Lin, Deng-Sung; Verdaguer, Albert; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-08-11

    The adsorption of water on alkali halide (KBr, KCl, KF, NaCl) nanocrystals on SiO{sub 2} and their deliquescence was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) from 8% to near saturation by scanning polarization force microscopy. At low humidity, water adsorption solvates ions at the surface of the crystals and increases their mobility. This results in a large increase in the dielectric constant, which is manifested in an increase in the electrostatic force and in an increase in the apparent height of the nanocrystals. Above 58% RH, the diffusion of ions leads to Ostwald ripening, where larger nanocrystals grow at the expense of the smaller ones. At the deliquescence point, droplets were formed. For KBr, KCl, and NaCl, the droplets exhibit a negative surface potential relative to the surrounding region, which is indicative of the preferential segregation of anions to the air/solution interface.

  11. Fluidized bed boiler having a segmented grate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waryasz, Richard E.

    1984-01-01

    A fluidized bed furnace (10) is provided having a perforate grate (9) within a housing which supports a bed of particulate material including some combustibles. The grate is divided into a plurality of segments (E2-E6, SH1-SH5, RH1-RH5), with the airflow to each segment being independently controlled. Some of the segments have evaporating surface imbedded in the particulate material above them, while other segments are below superheater surface or reheater surface. Some of the segments (E1, E7) have no surface above them, and there are ignitor combustors (32, 34) directed to fire into the segments, for fast startup of the furnace without causing damage to any heating surface.

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ueno and J. Lstiburek

    2015-09-01

    Test houses with unvented roof assemblies were built to measure long-term moisture performance, in the Chicago area (5A) and the Houston area (2A). The Chicago-area test bed had seven experimental rafter bays, including a "control" vented compact roof, and six unvented roof variants with cellulose or fiberglass insulation. The interior was run at 50% RH. All roofs except the vented cathedral assembly experienced wood moisture contents and RH levels high enough to constitute failure. Disassembly at the end of the experiment showed that the unvented fiberglass roofs had wet sheathing and mold growth. In contrast, the cellulose roofs only had slight issues, such as rusted fasteners and sheathing grain raise.

  13. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

  14. Tuned sensitivity towards H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} with Cu doped barium strontium titanate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simion, C. E. Teodorescu, V. S.; Stănoiu, A.; Sackmann, A.; Ruşti, C. F.; Piticescu, R. M.

    2014-11-05

    The different amount of Cu-doped Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) thick film materials have been tested for their gas-sensing performances towards NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S under dry and 50% relative humidity (RH) background conditions. The optimum NH{sub 3} sensitivity was attained with 0.1mol% Cu-doped BST whereas the selective detection of H{sub 2}S was highlighted using 5mol% Cu-doped BST material. No cross-sensitivity effects to CO, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and SO{sub 2} were observed for all tested materials operated at their optimum temperature (200°C) under humid conditions (50% RH). The presence of humidity clearly enhances the gas sensitivity to NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S detection.

  15. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane cerium gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.

  16. Milestone reached: Waste shipment leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste shipment leaves LANL Milestone reached: Waste shipment leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory The material, known as "remote-handled transuranic waste" (RH-TRU), has been stored at the Laboratory since 1995. June 2, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

  17. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Audit Report A-07-16 for INL/CCP RH Waste Characterization Activities dated November 22, 2006 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for SRS A-07-01 dated November 21, 2006 Annual Proposed Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination List Annual Report Submittals Submittal of Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination Notice of Submittal of a Dispute

  18. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preliminary Correction of Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Measurements for Slow Sensor Time-Response at Cold Temperatures L. M. Miloshevich and A. J. Heymsfield National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado A. Paukkunen Vaisala Oy Helsinki, Finland Introduction The goal of this study is to improve the accuracy of relative humidity (RH) measurements from Vaisala radiosondes, especially in the upper troposphere (UT), by correcting measurement error that results from slow time-response of

  19. CBERD: Climate Responsive Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Responsive Buildings CBERD: Climate Responsive Buildings Figure 1: Chamber experiment to study impact of air movement on thermal comfort using personally controlled fans and eight different thermal conditions. Preliminary results show that air movement allowed people to stay thermally neutral up to 32°C (89.6°F), 60% RH. Source: UC-Berkeley. Figure 1: Chamber experiment to study impact of air movement on thermal comfort using personally controlled fans and eight different thermal

  20. Intensive Variables & Nanostructuring in Magnetostructural Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Laura

    2014-08-13

    Over the course of this project, fundamental inquiry was carried out to investigate, understand and predict the effects of intensive variables, including the structural scale, on magnetostructural phase transitions in the model system of equiatomic FeRh. These transitions comprise simultaneous magnetic and structural phase changes that have their origins in very strong orbital-lattice coupling and thus may be driven by a plurality of effects.

  1. Solid Waste Processing Center Primary Opening Cells Systems, Equipment and Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Mullen, O Dennis; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2006-04-17

    This document addresses the remote systems and design integration aspects of the development of the Solid Waste Processing Center (SWPC), a facility to remotely open, sort, size reduce, and repackage mixed low-level waste (MLLW) and transuranic (TRU)/TRU mixed waste that is either contact-handled (CH) waste in large containers or remote-handled (RH) waste in various-sized packages.

  2. In Situ Validation of a Correction for Time-Lag and Bias Errors in Vaisala RS80-H Radiosonde Humidity Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Validation of a Correction for Time-Lag and Bias Errors in Vaisala RS80-H Radiosonde Humidity Measurements L. M. Miloshevich National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado H. Vömel and S. J. Oltmans National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado A. Paukkunen Vaisala Oy Helsinki, Finland Introduction Radiosonde relative humidity (RH) measurements are fundamentally important to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program goals because they are used in a

  3. Heterogeneous Catalysis for Thermochemical Conversion | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heterogeneous Catalysis for Thermochemical Conversion Our mission is to transform thermal biomass deconstruction products (syngas and pyrolysis oil) into the fuels and chemicals that keep society moving forward. Figure includes three panels. The first pane, labeled single-source precursors, depicts a bis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium(I) carbonyl chloride single-source precursor for producing rhodium phosphide nanoparticles, shown by a vertical line labeled PPh3 at the top, Rh in the middle, and

  4. SR-09-04.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River Site Accelerates TRU Waste Shipment under Recovery Act Aiken, SC -- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) began a new phase of waste disposition today, initiating the first shipment of Remote Handled (RH) Transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. These shipments compliment the contact handled TRU waste shipments that have been occurring at SRS for almost a decade. TRU waste, a result of decades of

  5. Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1

  6. Defense Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Cost/Schedule Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, G.D. . Joint Integration Office); Beaulieu, D.H. ); Wolaver, R.W.; Carson, P.H. Corp., Boulder, CO )

    1986-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide the DOE information with which it can establish the most efficient program for the long management and disposal, in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste. To fulfill this purpose, a comprehensive review of waste characteristics, existing and projected waste inventories, processing and transportation options, and WIPP requirements was made. Cost differences between waste management alternatives were analyzed and compared to an established baseline. The result of this study is an information package that DOE can use as the basis for policy decisions. As part of this study, a comprehensive list of alternatives for each element of the baseline was developed and reviewed with the sites. The principle conclusions of the study follow. A single processing facility for RH TRU waste is both necessary and sufficient. The RH TRU processing facility should be located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Shielding of RH TRU to contact handled levels is not an economic alternative in general, but is an acceptable alternative for specific waste streams. Compaction is only cost effective at the ORNL processing facility, with a possible exception at Hanford for small compaction of paint cans of newly generated glovebox waste. It is more cost effective to ship certified waste to WIPP in 55-gal drums than in canisters, assuming a suitable drum cask becomes available. Some waste forms cannot be packaged in drums, a canister/shielded cask capability is also required. To achieve the desired disposal rate, the ORNL processing facility must be operational by 1996. Implementing the conclusions of this study can save approximately $110 million, compared to the baseline, in facility, transportation, and interim storage costs through the year 2013. 10 figs., 28 tabs.

  7. leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milestone reached: Waste shipment leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory June 2, 2009 Remote-handled transuranic waste will go to WIPP LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 2, 2009 - Los Alamos National Laboratory officials today announced the departure of the Laboratory's first shipment of a special type of radioactive waste destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The material, known as "remote-handled transuranic waste" (RH-TRU), has been stored at the Laboratory

  8. Stabilization of Pt monolayer catalysts under harsh conditions of fuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cells (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Stabilization of Pt monolayer catalysts under harsh conditions of fuel cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stabilization of Pt monolayer catalysts under harsh conditions of fuel cells We employed density functional theory (DFT) to explore the stability of core (M = Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Os, Ir, Au)-shell (Pt) catalysts under harsh conditions, including solutions and reaction intermediates involved in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in

  9. CoverSheet

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and close to antiferromagnetism CeIn 3 CeRhIn 5 Ce 2 CoIn 8 CePt 2 In 7 T c 0.4 K T N 3.8 K T c 2.5 K (P) T N 5.0 K T c 2.3 K T N 10 K T c 0.2 K (under P) *...

  10. Electrocatalyst for Alcohol Oxidation at Fuel Cell Anodes - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Alcohol Oxidation at Fuel Cell Anodes Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Ternary Pt/Rh/SnO2 electrocatalysts for oxidizing ethanol to CO2 (2,641 KB) <p> Scanning transmission electron micrograph showing uniform dispersion of the catalyst particles (bright spots) on the carbon support (dark background). The average particle size is about 1.5&nbsp;nm.</p> Scanning transmission electron

  11. Synthesis of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted precipitation and evaluation of their photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Martnez, D.; Martnez-de la Cruz, A.; Lpez-Cullar, E.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ? WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ? WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), BrunauerEmmittTeller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UVvis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  12. Relative Hazard and Risk Measure Calculation Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Elder, Matthew S.

