Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Anisotropic intermediate valence in Yb2M3Ga9 (M = Rh, Ir)  

SciTech Connect

The intermediate valence compounds Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} (M = Rh, Ir) exhibit an anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the temperature dependence of the 4f occupation number, n{sub f}(T), for Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} as well as the magnetic inelastic neutron scattering spectrum S{sub mag}({Delta}E) at 12 and 300 K for Yb{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}. Both n{sub f}(T) and S{sub mag}({Delta}E) were calculated for the Anderson impurity model with crystal field terms within an approach based on the non-crossing approximation. These results corroborate the importance of crystal field effects in these materials; they also suggest that Anderson lattice effects are important to the physics of Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}.

Christianson, A.D.; Lawrence, J.M.; Lobos, A.M.; Aligia, A.A.; Bauer, E.D.; Moreno, N.O.; Booth, C.H.; Goremychkin, E.A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Batista, C.D.; Trouw, F.R.; Hehlen, M.P.

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates  

SciTech Connect

Transition metal modified Rh-catalysts can be used for converting syngas (CO+H2) into C2+ oxygenates. It has been found that Mn has a favorable effect in the selectivity towards oxygenates, while addition of Ir to the binary Rh-Mn catalysts significantly increases the space-time yield of C2+ oxygenates. In this paper, we use quantum mechanical calculations to investigate the distribution of promoter sites within Rh rich nanoparticles and their role in the conversion of syngas towards ethanol. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated by Battelle for the DOE under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. A portion of the research was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national science user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at PNNL.

Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Jaffe, John E.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Mei, Donghai; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gray, Michel J.; Gerber, Mark A.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

EXAFS and FT-IR Characterization of Mn and Li Promoted Titania-Supported Rh Catalysts for CO Hydrogenation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of Li and Mn promoters on the structure and selectivity of supported Rh catalysts for CO hydrogenation reaction was examined. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray absorption were used to investigate the adsorption of reactants and local structure of Rh. These techniques were used in combination with reactivity, H{sub 2} chemisorption, and temperature programmed studies to correlate structural characteristics with activity and selectivity during CO hydrogenation of unpromoted Rh/TiO{sub 2} and three promoted Rh catalysts: Rh-Li/TiO{sub 2}, Rh-Mn/TiO{sub 2}, and Rh-Li-Mn/TiO{sub 2}. The presence of a promoter slightly decreases the Rh clusters size; however, no evidence for an electronic effect induced by the presence of Li and Mn was found. Higher turnover frequencies were found for the promoted catalysts, which also showed the lower dispersion. The Li promoter introduces a weakened CO adsorption site that appears to enhance the selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates. The selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates varies inversely with the reducibility of Rh metal, that is, the lower the Rh reducibility, the higher the selectivity.

V Schwartz; A Campos; A Egbebi; J Spivey; S Overbury

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

{sup 45}Sc Solid State NMR studies of the silicides ScTSi (T=Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt)  

SciTech Connect

The silicides ScTSi (T=Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt) were synthesized by arc-melting and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. The structures of ScCoSi, ScRuSi, ScPdSi, and ScIrSi were refined from single crystal diffractometer data. These silicides crystallize with the TiNiSi type, space group Pnma. No systematic influences of the {sup 45}Sc isotropic magnetic shift and nuclear electric quadrupolar coupling parameters on various structural distortion parameters calculated from the crystal structure data can be detected. {sup 45}Sc MAS-NMR data suggest systematic trends in the local electronic structure probed by the scandium atoms: both the electric field gradients and the isotropic magnetic shifts relative to a 0.2 M aqueous Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution decrease with increasing valence electron concentration and within each T group the isotropic magnetic shift decreases monotonically with increasing atomic number. The {sup 45}Sc nuclear electric quadrupolar coupling constants are generally well reproduced by quantum mechanical electric field gradient calculations using the WIEN2k code. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arc-melting synthesis of silicides ScTSi. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal X-ray data of ScCoSi, ScRuSi, ScPdSi, and ScIrSi. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 45}Sc solid state NMR of silicides ScTSi.

Harmening, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Eckert, Hellmut, E-mail: eckerth@uni-muenster.de [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Fehse, Constanze M. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Sebastian, C. Peter, E-mail: sebastiancp@jncasr.ac.in [New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560064 (India); Poettgen, Rainer, E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.de [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie and NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

SYSTRAN MT dictionary development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYSTRAN has demonstrated success in the MT field with its long history spanning nearly 30 years. As a general-purpose fully automatic MT system, SYSTRAN employs a transfer approach. Among its several components, large, carefully encoded, high-quality dictionaries are critical to SYSTRAN's translation capability. A total of over 2.4 million words and expressions are now encoded in the dictionaries for twelve source language systems (30 language pairs- one per year!). SYSTRAN'S dictionaries, along with its parsers, transfer modules, and generators, have been tested on huge amounts of text, and contain large terminology databases covering various domains and detailed linguistic rules. Using these resources, SYSTRAN MT systems have successfully served practical translation needs for nearly 30 years, and built a reputation in the MT world for their large, mature dictionaries. This paper describes various aspects of SYSTRAN MT dictionary development as an important part of the development and refinement of SYSTRAN MT systems. There are 4 major sections: 1) Role and Importance of Dictionaries in the SYSTRAN Paradigm describes the importance of coverage and depth in the dictionaries; 2) Dictionary Structure discusses the specifics of

Laurie Gerber; Jin Yang

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the "RH-TRU 72-B cask") and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

RH_SRS_Shipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Trucks Delivering First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste WIPP Trucks Delivering First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste from the Savannah River Site CARLSBAD, N.M., June 11, 2012- Photo caption: On June 7, 2012, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) trucks approach the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico, with the first shipment of defense- related remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. TRU waste consists of materials contaminated with radioactive elements that have atomic numbers greater than uranium, including tools, rags, protective clothing, sludge and soil. That shipment and two contact- handled TRU waste shipments were released by SRS at the same time The three shipments consisted of (left to right) a TRUPACT-III, a RH-72B and one with

11

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. The C of C states: ''...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, ''Operating Procedures,'' of the application.'' It further states: ''...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, ''Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR {section} 71.11, ''Deliberate Misconduct.'' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARP. This document is available on the Internet at: ttp://www.ws/library/t2omi/t2omi.htm. Users are responsible for ensuring they are using the current revision and change notices. Sites may prepare their own document using the word-for-word steps in th is document, in sequence, including Notes and cautions. Site specific information may be included as necessary. The document, and revisions, must then be submitted to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval. A copy of the approval letter from CBFO shall be available for audit purposes. Users may develop site-specific procedures addressing preoperational activities, quality assurance (QA), hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used with the instructions contained in this document. Users may recommend changes to this document by submitting their recommendations (in writing) to the WIPP M&O Contractor RH Packaging Maintenance Engineer for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by ALL users. Before first use and every 12 months after, user sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance. They will also be audited within one year from the effective date of revisions to this document.

Washington TRU Solutions, LLC

2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

IR-2003-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 www.IRS.gov/newsroom Public Contact: 800.829.1040 $1 BILLION IN TAX CREDITS ALLOCATED TO CLEAN COAL PROJECTS IR-2006-184, Nov. 30, 2006 WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service announced that it has allocated nearly $1 billion of tax credits to nine planned clean coal projects. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorized $1.65 billion in tax credits for clean coal projects. The Act allocated $800 million of credits to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) projects, $500 million to non-IGCC advanced coal electricity generation projects and $350 million to gasification projects. The $800 million allocated to IGCC projects is required to be allocated in relatively equal amounts among bituminous coal,

14

NIST Open Machine Translation (OpenMT) Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DARPA TIDES Machine Translation 2004 Evaluation (MT04). Current and Recent DARPA TIDES MT Activities. MT04 takes ...

15

Rh-Based Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts: Characterization and Computational Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting a program focused on developing a process for the conversion of biomass to bio-based fuels and co-products. Biomass-derived syngas is converted thermochemically within a temperature range of 240 to 330°C and at elevated pressure (e.g., 1200 psig) over a catalyst. Ethanol is the desired reaction product, although other side compounds are produced, including C3 to C5 alcohols; higher (i.e., greater than C1) oxygenates such as methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, acetic acid and acetaldehyde; and higher hydrocarbon gases such as methane, ethane/ethene, propane/propene, etc. Saturated hydrocarbon gases (especially methane) are undesirable because they represent a diminished yield of carbon to the desired ethanol product and represent compounds that must be steam reformed at high energy cost to reproduce CO and H2. Ethanol produced by the thermochemical reaction of syngas could be separated and blended directly with gasoline to produce a liquid transportation fuel. Additionally, higher oxygenates and unsaturated hydrocarbon side products such as olefins also could be further processed to liquid fuels. The goal of the current project is the development of a Rh-based catalyst with high activity and selectivity to C2+ oxygenates. This report chronicles an effort to characterize numerous supports and catalysts to identify particular traits that could be correlated with the most active and/or selective catalysts. Carbon and silica supports and catalysts were analyzed. Generally, analyses provided guidance in the selection of acceptable catalyst supports. For example, supports with high surface areas due to a high number of micropores were generally found to be poor at producing oxygenates, possibly because of mass transfer limitations of the products formed out of the micropores. To probe fundamental aspects of the complicated reaction network of CO with H2, a computational/ theoretical investigation using quantum mechanical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations was initiated in 2009. Computational investigations were performed first to elucidate understanding of the nature of the catalytically active site. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that Mn likely exists as a metallic alloy with Rh in Rh-rich environments under reducing conditions at the temperatures of interest. After determining that reduced Rh-Mn alloy metal clusters were in a reduced state, the activation energy barriers of numerous transition state species on the catalytically active metal particles were calculated to compute the activation barriers of several reaction pathways that are possible on the catalyst surface. Comparison of calculations with a Rh nanoparticle versus a Rh-Mn nanoparticle revealed that the presence of Mn enabled the reaction pathway of CH with CO to form an adsorbed CHCO species, which was a precursor to C2+ oxygenates. The presence of Mn did not have a significant effect on the rate of CH4 production. Ir was observed during empirical catalyst screening experiments to improve the activity and selectivity of Rh-Mn catalysts. Thus, the addition of Ir to the Rh-Mn nanoparticles also was probed computationally. Simulations of Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles revealed that, with sufficient Ir concentrations, the Rh, Mn and Ir presumably would be well mixed within a nanoparticle. Activation barriers were calculated for Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles for several C-, H-, and O-containing transitional species on the nanoparticle surface. It was found that the presence of Ir opened yet another reactive pathway whereby HCO is formed and may undergo insertion with CHx surface moieties. The reaction pathway opened by the presence of Ir is in addition to the CO + CH pathway opened by the presence of Mn. Similar to Mn, the presence of Ir was not found to not affect the rate of CH4 production.

Albrecht, Karl O.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Varga, Tamas; Colby, Robert J.; Jaffe, John E.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Mei, Donghai; Windisch, Charles F.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Gray, Michel J.; Hart, Todd R.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Category:Billings, MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT MT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Billings, MT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVHospital Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVHospital Billings MT... 62 KB SVLargeHotel Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVLargeHotel Billings ... 62 KB SVLargeOffice Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVLargeOffice Billings... 62 KB SVMediumOffice Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVMediumOffice Billing... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVMidriseApartment Bil... 63 KB SVOutPatient Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVOutPatient Billings ...

17

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

IPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 200 millirem per hour or less; this waste can be safely handled directly by personnel. Remote-handled (RH) TRU waste has a radiation dose rate at a package surface of 200...

19

Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

Li, Meng [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Cullen, David A [ORNL; Sasaki, Kotaro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Marinkovic, N. [University of Delaware; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Adzic, Radoslav R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hf-Ir (Hafnium - Iridium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hf-Ir crystallographic data...Hf-Ir crystallographic data Phase Composition, wt% Ir Pearson symbol Space group (βHf) 0 to ~10.5 cI 2 Im m (αHf) 0 to ~1.5 hP 2 P 6 3 / mmc Hf 2 Ir ~28 to 35.0 cF 96 Fd m Hf 5 Ir 3 39.3 hP 16 P 6 3 / mcm HfIr 51.9 to 59 o ** � HfIr 3 76 to 82 cP 4 Pm m (Ir) ~91 to 100 cF 4 Fm m...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ground Gravity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date...

22

Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlled Source Audio MT Controlled Source Audio MT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Controlled Source Audio MT Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 1,866.44186,644 centUSD

23

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area (Redirected from Marysville Mt Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

24

ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements 2000.01.01 - 2005.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92).

25

IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' w&m PadmmmTuJ tmml' aIs~#l!REm m-t, - 188kwxm BYI alahard 0. cr*rrror cy- r' , ' .~ -' - -' ^ , /' cs< 4. .c :' ; *. .h,- ' (z&&y .' ,/ ;f. .* &J >l a. L \' P" ,,,' ,.' I * :{' \ !' l t ..b c&~ tf ~ , r ,, r. ,* .;;;., k J ;, b $y$' Lrmprrw)rlt&tmxJ- a@. Frqrr at t&i8 raoLli:.y SC\ daummiI~Luualndr8rr~lfCUIf@@?~~oy-~ d )I t rq ,i .* 1 Virium~~bUrlJlOgarspvlr at ma rdutw. (500 p-4 3) i" 1 ) ,ip" 2. rt A8 - u %I* mm 4almpa~&rnbM Itrr+@# vbrp a** -y ;I11 ~*~~*- miw&mmwlrrwrbsr* ~rSthLtL,ort' tar,da*pcr¶.florllj pi &8~wl~cm@n-~ t#barwatla~r~tOf~. hwrl'r#tarr,urueunUr .--,U-L BirLl#a ofmml -vom. pe a ,Tjm-&,, i L) cc (. a 41 IA.9 #y7 /.& r*-rc * &ah&L- '2 , p-

26

Mt. Baker Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 48.777222222222°, -121.81333333333° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.777222222222,"lon":-121.81333333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

28

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

29

I\r'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

r' r' ( g-.] ic' fz .; w .fl ! : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X-~ Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-~n,~-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :. , ::; /. 1 httetii OP J xl-. P, 3. 2gp C+~t~Sil;lsXl t ?~~$Tly~lf .t: GA.3 L?wjpnaJiQn Of p-3&7:2-Liop 9.0";:7~+50 s' , -ir ,.,,3 iashlla+im it i3 our da3irs 20 be rslia-T.73 of _"\L:t&?T --:wzk&ili* of the SC1298 ' _ _ Zj31Wf end i~i3sio~~31.3 rsskeri31ii izxLi.c~~t& S' ;az&;-d -D~YX-C.I o-Ada - 451 g3ac SyT,kd jl-J$; 3.xi.da - 2% p3 I :&at a 1 a azqi?L;3 3 - ' T-44 pi3. 3 ,LS oxid-\ 3aqr1.93 aar9 ~z;cc?33a~jr la 5.x0 st?%zl*hl~iao- ::>a of In'se-3' -J*-y chs=iical r9tag;P,sta d.ili::d fn cm2 sxlgtit3sl -.- -n4A..*

30

NETL: IRS Tax Credit Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solicitations & Business Opportunities IRS Tax Credit Program The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is collaborating with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to evaluate applications for Tax Credits under Section 1307 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, per instruction in the Treasury and IRS Announcement 2010-56, which can be found at: http://www.irs.gov/irb/2010-39_IRB/ar09.html or http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/a-10-56.pdf Specifically, NETL will be evaluating and providing certifications of feasibility for advanced coal and gasification projects consistent with energy policy goals (“DOE certification”). To facilitate the review process, NETL has established this website to receive and respond to questions from prospective applicants regarding the Notices. NETL will post responses to questions or groups of similar questions.

31

Microsoft Word - MtRichmond_CX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Mt. Richmond property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, BPA-007071 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real Property transfers for cultural protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management. Location: Fairdale and Yamhill quadrangles, in Yamhill County, Oregon (near Yamhill, Oregon). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund the Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District's (YSWCD) purchase of the Mt. Richmond property (Property), a 284.66-acre parcel of land located west of the City of Yamhill in Yamhill County Oregon.

32

Mt Peak Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Utility Peak Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Peak Utility Facility Mt Peak Utility Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Mnt Peak Utility Energy Purchaser Mnt Peak Utility Location Midlothian TX Coordinates 32.42144978°, -97.02427357° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.42144978,"lon":-97.02427357,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Mt Poso Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poso Cogeneration Poso Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Poso Cogeneration Place Bakersfield, California Zip 93308 Product California-based project developer for the Mt Poso Cogeneration project near Bakersfield, California. Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Heat flow analysis. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=388982" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs

35

Opening the Doors at WIPP to RH TRU Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On October 16, 2006, the Governor of New Mexico and Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) jointly approved a hazardous waste permit modification allowing the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to manage, store, and dispose of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. RH TRU mixed waste is TRU waste that requires shielding for safe handling. Accordingly, some equipment and operations that are used to handle contact-handled (CH) TRU waste were not adequate to safely handle the RH TRU waste. Changes were needed at WIPP to accommodate the expanded waste envelope. To evaluate facility readiness to handle RH TRU waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters performed an operational readiness review (ORR). But even before the DOE planned the ORR, Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the Managing and Operating Contractor (MOC) for the WIPP, performed its own Line Management Assessment (LMA) and Contractor ORR. Upon successful completion of the RH LMA, line management affirmed to the WTS general manager that they were ready to proceed with the Contractor ORR. A team of independent subject matter experts from around the nation gathered to formally assess whether the MOC was indeed ready to receive, manage, store, and dispose of RH TRU waste at the WIPP. The Contractor ORR evaluated in detail, seven guiding principles set forth in DOE Order for Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities considering the DOE Standard for Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews. Through DOE Headquarters, the DOE gathered its own team of subject matter experts to assess the WIPP's readiness for RH TRU waste operations. Upon completion of the DOE RH ORR the DOE Team reported back to Headquarters and made the recommendation that WIPP proceed with RH TRU waste operations. (author)

Kehrman, R.F.; Most, W.A. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies The USGS published a USGS Professional Paper in 2010 entitled 

37

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies Dataset Summary...

38

Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal...

39

,"Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

40

,"Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2003 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

,"Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

42

,"Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

43

Controlled Source Audio MT At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Combs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, MT, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data may be available" References Jim Combs (1...

44

Publication Number: NIST Interagency Report (IR) 7298 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Publication Date: 05/31/2013 • Final Publication: http://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/ ir/2013/NIST.IR.7298r2.pdf • Related Information on CSRC: ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

45

Mt Signal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Signal Geothermal Area Signal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Signal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.65,"lon":-115.71,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montanaâ??s vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQâ??s wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the stateâ??s university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for September 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

48

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

49

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for June 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

50

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for February 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

51

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

52

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for October 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

53

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for June 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

54

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

55

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

56

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

57

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

58

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for March 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

59

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for September 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

60

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for July 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for August 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

62

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for November 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

63

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for April 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

64

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for July 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

65

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for November 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

66

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

67

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for September 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

68

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

69

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for July 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

70

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for May 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

71

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for June 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

72

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for October 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

73

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

74

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for August 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

75

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for November 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

76

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for October 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

77

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

78

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

79

Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980. [Pt/Rh, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ni/Rh, Rh/Re, Ni  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalysts are being screened to steam reform hydrocarbons in an autothermal reformer (STR). Twenty-one samples have been screened in a 1-in.-diam (ATR) reactor using No. 2 oil as the hydrocarbon feed. A series of platinum-rhodium catalysts were evaluated to study the effect of varying compositions. A sample containing 1.7% Pt/0.3% Rh was most active but the difference among the samples was within the range of test variability. Development of a more realistic test has been started. The effect of O/sub 2//C level on the gas composition leaving the catalytic partial oxidation section has been determined. The amount of unreacted oil increases as O/sub 2//C level decreases. The unreacted oil is more aromatic than the feedstock. The gas composition contains considerably more olefins as the O/sub 2//C level decreases. Post-run catalyst characterization indicates that the catalyst carrier does not deteriorate in the ATR test. A drastic decrease in CO chemisorption is noted on the Pt/Rh samples. This decline in CO chemisorption could either be due to metal sintering or to carbon deposition on the metal. Other analysis are required to determine which is causing the decline in CO chemisorption. Very low coke levels were found on Pt, Rh, and Pt/Rh samples. Addition of Rh to nickel reduces the coke level over that observed for nickel catalysts.

Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A ground magnetic survey located no anomaly with an amplitude of more than 20 or 30 gammas that could be associated with the thermal anomaly, however the magnetic data did outline the Cretaceous stock in great detail and allow the removal from the gravity field of the effect of the stock. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Magnetics_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=389390"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

and IR-4 Project Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In both tables, erroneous industry direct effects were reported that do not impact the overall findings of this report. The direct effect numbers previously reported in Tables 4 and 5 were not used in the calculations of overall impacts. The corrected tables in this document do reflect the estimates, as described in the text of the original report. October 22, 2012Executive Summary The Interregional Research Project Number 4 (IR-4 Project) has been a pivotal resource in providing U.S. residents a plentiful and low-cost array of vegetables, fruits, berries and tree nuts since 1963 by facilitating the registration of newer, lower-toxic pest control products with the EPA for application on specialty crops. Specialty crop growers often are at a disadvantage relative to program crop growers in having access to effective crop loss mitigation options against common agricultural pests. Specialty crops make up about 40 percent of the total value of U.S. crop production and include both food and ornamental crops that afford insufficient economic incentive for a pesticide companies to support initial or continuing registration of commercial pesticides. As all agricultural uses of pesticides are regulated by the EPA, each use must be registered or exempted before applied. Such registration is costly, making only registration for uses on any but large acreage crops unprofitable for pesticide companies. The IR-4 Project leverages resources to pursue registration for such uses. Along with supporting the use of reduced-toxicity pesticides, with its Biological and Organic Support program, the IR-4 Project is able to direct necessary resources to meet the U.S. goal of substantially decreasing the environmental and health impacts of agricultural pesticide use following the passage of the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. This report assesses the economic impact of the IR-4 Project on the U.S. economy. The assessment assumes a long-run presence of the IR-4 Project, such that relevant decision makers recognize and

Steven R. Miller; Andrea Leschewski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Controlled Source Audio MT At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlled Source Audio MT At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Pilgrim Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT...