    2004-03-20

    The relative hazard (RH) and risk measure (RM) methodology and computer code is a health risk-based tool designed to allow managers and environmental decision makers the opportunity to readily consider human health risks (i.e., public and worker risks) in their screening-level analysis of alternative cleanup strategies. Environmental management decisions involve consideration of costs, schedules, regulatory requirements, health hazards, and risks. The RH-RM tool is a risk-based environmental management decision tool that allows managers the ability to predict and track health hazards and risks over time as they change in relation to mitigation and cleanup actions. Analysis of the hazards and risks associated with planned mitigation and cleanup actions provides a baseline against which alternative strategies can be compared. This new tool allows managers to explore “what if scenarios,” to better understand the impact of alternative mitigation and cleanup actions (i.e., alternatives to the planned actions) on health hazards and risks. This new tool allows managers to screen alternatives on the basis of human health risk and compare the results with cost and other factors pertinent to the decision. Once an alternative or a narrow set of alternatives are selected, it will then be more cost-effective to perform the detailed risk analysis necessary for programmatic and regulatory acceptance of the selected alternative. The RH-RM code has been integrated into the PNNL developed Framework for Risk Analysis In Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) to allow the input and output data of the RH-RM code to be readily shared with the more comprehensive risk analysis models, such as the PNNL developed Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) model.

  13. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center- Cask Processing Enclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wastren Advantage, Inc., the DOE Prime contractor for the TRU Waste Processing Center (TWPC) conceived, designed, and constructed the new Cask Processing Enclosure (CPE) approach based on experience gained to date from Remote Handled (RH) waste processing. The CPE was designed August to October 2011, constructed from October 2011 to April 2012, and Start-up Readiness activities have just been completed. Initial radiological operations are targeted for July 19, 2012.

  14. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 5-394 5.2 FFTF DECOMMISSIONING ALTERNATIVES This section describes the potential long-term environmental and human health impacts associated with implementation of alternatives considered to decommission FFTF and auxiliary facilities at Hanford; to manage waste from the decommissioning process, including waste designated as remote-handled special components (RH-SCs); and to manage the disposition of the Hanford inventory of radioactively contaminated

  15. NREL Teams with French Researchers - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Teams with French Researchers NREL Director to Receive Recognition for Joint Research Efforts April 14, 2010 Two men seated at a table with others looking on. Attending the MOU signing were: Véronique Péquignat, International Manager, Rhone Alps Economic Development Agency; Hervé Fradet, Director, Rhône Alps Economic Development Agency; David E. Rodgers, Director, Strategic Energy Analysis, DOE/EERE; Ron Benioff, International Programs Manager, NREL; Daniel Harris, Minister Counselor

  16. Quality Controlled Radiosonde Profile from MC3E (Dataset) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Dataset: Quality Controlled Radiosonde Profile from MC3E Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quality Controlled Radiosonde Profile from MC3E The sonde-adjust VAP produces data that corrects documented biases in radiosonde humidity measurements. Unique fields contained within this datastream include smoothed original relative humidity, dry bias corrected relative humidity, and final corrected relative humidity. The smoothed RH field refines the relative

  17. Magnetization studies of oxides related to the high temperature cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.

    1995-06-19

    The magnetic properties related to the following high temperature superconductors were measured utilizing a Faraday magnetometer: BaCuO{sub 2+x}, La{sub 2} CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2} RhO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2} VO{sub 4}, and Sr{sub 2} CuO{sub 3}. Neutron diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements are discussed.

  18. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) Handbook (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) Handbook Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) Handbook The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used

  19. January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste January 23, 2007: WIPP receives first shipment of waste January 23, 2007 The Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, receives (pdf) its first shipment of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. The waste, which consisted of three 30-gallon drums of radioactive debris waste and originated at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory, was

  20. Quality Controlled Radiosonde Profile from MC3E (Dataset) | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quality Controlled Radiosonde Profile from MC3E Title: Quality Controlled Radiosonde Profile from MC3E The sonde-adjust VAP produces data that corrects documented biases in radiosonde humidity measurements. Unique fields contained within this datastream include smoothed original relative humidity, dry bias corrected relative humidity, and final corrected relative humidity. The smoothed RH field refines the relative humidity from integers - the resolution of the instrument - to fractions of a

  1. Studies of Immobilized Homogeneous Metal Catalysts on Silica Supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith James Stanger

    2003-05-31

    The tethered, chiral, chelating diphosphine rhodium complex, which catalyzes the enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl-{alpha}-acetamidocinnamate (MAC), has the illustrated structure as established by {sup 31}P NMR and IR studies. Spectral and catalytic investigations also suggest that the mechanism of action of the tethered complex is the same as that of the untethered complex in solution. The rhodium complexes, [Rh(COD)H]{sub 4}, [Rh(COD){sub 2}]{sup +}BF{sub 4}{sup -}, [Rh(COD)Cl]{sub 2}, and RhCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O, adsorbed on SiO{sub 2} are optimally activated for toluene hydrogenation by pretreatment with H{sub 2} at 200 C. The same complexes on Pd-SiO{sub 2} are equally active without pretreatments. The active species in all cases is rhodium metal. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, TEM, DRIFTS, and mercury poisoning experiments. Rhodium on silica catalyzes the hydrogenation of fluorobenzene to produce predominantly fluorocyclohexane in heptane and 1,2-dichloroethane solvents. In heptane/methanol and heptane/water solvents, hydrodefluorination to benzene and subsequent hydrogenation to cyclohexane occurs exclusively. Benzene inhibits the hydrodefluorination of fluorobenzene. In DCE or heptane solvents, fluorocyclohexane reacts with hydrogen fluoride to form cyclohexene. Reaction conditions can be chosen to selectively yield fluorocyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene, or cyclohexane. The oxorhenium(V) dithiolate catalyst [-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}s-]Re(O)(Me)(PPh{sub 3}) was modified by linking it to a tether that could be attached to a silica support. Spectroscopic investigation and catalytic oxidation reactivity showed the heterogenized catalyst's structure and reactivity to be similar to its homogeneous analog. However, the immobilized catalyst offered additional advantages of recyclability, extended stability, and increased resistance to deactivation.

  2. ARM - VAP Process - aerosolbe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsaerosolbe Documentation & Plots Technical Report Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP : Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Instrument Categories Aerosols Quicklook plots of monthly time series are generated for column AOD, vertical profiles up to 4 km of SSA and g, and for the corresponding RH profile. The optical properties are shown for the

  3. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for concrete-shielded RHTRU waste drum for the 327 postirradiation testing laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.

    1996-10-29

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete- Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to the Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility in the 200 West Area and on to a Solid Waste Storage Facility, also in the 200 Area.

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Radiosonde Humidity Measurements and Proposed Corrections Based On AWEX Radiosonde Intercomparisons Miloshevich, L.M.(a), Lesht, B.M.(b), and Voemel, H.(c), National Center for Atmospheric Research (a), Argonne National Laboratory (b), NOAA/CMDL (c) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM radiosonde relative humidity (RH) measurements are widely used in numerical modeling, remote sensor validation, and radiative transfer calculations, yet their accuracy as

  5. Site Performance Measure Unit Lifecycle Total Estimate Pre-2016 Lifecycle Values

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Guide Site Management Guide Site Management Guide (Blue Book) (Update 18, January 2016) PDF icon Site Management Guide (Blue Book) (Update 18, January 2016) More Documents & Publications 2014 ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT (ASER) 2013 ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT (ASER) 2011 Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER)

    Performance Measure Unit Lifecycle Total Estimate Pre-2016 Lifecycle Values 2016 Target 2017 Target Argonne National Laboratory-East TRU-RH Cubic meters 22 22

  6. Luminescence imaging for aerodynamic temperature and pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallery, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    A luminescent temperature sensitive paint containing the molecule rhodamine B base (rhBb) is described whose emission intensity can be monitored by video camera to produce qualitative and quantitative two dimensional surface temperature maps. This paint was designed for use with the pressure sensitive paint containing platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), but is also a useful tool when used alone in the measurement of heat flow, boundary layer transition, and quantitative surface temperature during wind tunnel studies. The ability of the rhBb paint to produce a continuous temperature map makes it possible to locate structures in the temperature field on an airfoil that are otherwise undetected by surface mounted thermocouples spaced a finite distance apart. A dual temperature/pressure sensitive paint was investigated with both the rhBb and PtOEP dyes incorporated into the silicone polymer paint base of the pressure sensor. Photodegradation and batch variations in the polymer were found to compromise the calibration parameters of the PtOEP paint and therefore the accuracy of pressure predictions. Suggestions are made for improving the prediction ability of the paint. The molecule europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (EuTTA) is also discussed as a temperature sensor for a two layer temperature/pressure paint. EuTTA can not be directly incorporated into the silicone paint base of the PtOEP paint (as the rhBp paint can), but performs well in non-oxygenpermeable coatings. Benefits of the EuTTA temperature paint include: (1) decreased photodegradation, (2) very bright luminescence intensity, and (3) long luminescent lifetime (several hundred microseconds). The long lifetime facilitates lifetime imaging, a technique currently under development as an alternative detection method where luminescent lifetimes rather than emission intensity are related to temperature and pressure.

  7. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  8. DOE Reaches Recovery Act Goal With Cleanup of All Legacy Transuranic Waste at Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M., May 3, 2012 –The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed cleanup of the Cold War legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico when four shipments of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Sandia arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M. for permanent disposal on May 2, 2012.

  9. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  10. Laser photoelectron spectroscopy of ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, G.B.

    1993-12-01

    During the last year the author has (a) completed a review article that critically contrasts three methods to measure R-H bond energies, (b) finished a spectroscopic study of the phenylnitrene anion, and (c) successfully completed an overhaul of the light source of the photodetachment spectrometer. The new light source is based on an Ar III laser that provides approximately 100 W of 3.531 eV photons.

  11. WIPP Receives First Remote-Handled Waste Shipment From Sandia Labs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For immediate release WIPP Receives First Remote-Handled Waste Shipment From Sandia Labs CARLSBAD, N.M., December 21, 2011 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has received the first of eight planned defense-related remote- handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste shipments from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque. The shipment arrived December 16 for permanent disposal in WIPP's underground repository. DOE National TRU Program Director J.R. Stroble

  12. DOE-WIPP 02-3214 FINAL _3_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REMOTE-HANDLED TRU WASTE CHARACTERIZATION PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION PLAN DOE/WIPP-02-3214 Revision 3 September 19, 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office DOE/WIPP-02-3214 Revision 3 2 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................6 2.0 RH TRU Waste Characterization Program Requirements and Objectives .................7 2.1. Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) and Quality Assurance

  13. Analysis of Selected Radiosonde Data from the ARM/NSA Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Selected Radiosonde Data from the ARM/NSA Site B. Petracca, H. W. Church, and B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico R. Storvold and C. Marty Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska B. M. Lesht Argonne National Laboratories Argonne, Illinois Introduction The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in temperature and relative humidity (RH) profiles obtained from near-simultaneous radiosonde soundings made from different locations

  14. Environment on the Surfaces of the Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Wolery

    2005-02-22

    This report provides supporting analysis of the conditions at which an aqueous solution can exist on the drip shield or waste package surfaces, including theoretical underpinning for the evolution of concentrated brines that could form by deliquescence or evaporation, and evaluation of the effects of acid-gas generation on brine composition. This analysis does not directly feed the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA), but supports modeling and abstraction of the in-drift chemical environment (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169863]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). It also provides analyses that may support screening of features, events, and processes, and input for response to regulatory inquiries. This report emphasizes conditions of low relative humidity (RH) that, depending on temperature and chemical conditions, may be dry or may be associated with an aqueous phase containing concentrated electrolytes. Concentrated solutions at low RH may evolve by evaporative concentration of water that seeps into emplacement drifts, or by deliquescence of dust on the waste package or drip shield surfaces. The minimum RH for occurrence of aqueous conditions is calculated for various chemical systems based on current understanding of site geochemistry and equilibrium thermodynamics. The analysis makes use of known characteristics of Yucca Mountain waters and dust from existing tunnels, laboratory data, and relevant information from the technical literature and handbooks.

  15. Thermal and non-thermal production of dark matter via Z{sup ′}-portal(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Mambrini, Yann; Quevillon, Jérémie; Zaldívar, Bryan

    2014-01-23

    We study the genesis of dark matter in the primordial Universe for representative classes of Z{sup ′}-portals models. For weak-scale Z{sup ′} mediators we compute the range of values of the kinetic mixing allowed by WMAP/PLANCK experiments corresponding to a FIMP regime. We show that very small values of δ (10{sup −12}≲δ≲10{sup −11}) are sufficient to produce the right amount of dark matter. We also analyse the case of very massive gauge mediators, whose mass m{sub Z{sup ′}} is larger than the reheating temperature, T{sub RH}, with a weak-scale coupling g{sub D} to ordinary matter. Relic abundance constraints then impose a direct correlation between T{sub RH} and the effective scale Λ of the interactions: Λ∼10{sup 3}−10{sup 5}×T{sub RH}. Finally we describe in some detail the process of dark thermalisation and study its consequences on the computation of the relic abundance.

  16. The dynamic shape factor of sodium chloride nanoparticles as regulated by drying rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.; Lewis, E.; King, S. M.; Freney, E.; Rosenoern, T.; Smith, M.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Poschl, U.; Wang, W.; Buseck, P. R.; Martin, S. T.

    2010-09-01

    The influence of drying rate on the dynamic shape factor {chi} of NaCl particles was investigated. The drying rate at the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of 45% was controlled in a laminar flow tube and varied from 5.5 {+-} 0.9 to 101 {+-} 3 RH s{sup -1} at ERH, where RH represents one percent unit of relative humidity. Dry particles having mobility diameters of 23-84 nm were studied, corresponding to aqueous particles of 37-129 nm at the RH (57%) prior to drying. At each mobility diameter and drying rate, the critical supersaturation of cloud-condensation activation was also measured. The mobility diameter and the critical supersaturation were combined in an analysis to determine the value of {chi}. The measured values varied from 1.02 to 1.26. For fixed particle diameter the {chi} value decreased with increasing drying rate. For fixed drying rate, a maximum occurred in {chi} between 35- and 40-nm dry mobility diameter, with a lower {chi} for both smaller and larger particles. The results of this study, in conjunction with the introduced apparatus for obtaining quantified drying rates, can allow the continued development of a more detailed understanding of the morphology of submicron salt particles, with the potential for the follow-on development of quantitative modeling of evaporation and crystal growth at these dimensions.

  17. Photocatalytic activity of PANI loaded coordination polymer composite materials: Photoresponse region extension and quantum yields enhancement via the loading of PANI nanofibers on surface of coordination polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Zhongping; Qi, Ji; Xu, Xinxin Liu, Lu; Wang, Yi

    2013-09-15

    To enhance photocatalytic property of coordination polymer in visible light region, polyaniline (PANI) loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst was synthesized through in-situ chemical oxidation of aniline on the surface of coordination polymer. The photocatalytic activity of PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material for degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) was investigated. Compared with pure coordination polymer photocatalyst, which can decompose RhB merely under UV light irradiation, PANI loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst displays more excellent photocatalytic activity in visible light region. Furthermore, PANI loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst exhibits outstanding stability during the degradation of RhB. - Graphical abstract: PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material, which displays excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light was firstly synthesized through in-situ chemical oxidation of aniline on surface of coordination polymer. Display Omitted - Highlights: This PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material represents the first conductive polymer loaded coordination polymer composite material. PANI/coordination polymer composite material displays more excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO in visible light region. The combination of coordination polymer and PANI will enable us to design high-activity, high-stability and visible light driven photocatalyst in the future.

  18. Mild partial deoxygenation of esters catalyzed by an oxazolinylborate-coordinated rhodium silylene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Songchen; Boschen, Jeffery S.; Biswas, Abhranil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-08-17

    An electrophilic, coordinatively unsaturated rhodium complex supported by borate-linked oxazoline, oxazoline-coordinated silylene, and N-heterocyclic carbene donors [{κ³-N,Si,C-PhB(OxMe²)(OxMe²SiHPh)ImMes}Rh(H)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] (2, OxMe² = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImMes = 1-mesitylimidazole) is synthesized from the neutral rhodium silyl {PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (1) and B(C6F5)3. The unusual oxazoline-coordinated silylene structure in 2 is proposed to form by rearrangement of an unobserved isomeric cationic rhodium silylene species [{PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiHPh)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] generated by H abstraction. Complex 2 catalyzes reductions of organic carbonyl compounds with silanes to give hydrosilylation products or deoxygenation products. The pathway to these reactions is primarily influenced by the degree of substitution of the organosilane. Reactions with primary silanes give deoxygenationmore » of esters to ethers, amides to amines, and ketones and aldehydes to hydrocarbons, whereas tertiary silanes react to give 1,2-hydrosilylation of the carbonyl functionality. In contrast, the strong Lewis acid B(C₆F₅)₃ catalyzes the complete deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to hydrocarbons with PhSiH₃ as the reducing agent.« less

  19. Expanding iClick to group 9 metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beto, Christopher C.; Yang, Xi; Powers, Andrew R.; Ghiviriga, Ion; Abboud, Khalil A.; Veige, Adam S.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the iClick (inorganic click) reactions between gold-acetylides and group 9 transition metal-azide complexes are presented. Complexes [Rh(CO)(PPh3)2][PPh3Au](μ-N3C2C6H4NO2) (3), {[Rh(CO)(PPh3)][PPh3Au](μ-N3C2C6H4NO2)}2 (4), and [(CO)(PPh3)2IrAuPPh3](μ-N3C2C6H4NO2) (6) have been synthesized via M-azide/M-acetylide cycloaddition reactions between PPh3Au(Ctriple bond; length of mdashCC6H4NO2) (2) and either Rh(CO)(PPh3)2N3 (1), or Ir(CO)(PPh3)2N3 (5). Complexes 3, 4, and 6 have been characterized by a combination of NMR spectroscopies, crystallography and combustion analysis.

  20. Constraining spacetime noncommutativity with primordial nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horvat, Raul; Trampetic, Josip

    2009-04-15

    We discuss a constraint on the scale {lambda}{sub NC} of noncommutative (NC) gauge field theory arising from consideration of the big bang nucleosynthesis of light elements. The propagation of neutrinos in the NC background described by an antisymmetric tensor {theta}{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}} does result in a tree-level vectorlike coupling to photons in a generation-independent manner, raising thus a possibility to have an appreciable contribution of three light right-handed (RH) fields to the energy density of the Universe at nucleosynthesis time. Considering elastic scattering processes of the RH neutrinos off charged plasma constituents at a given cosmological epoch, we obtain for a conservative limit on an effective number of additional doublet neutrinos {delta}N{sub {nu}}=1, a bound {lambda}{sub NC} > or approx. 3 TeV. With a more stringent requirement, {delta}N{sub {nu}} < or approx. 0.2, the bound is considerably improved, {lambda}{sub NC} > or approx. 10{sup 3} TeV. For our bounds the {theta} expansion of the NC action stays always meaningful, since the decoupling temperature of the RH species is perseveringly much less than the inferred bound for the scale of noncommutativity.