83

Controlled Source Audio MT At Soda Lake Area (Combs 2006) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "EM sounding, MT, CSAMT, dipole-dipole resistivity; reservoir...

84

Matter Matters: Unphysical Properties of the Rh = ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally agreed that there is matter in the universe and, in this paper, we show that the existence of matter is extremely problematic for the proposed Rh = ct universe. Considering a dark energy component with an equation of state of w=-1/3, it is shown that the presence of matter destroys the strict expansion properties that define the evolution of Rh = ct cosmologies, distorting the observational properties that are touted as its success. We further examine whether an evolving dark energy component can save this form of cosmological expansion in the presence of matter by resulting in an expansion consistent with a mean value of = -1/3, finding that the presence of mass requires unphysical forms of the dark energy component in the early universe. We conclude that matter in the universe significantly limits the fundamental properties of the Rh = ct cosmology, and that novel, and unphysical, evolution of the matter component would be required to save it. Given this, Rh = ct cosmology is not simpler or...

Lewis, Geraint F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mt St Helens Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

86

3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: MT and TDEM surveys acquired in 2005 were integrated with existing MT and TDEM data recovered from obsolete formats to characterize the geometry of the geothermal reservoir. An interpretation based on the correlation of the 3D MT resistivity with well properties indicated that most of the previous exploration wells had been tarted close to but not in the center of areas tha appeared most likely to be permeable. Such

87

Definition: Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Controlled Source Audio MT Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Controlled Source Audio MT Controlled Source Audio-Magnetotellurics (CSAMT) is an active source application of a magnetotelluric survey aimed at providing a more reliable signal and rapid acquisition time relative to a natural source MT measurement.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Magnetotellurics (MT) is an electromagnetic geophysical method of imaging the earth's subsurface by measuring natural variations of electrical and magnetic fields at the Earth's surface. Investigation depth ranges from 300m below ground by recording higher frequencies down to 10,000m or deeper with long-period soundings. Developed in Russia and

88

Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Area (Blackwell) Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic mapping has outlined a structure which may be a partial control on the high heat flow. The Cretaceous intrusive (outlined by the magnetic data) and the heat flow anomaly occupy a broad dome in the Precambrian rocks, the stock outcropping in the northwest portion of the dome, and the heat flow anomaly restricted to the southwest portion of the dome. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa

89

MT Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saxony, Germany Zip 27404 Sector Services Product MT-Energie provides both turn-key biogas plants and related components and services. Coordinates 53.295765, 9.27964 Loading...

90

Mt. St. Helens' Aerosols: Some Tropospheric and Stratospheric Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical depth measurements based on the attenuation of direct solar radiation before and after the six major explosive eruptions of Mt. St. Helens during 1980 are presented. These automated measurements are from a site 200 km mostly cut ...

J. J. Michalsky; G. M. Stokes

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Million Cubic Feet) Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA...

92

Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 2 2013 3 5 4 6 9...

93

Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

94

Chirality in odd-$A$ Rh isotopes within triaxial particle rotor model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adopting the fully quantal triaxial particle rotor model, the candidate chiral doublet bands in odd-$A$ nuclei $^{103}$Rh and $^{105}$Rh with $\\pi g_{9/2}^{-1}\\otimes\

B. Qi; S. Q. Zhang; S. Y. Wang; J. Meng; T. Koike

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

RH-TRU Waste Inventory Characterization by AK and Proposed WIPP RH-TRU Waste Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has developed draft documentation to present the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) remote-handled (RH-) transuranic (TRU) waste characterization program to its regulators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department. Compliance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 191 and 194; the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579); and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, as well as the Certificates of Compliance for the 72-B and 10-160B Casks, requires that specific waste parameter limits be imposed on DOE sites disposing of TRU waste at WIPP. The DOE-CBFO must control the sites' compliance with the limits by specifying allowable characterization methods. As with the established WIPP contact handled TRU waste characterization program, the DOE-CBFO has proposed a Remote-Handled TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria (RH-WAC) document consolidating the requirements from various regulatory drivers and proposed allowable characterization methods. These criteria are consistent with the recommendation of a recent National Academy Sciences/National Research Council to develop an RH-TRU waste characterization approach that removes current self imposed requirements that lack a legal or safety basis. As proposed in the draft RH-WAC and other preliminary documents, the DOE-CBFO RH-TRU waste characterization program proposes the use of acceptable knowledge (AK) as the primary method for obtaining required characterization information. The use of AK involves applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or processes used to generate the waste. Documentation, records, or processes providing information about various attributes of a waste stream, such as chemical, physical, and radiological properties, may be used as AK and may be applied to individual waste containers either independently or in conjunction with radiography, visual examination, assay, and other sampling and analytical data. RH-TRU waste cannot be shipped to WIPP on the basis of AK alone if documentation demonstrating that all of the prescribed limits in the RH-WAC are met is not available, discrepancies exist among AK source documents describing the same waste stream and the most conservative assumptions regarding those documents indicates that a limit will not be met, or all required data are not available for a given waste stream.

Most, W. A.; Kehrman, R.; Gist, C.; Biedscheid, J.; Devarakonda, J.; Whitworth, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fotovoltinio modulio su koncentratoriumi projektavimas ir tyrimas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Baigiamajame magistro darbe suprojektuotos ir pagamintos dviej? r?ši? šviesos koncentratorin?s sistemos: jungtin? parabolin? ir sistema su Frenelio l?šiu. Atlikta saul?s element? efektyvumo analiz?, išnagrin?tos švies?… (more)

Gaili?nas,; Paulius

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Publication Number: NIST Interagency Report (IR) 7298 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Glossary of Key Information Security Terms ... Interagency Report (IR) 7298, Revision 2, Glossary of Key Information Security Terms. ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

98

?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GE 1 GE 1 ;" qr)-1 s?llq ' p raspy.. c" ifa K. mris I talked with Hr. Wllllm cIF(Iy, Metrllurgist, Wnlon CarbId@ Nuclear cOrp8ny, 08k B&t&$@, Tenne66ee, on April 26, 1961. He informed me th&t the #rtioMl Northern birislon, Ame~ic6.n ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8, la pePfopn1~ lo8lve forming studier for the. ilnion olo)w Wuolem Conpmy "p l7?JHa). The work at National Northern l#rirc.- alon ir under the 6upenl6lon of Ehsll Phillpohuc4~, v of Spealrl Prcbduots. The @ox& to data ha8 been pwfonwd wlth 430 strlnle66 rteel and urma%um metal - both hot snb 0018 wor4c have been performed at pr688u~r fmm 100,000 to 900,000 prl. The shape of the pleu88 na not dlrolored. In 6<lon work ha6 been done with

99

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power March 14, 2011 - 1:14pm Addthis Mount Wachusett Community College staff Bill Swift, Bob LaBonte, Norm Boudreau, George Couillard and Vestas trainer Bill Fulkerson about to ascend the MWCC north wind turbine | Photo courtesy of GreenOnGreenStreet Mount Wachusett Community College staff Bill Swift, Bob LaBonte, Norm Boudreau, George Couillard and Vestas trainer Bill Fulkerson about to ascend the MWCC north wind turbine | Photo courtesy of GreenOnGreenStreet Mark Higgins Operations Supervisor, Wind & Water Power Technologies Office What will this project do? The turbines are expected to provide an annual savings of approximately $700,000 based on the area's current utility rates.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

102

IRS Actions on Decisions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digital@treasury.gov Unique Identifier TREAS-4430 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http:www.irs.govapppicklistlistactionsOnDecisions.html Data Download URL...

103

IRS Internal Revenue Bulletin | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digital@treasury.gov Unique Identifier TREAS-4431 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http:www.irs.govapppicklistlistinternalRevenueBulletins.html Data Download URL...

104

Werner Steimle, MT(ASCP) OSU Student Health Services Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Werner Steimle, MT(ASCP) OSU Student Health Services Laboratory Staff Medical Technologist OSU Student Health Services Laboratory Corvallis, OR · 1998 ­ 2007 Section Supervisor, Laboratory Salem Hospital Regional Health Services Salem, OR · 1994 ­ 1998 Lead Medical Technologist/ Oregon

Tullos, Desiree

105

Mn Monolayer Modified Rh for Syngas-to-Ethanol Conversion: A First-Principles Study  

SciTech Connect

Rh is unique in its ability to convert syngas to ethanol with the help of promoters. We performed systematic first-principles computations to examine the catalytic performance of pure and Mn modified Rh(100) surfaces for ethanol formation from syngas. CO dissociation on the surface as well as CO insertion between the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} and the surface are the two key steps. The CO dissociation barrier on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is remarkably lowered by {approx}1.5 eV compared to that on Rh(100). Moreover, the reaction barrier of CO insertion into the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} group on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is 0.34 eV lower than that of methane formation. Thus the present work provides new mechanistic insight into the role of Mn promoters in improving Rh's selectivity to convert syngas to ethanol.

Li, Fengyu [University of Puerto Rico; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Zeng, X.C. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chen, Zhongfang [University of Puerto Rico

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

GRR/Section 13-MT-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-MT-a - Land Use...

107

Selectivity, activity, and metal-support interactions of Rh bimetallic catalysts. Progress report, 15 November 1981-15 August 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on a detailed investigation of the effect of TiO/sub 2/ support on Rh-Ag interaction as exhibited in catalytic activity. The temporal evolution of activity over Rh-Ag/TiO/sub 2/ for ethane hydrogenolysis and hydrogen chemisorption as a function of temperature, Ag to Rh ratio, the Rh particle size, Rh loading, and ambient gas were studied. Preliminary extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of Rh/TiO/sub 2/ catalysts indicate that 100% exposed (dispersed) catalyst prepared by ion exchange may be atomically dispersed after low temperature reduction. 7 figures, 1 table.

Haller, G L

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

File:INL-geothermal-mt.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mt.pdf mt.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Montana Geothermal Resources Size of this preview: 728 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 4,200 pixels, file size: 1.99 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Montana Geothermal Resources Sources Idaho National Laboratory Authors Patrick Laney; Julie Brizzee Related Technologies Geothermal Creation Date 2003-11-01 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:41, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:41, 16 December 2010 5,100 × 4,200 (1.99 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

109

Micro-Earthquake At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Blackwell) Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A seismic ground noise was carried out but the ground noise in the anomaly area (and the surrounding region) was extremely low, approximately 4 orders of magnitude below that observed in the geothermal areas in the Salton Sea between 1-10 Hz (in units of power density). Because of this very low background noise the micro-earthquake survey was possible with instrument gains well in excess of a million. Regional micro-earthquake activity was located within about 15 km of the geothermal area but no micro-earthquakes

110

Mt. Edgecumbe High School Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edgecumbe High School Wind Project Edgecumbe High School Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt. Edgecumbe High School Wind Project Facility Mt. Edgecumbe High School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location AK Coordinates 57.053928°, -135.356903° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.053928,"lon":-135.356903,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes No further mention of infrared photography. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_And-Or_Near_Infrared_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=386636" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

112

IRS General Counsel Memoranda | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digital@treasury.gov Unique Identifier TREAS-4432 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http:www.irs.govfoiaarticle0,,id103756,00.html Data Download URL http:...

113

IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for IR Spectral Bands and Performance Citation Chris Douglass. IR Spectral Bands...

114

Mechanin?s aktyvacijos ir pried? poveikis ekstrakcinio pushidra?io fosfogipso ir jo gamini? savyb?ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fosfogipso perdirbimas tampa vis aktualesn? problema ne tik Lietuvoje, bet ir visame pasaulyje. Tiek Lietuvos, tiek ir pasaulio mokslininkai jau seniai bando spr?sti fosfogipso perdirbimo… (more)

Gaidu?is, Sergejus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

m(T2): The Truth behind the glamour.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 03 04 22 6v 1 2 3 A pr 2 00 3 Cavendish HEP-2002-02/14 PACS: 14.80.Ly 13.85.Qk mT2 : the truth behind the glamour Alan Barr† Christopher Lester‡ Phil Stephens§ Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road... .5 % 22.2 % Table 1: The lightest chargino mass, the mass difference, ?M?˜1 = m?+1 ?m?01 , and two chargino branching ratios for the AMSB-like points discussed in section 4.2. The hadronic branching ratios can be found in [7]. 4.2 Case 2 – AMSB...

Barr, Alan; Lester, Christopher G; Stephens, Phil

116

Feasibility analysis of the use of TRUPACT-II for transport of RH-TRU waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research indicated the feasibility of utilizing existing TRUPACT-II casks for transporting RH-TRU waste. This could be achieved with an off-the-shelf TRUPACT-II (without modifications). The only added feature would be a removable impact-limiting assembly, preferably made of aluminum-honeycomb to minimize mass and thermal resistance. The assembly would be required because the volume of the RH-TRU cargo is much smaller than the standard 14-drum CH-TRU cargo. The TRUPACT-II has the potential to be an economical alternative to the 72B cask or any other RH-TRU design; it is certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and sufficient specimens exist to allow for fast proof of concept. Potentially significant savings could be achieved by using the TRUPACT-II instead of designing, developing, and testing a separate RH-TRU cask.

Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Adsorption studies of gases on Pt-Rh bimetallic catalysts by reversed-flow gas chromatography  

SciTech Connect

In the present work, the relatively new technique of reversed-flow gas chromatography was applied for the study of adsorption of carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide on Pt-Rh bimetallic catalysts. Using suitable mathematical analysis, equations were derived by means of which rate constants for adsorption, desorption, and disproportionation reaction were calculated. From the variation of these rate constants with temperature and the nature of the catalyst (Pt content), as well as from the finding that the CO adsorption is a dissociative process, useful conclusions concerning the mechanism for the CO oxidation reaction over Pt-Rh bimetallic catalysts were extracted. The catalytic fractional conversions for the CO disproportionation reaction were found to be higher for the Pt-RH bimetallic catalysts than those for the pure Pt catalyst, indicating the presence of beneficial Pt-Rh synergism.

Gavril, D.; Koliadima, A.; Karaiskakis, G. [Univ. of Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Preliminary results for the abundance of multicored EAS at Mt. Norikura  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multicore type EAS was observed by 54 m2 spark chamber at Mt. Norikura (740 g/?cm2). As a preliminary result

Norikura Air Shower Group

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Model for the Prediction of the Hydriding Thermodynamics of Pd-Rh-Co Ternary Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A dilute solution model (with respect to the substitutional alloying elements) has been developed, which accurately predicts the hydride formation and decomposition thermodynamics and the storage capacities of dilute ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The effect of varying the rhodium and cobalt compositions on the thermodynamics of hydride formation and decomposition and hydrogen capacity of several palladium-rhodium-cobalt ternary alloys has been investigated using pressure-composition (PC) isotherms. Alloying in the dilute regime (<10 at.%) causes the enthalpy for hydride formation to linearly decrease with increasing alloying content. Cobalt has a stronger effect on the reduction in enthalpy than rhodium for equivalent alloying amounts. Also, cobalt reduces the hydrogen storage capacity with increasing alloying content. The plateau thermodynamics are strongly linked to the lattice parameters of the alloys. A near-linear dependence of the enthalpy of hydride formation on the lattice parameter was observed for both the binary Pd-Rh and Pd-Co alloys, as well as for the ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The Pd-5Rh-3Co (at. %) alloy was found to have similar plateau thermodynamics as a Pd-10Rh alloy, however, this ternary alloy had a diminished hydrogen storage capacity relative to Pd-10Rh.

Teter, D.F.; Thoma, D.J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mt Wheeler Power, Inc (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Utah Utility Id 13073 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0786/kWh Commercial: $0.0810/kWh Industrial: $0.0610/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Mt Wheeler Power, Inc (Utah). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 11.289 138.131 203 9.256 101.356 114 1.61 12.38 14 22.155 251.867 331

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Village of Mt Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Horeb Village of Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13036 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

122

Mt Carmel Public Utility Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Utility Co Public Utility Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Carmel Public Utility Co Place Illinois Utility Id 13032 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Electric Service Commercial Commercial Electric Space Heating Service Commercial Large Light and Power Electric Service - Less Than 10 MW Industrial Large Light and Power Electric Service - equal or greater than 10 MW

123

Rule-based partial MT using enhanced finite-state grammars in NooJ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper argues for the viability and utility of partial machine translation (MT) in multilingual information systems. The notion of partial MT is modelled on partial parsing and involves a bottomup pattern matching approach where the finite-state transducers ... Keywords: NooJ system, finite-state language processing, local grammars, machine translation, multilingual information systems

Tamás Váradi

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Understanding of Ethanol Decomposition on Rh(111) From Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reaction mechanisms of ethanol decomposition on Rh(1 1 1) were elucidated by means of periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. We propose that the most probable reaction pathway is via CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* on the basis of our mechanistic study: CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. In contrast, the contribution from the pathway via CH{sub 3}CHOH* is relatively small, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHOH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 3}CO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. According to our calculations, one of the slow steps is the formation of the oxametallacycle CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* species, which leads to the production of CHCO*, the precursor for C-C bond breaking. Finally, the decomposition of ethanol leads to the production of C and CO. Our calculations, for ethanol combustion on Rh, the major obstacle is not C-C bond cleavage, but the C contamination on Rh(1 1 1). The strong C-Rh interaction may deactivate the Rh catalyst. The formation of Rh alloys with Pt and Pd weakens the C-Rh interaction, easing the removal of C, and, as expected, in accordance with the experimental findings, facilitating ethanol combustion.

Liu, P.; Choi, Y.M.

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used to map fracture and fluid flow patterns. References K. Richards, A. Revil, A. Jardani, F. Henderson, M. Batzle, A. Haas (2010) Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Self_Potential_At_Mt_Princeton_Hot_Springs_Area_(Richards,_Et_Al.,_2010)&oldid=388680"

126

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A dipole-dipole resistivity survey of the area was carried out with estimated penetration up to 700 meters and no indication of low values of resistivity were found associated with the thermal anomaly. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=510539

127

GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Major Facility Siting Act ARM Title 17 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Montana Major Facility Siting Act governs the siting of energy facilities in Montana. 7-MT-a.1 to 7-MT-a.2 - Does the Power Plant Have a Production Capacity of

128

Broadband Water Vapor Transmission Functions for Atmospheric IR Flux Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmission functions associated with water vapor molecular line and e-type absorption in the IR spectral regions are presented in the form of simple analytical functions and small tables, from which atmospheric IR fluxes and cooling rates can ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.73166667,"lon":-106.17,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

130

Cooling effect in emissions of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear characteristic emissions of K alpha, K beta and gamma with a significant triplet splitting at room temperature are observed from the long-lived nuclear state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung irradiation. A pronounced phase-transition-like narrowing of the emission profiles occurs immediately after the sample is cooled down to 77 K. The room temperature profiles reappear again abruptly and almost reversibly as the temperature drifts freely back to approximately the ice point after the filling of liquid nitrogen is stopped. These emission properties at 300 K and at low temperature may indicate that the 103mRh nuclei are in collective states.

Yao Cheng; Bing Xia; Chinping Chen

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

Senesac, Larry R [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Authors Philip E. Wannamaker, William M. Doerner and Derrick P. Hasterok Conference proceedings, 32th workshop on geothermal reservoir Engineering, Stanford University; Stanford University; 2007 Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal

134

A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In view of recent extensive investigation of shallow resistivity structure for active fault studies and geothermal exploration, we developed a portable magnetotelluric (MT) system for the extremely low frequency (ELF) range. The system aims primarily at making real-time analyses of MT data at the so-called Schumann resonance frequencies of ~ 8, 14 and 20 Hz.

135

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mt. Cimone Mt. Cimone Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone graphics Graphics data Data Investigators Tiziano Colombo and Riccardo Santaguida Italian Meteorological Service, Via delle Ville, 100-41029 Sestola (MO), Italy Period of Record 1979-1997 Methods Continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements have been carried out at Mt. Cimone since 1979. Since December 1988, air samples have also been collected approximately once per week in a pair of 2-L, electropolished, stainless steel cylindrical flasks. From 1979 until December 1988, a Hartmann and Braun URAS-2T NDIR gas analyzer was used for CO2 determinations. Currently, CO2 determinations are made through the use of a Siemens Ultramat-5E NDIR gas analyzer. Water vapor is eliminated by passing the air through a U-tube

136

Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples

137

3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed density model of Mt. Etna and its surrounding areas has been evaluated using a 3-D inversion of the gravimetric data acquired in the 1980's. Several high-density and low-density bodies are found, penetrating from shallow depths as far down as 12 km bsl. A positive correlation (in terms of location, extent, density, and velocity) is established between several anomalies of the density model and features identified in previously published seismic tomographies. A prominent high-density body extending down to 7 km bsl is recognized in the southern

138

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Infrared images acquired through joint US. Department of Energy and U.S. Geological Survey efforts (Kieffer et al., 1982) show a representative pattern of heat emission from the summit area (Fig. 5). References David Frank (1995) Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Rainier, Washington Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_And-Or_Near_Infrared_At_Mt_Ranier_Area_(Frank,_1995)&oldid=386481" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes

139

GRR/Section 6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit 6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit 06MTEFloodplainDevelopmentPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Federal Emergency Management Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTEFloodplainDevelopmentPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Anyone planning new development within a designated Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA). Check with local floodplain [www.mtfloodplain.mt.gov

140

Missing Stratospheric Ozone Decrease at Southern Hemisphere Middle Latitudes after Mt. Pinatubo: A Dynamical Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although large total ozone decreases occurred in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics in the years after the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo that are generally attributed to the eruption, comparable decreases did not emerge in the Southern ...

C. Schnadt Poberaj; J. Staehelin; D. Brunner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home...

142

GRR/Section 14-MT-d - 401 Water Quality Certification | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon GRRSection 14-MT-d - 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY...

143

A Large Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Large Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Self-potential (SP) surveys were carried out on Mt. Fuji volcano, Japan, and an intense positive anomaly (about 2000 mV) was found in the summit area. The positive SP anomaly was stable on 2001 and 2002, but increased 150 mV in amplitude on September 12, 2003, and suddenly decreased 300 mV two weeks later. This amplitude change coincides with the emergence of the fumaroles, which appeared for the first time in 40 years, on the east-northeast flank 6 km apart from the summit. The SP anomaly is thought

144

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-MT-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685537" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

145

Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Million Cubic Feet) Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

146

Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

147

Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH. The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere, and the wind speed and direction.