  1. A radiation hybrid map of the distal short arm of human chromosome II, containing the Beckwith-Weidemann and associated embroyonal tumor disease loci

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, C.W. III; Berg, D.J.; Meeker, T.C.; Myers, R.M.; Cox, D.R. ); Boehnke, M.; Hauser, E. ); Lichy, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors describe a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH) map of the distal short arm of human chromosome 11 containing the Beckwith-Weidemann gene and the associated embryonal tumor disease loci. Thirteen human 11p15 genes and 17 new anonymous probes were mapped by a statistical analysis of the cosegregation of markers in 102 rodent-human radiation hybrids retaining fragments of human chromosome 11. The 17 anonymous probes were generated from lambda phage containing human 11p15.5 inserts, by using ALU-PCR. A comprehensive map of all 30 loci and a framework map of nine clusters of loci ordered at odds of 1,000:1 were constructed by a multipoint maximum-likelihood approach by using the computer program RHMAP. This RH map localizes one new gene to chromosome 11p15 (WEE1), provides more precise order information for several 11p15 genes (CTSD, H19, HPX,.ST5, RNH, and SMPD1), confirms previous map orders for other 11p15 genes (CALCA, PTH, HBBC, TH, HRAS, and DRD4), and maps 17 new anonymous probes within the 11p15.5 region. This RH map should prove useful in better defining the positions of the Beckwith-Weidemann and associated embryonal tumor disease-gene loci. 41 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Performance of a Cross-Flow Humidifier with a High Flux Water Vapor Transport Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-30

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  3. Expanding iClick to group 9 metals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beto, Christopher C.; Yang, Xi; Powers, Andrew R.; Ghiviriga, Ion; Abboud, Khalil A.; Veige, Adam S.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the iClick (inorganic click) reactions between gold-acetylides and group 9 transition metal-azide complexes are presented. Complexes [Rh(CO)(PPh3)2][PPh3Au](μ-N3C2C6H4NO2) (3), {[Rh(CO)(PPh3)][PPh3Au](μ-N3C2C6H4NO2)}2 (4), and [(CO)(PPh3)2IrAuPPh3](μ-N3C2C6H4NO2) (6) have been synthesized via M-azide/M-acetylide cycloaddition reactions between PPh3Au(Ctriple bond; length of mdashCC6H4NO2) (2) and either Rh(CO)(PPh3)2N3 (1), or Ir(CO)(PPh3)2N3 (5). Complexes 3, 4, and 6 have been characterized by a combination of NMR spectroscopies, crystallography and combustion analysis.

  4. Sub-micrometre Particulate Matter is Primarily in Liquid Form over Amazon Rainforests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, Adam P.; Gong, Z. H.; Liu, Pengfei; Sato, Bruno; Cirino, Glauber; Zhang, Yue; Artaxo, Paulo; Bertram, Allan K.; Manzi, A.; Rizzo, L. V.; Souza, Rodrigo A.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) occurs in the Earth’s atmosphere both in liquid and non-liquid forms. The physical state affects the available physical and chemical mechanisms of growth and reactivity, ultimately affecting the number, size, and composition of the atmospheric particle population. Herein, the physical state, including the response to relative humidity (RH), was investigated on-line and in real time for PM (< 1 μm) over the tropical rain forest of central Amazonia during both the wet and dry seasons of 2013. The results show that the PM was liquid for RH > 80% across 296 to 300 K. These results, in conjunction with the distributions of RH and temperature in Amazonia, imply that near-surface submicron PM in Amazonia is liquid most of the time. The observations are consistent with laboratory experiments showing that PM produced by isoprene photo-oxidation is liquid across these meteorological conditions. The findings have implications for the mechanisms of new particle production in Amazonia, the growth of submicron particles and hence dynamics of the cloud life cycle, and the sensitivity of these processes to anthropogenic activities. An approach for inclusion of particle physical state in chemical transport models is presented.

  5. The photocatalysis of Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} under the irradiation of blue LED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenzhong Zhang, Ling; Sun, Songmei

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ·OH trap and hole sink were involved to investigate the active radicals. • Holes play a more important role in the degradation of RhB. • The ·OH were related to the decomposition of phenol. • The ·O{sub 2}-played a leading role in the photodegradation of phenol. • Blue LED is competitive and promising alternative for the future application. - Abstract: Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} has been reported as a promising photocatalyst in wastewater treatment. The active radicals generated over the Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} during the photocatalytic process were thought to be hydroxyl radical (·OH) but have not been proved. Herein, Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} with nanoplate like morphology was synthesized and its photocatalytic performances in the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol as colored and colorless model pollutants respectively were evaluated under the irradiation of blue light emitting diode (LED). The tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as a ·OH trap and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a hole sink were involved to investigate the main active groups that are generated on Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} and function during the photodegradation of RhB and phenol. In addition, it is a competitive and promising alternative plan to use blue LED as light source for the future practical application in environmental remediation.

  6. Evaluation of the response of tritium-in-air instrumentation to HT in dry and humid conditions and to HTO vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, H.; Dean, J.; Privas, E.

    2015-03-15

    Nuclear plant operators (power generation, decommissioning and reprocessing operations) are required to monitor releases of tritium species for regulatory compliance and radiation protection purposes. Tritium monitoring is performed using tritium-in-air gas monitoring instrumentation based either on flow-through ion chambers or proportional counting systems. Tritium-in-air monitors are typically calibrated in dry conditions but in service may operate at elevated levels of relative humidity. The NPL (National Physical Laboratory) radioactive gas-in-air calibration system has been used to study the effect of humidity on the response to tritium of two tritium-in-air ion chamber based monitors and one proportional counting system which uses a P10/air gas mixture. The response of these instruments to HTO vapour has also been evaluated. In each case, instrument responses were obtained for HT in dry conditions (relative humidity (RH) about 2%), HT in 45% RH, and finally HTO at 45% RH. Instrumentation response to HT in humid conditions has been found to slightly exceed that in dry conditions. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of two Vaisala RS92 radiosonde solar radiative dry bias correction algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dzambo, A. M.; Turner, D. D.; Mlawer, E. J.

    2015-10-20

    Solar heating of the relative humidity (RH) probe on Vaisala RS92 radiosondes results in a large dry bias in the upper troposphere. Two different algorithms (Miloshevich et al., 2009, MILO hereafter; and Wang et al., 2013, WANG hereafter) have been designed to account for this solar radiative dry bias (SRDB). These corrections are markedly different with MILO adding up to 40 % more moisture to the original radiosonde profile than WANG; however, the impact of the two algorithms varies with height. The accuracy of these two algorithms is evaluated using three different approaches: a comparison of precipitable water vapor (PWV),moredownwelling radiative closure with a surface-based microwave radiometer at a high-altitude site (5.3 km MSL), and upwelling radiative closure with the space-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The PWV computed from the uncorrected and corrected RH data is compared against PWV retrieved from ground-based microwave radiometers at tropical, mid-latitude, and arctic sites. Although MILO generally adds more moisture to the original radiosonde profile in the upper troposphere compared to WANG, both corrections yield similar changes to the PWV, and the corrected data agree well with the ground-based retrievals. The two closure activities done for clear-sky scenes use the radiative transfer models MonoRTM and LBLRTM to compute radiance from the radiosonde profiles to compare against spectral observations. Both WANG- and MILO-corrected RH are statistically better than original RH in all cases except for the driest 30 % of cases in the downwelling experiment, where both algorithms add too much water vapor to the original profile. In the upwelling experiment, the RH correction applied by the WANG vs. MILO algorithm is statistically different above 10 km for the driest 30 % of cases and above 8 km for the moistest 30 % of cases, suggesting that the MILO correction performs better than the WANG in clear-sky scenes. The cause of this statistical significance is likely explained by the fact the WANG correction also accounts for cloud cover a condition not accounted for in the radiance closure experiments.less

  8. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  9. A comparative study of SrO and BaO doping to CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}: Characteristic and its catalytic performance for three-way catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jiaxiu; National Engineering Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 ; Shi, Zhonghua; Wu, Dongdong; Yin, Huaqiang; National Engineering Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065 ; Gong, Maochu; Chen, Yaoqiang; National Engineering Research Center for Flue Gas Desulfurization, Chengdu 610065

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► The prepared materials have a face-centered cubic structure and nanosize particles. ►Comparing to CZB, aged CZS has 494 μmol/g of OSC and 30 m{sup 2}/g of surface area. ► CZS and CZB have similar NO sorption and reductive properties and different H{sub 2} uptake. ► T{sub 50} of Pt-Rh/CZS/LA is as low as 199 °C for CO, 228 °C for NO, and 252 °C for C{sub 3}H{sub 8}. ► Pt-Rh/CZS/LA has wider working-window at 320 °C under different λ value. -- Abstract: Ceria-zirconia-strontia (Ce{sub 0.35}Zr{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.10}O{sub 1.9}) and ceria-zirconia-baria (Ce{sub 0.35}Zr{sub 0.55}Ba{sub 0.10}O{sub 1.9}) were synthesized using an oxidation-co-precipitation method with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) as oxidant. The physical and chemical properties of the prepared materials were investigated using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area characterization, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and oxygen pulse reaction. The prepared materials were used in preparing three-way catalysts with low Pt and Rh content. Moreover, catalytic activities were evaluated at a fixed bed under a simulated gaseous mixture. The results are as follows: (1) the prepared materials have a face-centered cubic structure and are nano-sized; (2) aged Ce{sub 0.35}Zr{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.10}O{sub 1.9} has higher oxygen storage capacity (494 μmol/g), better thermal stability (30 m{sup 2}/g), good low-temperature reducibility, and high hydrogen uptake after TPR-redox cycles; (3) the light-off temperature (T{sub 50}) of Pt-Rh/CZS/LA can be as low as 199 °C for CO, 228 °C for NO, and 252 °C for C{sub 3}H{sub 8}; and (4) Pt-Rh/CZS/LA has a fairly wide working-window.

  10. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore » significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.« less

  11. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J. -D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; et al

    2015-03-16

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water solublemore » fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34% in the accumulation vs. ~ 47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ~ 70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35% RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50% RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ~ 0.15 for the accumulation mode and ~ 0.36 for the coarse mode, respectively. The obtained κv, ws for the accumulation mode is in good agreement with earlier data reported for remote sites in the Amazon rain forest (κv ≈ 0.15) and a Colorado boreal forest (κv ≈ 0.16). We used the Zdanovskii–Stokes–Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule to predict the chemical composition dependent hygroscopicity, κv, p. The obtained κv, p values overestimate the experimental FDHA-KIM-derived κv, ws by factors of 1.8 and 1.5 for the accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. This divergence can be partly explained by incomplete dissolution of the hygroscopic inorganic compounds resulting from kinetic limitations due to a sparingly soluble organic coating. The TEM and STXM-NEXAFS results indicate that aged submicron (>300 nm) and supermicron aerosol particles possess core-shell structures with an inorganic core, and are enriched in organic carbon at the mixed particle surface. The direct FDHA kinetic studies provide a bulk diffusion coefficient of water of ~ 10−12 cm2 s−1 indicating a semi-solid state of the organic-rich phase leading to kinetic limitations of water uptake and release during hydration and dehydration cycles. Overall the present ZOTTO data set, obtained in the growing season, has revealed a strong influence of organic carbon on the hygroscopic properties of the ambient aerosols. The sparingly soluble organic coating controls hygroscopic growth, phase transitions, and microstructural rearrangement processes. The observed kinetic limitations can strongly influence the outcome of experiments performed on multi-second time scales, such as the commonly applied HTDMA (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) and CCNC (Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter) measurements.« less

  12. Spin-orbit tuned metal-insulator transitions in single-crystal Sr₂Ir1–xRhxO₄ (0≤x≤1)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qi, T. F.; Korneta, O. B.; Li, L.; Butrouna, K.; Cao, V. S.; Wan, Xiangang; Schlottmann, P.; Kaul, R. K.; Cao, G.

    2012-09-06

    Sr₂IrO₄ is a magnetic insulator driven by spin-orbit interaction (SOI) whereas the isoelectronic and isostructural Sr₂RhO₄ is a paramagnetic metal. The contrasting ground states have been shown to result from the critical role of the strong SOI in the iridate. Our investigation of structural, transport, magnetic, and thermal properties reveals that substituting 4d Rh⁴⁺ (4d⁵) ions for 5d Ir⁴⁺ (5d⁵) ions in Sr₂IrO₄ directly reduces the SOI and rebalances the competing energies so profoundly that it generates a rich phase diagram for Sr₂Ir1–xRhxO₄ featuring two major effects: (1) Light Rh doping (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16) prompts a simultaneous andmore » precipitous drop in both the electrical resistivity and the magnetic ordering temperature TC, which is suppressed to zero at x = 0.16 from 240 K at x = 0. (2) However, with heavier Rh doping [0.24 < x < 0.85 (±0.05)] disorder scattering leads to localized states and a return to an insulating state with spin frustration and exotic magnetic behavior that only disappears near x = 1. The intricacy of Sr₂Ir1–xRhxO₄ is further highlighted by comparison with Sr₂Ir1–xRuxO₄ where Ru⁴⁺ (4d⁴) drives a direct crossover from the insulating to metallic states.« less

  13. Low-mass right-handed sneutrino dark matter: SuperCDMS and LUX constraints and the Galactic Centre gamma-ray excess

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerdeo, D.G.; Peir, M.; Robles, S. E-mail: miguel.peiro@uam.es

    2014-08-01

    Recent results from direct and indirect searches for dark matter (DM) have motivated the study of particle physics models that can provide weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range 150 GeV. Viable candidates for light WIMP DM must fulfil stringent constraints. On the one hand, the observation at the LHC of a Higgs boson with Standard Model properties set an upper bound on the coupling of light DM particles to the Higgs, thereby making it difficult to reproduce the correct relic abundance. On the other hand, the recent results from direct searches in the CDMSlite, SuperCDMS and LUX experiments have set upper constraints on the DM scattering cross section. In this paper, we investigate the viability of light right-handed sneutrino DM in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Model (NMSSM) in the light of these constraints. To this aim, we have carried out a scan in the NMSSM parameter space, imposing experimental bounds on the Higgs sector and low-energy observables, such as the muon anomalous magnetic moment and branching ratios of rare decays. We demonstrate that the enlarged Higgs sector of the NMSSM, together with the flexibility provided by the RH sneutrino parameters, make it possible to obtain viable RH sneutrino DM with a mass as light as 2 GeV. We have also considered the upper bounds on the annihilation cross section from Fermi LAT data on dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and extracted specific examples with mass in the range 850 GeV that could account for the apparent low-energy excess in the gamma-ray emission at the Galactic Centre. Then, we have computed the theoretical predictions for the elastic scattering cross-section of RH sneutrinos. Finally, after imposing the recent bounds from SuperCDMS and LUX, we have found a wide area of the parameter space that could be probed by future low-threshold direct detection experiments.

  14. Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-06-22

    One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

  15. Bayesian probabilistic model for life prediction and fault mode classification of solid state luminaires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lall, Pradeep; Wei, Junchao; Sakalaukus, Peter

    2014-06-22

    A new method has been developed for assessment of the onset of degradation in solid state luminaires to classify failure mechanisms by using metrics beyond lumen degradation that are currently used for identification of failure. Luminous Flux output, Correlated Color Temperature Data on Philips LED Lamps has been gathered under 85°C/85%RH till lamp failure. Failure modes of the test population of the lamps have been studied to understand the failure mechanisms in 85°C/85%RH accelerated test. Results indicate that the dominant failure mechanism is the discoloration of the LED encapsulant inside the lamps which is the likely cause for the luminous flux degradation and the color shift. The acquired data has been used in conjunction with Bayesian Probabilistic Models to identify luminaires with onset of degradation much prior to failure through identification of decision boundaries between lamps with accrued damage and lamps beyond the failure threshold in the feature space. In addition luminaires with different failure modes have been classified separately from healthy pristine luminaires. The α-λ plots have been used to evaluate the robustness of the proposed methodology. Results show that the predicted degradation for the lamps tracks the true degradation observed during 85°C/85%RH during accelerated life test fairly closely within the ±20% confidence bounds. Correlation of model prediction with experimental results indicates that the presented methodology allows the early identification of the onset of failure much prior to development of complete failure distributions and can be used for assessing the damage state of SSLs in fairly large deployments. It is expected that, the new prediction technique will allow the development of failure distributions without testing till L70 life for the manifestation of failure.

  16. Synthesis and photocatalytic performance of an efficient Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalyst under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Yinghua; Lin, Shuanglong; Liu, Li; Hu, Jinshan; Cui, Wenquan

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: The plasmatic Ag@AgBr sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts. Ag@AgBr greatly increased visible light absorption for K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The plamonic photocatalysts exhibited enhanced activity for the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Ag@AgBr nanoparticle-sensitized K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} composite photocatalysts (Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}) were prepared by a facile precipitationphotoreduction method. The photocatalytic activities of the Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanocomposites were evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The composites exhibited excellent visible light absorption, which was attributable to the surface plasmon effect of Ag nanoparticles. The Ag@AgBr was uniformly scattered on the surface of K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and possessed sizes in the range of 2050 nm. The loading amount of Ag@AgBr was also studied, and was found to influence the absorption spectra of the resulting composites. Approximately 95.9% of RhB was degraded by Ag@AgBr (20 wt.%)/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} after irradiation for 1 h. The stability of the material was also investigated by performing consecutive runs. Additionally, studies performed using radical scavengers indicated that O{sub 2}{sup ?} and Br{sup 0} acted as the main reactive species. Based on the experimental results, a photocatalytic mechanism for organics degradation over Ag@AgBr/K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} photocatalysts was proposed.

  17. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  18. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometermore » (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.« less

  19. Transuranic Waste Transportation Containers - Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Types of Containers Container Waste Type Status of Certification T RU PA CT -II Con tact-H andled Approved by NRC , August 1989 H alf P AC T Con tact-H andled Approved by NRC , November 2000 RH -72B Rem ote-H andled Approved by NRC , March 2000 . . . a critical step toward solving the nation's nuclear waste disposal problem Transuranic Waste Transportation Containers In 1980, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) committed to transporting transuranic radioactive waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot

  20. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-14 of the AMWTP dated September 27, 2007 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-03 of the ANL-CCP dated September 18, 2007 Final Audit Report A-07-24 of the SRS-CCP Battelle Columbus RH Waste dated September 6, 2007 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Hanford Site, Audit A-07-10 dated

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2/25/16 WIPP Home Page About WIPP Contact Us Search About WIPP The nation's only deep geologic repository for nuclear waste The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep geologic repository for permanent disposal of a specific type of waste that is the byproduct of the nation's nuclear defense program. CH and RH Waste WIPP is the nation's only repository for the disposal of nuclear waste known as transuranic, or TRU, waste. It consists of clothing, tools,

  2. Propensity-Weighted Comparison of Long-Term Risk of Urinary Adverse Events in Elderly Women Treated For Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Sean P.; Fan, Yunhua; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Downs, Levi; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Geller, Melissa A.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Cervical cancer treatment is associated with a risk of urinary adverse events (UAEs) such as ureteral stricture and vesicovaginal fistula. We sought to measure the long-term UAE risk after surgery and radiation therapy (RT), with confounding controlled through propensity-weighted models. Methods and Materials: From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we identified women ≥66 years old with nonmetastatic cervical cancer treated with simple surgery (SS), radical hysterectomy (RH), external beam RT plus brachytherapy (EBRT+BT), or RT+surgery. We matched them to noncancer controls 1:3. Differences in demographic and cancer characteristics were balanced by propensity weighting. Grade 3 to 4 UAEs were identified by diagnosis codes plus treatment codes. Cumulative incidence was measured using Kaplan-Meier methods. The hazard associated with different cancer treatments was compared using Cox models. Results: UAEs occurred in 272 of 1808 cases (17%) and 222 of 5424 (4%) controls; most (62%) were ureteral strictures. The raw cumulative incidence of UAEs was highest in advanced cancers. UAEs occurred in 31% of patients after EBRT+BT, 25% of patients after RT+surgery, and 15% of patients after RH; however, after propensity weighting, the incidence was similar. In adjusted Cox models (reference = controls), the UAE risk was highest after RT+surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.32-11.07), followed by EBRT+BT (HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.45-7.65), RH (HR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.41-9.46) and SS (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.32-3.01). The higher risk after RT+surgery versus EBRT+BT was statistically significant, whereas, EBRT+BT and RH were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions: UAEs are common after cervical cancer treatment, particularly in patients with advanced cancers. UAEs are more common after RT, but these women tend to have the advanced cancers. After propensity weighting, the risk after RT was similar to that after surgery.