Coulter,Richard; Ritsche,Michael

148

Catalytic partial oxidation of n-tetradecane on Rh and Sr substituted pyrochlores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalyst deactivation by high levels of sulfur and aromatics limits the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of diesel fuel into a H2-rich stream for fuel cells. These species poison traditional supported metal catalysts because they adsorb strongly to electron dense metal clusters and promote the formation of carbon on the surface. In this work, Rh + Sr are substituted into lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlore (La2Zr2O7) to give an La(2-x)SrxRhyZr(2-y)O(7- î) (LSRZ) catalyst. The resistance to deactivation and carbon formation were examined by the CPOX of a mixture of 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene + 1000 ppmw dibenzothiophene in n-tetradecane. The results were compared to a commercial Rh/ã-Al2O3 catalyst. In the presence of these contaminants, the activity of the LSRZ was only kinetically inhibited, which is thought to be attributable to the oxygen-ion conductivity that results from Sr substitution into the pyrochlore structure. Rh/ã-Al2O3 was deactivated, likely due to significant carbon accumulation on/near the Rh metal

Haynes, D.J.; Berry, D.A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Gardner, T.H.; Spivey, J.J.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Disordered surface structure of an ultra-thin tin oxide film on Rh(100)  

SciTech Connect

The composition and structure of an ultra-thin tin oxide film on Rh(100), prepared by the deposition of a submonolayer of tin followed by annealing in an O{sub 2} atmosphere, were examined by a combination of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). Although the LEED pattern exhibited c(2 x 8) spots clearly, a uniform periodicity of the c(2 x 8) unit cell was not observed in the STM images. The bright dots that were observed periodically in the STM image were similar to those of the ultra-thin Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} film on Rh(111) and formed a zigzag arrangement with the numerous point and line defects. The XPS study revealed that the Sn 3d{sub 5/2} peak of the tin oxide film on Rh(100) showed a metallic state as well as an oxide state that was between the SnO{sub 2} and SnO states. The structural models, which were based on the Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure on Rh(111), were determined using DFT total energy calculations. The simulated STM images of the two slightly different honeycomb-chain models well reproduced the zigzag arrangement in the STM image. The STM image and XPS spectrum were interpreted using a combination of the two models.

Zenkyu, R.; Tajima, D.; Yuhara, J. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Determination of the proton separation energy of {sup 93}Rh from mass measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed {nu}p process, which occurs in the early time proton-rich neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae, has the potential to resolve the long-standing uncertainty in the production of the light p-nuclei {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. A recent study incorporating this {nu}p process has indicated that the proton separation energy S{sub p} of {sup 93}Rh is especially important in determining the relative production of these two isotopes. To reproduce the observed solar {sup 92}Mo/{sup 94}Mo abundance ratio of 1.57 a S{sub p} value for {sup 93}Rh of 1.64{+-}0.1 MeV is required. The previously unknown masses of {sup 92}Ru and {sup 93}Rh have been measured with the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer resulting in an experimental value for S{sub p}({sup 93}Rh) of 2.007{+-}0.009 MeV. This implies that with our current understanding of the conditions in core-collapse supernova explosions the {nu}p process is not solely responsible for the observed solar {sup 92}Mo/{sup 94}Mo abundance ratio.

Fallis, J.; Russell, S.; Vorst, M. Scholte van de; Sharma, H.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Clark, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Sharma, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Savard, G.; Caldwell, S.; Sternberg, M.; Schelt, J. Van [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Buchinger, F.; Crawford, J. E.; Gulick, S.; Lee, J. K. P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Deibel, C. M.; Wrede, C. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Fisker, J. L. [Physical Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hecht, A. A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] (and others)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Rhodium dihydride (RhH[subscript 2]) with high volumetric hydrogen density  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials with very high hydrogen density have attracted considerable interest due to a range of motivations, including the search for chemically precompressed metallic hydrogen and hydrogen storage applications. Using high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique and theoretical calculations, we have discovered a new rhodium dihydride (RhH{sub 2}) with high volumetric hydrogen density (163.7 g/L). Compressing rhodium in fluid hydrogen at ambient temperature, the fcc rhodium metal absorbs hydrogen and expands unit-cell volume by two discrete steps to form NaCl-typed fcc rhodium monohydride at 4 GPa and fluorite-typed fcc RhH{sub 2} at 8 GPa. RhH{sub 2} is the first dihydride discovered in the platinum group metals under high pressure. Our low-temperature experiments show that RhH{sub 2} is recoverable after releasing pressure cryogenically to 1 bar and is capable of retaining hydrogen up to 150 K for minutes and 77 K for an indefinite length of time.

Li, Bing; Ding, Yang; Kim, Duck Young; Ahuja, Rajeev; Zou, Guangtian; Mao, Ho-Kwang (Jilin); (Uppsala); (Cambridge); (CIW)

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

153

RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Note on Non-parametric and Semi-parametric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Note on Non-parametric and Semi-parametric Modeling for comparative purposes in order to assess the predictive performance of the Burning Index. 1 Department including the Burning Index (BI) at each of various Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) in the United

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

154

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

155

IRS Private Letter Rulings and Technical Advice Memoranda | Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digital@treasury.gov Unique Identifier TREAS-4433 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http:www.irs.govtaxexemptbondarticle0,,id134365,00.html Data Download URL...

156

Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental interest in that they add to a growing body of evidence indicating that certain, appropriately ligated, coordinatively unsaturated, subnanometer M4 transition-metal clusters can be relatively robust catalysts. Also demonstrated herein is that Rh4 clusters are poisoned by Hg(0), demonstrating for the first time that the classic Hg(0) poisoning test of 'homogeneous' vs 'heterogeneous'catalysts cannot distinguish Rh4-based subnanometer catalysts from Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysts, at least for the present examples of these two specific, Rh-based catalysts.

Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Catalytic partial oxidation of n-tetradecane using Rh and Sr substituted pyrochlores: Effects of sulfur  

SciTech Connect

The presence of high levels of organosulfur compounds hinders the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of logistic fuels into a H2-rich gas stream for fuel cells. These species poison traditional supported metal catalysts because the sulfur adsorbs strongly to electron dense metal clusters and promotes the formation of carbon on the surface. To minimize deactivation by sulfur, two substituted lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlores (La2Zr2O7), identified in a previous study [D.J. Haynes, D.A. Berry, D. Shekhawat, J.J. Spivey, Catal. Today 136 (2008) 206], were investigated: (a) La–Rh–Zr (LRZ) and La–Sr– Rh–Zr (LSRZ). Using unsubstituted lanthanum zirconate and a conventional 0.5 wt% Rh/g-Al2O3 as comparisons, these four catalysts were exposed to a feed containing 1000 ppmw dibenzothiophene (DBT) in n-tetradecane (TD). DBT rapidly deactivated both the 0.5 wt% Rh/g-Al2O3 and LZ. The LRZ catalyst experienced a gradual deactivation, suggesting that Rh substitution into the pyrochlore structure, by itself, cannot completely eliminate deactivation by sulfur. However, the additional substitution of Sr stabilized yields of H2 and CO in the presence of DBT at levels only slightly below those observed without sulfur in the feed. After sulfur was removed from the feed, each catalyst was able to recover some activity. The recovery appears to be linked to carbon formed on active sites. The 0.5 wt% Rh/g-Al2O3, LZ, and LRZ all had comparable amounts of carbon formed on the surface: 0.90, 0.80 and 0.86 gcarbon/gcat, respectively. Of these three catalysts, only the LRZ was able to recover a significant portion of initial activity, suggesting that the carbon formed indiscriminately on the surface, and not solely on the active sites. LSRZ was able to regain almost its initial activity once sulfur was removed from the feed, and had the least amount of carbon on the surface (0.30 gcarbon/gcat). It is hypothesized that oxygen-ion mobility, which results from Sr substitution, reduces carbon formation and the deactivation by sulfur.

Haynes, D.; Berry, D.; Shekhawat, D. Spivey, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Monitoring and Targeting (M&T): A Low Investment, Low Risk Approach to Energy Cost Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring and Targeting (M&T) is a disciplined approach to energy management that ensures that energy resources are used to their maximum economic advantage. M&T serves two principal functions: • Ongoing, day-to-day control of energy use • Planned improvements in energy efficiency Key elements of an M&T program include: • Measurement of utility (steam, fuel, power) consumption levels • The establishment of consumption targets that take variations in key variables (e.g., throughput, conversion, product quality...etc.) into account • Comparison of actual vs. target energy usage • "Exception reports" to highlight areas experiencing unusually good or unusually poor performance • An established protocol, involving both management and operating personnel, for reviewing and acting upon the energy information available. • Tracking and reporting of the savings achieved • Periodic review and reassessment of the energy targets. This paper briefly reviews key M&T concepts and their application in industrial settings. Practical aspects of program implementation -such as data entry, target setting, report generation, software requirements, and personnel orientation and training -are discussed. Representative savings produced by M&T in a variety of plant types also are presented. These savings typically are achieved with little or no capital investment.

McMullan, A.; Rutkowski, M.; Karp, A.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rh and Co-based catalyst performance was compared for steam reforming of ethanol under conditions suitable for industrial hydrogen production. The reaction conditions were varied to elucidate the differences in reaction pathways on both catalysts. On Co/ZnO, CH4 is a secondary product formed through the methanation reaction, while it is produced directly by ethanol decomposition on Rh. The difference in the reaction mechanism is shown to favor Co-based catalysts for selective hydrogen production under elevated system pressures (up to 15 bar) of industrial importance. The carbon deposition rate was also studied, and we show that Co is more prone to coking and catalyst failure. However, the Co/ZnO catalyst can be regenerated, by mild oxidation, despite the high carbon deposition rate. We conclude that Co/ZnO is a more suitable catalyst system for steam reforming of ethanol due to the low methane selectivity, low cost and possibility of regeneration with mild oxidation.

Karim, Ayman M.; Su, Yu; Sun, Junming; Yang, Cheng; Strohm, James J.; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Testing a Model of IR Radiative Losses: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global and diffuse shortwave measurements made with first class thermopile based instruments. Pyrgeometers can be used to measure the sky temperature and are used to calculate the pyranometer?s IR radiative losses.

Vignola, F.; Long, C. N.; Reda, I.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Scaling IR-system evaluation using term relevance sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an evaluation method based on Term Relevance Sets Trels that measures an IR system's quality by examining the content of the retrieved results rather than by looking for pre-specified relevant pages. Trels consist of a list ... Keywords: IR-system evaluation, keywords, trels, web search evaluation

Einat Amitay; David Carmel; Ronny Lempel; Aya Soffer

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy investigation of oxidized wool  

SciTech Connect

The Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectra (FT-IR/PAS) of wool, shrink-resist treated wool and corona discharge oxidized wool are reported. Products of the oxidation of wool by dichloroisocyanuric acid are discussed. The FT-IR/PAS results indicate the formation of a sulphinic acid residue during the wool treatment.

McKenna, W.P.; Gale, D.J.; Rivett, D.E.; Eyring, E.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Properties of Encapsulated CIGS Cells in 85 degrees C/85%RH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper concerns studies of encapsulated cells subjected to an environment of 85ºC and 85%RH (85/85). Cells are encapsulated with PNNL multi-layer coatings (referred to as PML coatings) utilizing alternating layers of Al2O3, and an advanced polymer. The new polymer has been determined to withstand the 85/85 environment. Two types of cells were used for these studies, namely, SSI mini-modules (which are actually CIGSS devices) and CIGS cells provided by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC). Cells were coated and stressed at 85/85 in an environmental chamber. Current-voltage characteristics were acquired before and after coating, and periodically after being subjected to the 85/85 environment. Whereas coated SSI modules were determined to last 1000 hours when stressed at 60ºC/90%RH without degradation, the efficiency of these modules degrade to a level of 60% of the beginning-of-life value when stressed at 85/85. Encapsulated IEC cells, however, have exhibited extraordinary results. The efficiency of several encapsulated cells did not decrease for 1500 hours in an 85ºC/85%RH environment. This results establishes a benchmark for stressed, encapsulated CIGS cells.

Olsen, Larry C.; Gross, Mark E.; Kundu, Sambhu N.; Shafaman, William N.

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

GRR/Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit GRR/Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit 06MTAMontanaOverdimensionalOrOverweightLoadPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 61-10-101 et seq. Administrative Rules of Monatana 18.8 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTAMontanaOverdimensionalOrOverweightLoadPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

165

Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Controlled_Source_Audio_MT_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598122"

166

GRR/Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit GRR/Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit 03MTEEncroachmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Transportation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTEEncroachmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart is intended to address the permitting requirements for encroachments on Montana Department of Transportation lands.

167

GRR/Section 18-MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks 18MTAUndergroundStorageTanks (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-11-501 Administrative Rules of Montana 17-56 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18MTAUndergroundStorageTanks (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A developer must obtain an Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit

168

GRR/Section 14-MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14MTANonpointSourcePollution (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Watershed Coordination Council United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTANonpointSourcePollution (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution is the state's single largest source of

169

GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14MTD401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Federal Clean Water Act (33 USC § 1251 et seq.) Montana Codes Annotated 75-5-401 Aministrative Rules of Montana Chapter 30 Administrative Rules of Montana 17.30.101 through 109 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTD401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

170

Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser Goff (1995) Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Mt_St_Helens_Area_(Shevenell_%26_Goff,_1995)&oldid=389549" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

171

Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Water Sampling At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Rainier Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples collected during field investigations in 1982-1985 (Frank, 1985), whereas

172

GRR/Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process GRR/Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process 04MTAStateExplorationProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation Regulations & Policies ARM 17.20.202: Geothermal Exploration Plan ARM 17.20.203: Initial Field Report ARM 17.20.204: Periodic Field Report ARM 17.20.205: Final Field Report ARM 17.20.206: Geological Report MCA 82-1-103: Notice of Intent MCA 82-1-104: Bond MCA 82-1-105: Permit Issuance MCA 82-1-106: NOI Forwarded MCA 82-1-107: Notice to Surface Owner MCA 82-1-108: Record of Work Performed Triggers

173

GRR/Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process GRR/Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process 14MTBMPDESPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-402: Duties of MDEQ MCA 75-5-403: Denial, Modification, Review 75-5-611: Violation, Hearing Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTBMPDESPermittingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

174

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used to map fracture and fluid flow patterns. References K. Richards, A. Revil, A. Jardani, F. Henderson, M. Batzle, A. Haas (2010) Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,

175

GRR/Section 14-MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Water Quality Act (Montana Codes Annotated 75-5-101 et seq.) Administrative Rules of Montana 17.30.1001 et seq. Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

176

GRR/Section 20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process 20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process 20MTAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Rule 36.21.671 - Abandonment of Flowing Wells Rule 36.21.810 - Abandonment Rule Chapter 36.21 Board of Water Well Contractors Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20MTAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana requires the employment of particular engineering standards when

177

Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Rainier Area Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Rainier Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples collected during field investigations in 1982-1985 (Frank, 1985), whereas

178

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 87-5-501 et seq Montana Stream Protection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana has a policy to preserve fish and wildlife habitat as well as

179

GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated Title 75, Chapter 10, Part 4 Administrative Rules of Montana Title 17, Chapter 53 40 CFR 260 through 40 CFR 270 40 CFR 124 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

180

GRR/Section 8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process 8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process 08MTATransmission (3).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated Title 75, Chapter 20 Montana Environmental Policy Act MCA 75-20-301 Findings Necessary for Certification ARM 17.20.1606 Electric Transmission Lines, Need Standard ARM 17.20.907 ARM 17.20.920 ARM 17.20.921 ARM 17.20.923 ARM 17.20.1902 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 08MTATransmission (3).pdf 08MTATransmission (3).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-2 Administrative Rules of Montana 17.8 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requires a Montana Air Permit to construct and operate a new or modified source of air

182

GRR/Section 3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease 3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease 03MTAStateGeothermalResourceLease.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Rule 36.25.404 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTAStateGeothermalResourceLease.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart is intended to document the process behind the geothermal resource lease in Montana. The procedure is outlined in Rule 36.25.404.

183

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies MCA 37-43-104: Monitoring Wells MCA 37-43-302: License Requirements MCA 37-43-306: Bonding Requirements Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

184

RECIPIENT:MT DEQ u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT DEQ MT DEQ u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlVIINATION PROJECT TITLE: Montana FormauJ SEP Page 1 of2 STATE: MT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA000643 NT43199 GF0-Q043199-OO1 Based on my review ofthe inrormation concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation

185

GRR/Section 6-MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit 06MTBConstructionStormWaterPermit (7).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-5 [ARM 17.30.1101] Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTBConstructionStormWaterPermit (7).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana regulates water quality under Montana Code Annotated 75-5. The

186

GRR/Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations GRR/Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations 12MTAFloraFaunaConsiderations (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies Commercial Use Administrative Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12MTAFloraFaunaConsiderations (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart and the following content outlines the flora and fauna considerations that are specific to Montana and in addition to federal

187

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-318 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

188

GRR/Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview GRR/Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview 06MTDOtherOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTDOtherOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This overview is intended to direct the developer to additional construction permits. For projects intended near waterways, Montana also provides a joint

189

GRR/Section 3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities 3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities 03MTFRightOfWayEasementForUtilitiesProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana State Historic Preservation Office Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTFRightOfWayEasementForUtilitiesProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart is intended to describe the process for obtaining an

190

Adequacy of a Small Quantity Site RH-TRU Waste Program in Meeting Proposed WIPP Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The first remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste is expected to be permanently disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The first RH-TRU waste shipments are scheduled from the Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) to WIPP in order to facilitate compliance with BCL Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) milestones. Milestones requiring RH-TRU waste containerization and removal from the site by 2004 in order to meet a 2006 site closure goal, established by Congress in the Defense Facilities Closure Projects account, necessitated the establishment and implementation of a site-specific program to direct the packaging of BCLDP RH-TRU waste prior to the finalization of WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements. The program was designed to collect waste data, including audio and videotape records of waste packaging, such that upon completion of waste packaging, comprehensive data records exist from which compliance with final WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements can be demonstrated. With the BCLDP data records generated to date and the development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) of preliminary documents proposing the WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization program, it is possible to evaluate the adequacy of the BCLDP program with respect to meeting proposed characterization objectives. The BCLDP characterization program uses primarily acceptable knowledge (AK) and visual examination (VE) during waste packaging to characterize RH-TRU waste. These methods are used to estimate physical waste parameters, including weight percentages of metals, cellulosics, plastics, and rubber in the waste, and to determine the absence of prohibited items, including free liquids. AK combined with computer modeling is used to estimate radiological waste parameters, including total activity on a waste container basis, for the majority of BCLDP RH-TRU waste. AK combined with direct analysis is used to characterize radiological parameters for the small populations of the RH-TRU waste generated by the BCLDP. All characterization based on AK is verified. Per its design for comprehensive waste data collection, the BCLDP characterization program using AK and waste packaging procedures, including VE during packaging, meets the proposed WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization objectives. The conservative program design implemented generates certification data that will be adequate to meet any additional program requirements that may be imposed by the CBFO.

Biedscheid, J.; Stahl, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Peters, K.; Eide, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

Catalytic Partial oxidation of n-Tetradecane Using Pyrochlores: Effect of Rh and Sr Substitution  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of transportation fuels into synthesis gas (H2 + CO) for fuel cells is complicated by the large quantities of aromatics and sulfur-containing compounds commonly found in these fuels. Traditional supported metal catalysts are easily poisoned by these species which adsorb strongly onto the electron-rich metal clusters. The use of noble metal and/or oxide based catalyst systems may offer higher activity and stability, but only if the metal can be bound into a thermally stable structure. To that end, Rh metal was substituted into the structure of a lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlore to give La2RhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j,) (LRZ) to produce a strongly bound, well-dispersed metal which is active for CPOX. A second catalyst was prepared in which Sr was substituted for a portion of La in the LRZ structure, producing La(2#2;x)SrxRhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j) (LSRZ). Each of these pyrochlore catalysts, including the unsubstituted LZ, were characterized and screened for activity in the CPOX of ntetradecane (TD), which is a surrogate for linear paraffins typical of diesel fuel. Results were compared to a commercial Rh/g-Al2O3 catalyst. X-ray diffraction patterns of both the LZ and LRZ showed that each had the cubic unit-cell pyrochlore structure. However, substitution of Sr resulted in a binary perovskite-pyrochlore phase with a defect SrZrO3 phase. Hydrogen pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction studies confirmed that Rh metal was substituted into the structure of the LRZ and LSRZ, and was reducible. Activity screening with the CPOX of TD showed that the Rh substituted in both LRZ and LSRZ is able to retain activity-producing essentially equilibrium synthesis gas yields, as was the Rh/g-Al2O3. Temperature programmed oxidation experiments performed after the CPOX of TD demonstrated that the amount of carbon was quantitatively similar for each catalyst (roughly 0.3 gcarbon/gcatalyst after each run), with the exception of LSRZ, which had significantly less carbon (0.17 gcarbon/gcatalyst). It is speculated that improved oxygen ion mobility in the LSRZ material, which resulted from Sr substitution, was responsible for the reduction in carbon formation on the surface.

Haynes, D.J.; Berry, D.A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Spivey, J.J.

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Catalytic partial oxidation of n-tetradecane using pyrochlores: Effect of Rh and Sr substitution  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of transportation fuels into synthesis gas (H2 + CO) for fuel cells is complicated by the large quantities of aromatics and sulfur-containing compounds commonly found in these fuels. Traditional supported metal catalysts are easily poisoned by these species which adsorb strongly onto the electron-rich metal clusters. The use of noble metal and/or oxide based catalyst systems may offer higher activity and stability, but only if the metal can be bound into a thermally stable structure. To that end, Rh metal was substituted into the structure of a lanthanum zirconate (LZ) pyrochlore to give La2RhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j,) (LRZ) to produce a strongly bound, well-dispersed metal which is active for CPOX. A second catalyst was prepared in which Sr was substituted for a portion of La in the LRZ structure, producing La(2#2;x)SrxRhyZr(2#2;y)O(7-j) (LSRZ). Each of these pyrochlore catalysts, including the unsubstituted LZ, were characterized and screened for activity in the CPOX of ntetradecane (TD), which is a surrogate for linear paraffins typical of diesel fuel. Results were compared to a commercial Rh/g-Al2O3 catalyst. X-ray diffraction patterns of both the LZ and LRZ showed that each had the cubic unit-cell pyrochlore structure. However, substitution of Sr resulted in a binary perovskite-pyrochlore phase with a defect SrZrO3 phase. Hydrogen pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction studies confirmed that Rh metal was substituted into the structure of the LRZ and LSRZ, and was reducible. Activity screening with the CPOX of TD showed that the Rh substituted in both LRZ and LSRZ is able to retain activity-producing essentially equilibrium synthesis gas yields, as was the Rh/g-Al2O3. Temperature programmed oxidation experiments performed after the CPOX of TD demonstrated that the amount of carbon was quantitatively similar for each catalyst (roughly 0.3 gcarbon/gcatalyst after each run), with the exception of LSRZ, which had significantly less carbon (0.17 gcarbon/gcatalyst). It is speculated that improved oxygen ion mobility in the LSRZ material, which resulted from Sr substitution, was responsible for the reduction in carbon formation on the surface.