  3. Mechanistic study of methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on a modified

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    model Mo₆S₈ cluster (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Mechanistic study of methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on a modified model Mo₆S₈ cluster Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mechanistic study of methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on a modified model Mo₆S₈ cluster We report the methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on metal (M = K, Ti, Co, Rh, Ni, and Cu)-modified model Mo₆S₈ catalyst using density functional theory (DFT). The results show that the

  4. Design and synthesis of mixed oxides nanoparticles for biofuel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Senniang

    2010-05-15

    The work in this dissertation presents the synthesis of two mixed metal oxides for biofuel applications and NMR characterization of silica materials. In the chapter 2, high catalytic efficiency of calcium silicate is synthesized for transesterfication of soybean oil to biodisels. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of a new Rh based catalyst on mesoporous manganese oxides. The new catalyst is found to have higher activity and selectivity towards ethanol. Chapter 4 demonstrates the applications of solid-state Si NMR in the silica materials.

  5. Low temperature properties of some Er-rich intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.A. Gshneidner,jr; A.O. Pecharsky; L.Hale; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The low temperature volumetric heat capacity ({approx}3.5 to 350 K) and magnetic susceptibility ({approx}4 to 320 K) of Er{sub 3}Rh, Er{sub 3}Ir, Er{sub 3}Pt, Er{sub 2}Al, and Er{sub 2}Sn have been measured. All of the compounds order antiferromagnetically (or ferrimagnetically), and most exhibit more than one magnetic ordering transition. The volumetric heat capacities in general are smaller than those of the prototype magnetic regenerator materials, except for Er{sub 3}Ir in the 12 to 14 K temperature range.

  6. Absence of cytotoxicity towards microglia of iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) nanorhombohedra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crystal S. Lewis; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Torres, Luisa; Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Rastegar, Cyrus; Patete, Jonathan M.; Smith, Jacqueline M.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2016-02-26

    Understanding the nature of interactions between nanomaterials, such as commercially ubiquitous hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanorhombohedra (N-Rhomb) and biological systems is of critical importance for gaining insight into the practical applicability of nanomaterials. Microglia represent the first line of defense in the central nervous system (CNS) during severe injury or disease such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease as illustrative examples. Hence, to analyze the potential cytotoxic effect of N-Rhomb exposure in the presence of microglia, we have synthesized Rhodamine B (RhB)-labeled α-Fe2O3 N-Rhomb, with lengths of 47 ± 10 nm and widths of 35 ± 8 nm. Internalization of RhB-labeled α-Fe2O3 N-Rhombmore » by microglia in the mouse brain was observed, and a dose-dependent increase in the cellular iron content as probed by cellular fluorescence was detected in cultured microglia after nanoparticle exposure. The cells maintained clear functional viability, exhibiting little to no cytotoxic effects after 24 and 48 hours at acceptable, physiological concentrations. Importantly, the nanoparticle exposure did not induce microglial cells to produce either tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) or interleukin 1-beta (IL1β), two pro-inflammatory cytokines, nor did exposure stimulate the production of nitrites and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are common indicators for the onset of inflammation. Finally, we propose that under the conditions of our experiments, i.e. in the presence of RhB labeled-α-Fe2O3 N-Rhomb maintaining concentrations of up to 100 μg mL–1 after 48 hours of incubation, the in vitro and in vivo internalization of RhB-labeled α-Fe2O3 N-Rhomb are likely to be clathrin-dependent, which represents a conventional mechanistic uptake route for most cells. Furthermore, given the crucial role that microglia play in many neurological disorders, understanding the potential cytotoxic effects of these nanostructures is of fundamental importance if they are to be used in a therapeutic setting.« less

  7. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2013-10-15

    Experimental nuclear structure and decay data for all known A=91 nuclides (As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd) have been evaluated. This evaluation, covering data received by 1 September 2013, supersedes the 1998 evaluation by C. M. Baglin published in Nuclear Data Sheets86, 1 (1999) (15 December 1998 literature cutoff), and subsequent evaluations by C. M. Baglin added to the ENSDF database for Kr, Sr and Zr (29 December 2000 literature cutoff) and by B. Singh for {sup 91}Tc (6 November 2000 literature cutoff)

  8. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2012-10-15

    Nuclear structure and decay data pertaining to all nuclides with mass number A = 92 (As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd) have been compiled and evaluated, and incorporated into the ENSDF data file. All literature available by 15 September 2012 has been considered. This evaluation supersedes the previous publication for this mass chain (Coral M. Baglin, Nuclear Data Sheets 91, 423 (2000) (November 2000 cutoff date)), and subsequent unpublished reevaluations by C.M. Baglin for {sup 92}Kr (January 2004 literature cut-off) and {sup 92}Sr (August 2003 literature cut-off).

  9. Visible light photocatalytic property of Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2012-06-05

    The Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition method. The prepared samples were characterized by various techniques like Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The photocatalytic activities of pure and Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles were examined based on the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB). Experimental results indicated that the Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} photocatalyst (the molar ratio of V to Zn is 99: 1) exhibited maximum photocatalytic activity.

  10. CTAB-assisted ultrasonic synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic properties of WO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Martnez, D. Gomez-Solis, C.; Torres-Martinez, Leticia M.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: WO{sub 3} 2D nanostructures were synthesized by ultrasound method assisted with CTAB. WO{sub 3} morphology was mainly of rectangular nanoplates with a thickness of ?50 nm. The highest surface area value of WO{sub 3} was obtained to lowest concentration of CTAB. WO{sub 3} activity was attributed to morphology, surface area and the addition of CTAB. WO{sub 3} nanoplates were able to causing almost complete mineralization of rhB and IC. - Abstract: WO{sub 3} 2D nanostructures have been prepared by ultrasound synthesis method assisted with CTAB using different molar ratios. The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the WO{sub 3} samples was complemented by analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed morphology mainly of rectangular nanoplates with a thickness of around 50 nm and length of 100500 nm. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to confirm the elimination of the CTAB in the synthesized samples. The specific surface area was determinate by the BET method and by means of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) it was determinate the band-gap energy (E{sub g}) of the WO{sub 3} samples. The photocatalytic activity of the WO{sub 3} oxide was evaluated in the degradation reactions of rhodamine B (rhB) and indigo carmine (IC) under Xenon lamp irradiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the samples containing low concentration of CTAB with morphology of rectangular nanoplates and with higher surface area value than commercial WO{sub 3}. Photodegradation of rhB and IC were followed by means of UVvis absorption spectra. The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 92% for rhB and 50% for IC after 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  11. Light-storing photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Junying; Pan Feng; Hao Weichang; Ge Qi; Wang Tianmian

    2004-12-06

    Light-storing photocatalyst was prepared by coating light-storing phosphor and TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst in sequence on ceramic. The light-storing photocatalyst can store light irradiation and emit slowly. Consequently, the photocatalyst remains active when the irradiation source is cut off. Rhodamine B (RhB) can be decomposed efficiently by this photocatalyst in the dark after it absorbs light irradiation. This photocatalyst is photoreactive in an outdoor environment or can save energy by supplying irradiation intermittently for the photocatalyst.

  12. Synthesis of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} heterojunction with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Peizhi; Song, Limin; Zhang, Shujuan; Wu, Xiaoqing; Wei, Qingwu

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalyst with visible-light response was prepared by a facile coprecipitation method. The results show that g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} possesses a much higher activity for the decomposition of RhB than that of the pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} particles. The most mechanism is that g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalyst can efficiently separate the photogenerated electronhole pairs, enhancing the photocatalytic activity of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites. - Highlights: g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} heterojunction showed much higher activity than that of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. The high activity could be attributed to g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} for modifying Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. More OH radicals may be significant reason to improve Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} activity. - Abstract: g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalyst with visible-light response was prepared by a facile coprecipitation method. The photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UVvis absorption spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities of the obtained samples were tested by using Rhodamine B (RhB) as the degradation target under visible light irradiation. g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} decomposed RhB more effectively than the pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} particles did, and 2 wt.% g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} had the highest activity. Furthermore, 2 wt.% g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} degraded high-concentration RhB more potently than unmodified Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} did, probably because g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalyst enhanced the photocatalytic activity by efficiently separating the photogenerated electronhole pairs.