Haynes, D.; Berry, D.; Shekhawat, D.; Spivey, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Combination of Manually Digitized Radar and GOES IR for Real-Time Display of Rainfall Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manually Digitized Radar (MDR) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) thermal infrared (IR) data were merged to form a higher-resolution radar/IR product than that represented by the MDR. The combination MDR/IR maps were ...

Paul H. Heinemann; J. David Martsolf; John F. Gerber; Daniel L. Smith

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Comparison of Infrared Light Emitting Diodes (IR-LED) versus Infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Characteristics of a typical IR LED analogous to the typeLight Emitting Diodes (IR-LED) versus Infrared Helium-Neon (light emitting diode (IR-LED) to quantitatively measure fuel

Girard, James W.; Bogin, Gregory E; Mack, John Hunter; Chen, J-Y; Dibble, Rober W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

MT_GEQ_Handbook_July2009.doc MUSIC EDUCATION AND MUSIC THERAPY (MEMT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MT_GEQ_Handbook_July2009.doc MUSIC EDUCATION AND MUSIC THERAPY (MEMT) Music Therapy Graduate Equivalency Program Handbook Music Therapy Graduate Equivalency Program Individuals who hold baccalaureate in Music Therapy planning outline. This handbook is designed to supplement the information in the KU

Peterson, Blake R.

196

PyMT: a post-WIMP multi-touch user interface toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-touch and tabletop input paradigms open novel doors for post-WIMP (Windows, Icons, Menus, Pointer) user interfaces. Developing these novel interfaces and applications poses unique challenges for designers and programmers alike. We present PyMT ... Keywords: GUI, Python, UI toolkits, graphics, multi-touch, open source, post-WIMP, user interfaces

Thomas E. Hansen; Juan Pablo Hourcade; Mathieu Virbel; Sharath Patali; Tiago Serra

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Low dose ionizing radiation (IR) signaling regulation in vivo...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies from our lab indicated that human cells exposed to low doses of IR caused growth stimulation, speeding cells up in their cell cycle division (i.e., checkpoint regulation),...

198

US-LHC IR magnet error analysis and compensation  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the impact of the insertion-region (IR) magnet field errors on LHC collision performance. Compensation schemes including magnet orientation optimization, body-end compensation, tuning shims, and local nonlinear correction are shown to be highly effective.

Wei, J.; Ptitsin, V.; Pilat, F.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gelfand, N.; Wan, W.; Holt, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ir-based alloys for ultra-high temperature applications ...  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to Ir-based alloys for ultra-high temperature applications - Energy Innovation Portalto someone by E-mail

200

Synthetic IR Scene Simulation of Air-borne Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR scenes of high fidelity are needed to support the development and testing of various target detection and tracking techniques. It is impractical to test detection and tracking algorithms under all conceivable conditions. Therefore, to test the effectiveness of detection and tracking algorithms under variety of scenarios, synthetic IR scenes are generated. For air-borne targets, the presence of clouds plays an important role, since they affect most IR sensors. We propose, a mod- ification of original Gardner's Method [3], in order to generate clouds of richer spectral content. We also ex- plore an algorithm based on self-similarity [5] for cloud texture generation. Synthetic IR cloud images generated by our scene simulation software are radiometrically accurate and have typical cloud texture variations. We use Modtran J.O for radiometric calculation and VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) for scene rendering.

Shankar T. More; Avinash A. Pandit; Avinash A. P; S. N. Merchant; U. B. Desai

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To promote economic growth in tribal communities, Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published new guidance on July 18, 2012, allocating Tribal...

202

Design of high efficiency Mid IR QCL lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed research is a study of designing high-efficiency Mid-IR quantum cascade lasers (QCL). This thesis explores "injector-less" designs for achieving lower voltage defects and improving wall plug efficiencies through ...

Hsu, Allen Long

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To promote economic growth in tribal communities, Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published new guidance on July 18, 2012, allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs). The TEDB program was established under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, and provides Tribes with the authority to issue tax-exempt debt for a wider range of activities to spur job creation and promote economic growth in Indian country. Providing Tribes with the ability to issue tax-exempt debt for a broader scope of activities similar to that available to states and local governments lowers

204

Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste - General Presentation Modular Hot Cell Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Murray Paul Murray Oak Ridge, TN July 29, 2009 Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste- GENERAL PRESENTATION MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AREVA Worldwide Nuclear Lifecycle Transmission & Distribution Renewable Energy AREVA US Nuclear Fuel Services Nuclear Engineering Services AREVA Federal Services, LLC. (AFS) Federal Services Major Projects * MOX-MFFF * Yucca Mountain Project * DUF6 * Plateau Remediation Contract * Washington River Closure Project * SRS Liquid Waste AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AFS Technology Provider

205

Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

Johnson, Charles C. (Fairfield, OH); Taylor, Larry T. (Blacksburg, VA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

207

Vež?jo geležinkeliais civilin? atsakomyb? pagal CITIF CIM taisykles ir SMGS susitarim?, panašumai ir skirtumai.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??COTIF CIM ir SMGS reglamentuoja tarptautin? krovini? vežim? geležinkeliais tarp valstybi? nari?, kurios yra ši? susitarim? šalys nar?s. Kadangi abu teis?s aktai dažnai koreliuoja, kai… (more)

Sušinskait?,; Nast?

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Mid- and Far-Infrared Reflection/Absorption Spectroscopy (IRAS) Studies of NO on Rh Single Crystal Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NO/CO reaction over Rh metal in automobile catalytic converters is critical to the control of emissions of these pollutant molecules. As part of a program to determine the elementary mechanism(s) of this reaction, we have been performing mid- and far-infrared reflection/absorption spectroscopic (IRAS) measurements of the adsorption and co-adsorption and co-adsorption of NO and CO on Rh single crystal surfaces. Of particular interest is the low-frequency range of the IRAS spectra where we hoped to observe features due to metal-N stretching and/or bending vibrational motions. In particular, we hoped to obtain information regarding the site-requirements for the dissociation of the NO molecule on various Rh single crystal surfaces. An important result from our earlier work is that the selectivity of the reaction for the two nitrogen-containing products, N2 and N2O, is a strong function of the Rh surface structure. On the basis of ancillary data, we suggested that the location of adsorbed NO and N-atoms (formed from dissociation of adsorbed NO) on various Rh surfaces could, perhaps account for the selectivity differences.

Peden, Charles HF; He, Ting; Pilling, M.; Hirschmugl, Carol J.; Gardner, P.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fast-neutron interaction with the fission product {sup 103}Rh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron total and differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of {sup 103}Rh are measured from {approximately} 0.7 to 4.5 MeV (totals) and from {approximately} 1.5 to 10 MeV (scattering) with sufficient detail to define the energy-averaged behavior of the neutron processes. Neutrons corresponding to excitations of groups of levels at 334 {plus_minus} 13, 536 {plus_minus} 10, 648 {plus_minus} 25, 796 {plus_minus} 20, 864 {plus_minus} 22, 1120 {plus_minus} 22, 1279 {plus_minus} 60, 1481 {plus_minus} 27 and 1683 {plus_minus} 39 keV were observed. Additional groups at 1840 {plus_minus} 79 and 1991 {plus_minus} 71 key were tentatively identified. Assuming the target is a collective nucleus reasonably approximated by a simple one-phonon vibrator, spherical-optical, dispersive-optical, and coupled-channels models were developed from the data base with attention to the parameterization of the large inelastic-scattering cross sections. The physical properties of these models are compared with theoretical predictions and the systematics of similar model parameterizations in this mass region. In particular, it is shown that the inelastic-scattering cross section of the {sup 103}Rh fission product is large at the relatively low energies of applied interest.

Smith, A.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Guenther, P.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

GRR/Section 17-MT-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 17-MT-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment 17MTAAestheticResourceAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-7-101 et seq The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 MCA 87-5-501 et seq Montana Stream Protection

211

Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic model for the potential distributions of north European tree species under present and future climates. Journal of Biogeography 23(2):203- 233. A bioclimatic model based on physiological constraints to plant growth and regeneration is used here in an empirical way to describe the present natural distributions of northern Europe's major trees. Bioclimatic variables were computed from monthly means of temperature, precipitation and sunshine (%) interpolated to a 10' grid taking into account elevation. Minimum values of mean coldest-month temperature (T-c) and 'effective' growing degree days (GDD*) were fitted to species' range limits. GDD* is total annual growing degree days (GDD) minus GDD to budburst (GDD(o)). Each species was assigned to one of the

212

GRR/Section 3-MT-b - State Land Access | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - State Land Access b - State Land Access < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-b - State Land Access 03MTBStateLandAccess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana State Land Board Regulations & Policies Montana Code 77-4-101 et seq Geothermal Resources Natural Resources and Conservation Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTBStateLandAccess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 3-MT-b.1 - Application for Lease, Right-of-Way, or Easement

213

GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

214

GRR/Section 11-MT-a - State Cultural Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 11-MT-a - State Cultural Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-MT-a - State Cultural Considerations 11MTAStateCulturalConsiderations (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana State Historic Preservation Office Regulations & Policies MCA 22-3-421: Report of Discovery on State Land MCA 22-3-800: Human Skeletal Remains and Burial Site Protection Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

215

GRR/Section 3-MT-c - Encroachment Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 3-MT-c - Encroachment Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-c - Encroachment Overview 03MTCEncroachmentOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTCEncroachmentOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative There are several individual right of way or encroachment procedures in Montana. This overview is intended to lead the developer to the appropriate

216

GRR/Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act 09MTAMontanaEnvironmentalPolicyAct.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Environmental Quality Council Regulations & Policies Montana Environmental Policy Act National Environmental Policy Act ARM 36-2-521 et seq ARM 17-4-607 General Requirements for MFWP Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 09MTAMontanaEnvironmentalPolicyAct.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

217

Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towle, 1983) Towle, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The VLF method has proved useful in mapping the crater and central dome of Mount St. Helens. More detailed and extensive VLF investigations as well as other electrical and electromagnetic studies will be useful in determining the electrical structure of Mount St. Helens in more detail. Electrical and electromagnetic methods would be especially useful in determining the actual electrical conductivity of partial melt beneath the dome. The ability of these methods to determine the correlation of surface features

218

GRR/Section 11-MT-b - Human Remains Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Human Remains Process b - Human Remains Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-MT-b - Human Remains Process 11MTBHumanRemainsProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana State Historic Preservation Office Regulations & Policies MCA 22-3-805: Discovery of Human Remains or Burial Material Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11MTBHumanRemainsProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 11-MT-b.1 - Cease Operations and Contact County Coroner MCA 22-3-805: (1) A [developer] who by...construction, or other ground-disturbing

219

Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around {sup 192}Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate {sup 192}Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate ({approx}0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a {sup 192}Ir wire source.

Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 55, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF PROCESSING DATA FROM THE RH RU HG MATRIX STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of the statistical significance of Rh, Ru, and Hg on DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle catalytic hydrogen generation and process chemistry was conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a full-factorial experimental design. This test design can identify significant interactions between these three species in addition to individual effects. Statistical modeling of data from the Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study has been completed. Preliminary data and conclusions were given in an earlier report. This final report concludes the work on the Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study. Modeling results are summarized below. Rhodium was found to: Promote increased total hydrogen mass; Promote an increase in the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Promote an increase in the hydrogen generation rate shortly after acid addition; Shorten the elapsed time between acid addition and the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Increase formate loss; Inhibit NO{sub 2} and total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation; and Reduce nitrite-to-nitrate conversion. Ruthenium was found to: Promote increased total hydrogen mass; Promote an increase in the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Promote an increase in the hydrogen generation rate in the second half of the SRAT cycle; Promote an increase in total CO{sub 2} generated; Increase formate loss; Promote NO{sub 2} and total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation; and Reduce nitrite-to-nitrate conversion. Mercury was found to: Inhibit total hydrogen mass produced; Promote an increase in total CO{sub 2} generated; Promote NO{sub 2} off-gas species formation; and Inhibit total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation. Results confirmed qualitative observations that Rh was activating before Ru for hydrogen generation. An interaction between Rh and Ru was present in the model for the total hydrogen generated during the SRAT, perhaps because the total combined contributions from two separate episodes of hydrogen generation. The first episode was dominated by Rh and the second by Ru. Consequently, the linear statistical model was asked to explain more than one phenomenon and included more terms. Mercury did not significantly impact hydrogen generated by either Rh or Ru in models in this study (all tests had Hg {ge} 0.5 wt% in total solids), whereas tests in Sludge Batches 3 and 4 (SB3 and SB4) with and without Hg showed a very significant negative impact from adding Hg. The conclusion is that once a small quantity of Hg is present, the primary inhibiting effect of Hg is in place, and hydrogen generation is relatively insensitive to further increases in total Hg. Any secondary Hg effects were difficult to quantify and model. Mercury was found to be statistically significant, however, as an inhibiting factor for hydrogen generation when modeling was based on the logarithm of the hydrogen generation rate. Only limited statistical evidence was found for non-linearity and quadratic dependence of other SRAT process measures, such as formate loss or total NO{sub x} generation, on the three matrix variables. The interaction term for Ru with Hg, however, appeared in models for total CO{sub 2}, total NO{sub 2}, and total moles of nitrogen-derived off-gas species. A single interaction between Ru and Hg during nitrite destruction could explain all three of these effects in the observed responses. Catalytic decomposition of nitrite ion by formic acid produces CO{sub 2} plus either NO or N{sub 2}O. The vast majority of the NO produced is converted to NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub 2} is the major fraction of the total moles of nitrogen in the off-gas species. Future experimental work related to catalytic hydrogen generation control is expected with regard to minimizing formic acid use through alternative reductants as well as in pursuing mesoporous media for sequestering the catalytically active noble metals to inhibit catalytic hydrogen generation. Two alternative stoichiometric acid equations are also under development. A summary document is in draft form that provides an overview of progress made in understanding ca

Koopman, D

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Structural and heat-flow implications of infrared anomalies at Mt. Hood, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Surface thermal features occur in an area of 9700 m/sup 2/ at Mt. Hood, on the basis of an aerial line-scan survey made April 26, 1973. The distribution of the thermal areas below the summit of Mt. Hood, shown on planimetrically corrected maps at 1 : 12,000, suggests structural control by a fracture system and brecciated zone peripheral to a hornblende-dacite plug dome (Crater Rock), and by a concentric fracture system that may have been associated with development of the present crater. The extent and inferred temperature of the thermal areas permits a preliminary estimate of a heat discharge of 10 megawatts, by analogy with similar fumarole and thermal fields of Mt. Baker, Washington. This figure includes a heat loss of 4 megawatts (MW) via conduction, diffusion, evaporation, and radiation to the atmosphere, and a somewhat less certain loss of 6 MW via fumarolic mass transfer of vapor and advective heat loss from runoff and ice melt. The first part of the estimate is based on two-point models for differential radiant exitance and differential flux via conduction, diffusion, evaporation, and radiation from heat balance of the ground surface. Alternate methods for estimating volcanogenic geothermal flux that assume a quasi-steady state heat flow also yield estimates in the 5-11 MW range. Heat loss equivalent to cooling of the dacite plug dome is judged to be insufficient to account for the heat flux at the fumarole fields.

Friedman, J.D.; Frank, D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues 19MTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies MCA Title 85 Water Use MCA 77-4-108 Water Rights in Connection with Geothermal Development MCA 85-2-307 MCA 85-2-308 MCA 85-2-309 MCA 85-2-310 MCA 85-2-311 MCA 85-2-313 MCA 85-2-315 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19MTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

223

ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study 2010.12.06 - 2010.12.13 Lead Scientist : Kyle Leesman For data sets, see below. Description During December 2010, a prototype LWIR cloud camera system was deployed at the Southern Great Plains Guest Instrument Facility (SGP-GIF). The system consisted of a microbolometer camera (~7-15 ìm) to capture sky imagery, a blackbody calibration source, and a GPS receiver used to estimate atmospheric column water vapor and constrain atmospheric compensation. The camera system collected calibrated sky radiance images co-incident with the SGP Central Facility with the goal of quantitatively assessing its ability

224

An Estimate of the Chemical and Radiative Perturbation of Stratospheric Ozone Following the Eruption of Mt. Pinatubo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work a numerical assessment is attempted of trace species interactions with aerosols injected in the stratosphere by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. A photochemical two-dimensional model is used for this purpose, with heterogeneous chemical ...

G. Pitari; V. Rizi

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Quantitative Analysis of Mt. St. Helens Ash by X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative study by x-ray diffraction, optical polarizing microscopy, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry of fallout and ambient ash from three Mt. St. Helens eruptions has revealed a consistent picture of the mineralogical and elemental ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Dana T. Griffen; William Revell Phillips; Robert K. Stevens; David Maughan

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

An assessment of regional climate trends and changes to the Mt. Jaya glaciers of Irian Jaya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past century, glaciers throughout the tropics have predominately retreated. These small glaciers, which respond quickly to climate changes, are becoming increasingly important in understanding glacier-climate interactions. The glaciers on Mt. Jaya in Irian Jaya, Indonesia are the last remaining tropical glaciers in the Western Pacific region. Although considerable research exists investigating the climatic factors most affecting tropical glacier mass balance, extensive research on the Mt. Jaya glaciers has been lacking since the early 1970s. Using IKONOS satellite images, the ice extents of the Mt. Jaya glaciers in 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 were mapped. The mapping indicates that the recessional trend which began in the mid-19th century has continued. Between 1972 (Allison, 1974; Allison and Peterson, 1976) and 2000, the glaciers lost approximately 67.6% of their area, representing a reduction in surface ice area from 7.2 km2 to 2.35 km2. From 2000 to 2005, the glaciers lost an additional 0.54 km2, representing approximately 24% of the 2000 area. Rates of ice loss, calculated from area measurements for the Mt. Jaya glaciers in 1942, 1972, 1987, and 2005, indicate that ice loss on Mt. Jaya has increased during each subsequent period. Preliminary modeling, using 600 hPa atmospheric temperature, specific humidity, wind speeds, surface precipitation, and radiation values, acquired from the NCEP Reanalysis dataset, indicates that the only climate variable having a statistically-significant change with a magnitude great enough to strongly affect ice loss on these glaciers was an increase in the mean monthly atmospheric temperature of 0.24�°C between 1972 and 1987. However, accelerated ice loss occurring from 1988-2005 without large observed changes in the weather variables indicates that a more complex explanation may be required. Small, though statistically-significant changes were found in regional precipitation, with precipitation decreasing from 1972-1987 and increasing from 1988-2005. While, individually, these changes were not of sufficient magnitude to have greatly affected ice loss on these glaciers, increased precipitation along with a rising freezing level may have resulted in a greater proportion of the glacier surface being affected by rain. This may account for the increased recession rate observed in the latter period.

Kincaid, Joni L.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ETME 422 -REFRIGERATION & HVAC SYSTEMS FALL 2011 LEC -10:00 -10:50am M W F RH 312  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10/31/2011 ETME 422 - REFRIGERATION & HVAC SYSTEMS FALL 2011 LEC - 10:00 - 10:50am M W F RH 312 Catalog Description ETME 422 PRINCIPLES OF HVAC I F 3 cr. LEC 3 PREREQUISITE: EMEC 320 or EGEN 324. -- Refrigeration and heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) for comfort and industrial applications

Dyer, Bill

228

Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon supports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon synthesis other than grain fermentation, e.g. from syngas, because syngas can be conveniently manufactured we first undertake a brief overview of the catalyst development for syngas conversion to C2

Bao, Xinhe

229

Spatially Resolved Observations of the Galactic Center Source, IRS 21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present diffraction-limited 2-25 micron images obtained with the W. M. Keck 10-m telescopes that spatially resolve the cool source, IRS 21, one of a small group of enigmatic objects in the central parsec of our Galaxy that have eluded classification. Modeled as a Gaussian, the azimuthally-averaged intensity profile of IRS 21 has a half-width half-maximum (HWHM) size of 650+/-80 AU at 2.2 microns and an average HWHM size of 1600+/-200 AU at mid-infrared wavelengths. These large apparent sizes imply an extended distribution of dust. The mid-infrared color map indicates that IRS 21 is a self-luminous source rather than an externally heated dust clump as originally suggested. The spectral energy distribution has distinct near- and mid-infrared components. A simple radiative transfer code, which simultaneously fits the near- and mid- infrared photometry and intensity profiles, supports a model in which the near-infrared radiation is scattered and extincted light from an embedded central source, while the mid-infrared emission is from thermally re-radiating silicate dust. We argue that IRS 21 (and by analogy the other luminous sources along the Northern Arm) is a massive star experiencing rapid mass loss and plowing through the Northern Arm, thereby generating a bow shock, which is spatially resolved in our observations.

A. Tanner; A. M. Ghez; M. Morris; E. E. Becklin; A. Cotera; M. Ressler; M. Werner; P. Wizinowich

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

MID-IR FORCAST/SOFIA OBSERVATIONS OF M82  

SciTech Connect

We present 75'' Multiplication-Sign 75'' size maps of M82 at 6.4 {mu}m, 6.6 {mu}m, 7.7 {mu}m, 31.5 {mu}m, and 37.1 {mu}m with a resolution of {approx}4'' that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60'' ({approx}1 kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5'' west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4'' east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 {mu}m data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best-fitting templates have extinctions of A{sub V} = 18 and A{sub V} = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 {mu}m and 37 {mu}m measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }.