  13. LU

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I9 I LU ,2a,a1= #Au1 -. .- ,"# y-y"jA .b3- ' j _ ) a4~~I 3 OFFICIALUSE ONLY 6/m6 aa rh 7 - Ld * $c,rti AA-d w, AA CONTRACT NO. AT(&6)-924 THIS CONTRACT, entered into this / Lti day of ,- 1 -- ! r. --.7 m, effective as of the 1st day of Julytm between the UXITED STATES OF AMERICA (hereinafter called the llGover.nmentlf )- acting through the UNITED STATES AZWIC ENERGY CQWISSION (hereinafter called the Qzznissionn) and National Lead Company, Inc ., a corporation organized and existing

  14. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  15. Catalytic Process for the Conversion of Coal-derived Syngas to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Spivery; Doug Harrison; John Earle; James Goodwin; David Bruce; Xunhau Mo; Walter Torres; Joe Allison Vis Viswanathan; Rick Sadok; Steve Overbury; Viviana Schwartz

    2011-07-29

    The catalytic conversion of coal-derived syngas to C{sub 2+} alcohols and oxygenates has attracted great attention due to their potential as chemical intermediates and fuel components. This is particularly true of ethanol, which can serve as a transportation fuel blending agent, as well as a hydrogen carrier. A thermodynamic analysis of CO hydrogenation to ethanol that does not allow for byproducts such as methane or methanol shows that the reaction: 2 CO + 4 H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH + H{sub 2}O is thermodynamically favorable at conditions of practical interest (e.g,30 bar, {approx}< 250 C). However, when methane is included in the equilibrium analysis, no ethanol is formed at any conditions even approximating those that would be industrially practical. This means that undesired products (primarily methane and/or CO{sub 2}) must be kinetically limited. This is the job of a catalyst. The mechanism of CO hydrogenation leading to ethanol is complex. The key step is the formation of the initial C-C bond. Catalysts that are selective for EtOH can be divided into four classes: (a) Rh-based catalysts, (b) promoted Cu catalysts, (c) modified Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, or (d) Mo-sulfides and phosphides. This project focuses on Rh- and Cu-based catalysts. The logic was that (a) Rh-based catalysts are clearly the most selective for EtOH (but these catalysts can be costly), and (b) Cu-based catalysts appear to be the most selective of the non-Rh catalysts (and are less costly). In addition, Pd-based catalysts were studied since Pd is known for catalyzing CO hydrogenation to produce methanol, similar to copper. Approach. The overall approach of this project was based on (a) computational catalysis to identify optimum surfaces for the selective conversion of syngas to ethanol; (b) synthesis of surfaces approaching these ideal atomic structures, (c) specialized characterization to determine the extent to which the actual catalyst has these structures, and (d) testing at realistic conditions (e.g., elevated pressures) and differential conversions (to measure true kinetics, to avoid deactivation, and to avoid condensable concentrations of products in the outlet gas).

  16. TTW 8-21-08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21, 2008 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 08-20-08) 6,849 Shipments received since opening 56,244 Cubic meters of waste disposed 104,130 Containers disposed in the underground Preliminary draft permit renewal application available online A preliminary draft of the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Renewal Application is now available on the WIPP Home Page. Click here to read the draft online (Note large file size: 2.06 MB). WIPP receives RH shipments from Argonne National Laboratory The first two

  17. NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 NMED COMMENTS ITEM 3 REVISE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) TARGET ANALYTE LIST OTHER CHANGES TO VOC MONITORING PROGRAM Page 1 of 21 VOC 3*1: PMR Section 3, Topic 1, Table 1 Recalculated Waste Matrix Code Group Weighting Factors based on the 2004 Compliance Recertification Contact Handled (CH) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Inventory (m 3 ) The new weighting factors appear to be based on CH TRU waste only and do not include remote handled (RH) TRU waste. There was no discussion in the PMR addressing

  18. Defect-engineered GaN:Mg nanowire arrays for overall water splitting under violet light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibria, M. G.; Chowdhury, F. A.; Zhao, S.; Mi, Z.; Trudeau, M. L.; Guo, H.

    2015-03-16

    We report that by engineering the intra-gap defect related energy states in GaN nanowire arrays using Mg dopants, efficient and stable overall neutral water splitting can be achieved under violet light. Overall neutral water splitting on Rh/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} co-catalyst decorated Mg doped GaN nanowires is demonstrated with intra-gap excitation up to 450?nm. Through optimized Mg doping, the absorbed photon conversion efficiency of GaN nanowires reaches ?43% at 375450?nm, providing a viable approach to extend the solar absorption of oxide and non-oxide photocatalysts.

  19. The New Structural Materials Science Beamlines BL8A and 8B at Photon Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Koyama, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2010-06-23

    BL8A and 8B are new beamlines for structural materials science at Photon Factory. The primary characteristics of both beamlines are similar. The incident beam is monochromatized by the Si(111) double-flat crystal monochromator and focused at the sample position by a Rh-coated bent cylindrical quartz mirror. The Weissenberg-camera-type imaging-plate (IP) diffractometers were installed. The X-ray diffraction experiments for structural studies of strongly correlated materials, such as transition metals, molecular conductors, endohedral fullerenes, nano-materials, etc, are conducted at these stations.

  20. Harvard Bounce Apparatus GoAmazon 2014/15 Field Campaign Report (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Harvard Bounce Apparatus GoAmazon 2014/15 Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Harvard Bounce Apparatus GoAmazon 2014/15 Field Campaign Report The effect of relative humidity (RH) on the physical state of particulate matter during the GoAmazon 2014/15 campaign was investigated through the use of particle rebound (or lack thereof) during impaction. The physics governing particle rebound have

  1. Self-cleaning optic for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-12-16

    A multilayer reflective optic or mirror for lithographic applications, and particularly extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, having a surface or "capping" layer which in combination with incident radiation and gaseous molecular species such as O.sub.2, H.sub.2, H.sub.2 O provides for continuous cleaning of carbon deposits from the optic surface. The metal capping layer is required to be oxidation resistant and capable of transmitting at least 90% of incident EUV radiation. Materials for the capping layer include Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Au and combinations thereof.

  2. Carlsbad Area Office unveils full-scale model of new WIPP waste transportation cask

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad Area Office Unveils Full-Scale Model Of New WIPP Waste Transportation Cask CARLSBAD, N.M., February 23, 2000 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office today unveiled a full-scale model of its newest waste transportation cask, the RH-72B, during a ceremony at the local DOE offices. "This is another milestone for the Department of Energy," said Dr. Inés Triay, Manager of the Carlsbad Area Office, describing the importance of the new container for those

  3. WIPP - Video Clips

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quick links TRUPACT-II Shipping Container RH-72B Shipping Cask Waste Handling Waste Emplacement First Waste Shipment to WIPP March 26, 1999 Video Clips Instructions for playing video clips in Flash format: 1. Click on the screen you wish to view 2. Click on the play button TRUPACT-II Shipping Container The TRUPACT-II shipping container is certified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for shipping contact-handled transuranic waste to WIPP. It can hold up to 14 55-gallon drums or the equivalent.

  4. IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/2004 13:39 FAX IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 26 2004 OFFICE OF AIR AND RADIATION R. Paul Detwiler, Acting Manager Carlsbad Field Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, NM 88221-3090 Dear Dr. Detwiler: This letter announces the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) final decision to approve the Department of Energy's (DOE's) remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program Implementation Plan

  5. ARM - VAP Process - sondecalc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productssondecalc Documentation & Plots Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP : Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): recalculated wind/pressure/temp/RH (SONDECALC) Note:sondecalc is currently inactive and/or retired. Active Dates 1994.04.07 - 2001.01.03 Instrument Categories Atmospheric Profiling Output Products sondewndcalc : Balloon-borne sounding

  6. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig N.; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Fruh, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    The tegument phosphoprotein pp65 (UL83) is the most abundant virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Since pp65 is immunodominant in persistently infected individuals, subunit vaccines against HCMV often include pp65 as T cell stimulatory component. Although HCMV pp65 is non-essential for viral growth in vitro it is thought to have an important role in primary and persistent infection since pp65 displays multiple immunomodulatory functions. To determine whether pp65 is required for infection and to evaluate its role in natural and vaccination-induced immunity we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both homologues, pp65a (Rh111) and pp65b (Rh112). Lack of pp65 resulted in a slight growth defect in vitro and an increase of defective particle formation. However, most pp65-deleted virions in the supernatant were phenotypically normal and proteomics analysis revealed that the ratios of the remaining viral proteins were largely unchanged. RhCMV ?pp65ab was able to persistently infect CMV-negative rhesus macaques (RM) and to super-infect RM previously infected with CMV. To determine whether T cells against pp65 are essential for protection against CMV, we challenged ?pp65ab-infected animals with RhCMV ?US2-11, a viral recombinant that lacks inhibitors of MHC-I antigen presentation and is thus unable to overcome CMV-specific T cell immunity. Despite a complete lack of pp65-specific T cells, ?pp65ab protected against ?US2-11 challenge suggesting that pp65-specific T cells are not essential for T cell immunity against CMV. Using the same approach we further demonstrate that pp65b-specific T cells, induced by heterologous prime/boost vaccination, are not sufficient to protect against ?US2-11 challenge. Our data provides a new approach to test the efficacy of subunit vaccine candidates and suggest that pp65 vaccines are insufficient to induce a T cell response that recapitulates the protective effect of natural infection.

  7. Microsoft Word - 07-1090dsm ltr to Zappe Final Report A-07-12 LANL-CCP.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7-1090:UFC:2300 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 July 25, 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the CH Waste Re-certification and RH Waste Certification Audit Report for the LANL/CCP Audit A-07-12 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the Los Alamos National Laboratory/Central Characterization

  8. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Suo, Zhigang E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  9. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies Behavior of spent nuclear fuel in water pool storage Johnson, A.B. Jr. (1977) 78 Estimation of gas leak rates through very small orifices and channels. [From sealed PuO/sub 2/ containers under accident conditions] Bomelburg, H.J. (1977) 71 Review of thorium fuel reprocessing experience Brooksbank, R.E.; McDuffee, W.T.; Rainey, R.H. (1978) 70 Stress

  10. Part 4

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Part 2, Clauses Prescribed in DEAR Parts 952 and 970 Part 2, Clauses Prescribed in DEAR Parts 952 and 970 PDF icon M_O_ClauseMatrix.pdf More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Matrixpart2.doc AcqGuide70.52Matrixpart2Redo-OPAM Microsoft Word - AcqGuide70pt52Matrixpart2Redo

    4 Page 4-1 of 15 PART 4 - GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY DISPOSAL 4.1. DESIGNATED DISPOSAL UNITS This Part authorizes the management and disposal of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) mixed waste

  11. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parent, Yves O.; Magrini, Kim; Landin, Steven M.; Ritland, Marcus A.