Nikola, T.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D.; Gull, G. E.; Henderson, C. P.; Schoenwald, J.; Stacey, G. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Vacca, W. D.; De Buizer, J. M. [Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Keller, L. D. [Department of Physics, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Tielens, A. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, Leiden, 2300 RA (Netherlands)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ir Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE I.: ~ CONTRACT NO. DE-AC04-83AL18796 1. Vicinity Property i: Completion Report i , . Remedial Actions , cContractor 4,. -~'~ ~for the Uranium Mill Tailings ~~~z ~ Remedial Actions Project - MK-FEROUSON COMPANY *C~Ad PEE *CMIWN>tfIOW VICINITY PROPERTY COMPLETION REPORT AT CA-401 MAYERS STREET BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 JUNE 30, 1987 FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT OFFICE ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE, NM BY MK-FERGUSON CC IPANY AND CHEM-NUCLEAR SYSTEMS, INC. MK-Ferguson Company has been granted authorization to perform remedial action under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604. Remedial action was done in accordance to the EPA Standards for

232

IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Influence of collisions on coherent IR multiphoton absorption in thiophosgene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absolute changes due to IR pumping in the intergrated rotational population of the vibrationless level (000000) of thiophosgene have been measured under beam conditions and bulb conditions (1--1000 mTorr). Under collisionless conditions, large decreases are observed which reflect depopulation of all rotational states at a single CO/sub 2/ laser frequency. At higher thiophosgene pressure, less depopulation occurs; zero depopulation of the vibrationless level is observed at pressure > or = 300 mTorr within experimental uncertainty (> gas kinetic.

Brenner, D.M.; Spencer, M.; Steinfeld, J.I.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

MT2-reconstructed invisible momenta as spin analizers, and an application to top polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Full event reconstruction is known to be challenging in cases with more than one undetected final-state particle, such as pair production of two states each decaying semi-invisibly. On the other hand, full event reconstruction would allow to access angular distributions sensitive to the spin fractions of the decaying particles, thereby dissecting their production mechanism. We explore this possibility in the case of Standard-Model t-tbar production followed by a leptonic decay of both W bosons, implying two undetected final-state neutrinos. We estimate the t and tbar momentum vectors event by event using information extracted from the kinematic variable MT2. The faithfulness of the estimated momenta to the true momenta is then tested in observables sensitive to top polarization and t-tbar spin correlations. Our method thereby provides a novel approach towards the evaluation of these observables, and towards testing t-tbar production beyond the level of the total cross section. While our discussion is confined to t-tbar production as a benchmark, the method is applicable to any process whose decay topology allows to construct MT2.

Diego Guadagnoli; Chan Beom Park

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

235

Dust Tracking Using Composite Visible/IR Images: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible and infrared (IR) images from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer are composited to improve the depiction of airborne dust over coastlines. On IR images, wind-raised dust ...

Thomas F. Lee

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fabrication of [001]L1{sub 0}-FePtRh ferro-antiferromagnetic pattern by flat-patterning method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flat-patterning method that exploits the ferromagnetic (FM) - antiferromagnetic (AF) transition in [001]-oriented L1{sub 0} FePt{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x} films was investigated. FM-AF patterns with dot diameters between 15 and 1000 nm were fabricated by locally diffusing a small percentage of FePt atoms onto the FePt{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x} film. The geometric and magnetic properties of the patterns were analyzed in detail. Only the area whose composition crossed the FM-AF threshold underwent a magnetic phase change to the FM phase. FM dots with single-domain structures were observed in the AF matrix in the range of 15-100 nm by magnetic force microscopy.

Hasegawa, T.; Tomioka, T.; Ishio, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata Gakuen-machi, Akita (Japan); Kondo, Y.; Yamane, H. [Akita Industrial Technology Center (AIT), 4-11 Sanuki Araya, Akita (Japan)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

Smith, R.J.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Quantitative Vapor-phase IR Intensities and DFT Computations to Predict Absolute IR Spectra based on Molecular Structure: I. Alkanes  

SciTech Connect

Recently recorded quantitative IR spectra of a variety of gas-phase alkanes are shown to have integrated intensities in both the C-H stretching and C-H bending regions that depend linearly on the molecular size, i.e. the number of C-H bonds. This result is well predicted from CH4 to C15H32 by DFT computations of IR spectra at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of DFT theory. A simple model predicting the absolute IR band intensities of alkanes based only on structural formula is proposed: For the C-H stretching band near 2930 cm-1 this is given by (in km/mol): CH¬_str = (34±3)*CH – (41±60) where CH is number of C-H bonds in the alkane. The linearity is explained in terms of coordinated motion of methylene groups rather than the summed intensities of autonomous -CH2- units. The effect of alkyl chain length on the intensity of a C-H bending mode is explored and interpreted in terms of conformer distribution. The relative intensity contribution of a methyl mode compared to the total C-H stretch intensity is shown to be linear in the number of terminal methyl groups in the alkane, and can be used to predict quantitative spectra a priori based on structure alone.

Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Yavelak, Veronica; Oats, R. P.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Band or Polaron: The Hole Conduction Mechanism in the p-Type Spinel Rh 2ZnO4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Given the emerging role of oxide spinels as hole conductors, we discuss in this article the traditional vs. new methodologies of determining the type of conduction mechanism at play - localized polaronic vs. band-like transport. Applying (i) traditional small polaron analysis to our in-situ high temperature four-point conductivity and thermopower measurements, we previously found an activated mobility, which is indicative of the small polaron mechanism. However, (ii) employing the recent developments in correcting density functional methodologies for hole localization, we predict that the self-trapped hole is unstable and that Rh{sub 2}ZnO{sub 4} is instead a band conductor with a large effective mass. The hole mobility measured by high-field room temperature Hall effect also suggests band rather than polaron conduction. The apparent contradiction between the conclusion of the traditional procedure (i) and first-principles theory (ii) is resolved by taking into account in the previous transport analysis the temperature dependence of the effective density of states, which leads to the result that the mobility is actually temperature-independent in Rh{sub 2}ZnO{sub 4}. Our case study on Rh{sub 2}ZnO{sub 4} illustrates the range of experimental and theoretical approaches at hand to determine whether the transport mechanism of a semiconductor is band or small polaron conduction.

Nagaraja, A. R.; Perry, N. H.; Mason, T. O.; Tang, Y.; Grayson, M.; Paudel, T. R.; Lany, S.; Zunger, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mt. Hood geothermal exploratory drilling and testing plan. Old Maid Flat holes No. 1 and No. 7A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This plan has been prepared to establish the objectives and set forth the procedures and guidelines for conducting geothermal exploratory drilling and testing operations in the Old Maid Flat area of Mt. Hood, Oregon, approximately 50 miles east of Portland. The project will be conducted on lands within the Mt. Hood National Forest, which are currently under Federal Lease OR 13994 to the Northwest Geothermal Corporation. The exploratory geothermal operations will consist of (1) testing an existing 4,000-foot temperature gradient hole to determine the quality of geothermal fluids, and (2) drilling and testing a new 5,000-foot hole to determine overall geothermal reservoir characteristics.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Role of Al on the Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Absorption/Desorption by Some Ternary Pd-M-Al Alloys where M=Rh, Ni, Pt, Cr, Ag.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solution of hydrogen and hydride formation in FCC substitutional solid solution Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys have been examined. In contrast to some other Pd ternary alloys, a linear relation does not obtain between the H capacity and x for the Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys investigated here where the H capacity of the alloys is estimated from the H content of the steeply rising part of the isotherms in the hydride phase regions. A linear increase of the dilute phase H solubility with x for these Pd0.9Rh0.1-xAlx alloys does, however, obtain for these alloys. Although Pd-Rh binary alloys have broader plateaux than does Pd itself, small amounts of Al substituted into Pd0.85Rh0.15 or Pd0.80Rh0.20 alloys can reduce or eliminate the two phase regions, the plateaux; there is, however, not much effect on the dilute phase solubilities. For example, small amounts of Al substituted into the Pd0.85Rh0.15 or Pd0.80Rh0.20 alloys eliminate the plateaux. On the other hand, alloying Pd with Al to form binary alloys with Xal equals 0.015 or 0.030 does not eliminate the plateaux which are present in these binary alloys up to Xal equals 0.075 (298 K). Small amounts of Al substitution do not have such a dramatic effect on the plateau widths of the Pd0.90Ni0.10 and Pd0.80Ni0.20 alloys and similarly substitution of Al into Pd-Cr and Pd-Ag alloys does not introduce any anomalous effects into the isotherms.

Shanahan, K.L.

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

GRR/Section 17-MT-c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310 c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310 Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310 Permit) 17MTCNaturalStreambedAndLandPreservationAct310Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Local Conservation District Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-7-101 et seq The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTCNaturalStreambedAndLandPreservationAct310Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

245

GRR/Section 17-MT-d - Streamside Management Zone Law | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Streamside Management Zone Law d - Streamside Management Zone Law < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-d - Streamside Management Zone Law 17MTDStreamsideManagementZoneLawProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTDStreamsideManagementZoneLawProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Any landowner or operator conducting a series of commercial forest practices that will access, harvest, or regenerate trees on a defined land

246

GRR/Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use License Process d - Land Use License Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Surface Management Rule 36.25.103 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The land use license is intended to be used for short-term use of state-owned lands. This license may be used for casual use of the lands

247

GRR/Section 11-MT-c - Cultural Resource Discovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c - Cultural Resource Discovery c - Cultural Resource Discovery < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-MT-c - Cultural Resource Discovery 11MTCCulturalResourceDiscoveryProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana State Historic Preservation Office Regulations & Policies 36 CFR 800.16: NHPA Definitions MCA 22-3-421: Montana Antiquities Definitions MCA 22-3-429: Consultation, Notice, Appeal MCA 22-3-430: Mitigation MCA 22-3-435: Report of Discovery ARM 36.2.801-813: Antiquities Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11MTCCulturalResourceDiscoveryProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

248

Traffic Management Command, ATTN: MT-INFF, 5611 Columbia Pike, Falls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

/ 'Vol 52,-No. 212. !/- Tuesday; November 3, -1987 1 Notices.- . / 'Vol 52,-No. 212. !/- Tuesday; November 3, -1987 1 Notices.- . . and responsibility of that company. This is not intented to prevent a carrier from interchanging equipment to allow for the through movement of traffic. Master- leases which do not meet the requirements of a long-term lease or that depend on other documentation and/or subleases to be complete are viewed as trip-leases. DATE: Comments must be received on or before 1 January 1988. ADDRESS: Comments should be addressed to: Headquarters, Military Traffic Management Command, ATTN: MT-INFF, 5611 Columbia Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041-5050. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Ms. Patricia McCormick, HQMTMC 5611 Columbia Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041- 5050, (202] 756-1887. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Master- leases which do not conform to the

249

Resource appraisal of the Mt. Shasta Wilderness Study area, Siskiyou County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of geological, geochemical, and aeromagnetic surveys indicate that the only potentially extractable resource of Mt. Shasta may be geothermal energy, but the potential within the Wilderness Study Area is low. Some sulfur and gypsum occur locally around active and extinct fumaroles near the summit but are too small to indicate a resource. Cinder deposits have been mined near the Wilderness Study Area, but almost none are exposed within it. The levels of trace-metal anomalies relative to background values and the amounts of exposed mineralized rock are too small to indicate economic potential. It is concluded that any significant potential for future geothermal development is more likely to exist on and near the lower slopes of the volcano, generally outside the study area. (JGB)

Christiansen, R.L.; Kleinhampl, F.J.; Blakely, R.J.; Tuchek, E.T.; Johnson, F.L.; Conyac, M.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Analyses of Nuclear ldhA Gene and mtDNA Control Region Sequences of Atlantic Northern Bluen Tuna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyses of Nuclear ldhA Gene and mtDNA Control Region Sequences of Atlantic Northern Blue®n Tuna: There has been considerable debate about whether the Atlantic northern blue®n tuna exist as a single®n tuna from the Mediterranean Sea and the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Pairwise comparisons of multiple

Ely, Bert

251

Pattern recognition of volcanic tremor data on Mt. Etna (Italy) with KKAnalysis-A software program for unsupervised classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous seismic monitoring plays a key role in the surveillance of the Mt. Etna volcano. Besides earthquakes, which often herald eruptive episodes, the persistent background signal, known as volcanic tremor, provides important information on the volcano ... Keywords: Cluster analysis, Fuzzy C-means, K-means, Self-organizing map, Volcano monitoring, Volcano seismology

A. Messina; H. Langer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

OPEN MIDPLANE DIPOLE DESIGN FOR LHC IR UPGRADE.  

SciTech Connect

The proposed luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), now under construction, will bring a large increase in the number of secondary particles from p-p collisions at the interaction point (IP). Energy deposition will be so large that the lifetime and quench performance of interaction region (IR) magnets may be significantly reduced if conventional designs are used. Moreover, the cryogenic capacity of the LHC will have to be significantly increased as the energy deposition load on the interaction region (IR) magnets by itself will exhaust the present capacity. We propose an alternate open midplane dipole design concept for the dipole-first optics that mitigates these issues. The proposed design takes advantage of the fact that most of the energy is deposited in the midplane region. The coil midplane region is kept free of superconductor, support structure and other material. Initial energy deposition calculations show that the increase in temperature remains within the quench tolerance of the superconducting coils. In addition, most of the energy is deposited in a relatively warm region where the heat removal is economical. We present the basic concept and preliminary design that includes several innovations.

GUPTA,R.; ANERELLA,M.; HARRISON,M.; SCHMALZLE,J.; MOKHOV,N.

2004-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

High Resolution FIR and IR Spectroscopy of Methanol Isotopologues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New astronomical facilities such as HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, the SOFIA airborne IR telescope and the ALMA sub-mm telescope array will yield spectra from interstellar and protostellar sources with vastly increased sensitivity and frequency coverage. This creates the need for major enhancements to laboratory databases for the more prominent interstellar 'weed' species in order to model and account for their lines in observed spectra in the search for new and more exotic interstellar molecular 'flowers'. With its large-amplitude internal torsional motion, methanol has particularly rich spectra throughout the FIR and IR regions and, being very widely distributed throughout the galaxy, is perhaps the most notorious interstellar weed. Thus, we have recorded new spectra for a variety of methanol isotopic species on the high-resolution FTIR spectrometer on the CLS FIR beamline. The aim is to extend quantum number coverage of the data, improve our understanding of the energy level structure, and provide the astronomical community with better databases and models of the spectral patterns with greater predictive power for a range of astrophysical conditions.

Lees, R. M.; Xu, Li-Hong [Centre for Laser, Atomic and Molecular Studies (CLAMS), University of New Brunswick, 100 Tucker Park Road, Saint John, NB E2L 4L5 (Canada); Appadoo, D. R. T.; Billinghurst, B. [Canadian Light Source, Univ. of Saskatchewan, 101 Perimeter Rd, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada)

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

IR differential-absorption lidars for ecological monitoring of the environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of studies on lidar sensing of the environment by the method of IR differential absorption is presented. The differential-absorption method is described and its various applications are considered. A comparison of this method with other methods of lidar sensing showed that a differential-absorption lidar successfully supplements a Raman lidar. The basic parameters are presented for IR lidars fabricated recently by various research groups. The outlook for the IR lidar sensing of the atmosphere is discussed. (review)

Vasil'ev, B I [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mannoun, Oussama [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Temperature Profile of IR Blocking Windows Used in Cryogenic X-Ray Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

Cryogenic high-resolution X-ray spectrometers are typically operated with thin IR blocking windows to reduce radiative heating of the detector while allowing good x-ray transmission. We have estimated the temperature profile of these IR blocking windows under typical operating conditions. We show that the temperature in the center of the window is raised due to radiation from the higher temperature stages. This can increase the infrared photon flux onto the detector, thereby increasing the IR noise and decreasing the cryostat hold time. The increased window temperature constrains the maximum window size and the number of windows required. We discuss the consequences for IR blocking window design.

Friedrich, S.; Funk, T.; Drury, O.; Labov, S.E.

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

Implied Dynamic Feedback of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated Cloud Fields D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman,...

257

EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio November 5-7, 2013 DAY 1 - Tuesday, November 5, 2013 8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Cate Alexander, EM SSAB Designated Federal Officer Will Henderson, Chair, Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board William Murphie, Manager, Portsmouth Paducah Project Office, DOE-EM 8:20 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Overview of Meeting Eric Roberts, Facilitator 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. EM Program Update Alice Williams, Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management 9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m. Round Robin (Chairs' Site Reports) 5 minutes each 10:20 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Recognition of Departing Chairs 10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. - 12:00

258

Chemical Weathering of New Pyroclastic Deposits from Mt. Merapi (Java), Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Java Island, Indonesia with abundant amount of pyroclastic deposits is located in the very active and dynamic Pacific Ring of Fires. Studying the geochemical weathering indices of these pyroclastic deposits is important to get a clear picture about weathering profiles on deposits resulting from the eruption of Mt. Merapi. Immediately after the first phase of the eruption (March to June 2006), moist and leached pyroclastic deposits were collected. These pyroclastic deposits were found to be composed of volcanic glass, plagioclase feldspar in various proportions, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, olivine, amphibole, and titanomagnetite. Total elemental composition of the bulk samples (including trace elements and heavy metals) were determined by wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses. Weathering of the pyroclastic deposits was studied using various weathering indices. The Ruxton ratio, weathering index of Parker, Vought resudual index and chemical index of weathering of moist pyroclastic are lower than the leached sample but the alteration indices (chemical and plagioclase) are slightly higher in the moist compared to the leached pyroclastic deposits.

Fiantis, Dian; Nelson, Malik; Van Ranst, Eric; Shamshudin, Josup; Qafoku, Nikolla

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Location of hydrogen adsorbed on Rh(111) studied by low-energy electron diffraction and nuclear reaction analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structures of clean and hydrogen-adsorbed Rh(111) surfaces were investigated by dynamical low-energy electron-diffraction (LEED) analysis. Exposure of D{sub 2} induced no additional LEED patterns except for (1x1). Surface-layer relaxation occurs vertically on both clean and D-saturated surfaces. On the clean surface, the interlayer distance between the first and second layers (d{sub 12}) is smaller by 1.2({+-}0.6)% than the corresponding bulk distance of 2.194 A. On the other hand, the contraction of d{sub 12} is removed on the D-saturated surface. Detailed LEED analysis demonstrates that the D atoms are adsorbed on the fcc threefold hollow sites. The absolute saturation coverage of H on Rh(111) was determined to be 0.84 ML by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Moreover, the zero-point vibrational energy of H was derived from the analysis of the NRA resonance profile, which is discussed in comparison with the results of high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy.

Fukuoka, Masayuki; Okada, Michio; Matsumoto, Masuaki; Ogura, Shouhei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043, Japan and PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 156-8505, Japan and CREST-JST, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 156-8505 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Structural controls, alteration, permeability and thermal regime of Dixie Valley from new-generation MT/galvanic array profiling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State-of-the-art MT array measurements in contiguous bipole deployments across the Dixie Valley thermal area have been integrated with regional MT transect data and other evidence to address several basic geothermal goals. These include 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single rangefront fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2), delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as indicated by low resistivity; 3), infer ultimate heat and fluid sources for the thermal area; and 4), from a generic technique standpoint, investigate the capability of well-sampled electrical data for resolving subsurface structure. Three dense lines cross the Senator Fumaroles area, the Cottonwood Creek and main producing area, and the low-permeability region through the section 10-15 area, and have stand-alone MT soundings appended at one or both ends for local background control. Regularized 2-D inversion implies that shallow pediment basement rocks extend for a considerable distance (1-2 km) southeastward from the topographic scarp of the Stillwater Range under all three dense profiles, but especially for the Senator Fumaroles line. This result is similar to gravity interpretations in the area, but with the intrinsic depth resolution possible from EM wave propagation. Low resistivity zones flank the interpreted main offsetting fault especially toward the north end of the field which may be due to alteration from geothermal fluid outflow and upflow. The appended MT soundings help to substantiate a deep, subvertical conductor intersecting the base of Dixie Valley from the middle crust, which appears to be a hydrothermal conduit feeding from deep crustal magmatic underplating. This may supply at least part of the high temperature fluids and explain enhanced He-3 levels in those fluids.

Philip E. Wannamaker

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wall-following method for an autonomous mobile robot using two IR sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a local navigation method for mobile robot, based on sensorial information given by two IR sensors. These types of sensors are simple and relatively low-cost sensing modalities to perform navigation tasks in environments with obstacles ... Keywords: IR sensors, behaviors, mobile robot, obstacles avoidance, wall-following

I. Gavrilut; V. Tiponut; A. Gacsadi; L. Tepelea

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Towards a Benchmark and Automatic Calibration for IR-Based Concept Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a great deal of research into the use of Information Retrieval (IR)-based techniques to support concept location in source code. Much of this research has been focused on determining how to use various IR techniques to support concept ... Keywords: concept location, data model, software change reenactment, information retrieval, parameter calibration, benchmark

Scott David Ohlemacher; Andrian Marcus

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Evaluation of Methods to Correct for IR Loss in Eppley PSP Diffuse Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this report. Several methods of correcting for IR loss are examined. First subtracting out the average nighttime offset during the day is tested. Next an extrapolation between early morning and late evening offsets is tested. This should help eliminate the IR offset in both the morning and evening hours

Oregon, University of

265

Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature-principles anharmonic calculations are carried out for the IR and Raman spectra of the CAH stretch- ing bands in butane.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction n-Butane is of great importance in several disciplines

Potma, Eric Olaf

266

In situ X-ray diffraction study of thin film Ir/Si solid state reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solid state reaction between a thin (30nm) Ir film and different Si substrates (p-type Si(100), n- and p-type Si(111), silicon on insulator (SOI) and polycrystalline Si) was studied using a combination of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ ... Keywords: Ir, NiSi, Si, XRD

W. Knaepen; J. Demeulemeester; D. Deduytsche; J. L. Jordan-Sweet; A. Vantomme; R. L. Van Meirhaeghe; C. Detavernier; C. Lavoie

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

268

Jeanne Wright, RN, BSN, MT, CCRP, CIM, RAC, SoCRA Research Analyst Lead, University of Michigan, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jeanne Wright, RN, BSN, MT, CCRP, CIM, RAC, SoCRA Research Analyst Lead, University of Michigan&D. CERTIFICATIONS Regulatory Affairs Certification (2012) National Association of IRB Managers (CIM), 2009

Eustice, Ryan

269

Structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of TaB{sub 2}, TaB, IrB{sub 2}, and IrB: First-principle calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First-principle calculations were performed to investigate the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of TaB{sub 2}, TaB, IrB{sub 2}, and IrB. The calculated equilibrium structural parameters, shear modulus, and Young's modulus of TaB{sub 2} are well consistent with the available experimental data, and TaB{sub 2} with P6/mmm space group has stronger directional bonding between ions than WB{sub 2}, OsB{sub 2}, IrN{sub 2}, and PtN{sub 2}. For TaB{sub 2}, the hexagonal P6/mmm structure is more stable than the orthorhombic Pmmn one, while for IrB{sub 2} the orthorhombic Pmmn structure is the most stable one. The high shear modulus of P6/mmm phase TaB{sub 2} is mainly due to the strong covalent pi-bonding of B-hexagon in the (0001) plane. Such a B-hexagon network can strongly resist against an applied [112-bar0] (0001) shear deformation. Correlation between the hardness and the elastic constants of TaB{sub 2} was discussed. The band structure shows that P6/mmm phase TaB{sub 2} and Pmmn phase IrB{sub 2} are both metallic. The calculations show that both TaB and IrB are elastically stable with the hexagonal P6{sub 3}/mmc structure. - Elastic constant c{sub 44} of TaB{sub 2} is calculated to be 235 GPa. This value is exceptionally high, exceeding those of WB{sub 2}, OsB{sub 2}, WB{sub 4}, OsN{sub 2}, IrN{sub 2}, and PtN{sub 2}.

Zhao Wenjie [Institute for Computational Materials Science, School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Wang Yuanxu, E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.c [Institute for Computational Materials Science, School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Tank waste consolidation analysis for transfer of ORNL RH-TRU tank sludges to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate the schedule and technical issues associated with consolidation of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs). This work supports the DOE Transuranic Waste (TRU) Program plans for private sector treatment of all ORNL TRU sludges for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Transfer of these sludges must be completed in FY 2000 to meet the required schedule for beginning shipment of treated sludges to the WIPP by 2002. This study was performed to (1) evaluate the sludge transfer schedule, (2) evaluate the ability of existing tank systems to contain and manage the sludges and liquids generated during the transfers, and (3) evaluate the costs and schedules of different solid/liquid separation and solids-monitoring methods used during sludge transfer for management of sluice waters.

Kent, T.E.; DePaoli, S.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Complete nucleotide sequences of the domestic cat (Felis catus) mitochondrial genome and a transposed mtDNA tandem repeat (Numt) in the nuclear genome  

SciTech Connect

The complete 17,009-bp mitochondrial genome of the domestic cat, Felis catus, has been sequenced and conforms largely to the typical organization of previously characterized mammalian mtDNAs. Codon usage and base composition also followed canonical vertebrate patterns, except for an unusual ATC (non-AUG) codon initiating the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) gene. Two distinct repetitive motifs at opposite ends of the control region contribute to the relatively large size (1559 bp) of this carnivore mtDNA. Alignment of the feline mtDNA genome to a homologous 7946-bp nuclear mtDNA tandem repeat DNA sequence in the cat, Numt, indicates simple repeat motifs associated with insertion/deletion mutations. Overall DNA sequence divergence between Numt and cytoplasmic mtDNA sequence was only 5.1%. Substitutions predominate at the third codon position of homologous feline protein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial gene sequences confirms the recent transfer of the cytoplasmic mtDNA sequences to the domestic cat nucleus and recapitulates evolutionary relationships between mammal species. 86 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lopez, J.V.; Cevario, S.; O`Brien, S.J. [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States)

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

An infrared study of galactic OH/IR stars. I. An optical/near-IR atlas of the Arecibo sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present optical and near-infrared finding charts, accurate astrometry (~1") and single-epoch near-infrared photometry for 371 IRAS sources, 96% of those included in the so-called Arecibo sample of OH/IR stars (Eder et al. 1988; Lewis et al. 1990a; Chengalur et al. 1993). The main photometric properties of the stars in the sample are presented and discussed as well as the problems found during the process of identification of the optical/near-infrared counterparts. In addition, we also identify suitable reference stars in each field to be used for differential photometry purposes in the future. We find that 39% of the sources (144 in number) have no optical counterpart, 8 of them being invisible even at near infrared wavelengths. The relative distribution of sources with and without optical counterpart in the IRAS two-colour diagram and their characteristic near infrared colours are interpreted as the consequence of the increasing thickness of their circumstellar shells. Among the objects not ...

Jiménez-Esteban, F M; Engels, D; García-Lario, P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mid-IR properties of Seyferts: Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of the IRAS 12micron Seyfert sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed an analysis of the mid-infared properties of the 12micron Seyfert sample, a complete unbiased 12micron flux limited sample of local Seyfert galaxies selected from the IRAS Faint Source Catalog, based on low resolution spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on-board Spitzer Space Telescope. A detailed presentation of this analysis is dicussed in Wu et al. (2009). We find that on average, the 15-30micron slope of the continuum is -0.85+/-0.61 for Seyfert 1s and -1.53+/-0.84 for Seyfert 2s, and there is substantial scatter in each type. Moreover, nearly 32% of Seyfert 1s, and 9% of Seyfert 2s, display a peak in the mid-infrared spectrum at 20micron, which is attributed to an additional hot dust component. The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) equivalent width decreases with increasing dust temperature, as indicated by the global infrared color of the host galaxies. However, no statistical difference in PAH equivalent width is detected between the two Seyfert types, 1 and 2, of the...

Charmandaris, V; Huang, J; Spinoglio, L; Tommasin, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Looking to the future: using IR interferometry to study microquasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrared interferometry is currently in a rapid development phase, with new instrumentation soon achieving milliarcsecond spatial resolutions for faint sources and astrometry on the order of 10 microarcseconds. For jet studies in particular, the next generation of instruments will bring us closer to the event horizon of supermassive black holes such as Sgr A*, and the region where jet launching must occur. But a new possibility to study microquasars in general and jet physics in particular may also arise, using techniques similar to those employed for finding faint exoplanets around stars. The compact, steady jets observed in the hard state of X-ray binaries display a flat/inverted spectrum from the lower radio wavelengths up through at least the far-IR band. Somewhere above this band, a turnover is predicted where the jets become optically thin, revealing a power-law spectrum. This break may have been observed directly in GX339-4, but in most sources such a feature is likely hidden under bright emission from the stellar companion or accretion disk components. Detecting the exact location of this break would provide a new constraint on our models of jet physics, since the break frequency is dependent on the total power, as well as internal density and magnetic field. Furthermore, knowing the break location combined with the spectral index of the power-law would help constrain the amount of synchrotron emission contributed by the jets to the X-ray bands. Along with a summary of some potential observations requiring less optimal instrumental specifications, I will discuss a technique which may enable us to discern the jet break, and the chances of success based on theoretical models applied to some potential target sources.

Sera Markoff

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

276

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has submitted a planned change request to use shielded containers for emplacement of selected remote-handled (RH) transuranic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shielded containers for emplacement of selected remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste streams, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM. DOE. 2007. First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Shipment arrives for transportation and handling and will prevent releases under the most severe accident conditions. The design

277

Assessment of coal and graphite electrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electroplated carbon fiber electrodes with noble metals (Pt, Rh, Pt-Rh, Pt-Ir, and Pt-Ir-Rh) are evaluated on a sandwich configuration coal electrolytic cell (CEC) for the… (more)

Sathe, Nilesh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

COMPARISON OF OFF-LINE IR BUMP AND ACTION-ANGLE KICK MINIMIZATION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction region bump (IR bump) nonlinear correction method has been used for the sextupole and octupole field error on-line corrections in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) . Some differences were found for the sextupole and octupole corrector strengths between the on-line IR bump correction and the predictions from the action-angle kick minimization. In this article, we compare the corrector strengths from these two methods based on the RHIC Blue ring lattice with the IR nonlinear modeling. The comparison confirms the differences between resulting corrector strengths. And the reason for the differences is found and discussed.

LUO, Y.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

80 BOOK REVIEWS What are the uses of this book? Those who design and implement IR systems and wish to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

80 BOOK REVIEWS What are the uses of this book? Those who design and implement IR systems and wish find the book useful, especially those who teach about IR algorithms and coding. In all, this is a well-written book that describes how to build IR systems, with a strong focus on compression methods. But its

280

IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors  

SciTech Connect

In this letter, we describe the fabrication of an array of bimaterial detectors for infrared (IR) imaging that utilize SiO2 as a structural material. All the substrate material underneath the active area of each detector element was removed. Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four photolithographic steps with no wet etching or sacrificial layers. The thermomechanical deflection sensitivity was 7.9 10-3 rad/K which corresponds to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture IR images while operating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and no need for vacuum packaging. The average measured NETD of our IR detector system was approximately 200 mK but some sensing elements exhibited an NETD of 50 mK.

Grbovic, Dragoslav [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

282

Unifying disc-jet behaviour in X-ray binaries: an optical/IR approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron emission from jets produced by X-ray binaries can be detected at optical and infrared (IR) frequencies. I show that optical/IR colour-magnitude diagrams of the outbursts of nine X-ray binaries successfully separate thermal disc emission from non-thermal jet emission, in both black hole and neutron star sources. A heated single-temperature blackbody is able to reproduce the observed relations between colour and magnitude, except when excursions are made to a redder colour than expected, which is due to jet emission. The general picture that is developed is then incorporated into the unified picture of disc-jet behaviour in black hole X-ray binaries. At a given position of a source in the X-ray hardness-intensity diagram, the radio, IR and optical properties can be inferred. Similarly, it is possible to predict the X-ray and radio luminosities and spectral states from optical/IR monitoring.

David M. Russell; Dipankar Maitra; Rob P. Fender; Fraser Lewis

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

Sullivan, Peter William

284

Ingersoll Rand I-R PowerWorks 70 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ingersoll Rand I-R PowerWorks 70 Jump to: navigation, search Manufacturer Ingersoll Rand Technology Type Microturbine Engine Type Inverter Power Output 70 kW0.07 MW 70,000 W...

285

Sen?jimo ?taka ekstrakcinio pushidra?io fosfogipso ir jo gamini? savyb?ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Baigiamajame magistro darbe nagrin?jamas k? tik nuo atliek? šalinimo konvejerio nuimtas, neatv?s?s ir nesusihidratav?s ekstrakcinis pushidratis fosfogipsas. Tai pati gausiausia mineralin? atlieka, kurios s?vartynai spar?iai… (more)

Parfionov,; Sergej

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy to study protein conformational dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature-jump (T-jump) two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) is developed, characterized, and applied to the study of protein folding and association. In solution, protein conformational changes span a wide range ...

Jones, Kevin C. (Kevin Chapman)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Inexpensive Near-IR Sun Photometer for Measuring Total Column Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive two-channel near-IR sun photometer for measuring total atmospheric column water vapor (precipitable water) has been developed for use by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) environmental science ...

David R. Brooks; Forrest M. Mims III; Richard Roettger

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Experimental Verification of the Linear Relationship between IR Extinction and Liquid Water Content of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IR extinction of clouds has been measured with a CO2 laster transmissometer (? = 10.6 ?m). Using an established linear relationship (based on the Chýlek approximation to the Mie theory) between extinction and liquid water content, the liquid ...

Alan W. Gertler; Roger L. Steele

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Applications of IR Thermography in Capturing Thermal Transients and Other High-Speed Thermal Events  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-speed, snap-shot mode, and the external triggering capability of an IR camera allows thermal transients to be captured. These advanced features were used to capture thermal transients during electrical breakdown of ZnO varistors and to freeze the rotation of an automobile disk brake in order to study thermoplastic instability in the braking system. The IR camera also showed the thermoplastic effect during cyclic fatigue testing of a glass matrix composite.

Dinwiddie, R.B.; Graham, S.; Wang, H.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Selective Production of H2 from Ethanol at Low Temperatures over Rh/ZrO2-CeO2 Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of Rh catalysts on various supports have been applied to H2 production from the bio-ethanol steam reforming reaction. Support plays a very important role on product selectivity at low temperatures (below 450°C). Acidic or basic supports favor ethanol dehydration, while ethanol dehydrogenation is favored over neutral supports at low temperatures. Among the catalysts evaluated in this study, the Rh/Ce-ZrO2 catalyst exhibited the highest H2 yield at 450 °C, which is possibly due to the high oxygen storage capacity of Ce-ZrO2 resulting in efficient transfer of mobile oxygen species from the H2O molecule to the reaction intermediate.

Roh, Hyun-Seog; Wang, Yong; King, David L.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Reactive Oxide Overlayer on Rh Nanoparticles during CO Oxidation and Its Size Dependence Studied by in Situ Ambient Pressure XPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CO oxidation is one of the most studied heterogeneous reactions, being scientifically and industrially important, particularly for removal of CO from exhaust streams and preferential oxidation for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. The precious metals Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, and Au are most commonly used for this reaction because of their high activity and stability. Despite the wealth of experimental and theoretical data, it remains unclear what is the active surface for CO oxidation under catalytic conditions for these metals. In this communication, we utilize in situ synchrotron ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) to monitor the oxidation state at the surface of Rh nanoparticles during CO oxidation and demonstrate that the active catalyst is a surface oxide, the formation of which is dependent on particle size. The amount of oxide formed and the reaction rate both increase with decreasing particle size.

Grass, Michael E.; Zhang, Yawen; Butcher, Derek R.; Park, Jeong Y.; Li, Yimin; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Zhang, Tianfu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979. [Pt/Rh, Ni/Rh, Ni/Pt/Rh, Ni, Ni/Ru, Ni/Pt, Ni/Co  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twelve steam reforming catalysts were evaluated using an autothermal reforming screening unit. Duplicate tests were run with two samples to determine test variability. The samples tested contained either base metals, precious metals, or combinations of base and precious metals. The test was capable of distinguishing among samples where gross variations in composition are the main factor; for example, catalysts containing 2% by weight precious metals are more active than catalysts containing 15% by weight nickel. The results show a decrease in hydrocarbon breakthrough as the weight of nickel charged to the constant volume reactor increases. A commercial nickel catalyst, G90C, appears slightly better than some Engelhard prepared samples of equal nickel concentrations due to the higher density of G90C. Visual observation of the used catalysts show that samples containing only precious metals (Pt/Rh) did not coke during the run. The samples containing only base metals (nickel, cobalt) were coked and were magnetic. Samples containing 14.5% nickel by weight with 0.5% precious metals by weight added were not coked, were not magnetic, and had a blue colored core as compared to the black core of the virgin samples. Some speculation about deactivation mechanisms based on these observations are made.

Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S; Mayer, C P

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Thermodynamic Studies of [H2Rh(diphosphine)2]+ and [HRh(diphosphine)2(CH3CN)]2+ Complexes in Acetonitrile  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermodynamic studies of a series of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ and [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes have been carried out in acetonitrile. Seven different diphosphine (PP) ligands were selected to allow variation of the electronic properties of the ligand substituents, the cone angles, and the natural bite angles (NBAs). Oxidative addition of H2 to [Rh(PP)2]+ complexes is favored by diphosphine ligands with large NBAs, small cone angles, and electron donating substituents, with the NBA being the dominant factor. Large pKa values for [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes are favored by small ligand cone angles, small NBAs, and electron donating substituents with the cone angles playing a major role. The hydride donor abilities of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ complexes increase as the NBAs decrease, the cone angles decrease, and the electron donor abilities of the substituents increase. These results indicate that if solvent coordination is involved in hydride transfer or proton transfer reactions, the observed trends can be understood in terms of a combination of two different steric effects, NBAs and cone angles, and electron-donor effects of the ligand substituents.

Aaron D. Wilson; Alexander J. M. Miller; Daniel L. DuBois; Jay A. Labinger; John E. Bercaw

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Monodisperse rhodium (Rh) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as small as {approx}1 nm were synthesized within a fourth generation polyaminoamide (PAMAM) dendrimer, a hyperbranched polymer, in aqueous solution and immobilized by depositing onto a high-surface-area SBA-15 mesoporous support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the as-synthesized Rh and Pt nanoparticles were mostly oxidized. Catalytic activity of the SBA-15 supported Rh and Pt nanoparticles was studied with ethylene hydrogenation at 273 and 293 K in 10 torr of ethylene and 100 torr of H{sub 2} after reduction (76 torr of H{sub 2} mixed with 690 torr of He) at different temperatures. Catalysts were active without removing the dendrimer capping but reached their highest activity after hydrogen reduction at a moderate temperature (423 K). When treated at a higher temperature (473, 573, and 673 K) in hydrogen, catalytic activity decreased. By using the same treatment that led to maximum ethylene hydrogenation activity, catalytic activity was also evaluated for pyrrole hydrogenation.

Huang, Wenyu; Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Zhang, Yawen; Habas, Susan E.; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

296

Reactions of electrophiles with a metal-hydride complex. Reduction of CS{sub 2} by Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} to produce the bridging methanedithiolate complex Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})(SCH{sub 2}S)  

SciTech Connect

The title complex Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})(SCH{sub 2}S) (3) was prepared by the reaction of Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} with Cs{sub 2}. No reaction was observed with CO{sub 2} at ambient or elevated temperatures and pressures. Reaction with OCS gave the known compounds Cp*Rh(PMe{sub 3})(CO) (4) and Cp*Rh(CO){sub 2} (5) plus S{double_bond}PMe{sub 3}. Kinetic measurements show a first-order dependence on [CS{sub 2}] and a small dependence on solvent polarity. Activation parameters for the reaction with CS{sub 2} were also measured, consistent with an associative transition state. The molecular structure of 3 was determined by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. 3 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n with a = 8.594 (5) {Angstrom}, b = 21.546 (7) {Angstrom}, c = 9.050 (4) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 95.73 (4){degrees}, and Z = 4. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Jones, W.D.; Selmeczy, A.D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Low dose IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of the IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of the IGF-1-sCLU pro-survival expression axis: A bystander and adaptive survival mechanism in vivo David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Over the past few years our laboratory has elucidated the regulatory mechanisms governing the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) - secretory clusterin (sCLU) expression axis, which can be induced by >2 cGy in vivo and in vitro with the same dose-response kinetics. IGF-1-sCLU expression can be induced by (A) TGF-β1 and (B) IR, but is suppressed by the p53 and Klotho tumor suppressors. Interestingly, there is a substantial difference between the regulatory mechanisms of IGF-1-sCLU induction after TGF-β1 and IR exposures, where p53 suppresses IR responses but does not suppress after

298

The Spectral Energy Distribution of HH30 IRS: Constraining The Circumstellar Dust Size Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present spectral energy distribution (SED) models for the edge-on classical T Tauri star HH30 IRS that indicate dust grains have grown to larger than 50 microns within its circumstellar disk. The disk geometry and inclination are known from previous modeling of multiwavelength Hubble Space Telescope images and we use the SED to constrain the dust size distribution. Model spectra are shown for different circumstellar dust models: a standard ISM mixture and larger grain models. As compared to ISM grains, the larger dust grain models have a shallower wavelength dependent opacity. Models with the larger dust grains provide a good match to the currently available data, but mid and far-IR observations are required to more tightly constrain the dust size distribution. The accretion luminosity in our models is L_accdistributions that are simple power-law extensions (i.e., no exponential cutoff) yield acceptable fits to the optical/near-IR but too much emission at mm wavelengths and require larger disk masses. Such a simple size distribution would not be expected in an environment such as the disk of HH30 IRS, particularly over such a large range in grain sizes. However, its ability to adequately characterize the grain populations may be determined from more complete observational sampling of the SED in the mid to far-IR.

Kenneth Wood; Michael J. Wolff; J. E. Bjorkman; Barbara Whitney

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Structural and Electrocatalytic Properties of PtIrCo/C Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of an investigation of the synthesis of PtIrCo nanoparticles (2-3 nm) for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction. The carbon-supported PtIrCo catalysts (PtIrCo/C) were thermally treated at temperatures ranging from 400 to 900 C. The size, composition, and atomic-scale structures of the PtIrCo/C catalysts were characterized for establishing their correlation with the electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction. The specific activity was found to increase by a factor of 3-5 for the PtIrCo/C catalysts in comparison with Pt/C catalysts. A correlation was identified between the specific activity and the nanoparticle's fcc-type lattice parameter. The specific activity increases whereas the fcc-type lattice parameter decreases with the thermal treatment temperature. This correlation was further substantiated by analyzing the interatomic spatial parameters in the trimetallic nanoparticles based on X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic and high-energy XRD experiments. Implications of these findings, along with the durability of the catalysts, to the design of active electrocatalysts were also discussed.

Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Yin, Jun; Fang, Bin; Luo, Jin; Shao, Minhua; Protsailo, Lesia; Kawamura, Tetsuo; Chen, Yongsheng; Petkov, Valeri; Zhong, Chuan-Jian (CMU); (SUNY-Binghamton); (UTC Power); (Toyota); (Penn)

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

300

Application of scanning mid-IR-laser microscopy for characterization of semiconductor materials for photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scanning mid-IR-laser microscopy was previously demonstrated as an effective tool for characterization of different semiconductor crystals. Now the technique has been successfully applied for the investigation of CZ SixGe1-x -- a promising material for photovoltaics - and multicrystalline silicon for solar cells. In addition, this technique was shown to be appropriate for imaging of polishing-induced defects as well as such huge defects as "pin holes". Besides, previously unexplained "anomalous" (cubic power) dependence of signal of the scanning mid-IR-laser microscope in the optical-beam-induced light scattering mode on the photoexcitation power obtained for mechanically polished samples has now been attributed to the excess carrier scattering on charged linear defects, likely dislocation lines. The conclusion is made in the article that the scanning mid-IR-laser microscopy may serve as very effective tool for defect investigations in materials for modern photovoltaics.