    2011-03-29

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  12. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and application of surface-functionalized ordered mesoporous nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Po-Wen

    2009-12-15

    The dissertation begins with Chapter 1, which is a general introduction of the fundamental synthesis of mesoporous silica materials, the selective functionlization of mesoporous silica materials, and the synthesis of nanostructured porous materials via nanocasting. In Chapter 2, the thermo-responsive polymer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) was synthesized via surface-initated polymerization and exhibited unique partition activities in a biphasic solution with the thermally induced change. In Chapter 3, the monodispersed spherical MSN with different mesoporous structure (MCM-48) was developed and employed as a template for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCN) via nanocasting. MCN was demonstrated for the delivery of membrane impermeable chemical agents inside the cells. The cellular uptake efficiency and biocompabtibility of MCN with human cervical cancer cells were also investigated. In addition to the biocompabtibility of MCN, MCN was demonstrated to support Rh-Mn nanoparticles for catalytic reaction in Chapter 4. Owing to the unique mesoporosity, Rh-Mn nanoparticles can be well distributed inside the mesoporous structure and exhibited interesting catalytic performance on CO hydrogenation. In Chapter 5, the synthesis route of the aforementioned MCM-48 MSN was discussed and investigated in details and other metal oxide nanoparticles were also developed via nanocasting by using MCM-48 MSN as a template. At last, there is a general conclusion summarized in Chapter 6.

  14. Synthesis and photocatlytic performance of nano-sized TiO{sub 2} materials prepared by dealloying Ti–Cu–Pd amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Jing; Zhu, Shengli; Xu, Wence; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanospindles were synthesized by dealloying Ti–Cu–Pd amorphous alloy. • Pd significantly enhanced the exposure of high-energy (0 0 1) facet of TiO{sub 2}. • TiO{sub 2} with high-energy (0 0 1) facet showed good photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanospindles with exposed (0 0 1) facet were synthesized through a simple dealloying reaction. The rutile photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer. A Rhodamine B dye (RhB) was used to detect the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} under full light irradiation. The presence of Pd in the original amorphous alloy reduced the surface free energy of TiO{sub 2}, stabilized the (0 0 1) facet. The Pd8-TiO{sub 2} sample exhibited the largest crystal size along the direction which is perpendicular to the (0 0 1) facet. The photocatalytic degradation rate of RhB was improved due to the Pd addition in the original amorphous alloy. This indicated that the exposure of (0 0 1) facets could enhance the activity of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. In addition, the presence of isolated Pd atoms on the surface of TiO{sub 2} would be another probable reason for the improvement of photocatalytic activity.

  15. Interplay between water uptake, ion interactions, and conductivity in an e-beam grafted poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) anion exchange membrane

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pandey, Tara P.; Maes, Ashley M.; Sarode, Himanshu N.; Peters, Bethanne D.; Lavina, Sandra; Vezzù, Keti; Yang, Yuan; Poynton, Simon D.; Varcoe, John R.; Seifert, Soenke; et al

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate that the true hydroxide conductivity in an e-beam grafted poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) [ETFE] anion exchange membrane (AEM) is as high as 132 mS cm-1 at 80 °C and 95% RH, comparable to a proton exchange membrane, but with very much less water present in the film. To understand this behaviour we studied ion transport of hydroxide, carbonate, bicarbonate and chloride, as well as water uptake and distribution. Water uptake of the AEM in water vapor is an order of magnitude lower than when submerged in liquid water. In addition 19F pulse field gradient spin echo NMR indicates that there ismore » little tortuosity in the ionic pathways through the film. A complete analysis of the IR spectrum of the AEM and the analyses of water absorption using FT-IR led to conclusion that the fluorinated backbone chains do not interact with water and that two types of water domains exist within the membrane. The reduction in conductivity was measured during exposure of the OH- form of the AEM to air at 95% RH and was seen to be much slower than the reaction of CO2 with OH- as the amount of water in the film determines its ionic conductivity and at relative wet RHs its re-organization is slow.« less

  16. Interplay between water uptake, ion interactions, and conductivity in an e-beam grafted poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) anion exchange membrane

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pandey, Tara P.; Maes, Ashley M.; Sarode, Himanshu N.; Peters, Bethanne D.; Lavina, Sandra; Vezzu, Keti; Yang, Yuan; Poynton, Simon D.; Varcoe, John R.; Seifert, Soenke; et al

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate that the true hydroxide conductivity in an e-beam grafted poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) [ETFE] anion exchange membrane (AEM) is as high as 132 mS cm-1 at 80 °C and 95% RH, comparable to a proton exchange membrane, but with very much less water present in the film. To understand this behaviour we studied ion transport of hydroxide, carbonate, bicarbonate and chloride, as well as water uptake and distribution. Water uptake of the AEM in water vapor is an order of magnitude lower than when submerged in liquid water. In addition 19F pulse field gradient spin echo NMR indicates that there ismore » little tortuosity in the ionic pathways through the film. A complete analysis of the IR spectrum of the AEM and the analyses of water absorption using FT-IR led to conclusion that the fluorinated backbone chains do not interact with water and that two types of water domains exist within the membrane. Furthermore, the reduction in conductivity was measured during exposure of the OH- form of the AEM to air at 95% RH and was seen to be much slower than the reaction of CO2 with OH- as the amount of water in the film determines its ionic conductivity and at relative wet RHs its re-organization is slow.« less

  17. Influence of Electron Doping on Magnetic Order in CeRu2Al10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Riki; Kaneko, Koji; Saito, Kotaro; Mignot, Jean-Michel; André, Gilles; Robert, Julien; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chi, Songxue; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Nishioka, Takashi; Matsumura, Masahiro; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi

    2014-09-17

    The effect of electron doping by the substitution of Rh for Ru on unconventional magnetic order in CeRu2Al10 was investigated via neutron powder diffraction. In Ce(Ru1-xRhx)2Al10 with x = 0.05, 0.12, and 0.2, reorientation of the ordered moment from the c- to the a-axis takes place in all samples, while the ordering vector q=(0 1 0) remains unchanged within this concentration range. The moment reorientation is accompanied by an enhancement in its size by a factor of ~2.4, from μ=0.43 μB at x=0 to μ =1.06, 1.04, and 1.02 μB for x=0.05, 0.12 and 0.2, respectively. The continuous decrease in N´eel temperature T0(TN), despite an abrupt increase in μ , underlines the strong anisotropy in the exchange interaction in CeRu2Al10, and the fact that this anisotropy is easily suppressed by electron doping.

  18. Investigation of platinum alloys for melting of inclusion free laser glass: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumitani, T.; Toratani, H.; Meissner, H.E.

    1986-02-28

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Pt alloys as crucible materials for melting LHG-8 phosphate laser glass. The tendency of forming metallic inclusions and ionic dissolution of alloy components in the glass is to be compared with that of pure Pt. Ionic Pt is introduced into the glass melt by direct dissolution of Pt at the crucible-melt interface and by vapor phase transport. It was felt that a Pt-alloy may behave sufficiently differently from Pt that a number of alloys should be studied. Pt inclusions may originate from Pt which reprecipitates from the glass melt on cooling or change in redox-conditions; from volatilized Pt which deposits in colder zones of the melting environment as crystallites which may drop back into the glass melt; and/or from Pt particles which are mechanically removed from the crucible and drop into the glass melt. Besides pure Pt, the following alloys have been tested: Pt//sup 10/Ir, Pt//sup 10/Rh, Pt//sup 5/Au, Pt-ZGS, Pt//sup 5/Au-ZGS, Pt//sup 10/Rh-ZGS.

  19. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-06

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been prepared for waste characterization activities to be conducted by the Transuranic (TRU) Project at the Hanford Site to meet requirements set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, 4890139088-TSDF, Attachment B, including Attachments B1 through B6 (WAP) (DOE, 1999a). The QAPjP describes the waste characterization requirements and includes test methods, details of planned waste sampling and analysis, and a description of the waste characterization and verification process. In addition, the QAPjP includes a description of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) requirements for the waste characterization program. Before TRU waste is shipped to the WIPP site by the TRU Project, all applicable requirements of the QAPjP shall be implemented. Additional requirements necessary for transportation to waste disposal at WIPP can be found in the ''Quality Assurance Program Document'' (DOE 1999b) and HNF-2600, ''Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan.'' TRU mixed waste contains both TRU radioactive and hazardous components, as defined in the WLPP-WAP. The waste is designated and separately packaged as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH), based on the radiological dose rate at the surface of the waste container. RH TRU wastes are not currently shipped to the WIPP facility.

  20. Insights into accelerated aging of SSL luminaires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davis, J. Lynn; Lamvik, Michael; Bittle, James; Shepherd, Sarah; Yaga, Robert; Baldasaro, Nick; Solano, Eric; Bobashev, Georgiy

    2013-09-30

    Although solid-state lighting (SSL) products are often intended to have product lifetimes of 15 years or more, the rapid change in technology has created a need for accelerated life tests (ALTs) that can be performed in the span of several months. A critical element of interpreting results from any systems-level ALT is understanding of the impact of the test environment on each component. Because of its ubiquity in electronics, the use of temperature-humidity environments as potential ALTs for SSL luminaires was investigated. Results from testing of populations of three commercial 6” downlights in environments of 85oC and 85% relative humiditymore » (RH) and 75oC and 75% RH are reported. These test environments were found to accelerate lumen depreciation of the entire luminaire optical system, including LEDs, lenses, and reflectors. The effects of aging were found to depend strongly on both the optical materials that were used and the design of the luminaire; this shows that the lumen maintenance behavior of SSL luminaires must be addressed at the optical systems level. Temperature-Humidity ALTs can be a useful test in understand lumainaire depreciation provided that proper consideration is given to the different aging rates of various materials. Since the impact of the temperature-humidity environment varies among components of the optical system, uniform aging of all system components in a single test is difficult to achieve.« less