Kalinushkin, V P; Yuryev, V A; 10.1016/S0927-0248(00)00076-3

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site exhibited less than Rayleigh magnitude. Remarking that this is a physical impossibility, the obvious conclusion forwarded by the authors was that there was some problem with the ARM SGP diffuse SW data. Shortly thereafter, the problem of infrared (IR) loss from thermopile-based single black detector

302

Microsoft Word - Responses for IRS Notices 2006-24, 25 May 5 2006.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

questions related to: questions related to: IRS Notice 2006-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, IRS Notice 2006-25, Qualifying Gasification Program May 5, 2006 DOE is answering questions related only to DOE certifications. Other questions should be directed to the IRS by calling Doug Kim or Kathy Reed at (202) 622-3110, or by faxing the questions to them at (202) 622-4779. 36. Independent Financial Analyst a. Will a duly licensed CPA or CPA firm, which is independent of the applicant under the profession's promulgated rules on independence, meet the definition of "Independent Financial Analyst"? If so, will they still be required to state, in the report, their qualifications and experience that establishes their competence to evaluate project financing?

303

Polynorbornene as a low loss matrix material for IR metamaterial applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel low loss photopatternable matrix materials for IR metamaterial applications were synthesized using the ring opening metathesis polymerization reaction (ROMP) of norbornene followed by a partial hydrogenation to remove most of the IR absorbing olefin groups which absorb in the 8-12 {micro}m range. Photopatterning was achieved via crosslinking of the remaining olefin groups with alpha, omega-dithiols via the thiol-ene coupling reaction. Since ROMP is a living polymerization the molecular weight of the polymer can be controlled simply by varying the ratio of catalyst to monomer. In order to determine the optimum photopattenable IR matrix material we varied the amount of olefin remaining after the partial hydrogenation. Hydrogenation was accomplished using tosyl hydrazide. The degree of hydrogenation can be controlled by altering the reaction time or reaction stoichiometry and the by-products can be easily removed during workup by precipitation into ethanol. Several polymers have been prepared using this reduction scheme including two polymers which had 54% and 68% olefin remaining. Free standing films (approx. 12 {micro}m) were prepared from the 68% olefin material using draw-down technique and subsequently irradiated with a UV lamp (365 nm) for thirty minutes to induce crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. After crosslinking, the olefin IR-absorption band disappeared and the Tg of the matrix material increased; both desirable properties for IR metamaterial applications. The polymer system has inherent photopatternable behavior primarily because of solubility differences between the pre-polymer and cross-linked matrix. Photopatterned structures using the 54% as well as the 68% olefin material were easily obtained. The synthesis, processing, and IR absorption data and the ramifications to dielectric metamaterials will be discussed.

Arrington, Christian Lew; Sinclair, Michael B.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Lee, Yun-Ju; Sanchez, Andrea E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Hines, Paul; Dirk, Shawn M.; Rasberry, Roger D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geothermal resource assessment of Mt. Hood volcano, Oregon, Phase I study. Technical progress report No. 2, October 1, 1977--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several phases of the Mt. Hood geothermal resource assessment project are nearing completion. Most of the field work has been completed for the geologic study, gravity survey, and water sampling portions of the project. Thermal modelling, water analyses, rock analyses and age dating, and preparation of a complete Bouguer gravity map are in progress.

Hull, D.A.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Search for the IR fixed point in the twisted Polyakov loop scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a non-perturbative study of the running coupling constant in the Twisted Polyakov Loop (TPL) scheme. We investigate how the systematic and statistical errors can be controlled {\\it via} a feasibility study in SU(3) pure Yang-Mills theory. We show that our method reproduces the perturbative determination of the running coupling in the UV. In addition, our numerical result agrees with the theoretical prediction of this coupling constant in the IR. We also present our preliminary results for $N_f=12$ QCD, where an IR fixed point may be present.

Erek Bilgici; Antonino Flachi; Etsuko Itou; Masafumi Kurachi; C. -J. David Lin; Hideo Matsufuru; Hiroshi Ohki; Tetsuya Onogi; Eigo Shintani; Takeshi Yamazaki

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Microsoft Word - SRS RH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24, 2009 For Immediate Release REMOTE-HANDLED TRU WASTE SHIPMENTS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ARRIVE SAFELY AT WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad...

307

Microsoft Word - ORNL RH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSURANIC WASTE SHIPMENT ARRIVES SAFELY AT WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT IN NEW MEXICO Energy Department meets regulatory milestone OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department...

308

Study and simulation of the infrared WLAN IrDA: an alternative to the radio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dramatic development of radio solutions for wireless communications tends to blur the wider use that can be made of infrared transmissions in a room, a workshop or even a building. For some local applications for which a wireless part often constitutes ... Keywords: Infrared, IrDA, Modelisation, OPNET, Protocols, Simulation, WLAN, WPAN, Wireless

Thierry Val; Fabrice Peyrard; Michel Misson

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS) is a Web-based tool to monitor “model minus observation” (M ? O) biases in clear-sky brightness temperatures (BTs) and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) produced by the Advanced Clear-...

Xingming Liang; Alexander Ignatov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dust in the polar region as a major contributor to the IR emission of AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) It is generally assumed that the distribution of dust on parsec scales forms a geometrically- and optically-thick entity in the equatorial plane around the accretion disk and broad-line region - dubbed "dust torus" - that emits the bulk of the sub-arcsecond-scale IR emission and gives rise to orientation-dependent obscuration. Here we report detailed interferometry observations of the unobscured (type 1) AGN in NGC 3783 that allow us to constrain the size, elongation, and direction of the mid-IR emission with high accuracy. The mid-IR emission is characterized by a strong elongation toward position angle PA -52 deg, closely aligned with the polar axis (PA -45 deg). We determine half-light radii along the major and minor axes at 12.5 {\\mu}m of (4.23 +/- 0.63) pc x (1.42 +/- 0.21) pc, which corresponds to intrinsically-scaled sizes of (69.4 +/- 10.8) rin x (23.3 +/- 3.5) rin for the inner dust radius of rin = 0.061 pc as inferred from near-IR reverberation mapping. This implies an axis ratio of 3:1, ...

Hoenig, Sebastian F; Tristram, Konrad R W; Prieto, M Almudena; Gandhi, Poshak; Asmus, Daniel; Antonucci, Robert; Burtscher, Leonard; Duschl, Wolfgang J; Weigelt, Gerd

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Combining the Best of Two Worlds: NLP and IR for Intranet Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural language processing (NLP) is becoming much more robust and applicable in realistic applications. One area in which NLP has still not been fully exploited is information retrieval (IR). In particular we are interested in search over intranets ... Keywords: natural language processing, information retrieval, dialogue, domain knowledge, visualization

Suma Adindla; Udo Kruschwitz

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Parameterizations for Water Vapor IR Radiative Transfer in Both the Middle and Lower Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor contributes a maximum of 1°C/day to the middle atmospheric thermal infrared (IR) cooling. This magnitude is small but not negligible. Because of the small amount of mass involved and the extremely narrow molecular absorption lines at ...

Ming-Dah Chou; William L. Ridgway; Michael M-H. Yan

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The magnetic and crystal structures of Sr2IrO4: A neutron diffraction study  

SciTech Connect

We report a single-crystal neutron diffraction study of the layered Sr2IrO4. This work unambigu- ously determines the magnetic and crystal structures, and reveals that the spin orientation rigidly tracks the staggered rotation of the IrO6 octahedra in Sr2IrO4. The long-range antiferromagnetic order has a canted spin configuration with an ordered moment of 0.208(3) B/Ir site within the basal plane; a detailed examination of the spin canting yields 0.202(3) and 0.049(2) B/site for the a-axis and the b-axis, respectively. It is intriguing that forbidden nuclear reflections of space group I41/acd are also observed in a wide temperature range from 4 K to 600 K, which suggests a reduced crystal structure symmetry. This neutron scattering work provides a direct, well-refined experimen- tal characterization of the magnetic and crystal structures that are crucial to the understanding of the unconventional magnetism existent in this unusual magnetic insulator.

Ye, Feng [ORNL; Chi, Songxue [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A [ORNL; Qi, Tongfei [University of Kentucky; Cao, Gang [University of Kentucky

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications  

SciTech Connect

GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Effects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the radiative and chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LLNL 2-D zonally averaged chemical-radiative transport model of the global atmosphere was used to study the effects of the June 15, 1991 eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo volcano on stratospheric processes. SAGE-11 time-dependent aerosol surface area density and optical extinction data were used as input into the model. By the winter solstice, 1991, a maximum change in column ozone was observed in the equatorial region of {minus}2% (with heterogeneous chemical reactions on sulfuric acid aerosols) and {minus}5.5% (including heterogeneous reactions plus radiative feedbacks). Maximum local ozone decreases of 12% were derived in the equatorial region, at 25 km, for winter solstice 1991. Column NO{sub 2} peaked ({minus}14%) at 30 S in October 1991. Local concentrations of NO{sub x}, Cl{sub x}, and HO{sub x}, in the lower stratosphere, were calculated to have changed between 30 S and 30 N by {minus}40%, +80%, and +60% respectively.

Kinnison, D.E.; Grant, K.E.; Connell, P.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1992-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

/sup 11/B study of spin dynamics in Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. [RE = Gd, Er  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been intense interest in re-entrance and coexistence in ternary rare earth magnetic superconductors of the form RE Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. Of particular interest in this investigation is the effect of the superconducting state on the RKKY (Yosida, 1957) coupling between RE ions. Since one expects the conduction electron spin susceptibility chi/sup e/(q) to be cut off for q < 1/xi in the superconducting state, a depression f the RKKY coupling should follow. Such an effect would both depress the magnetic ordering temperature and result in slower relaxation rates tau/sub m//sup -1/ for the RE moments in the superconducting state. This paper reports on the spin dynamics of the RE ions using the /sup 11/B nuclear magnetic relaxation rate T/sub 1//sup -1/ in dilute Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/ (RE = Gd and Er).

Kumagai, K.; Fradin, F.Y.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NIST IR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... clean, renewable, alternative energy-conversion equipment biofuels fuel cells grid ... If Institutes do not meet performance targets, their government ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

NIST IR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The technology focus areas that were most frequently quoted were: • sensors • energy devices/storage/renewable energy • nano/micro ...

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

NIST IR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... healthcare biomedical devices nanomedicine personalized ... vehicles water and water distribution ... Manufacturing Systems automation technologies ...

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NIST IR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... organic electronics printed electronics electro-optical devices energy clean, renewable, alternative energy-conversion equipment biofuels fuel cells ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sodium arsenite alters cell cycle and MTHFR, MT1/2, and c-Myc protein levels in MCF-7 cells  

SciTech Connect

There is limited available information on the effects of arsenic on enzymes participating in the folate cycle. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of sodium arsenite on the protein levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its further relationship with the expression MT1/2 and c-myc in MCF-7 cells. Arsenite treatment (0-10 muM) for 4 h decreased MTHFR levels in a concentration-dependent fashion without significant effects on DHFR. The effects on MTHFR were observed at arsenite concentrations not significantly affecting cell viability. We also observed an increase in S-phase recruitment at all concentrations probed. Lower concentrations (< 5 muM) induced cell proliferation, showing a high proportion of BrdU-stained cells, indicating a higher DNA synthesis rate. However, higher concentrations (>= 5 muM) or longer treatment periods induced apoptosis. Arsenite also induced dose-dependent increases in MT1/2 and c-Myc protein levels. The levels of MTHFR were inversely correlated to MT1/2 and c-Myc overexpression and increased S-phase recruitment. Our findings indicate that breast epithelial cells are responsive to arsenite and suggest that exposure may pose a risk for breast cancer. The reductions in MTHFR protein levels contribute to understand the mechanisms underlying the induction of genes influencing growth regulation, such as c-myc and MT1/2. However, further research is needed to ascertain if the effects here reported following short-time and high-dose exposure are relevant for human populations chronically exposed to low arsenic concentrations.

Ruiz-Ramos, Ruben [Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, INSP, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lopez-Carrillo, Lizbeth [Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, INSP, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Albores, Arnulfo [Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez-Ramirez, Raul U. [Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, INSP, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E., E-mail: mcebrian@cinvestav.m [Departamento de Toxicologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Microsoft Word - Responses for IRS Notices 2006 24 and 25 May 4 2006.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, 6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, IRS Notice 2006-25, Qualifying Gasification Program May 4, 2006 DOE is answering questions related only to DOE certifications. Other questions should be directed to the IRS by calling Doug Kim or Kathy Reed at (202) 622-3110, or by faxing the questions to them at (202) 622-4779. 21. Waste Coal. Is it correct that a low-cost anthracite culm (i.e., culm is defined as coal waste that consists of coal and rock with varying amounts of carbon material remaining after removal of a higher-quality saleable coal) qualifies for clean coal investment tax credits under sections 48A and 48B? Kindly assume that the producer procured the culm from a culm bank (i.e., ubiquitous piles or other depository of culm on

324

Improved ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data D. R. Doelling and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure the radiation budget components, broadband shortwave albedo and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), as accurately as possible. Measurement of OLR over the ARM surface sites has only been possible since the advent of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES; Wielicki et al. 1998) in 1998. Prior to

325

To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7, 19% 7, 19% To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§ Subject: Extrusion of Billets, Titus Metals, Inc., Waterloo, Iowa A grpup of ANL aqloyees consisting of LE. Walker and S. Matsas (MET), E. Leverens (SSE), I(. C.~Buffy'(SPM), and G. T. Lonergan (IRS), traveled to Waterloo, Iowa, on June 29 where they accomplished the extrusion of U308 billets into fuel plates for Argonaut. Prior to beginning the extrusion operation, the floor area around the press, run-out table, stretch straightener, and all accessible portions of the press were surveyed. No activity was detected. The floor area from the furnace (uhere the billets were heated) to the press was coveredwith a layer of vinyl approximately 48fl wide and topped

326

A link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia New York University School of Medicine Abstract Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) occurs as key developmental program but is also often activated during cancer progression. EMT is characterized by loss of epithelial cell polarity, loss of cell-cell contacts, and acquisition of mesenchymal markers and phenotypic traits that include increased cell motility1. Approximately 18% of breast cancers exhibit evidence of EMT. We have shown that the progeny of irradiated human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) undergo EMT when exposed to transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ). Additionally, recent publication from Weinberg and colleagues showed that induction of EMT through engineered expression of

327

About EffectiveŽ Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in "Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range V. N. Uzhegov, D. M. Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important factors affecting the radiation budget of the space - atmosphere - underlying surface system in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges. It is extremely important to take into account the contribution of this component into the extinction of solar radiation under cloudless sky conditions. Sometimes it is important to know not only the total value of the aerosol component of extinction, but also to have the possibility to estimate the "effective" height of

328

Search for supersymmetry in hadronic final states using $M_{T2}$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for supersymmetry or other new physics resulting in similar final states is presented using a data sample of 4.73 inverse femtobarns of pp collisions collected at sqrt(s)=7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Fully hadronic final states are selected based on the variable MT2, an extension of the transverse mass in events with two invisible particles. Two complementary studies are performed. The first targets the region of parameter space with medium to high squark and gluino masses, in which the signal can be separated from the standard model backgrounds by a tight requirement on MT2. The second is optimized to be sensitive to events with a light gluino and heavy squarks. In this case, the MT2 requirement is relaxed, but a higher jet multiplicity and at least one b-tagged jet are required. No significant excess of events over the standard model expectations is observed. Exclusion limits are derived for the parameter space of the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model, as...

Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Interacting Entropy-Corrected Holographic Dark Energy and IR Cut-Off Length  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider holographic dark energy model with corrected holographic energy density and show that this model may be equivalent to the modified Chaplygin gas model. Then we obtain relation between entropy corrected holographic dark energy model and scalar field models. We do these works by using choices of IR cut-off length proportional to the Hubble radius, the event horizon radius, the Ricci length, and the Granda-Oliveros length.

J. Sadeghi; B. Pourhassan; Z. Abbaspour Moghaddam

2013-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

First law of thermodynamics in IR modified Horava-Lifshitz gravity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the first law of thermodynamics in IR modified Horava-Lifshitz spacetime. Based on the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, we obtain the integral formula and the differential formula of the first law of thermodynamics for the Kehagias-Sfetsos black hole by treating {omega} as a new state parameter and redefining a mass that is just equal to M{sub ADM} obtained by Myung [32] if we take {alpha}=3{pi}/8.

Wang Mengjie; Jing Jiliang; Ding Chikun; Chen Songbai [Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China) and Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Role of dipolar correlations in the IR spectra of water and ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report simulated infrared spectra of deuterated water and ice using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with maximally localized Wannier functions. Experimental features are accurately reproduced within the harmonic approximation. By decomposing the lineshapes in terms of intra and intermolecular dipole correlation functions we find that short-range intermolecular dynamic charge fluctuations associated to hydrogen bonds are prominent over the entire spectral range. Our analysis reveals the origin of several spectral features and identifies network bending modes in the far IR range.

Wei Chen; Manu Sharma; Raffaele Resta; Giulia Galli; Roberto Car

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Light-Like Noncommutativity, Light-Front Quantization and New Light on UV/IR Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the problem of quantizing field theories on noncommutative Moyal spacetime with \\emph{light-like} noncommutativity. To tackle the issues arising from noncommuting and hence nonlocal time, we argue that for this case light-front quantization procedure should be employed. In this appropriate quantization scheme we perform the non-planar loop analysis for the light-like noncommutative field theories. One of the important and peculiar features of light-front quantization is that the UV cutoff of the light-cone Hamiltonian manifests itself as an IR cutoff for the light-cone momentum, $p^+$. Due to this feature, the naive results of covariant quantization for the light-like case allude to the absence of the UV/IR mixing in the light-front quantization. However, by a careful analysis of non-planar loop integrals we show that this is not the case and the UV/IR mixing persists. In addition, we argue in favour of the perturbative unitarity of light-like noncommutative field theories in the light-front quantization scheme.

M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari; A. Tureanu

2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Bimetallic IrNi Core Platinum Monolayer Shell Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We synthesized a low-Pt content electrocatalyst consisting of a Pt monolayer placed on carbon-supported thermally treated IrNi core-shell structured nanoparticles using galvanic displacement of a Cu monolayer deposited at underpotentials. The Pt mass activity of the Pt{sub ML}/IrNi/C electrocatalyst obtained in a scale-up synthesis is approximately 3 times higher than that of the commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. The electronic and geometrical effects of the IrNi substrate on the Pt monolayer result in its higher catalytic activity than that of Pt nanoparticles. The structure and composition of the core-shell nanoparticles were verified using transmission electron microscopy and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, while a potential cycling test was employed to confirm the stability of the electrocatalyst. Our experimental results, supported by the density functional calculations using a sphere-like model, demonstrate an effective way of using Pt that can resolve key problems of cathodic oxygen reduction hampering fuel cell commercialization.

Kuttiyiel K. A.; Sasaki, K.; Choi, Y.M.; Su, D.; Liu, P.; Adzic, R.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This came on the heels of a statement released earlier in the month by the UK's Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), saying in part, ...

335

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2010 ... “This report certainly played a key role in moving academic ... with the elite group of physicists and other scientists developing the atomic bomb.

336

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2009 ... Duranar Powder Coatings: PPG Industries, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Nanocrystal Solar Cells: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and ...

337

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2013 ... Ron earned a BSc and BEng (1944), a Master MetEng (1954), and a Doctor of Applied Science (1967) from the University of Melbourne.

338

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 28, 2012 ... Wettability and Interfacial Phenomena Between Metals and Ceramic/Refractory Materials:Submitted by Martin Pech-Canul. For a more ...

339

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 29, 2011... pyrometallurgical processing—viewed as inherently polluting—can ... to address air, land, and water pollution is part of that long-term dream.

340

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2011 ... Gary Gladysz, vice president of Technology for Trelleborg Offshore and a symposium organizer, said that deciding to pursue his Ph.D. under ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 9, 2009 ... A research team lead by Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, has confirmed that certain conditions necessary for superconductivity ...

342

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They also typically add copper, which retards the growth of algae, moss, and lichen. The Michigan team believes the stamp sand could prove an attractive ...

343

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Access “Scalable High-Power Redox Capacitors with Aligned Nanoforests of Crystalline MnO2 Nanorods by High Voltage Electrophoretic Deposition”.

344

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new form of clean coal technology reached an important milestone, with the successful operation of a research-scale combustion system at The Ohio State ...

345

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2010 ... Mailing Lists Rental ... “Over the past 25 years, the conference has covered many topics and, ... As in previous conferences, utility engineers and consultants ... Gabriel Ilevbare, Electric Power Institute, is the technical program ...

346

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 5, 2009 ... Materials for Nuclear Power .... All developed standards fulfill the requirements of the GRID computing, which largely ... To close gaps in the model chain, a further extension of microstructure simulation models is necessary.

347

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2009 ... Funding for the research was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program and the Office ...

348

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 12, 2010 ... Next-generation materials for renewable energy production and ... of recycling technologies are all materials research realms with recent ...

349

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 29, 2011 ... CHAMINI L. MENDIS National Institute for Materials Science, Japan JOM Advisor, Magnesium Committee The adoption of magnesium alloys in ...

350

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 19, 2013 ... These resources are free to all web users, so feel free to browse and download whatever you find useful. Development of the Materials ...

351

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 28, 2012... Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and advisor to the director on the Materials Genome ... Since the best way to experience a TMS Annual Meeting is to actually be ... 2013 All rights reserved.

352

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 21, 2013... radiation detection, thermal barrier, and tribological applications. ... reveal a prospect for the improvement and optimization of solar reflectors.

353

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 29, 2011 ... The question of where all of the additional electricity to power our vehicles ... The continuing high price of many metals in 2011 had a significant ...

354

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 18, 2013 ... You're going to make things very different when the price of oil goes ... deeply about how to increase the amount of electricity generated by ...

355

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2011 ... Request Meeting Information .... Could you share a few of the key points that you are planning to make? ... We already have a program called Advanced Technological ... Manufacturing Innovation; Electrical, Communications and Cyber ... Interdisciplinary Research Teams (MIRT) representing collaborative ...

356

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 20, 2013 ... This included limited resources and faculty availability, as well as limits on the number of courses that could be included in undergraduate ...

357

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2012... and yttrium are used in fluorescent light fixtures, while neodymium ... in electronic/electrical applications and in support radio and light bulbs, ...

358

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Met. Trans. Home .... as well as the environmental impacts and national security implications of that mix, and consider how they might leverage their research to ...

359

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 7, 2009 ... Through interviews with Harrie J. Stevens, director of the Center for Glass ... tensile stress, as well as manufacturing and tempering techniques.

360

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 24, 2013 ... Materials for Nuclear Power ... high temperature heat recovery; high temperature thermal storage; and use of domestically abundant ores.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 3, 2010 ... BRaDD covers data from alumina refineries around the world and has been developed as a comparative tool enabling identification of trends ...

362

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 30, 2012... National Laboratories, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Illinois-Chicago, ...

363

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key enabler that the MGI has identified in achieving this is a “materials innovation infrastructure.” The TMS Orlando Materials Innovation Principles was cited ...

364

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2010 ... On S3226, which supports the development of an offshore wind power industry on the Great Lakes, Herderick commented, “you can tell that a ...

365

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 10/16/2009. Gossan Resources Limited, headquartered in Manitoba, Canada, announced October 1 that Phase II bench scale testing has confirmed ...

366

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation ... Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Electronic Structure Theory of Stability and ...

367

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2009 ... For most homeowners, the technology is expensive and cumbersome ... generally cost 30 to 40 percent less than current solar energy systems.

368

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 30, 2009 ... Experiment Quantifies Consumer Benefits of “Deep Energy Retrofit” ... home owners willing to have their houses undergo a “deep energy retrofit” ... structures that use the latest in energy-efficient materials and technologies.

369

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 23, 2011... Science Foundation's Industry & University Cooperative Research Program, ... for portable electronics, as well as hybrid and electric vehicles.

370

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 19, 2013 ... Energy security, resource sustainability, environmental issues, and aging infrastructure are just a few of the challenges facing 21st century ...

371

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

“However, the ideas intuitively make economic and 'energy saving' sense. Approaches such as the use of more efficient grinding equipment and limiting the  ...

372

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 31, 2013 ... During its five operational years, Roadrunner, part of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's Advanced Simulation and Computing ...

373

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2010 ... The process used in drilling Marcellus shale—also known as “fracking”—entails pumping millions of gallons of water and chemicals deep ...

374

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 3, 2010 ... A Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) could likewise establish national goals and coordinate actions across agencies. It could also identify the ...

375

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 9, 2012 ... You are not signed in | Login here | New User? ... TMS Energy ... that will reduce dependence on non-renewable resources and improve the ...

376

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 23, 2012 ... A postulated failure mode consisting of a pinhole leak in a heat exchanger tube raises safety concerns because of autoignition of the working ...

377

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 3, 2009 ... Materials at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez: The Surge .... Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering professor and principal ...

378

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2009 ... ALEXANDRA CINTRÓN-APONTE, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO AT ... "Grain Refinement of Pure Al and Al-Si Alloy by Applying Electric ...

379

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials for Nuclear Power ... Posted on: 10/04/2011 ... scientific workforce and accelerating the transition from research to new products, processes and services, ... MS&T 2011 is organized as a partnership the American Ceramic Society, the ...

380

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 18, 2010 ... Materials for Nuclear Power ... The 1297 Magna Carta represents the transition from a brokered agreement to ... often called “America's Birth Certificate” because it is the first world map to label ... The Archives will display the Magna Carta until early 2011 while plans for the new encasement are developed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2010 ... This efficiency is more than five times greater than that of traditional ... offers better color rendering properties than is typically found in CFLs.

382

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... zeolite, dubbed SBN, captured enough medium source methane to turn it to high purity methane, which in turn could be used to generate efficient electricity.

383

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2011 ... It definitely left an impression that we thought funding for research was important enough to merit taking a trip to DC, especially getting toward ...

384

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 23, 2013... the survey, with three-quarters saying they would participate in open data sharing if encouraged as a term/condition of funding or publication.

385

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 23, 2012... successful technology implementation, Smith will present examples highlighting efforts in sustainability, composite materials, and lighting.

386

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 3, 2009 ... Reported Scientific American on January 14, “There was less talk of biofuels and almost no talk of hydrogen than in previous years, with the ...

387

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2011 ... The U.S. Department of Energy Office (DOE) of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is seeking applicants for a postdoctoral ...

388

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations will focus on searching for signs of the Higgs boson, a previously undetected particle thought to generate mass. Scientists will also probe the ...

389

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 3, 2008 ... CERN scientists are confident, however, that the LHC will be up and running next year to resume its search for the Higgs boson particle and ...

390

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrohydrolysis, recycling of lixiviants, and water conservation will also be explored, as well as the potential use of chloride technology for the development of ...

391

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In fact, the 21st century presents a range of challenges arising from every aspect of life from providing food, water, and energy to realizing livable cities; ...

392

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2012 ... Materials for Nuclear Power .... He commented that today's culture for managing science, in many instances, ... geologist with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. ... Our work was supported by assessment from various components of the corporation, so funding was secure.

393

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 31, 2009 ... Rube Goldberg and his creations became so popular that he has his own Webster's Dictionary definition: “A comically involved, complicated ...

394

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 23, 2012 ... “We thought the particle size would be too small to effectively capture,” said Prentice. “Not only can we capture the powder, we've also worked ...

395

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 19, 2010 ... Despite time limitations and a steep learning curve, Diedrich feels fortunate that she has found a hobby that meshes her artistic talents with her ...

396

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2013 ... The authors of this article—and organizers of ICME 2013—are Mei Li, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI; Carelyn Campbell, NIST, ...

397

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2010... are taught such as thermodynamics (e.g., HSC® Chemistry and its flow sheeting capability), mass and heat transfer, fluid flow, materials, and, ...

398

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 2, 2009 ... The AFDC is managed by NREL and sponsored by the Clean Cities Initiative, a government-industry partnership sponsored by DOE's Vehicle ...

399

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explores the potential of wind, solar, geothermal, solar-thermal, hydroelectric, and other renewable energy sources. Also presents likely deployment timelines,  ...

400

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2012 ... The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced seven new projects on August 13 that support the development of lighter and stronger ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 11, 2012 ... The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will invest up to $120 million over five years to launch a new Energy Innovation Hub, focused on ...

402

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanical engineer who later became interested in materials science and biology, Suresh has done pioneering work studying the biomechanics of blood ...

403

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 19, 2010... 3–4 were formed, and the students studied the basic facts, wrote essays, ... of rigorous analysis, active engagement, and creative synthesis.

404

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 26, 2012 ... ASME and ASCE have been collaborating on the salary survey report for the last five years. The firm enetrix, a division of Gallup Inc., prepared ...

405

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 30, 2012 ... Materials for Nuclear Power ... with companies and activities in several relevant areas of the industry (e.g., coal, gas, nuclear, solar, wind).

406

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Qatalum is a joint venture company equally owned by Qatar Petroleum and Hydro ... Headquartered in Oslo, Hydro is a Fortune Global 500 supplier of aluminum ...

407

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... expertise of five industrial companies, three research centers, and four universities from the United Kingdom, Sweden, France, Switzerland, Greece, and Spain ...

408

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 15, 2009 ... Combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, which capture and reuse waste heat from electric or mechanical power, account for about nine ...

409

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 3, 2009... an anti-reflective coating that facilitates the efficient conversion of solar ... the region to weather the current economic downturn far better than ...

410

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 23, 2012 ... Also discussed will be the rapid development of shale oil production, along with changes in global refining capacity (and coking capacity).

411

Interstitial BiO molecule as a center of broadband IR luminescence in bismuth-doped silica glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR luminescence and absorption in bismuth-doped silica glass-core fibers observed recently (see [arXiv:1106.2969v1 [physics.optics]) are argued to be caused by transitions in interstitial BiO molecules

Sokolov, V O; Dianov, E M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Scanning mid-IR-laser microscopy: an efficient tool for materials studies in silicon-based photonics and photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of scanning mid-IR-laser microscopy has recently been proposed for the investigation of large-scale electrically and recombination-active defects in semiconductors and non-destructive inspection of semiconductor materials and structures in the industries of microelectronics and photovoltaics. The basis for this development was laid with a wide cycle of investigations on low-angle mid-IR-light scattering in semiconductors. The essence of the technical idea was to apply the dark-field method for spatial filtering of the scattered light in the scanning mid-IR-laser microscope together with the local photoexcitation of excess carriers within a small domain in a studied sample, thus forming an artificial source of scattering of the probe IR light for the recombination contrast imaging of defects. The current paper presents three contrasting examples of application of the above technique for defect visualization in silicon-based materials designed for photovoltaics and photonics which demonstrate that this...

Astafiev, O V; Yuryev, V A; 10.1016/S0022-0248(99)00711-3

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Physical Method for the Calibration of the AVHRR/3 Thermal IR Channels 1: The Prelaunch Calibration Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absolute accuracy of the thermal infrared (IR) radiances and brightness temperatures derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is still unknown, with major sources of error not yet fully understood. This is despite the ...

Jonathan P. D. Mittaz; Andrew R. Harris; Jerry T. Sullivan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Atliekinio fosfogipso panaudojimas sunki?j? metal? immobilizacijai nuotek? dumble ir dumblo-dirvožemio mišiniuose.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuotek? dumble esan?i? sunki?j? metal? neigiam? poveik? aplinkai bei žmogaus sveikatai galima sumažinti apribojant metal? judrum? aplinkoje. Magistro darbe tiriamas sunki?j? metal? judrumas ir j?… (more)

Puodži?nas,; Marius

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

WATER ICE IN HIGH MASS-LOSS RATE OH/IR STARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate water-ice features in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high mass-loss rate OH/IR stars. We use a radiative transfer code which can consider multiple components of dust shells to make model calculations for various dust species including water ice in the OH/IR stars. We find that the model SEDs are sensitively dependent on the location of the water-ice dust shell. For two sample stars (OH 127.8+0.0 and OH 26.5+0.6), we compare the detailed model results with the infrared observational data including the spectral data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For the two sample stars, we reproduce the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 3.1 {mu}m and 11.5 {mu}m; emission at 44 and 62 {mu}m) observed by ISO using a separate component of the water-ice dust shell that condensed at about 84-87 K (r {approx} 1500-1800 AU) as well as the silicate dust shell that condensed at about 1000 K (r {approx} 19-25 AU). For a sample of 1533 OH/IR stars, we present infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) using the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and AKARI data compared with theoretical model results. We find that the theoretical models clearly show the effects of the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 11.5 {mu}m and emission at 62 {mu}m) on the 2CDs.

Suh, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Young-Joo, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Bismuth-doped optical fibres: A new breakthrough in near-IR lasing media  

SciTech Connect

Recent results demonstrate that bismuth-doped optical fibres have considerable potential as near-IR active lasing media. This paper examines bismuth-doped fibres intended for the fabrication of fibre lasers and optical amplifiers and reviews recent results on the luminescence properties of various types of bismuth-doped fibres and the performance of bismuth-doped fibre lasers and optical amplifiers for the spectral range 1150 - 1550 nm. Problems are discussed that have yet to be solved in order to improve the efficiency of the bismuth lasers and optical amplifiers. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Recovering the Line-Of-Sight Magnetic Field in the Chromosphere from Ca II IR Spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method to derive the line-of-sight magnetic flux density from measurements in the chromospheric Ca II IR line at 854.2 nm. The method combines two well-understood techniques, the center-of-gravity and bisector methods, in a single hybrid technique. The technique is tested with magneto-static simulations of a flux tube. We apply the method to observations with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) installed at the Dunn Solar Telescope of the NSO/SP to investigate the morphology of the lower chromosphere, with focus on the chromospheric counterparts to the underlying photospheric magnetic flux elements.

Wöger, F; Uitenbroek, H; Rimmele, T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Metallurgical and mechanical properties of thorium-doped Ir-0. 3% W alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metallurgical and mechanical properties of Ir-0.3% W alloys have been studied as a function of thorium concentration in the range 0 to 1000 ppM by weight. The solubility limit of thorium in Ir-0.3% W is below 30 ppM. Above this limit, the excess thorium reacts with iridium to form second-phase particles. Thorium additions raise the recrystallization temperature and effectively retard grain growth at high temperatures. Tensile tests at 650/sup 0/C show that the alloy without thorium additions (undoped alloy) fractured by grainboundary (GB) separation, while the alloys doped with less than 500 ppM thorium failed mainly by transgranular fracture at 650/sup 0/C. Intergranular fracture in the doped alloys is suppressed by GB segregation of thorium, which improves the mechanical properties of the boundary. The impact properties of the alloys were correlated with test temperature, grain size, and heat treatment. The impact ductility increases with test temperature and decreases with grain size. For a given grain size, particularly in the fine-grain size range, the thorium-doped alloys are much more ductile and resistant to GB fracture. All of these results can be correlated on the basis of stress concentration on GBs by using a dislocation pileup model.

Liu, C.T.; Inouye, H.; Schaffhauser, A.C.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir radiation sources for intravascular irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intravascular brachytherapy is a novel therapy for preventing the restenosis of coronary artery by use of low-dose irradiation. JAERI and Kyoto University have been developing sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir radiation sources by the cooperative research project entitled as 'The research on safety and effectiveness of the intravascular brachytherapy for preventing restenosis of the coronary artery disease' since 1998. The radiation source was introduced into the stenosis through a catheter (a guide-tube to insert directly into vascular) to irradiate the diseased part. Ten sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir seed sources (phi 0.4 mm x 2.5 mm) were positioned between nylon spacers (phi 0.3 mm x 1.0 mm) in a flexible covering tube and the tube was plugged with a core-wire; the tube was shrunk to fix the inside materials and the size is 0.46 mm in diameter and 3 m in length. The physically optimal design was determined to insert the radiation source easily into vascular and to get the dose uniformity in the diseased part. The production me...

Kogure, H; Iwamoto, S; Iwata, K; Kawauchi, Y; Nagata, Y; Sorita, T; Suzuki, K

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Thermodynamics of interacting holographic dark energy with apparent horizon as an IR cutoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As soon as an interaction between holographic dark energy and dark matter is taken into account, the identification of IR cutoff with Hubble radius $H^{-1}$, in flat universe, can simultaneously drive accelerated expansion and solve the coincidence problem. Based on this, we demonstrate that in a non-flat universe the natural choice for IR cutoff could be the apparent horizon radius, $\\tilde{r}_A={1}/{\\sqrt{H^2+k/a^2}}$. We show that any interaction of dark matter with holographic dark energy, whose infrared cutoff is set by the apparent horizon radius, implies an accelerated expansion and a constant ratio of the energy densities of both components thus solving the coincidence problem. We also verify that for a universe filled with dark energy and dark matter the Friedmann equation can be written in the form of the modified first law of thermodynamics, $dE=T_hdS_h+WdV$, at apparent horizon. In addition, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon. These results hold regardless of the specific form of dark energy and interaction term. Our study might reveal that in an accelerating universe with spatial curvature, the apparent horizon is a physical boundary from the thermodynamical point of view.

Ahmad Sheykhi

2009-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

Consistency of vendor-specified activity values for {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources  

SciTech Connect

A long-term comparison was done between the manufacturer-stated {sup 192}Ir activity and the measured {sup 192}Ir activities determined with a well-type ionization chamber. Sources for a Nucletron Micro Selectron high-dose-rate (HDR) unit were used for this purpose. The radioactive sources reference activities were determined using a PTW well-type ionization chamber traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology Primary Calibration Laboratory. The measurements were taken in a period of 56 months with 17 different radioactive sources. The manufacturer stated activities were taken from the source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer. These values were compared with the measured activities. The results have shown that both the percentage deviation of the monthly control measurements with the well-type chamber and the ratio between the measured activities to the manufacturer-stated value lie within {+-} 2.5%. These results were compared with similar published data and with uncertainty level (3% of the mean and 5% maximum deviation from mean) for brachytherapy sources calibration recommended by the AAPM. It was concluded that a threshold level of {+-}2.5% can be used as a suitable quality assurance indicator to spot problems in our department. The typical {+-}5% uncertainty as provided by the manufacturers may be tightened to {+-}3% to be more in line with published AAPM reports.

Austerlitz, Carlos, E-mail: camposc@ecu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Wolfe, Melodee; Campos, Diana; Sibata, C.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to ~42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5% as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: ~50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies (@ ~40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches ~40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

Khericha, Soli T

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

Khericha, S.T.

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Detailed mapping of the local Ir{sup 4+} dimers through the metal-insulator transitions of CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} thiospinel by x-ray atomic pair distribution function measurements.  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of the short-range structural signature of the Ir{sup 4+} dimer state in CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} thiospinel has been studied across the metal-insulator phase transitions as the metallic state is induced by temperature, Cr doping, and x-ray fluence. An atomic pair distribution function (PDF) approach reveals that there are no local dimers that survive into the metallic phase when this is invoked by temperature and doping. The PDF shows Ir{sup 4+} dimers when they exist, regardless of whether or not they are long-range ordered. At 100 K, exposure to a 98 keV x-ray beam melts the long-range dimer order within a few seconds, though the local dimers remain intact. This shows that the metallic state accessed on warming and doping is qualitatively different from the state obtained under x-ray irradiation.

Bozin, E. S.; Masadeh, A. S.; Hor, Y. S.; Mitchell, J. F.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Materials Science Division; BNL; Michigan State Univ.; Univ. of Jordan; Columbia Univ.

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Prospecting for Heavy Elements with Future Far-IR/Submillimeter Observatories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the cosmic history of element synthesis it will be important to obtain extinction-free measures of the heavy element contents of high-redshift objects and to chart two monumental events: the collapse of the first metal-free clouds to form stars, and the initial seeding of the universe with dust. The information needed to achieve these objectives is uniquely available in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/SMM) spectral region. Following the Decadal Report and anticipating the development of the Single Aperture Far-IR (SAFIR) telescope and FIR/SMM interferometry, we estimate the measurement capabilities of a large-aperture, background-limited FIR/SMM observatory and an interferometer on a boom, and discuss how such instruments could be used to measure the element synthesis history of the universe.

Leisawitz, D T; Kashlinsky, A; Lawrence, C R; Mather, J C; Moseley, S H; Rinehart, S A; Silverberg, R F; Yorke, H W

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Microsoft Word - PSEG Companies Comments in OE Docket No RRTT-IR-001.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K. Richter K. Richter Assistant General Regulatory Counsel Regulatory Department 80 Park Plaza, T5C, Newark, NJ 07102-4194 tel: 973.430.6451 fax: 973.802.1267 email: david.richter@pseg.com March 28, 2012 VIA ELECTRONIC FILING Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW. Washington, DC 20585 RE: DOE's Request for Information OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson, Public Service Electric and Gas Company ("PSE&G") 1 , PSEG Power LLC ("PSEG Power") and PSEG Energy Resources & Trade LLC ("PSEG ER&T") (collectively referred to herein as the "PSEG Companies") respectfully submit the following comments in response to the Department of Energy's ("DOE") Request for

429

Microsoft Word - Cover letter to RRTT-IR-001 Comments.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2012 8, 2012 via electronic mail to: Lamont.Jackson@hq.doe.gov Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Rapid Response Team for Transmission OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson: Pursuant to the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's February 21, 2012 Request for Information in the above-referenced docket, attached please find American Electric Power's comments. Respectfully submitted, /s/ Amanda Riggs Conner Amanda Riggs Conner American Electric Power Service Corporation 801 Pennsylvania Ave, N.W. Suite 320 Washington, DC 20004 Telephone: (202) 383-3436

430

Gemini Mid-IR Polarimetry of NGC1068: Polarized Structures Around the Nucleus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present diffraction limited, 10um imaging polarimetry data for the central regions of the archetypal Seyfert AGN, NGC1068. The position angle of polarization is consistent with three dominant polarizing mechanisms. We identify three distinct regions of polarization: (a) north of the nucleus, arising from aligned dust in the NLR, (b) south, east and west of the nucleus, consistent with dust being channeled toward the central engine and (c) a central minimum of polarization consistent with a compact (<22pc) torus. These observations provide continuity between the geometrically and optically thick torus and the host galaxy's nuclear environments. These images represent the first published mid-IR polarimetry from an 8-m class telescope and illustrate the potential of such observations.

C. Packham; S. Young; R. S. Fisher; K. Volk; R. Mason; J. H. Hough; P. F. Roche; M. Elitzur; J. Radomski; E. Perlman

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

431

Gemini Mid-IR Polarimetry of NGC1068: Polarized Structures Around the Nucleus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present diffraction limited, 10um imaging polarimetry data for the central regions of the archetypal Seyfert AGN, NGC1068. The position angle of polarization is consistent with three dominant polarizing mechanisms. We identify three distinct regions of polarization: (a) north of the nucleus, arising from aligned dust in the NLR, (b) south, east and west of the nucleus, consistent with dust being channeled toward the central engine and (c) a central minimum of polarization consistent with a compact (<22pc) torus. These observations provide continuity between the geometrically and optically thick torus and the host galaxy's nuclear environments. These images represent the first published mid-IR polarimetry from an 8-m class telescope and illustrate the potential of such observations.

Packham, C; Fisher, R S; Volk, K; Mason, R; Hough, J H; Roche, P F; Elitzur, M; Radomski, J; Perlman, E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Neutronic safety and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Kinetic parameters, isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients and three transients for the IR-8 research reactor cores loaded with either HEU(90%), HEU(36%), or LEU (19.75%) fuel assemblies (FA) were calculated using three dimensional diffusion theory flux solutions, RELAP5/MOD3.2 and PARET. The prompt neutron generation time and effective delayed neutron fractions were calculated for fresh and beginning-of-equilibrium-cycle cores. Isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated for changes in coolant density, coolant temperature and fuel temperature in fresh and equilibrium cores. These kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients were used in transient analysis models to predict power histories, and peak fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. The transients modeled were a rapid and slow loss-of-flow, a slow reactivity insertion, and a fast reactivity insertion.

Deen, J. R.; Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.; Egorenkov, P. M.; Nasonov, V. A.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

433

Physics of Outflows: the Binary Protostar L 1551 IRS 5 and its Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations of the deeply embedded L1551 IRS5 system permit the detailed examination of the properties of both the stellar binary and the binary jet. For the individual components of the stellar binary, we determine their masses, mass accretion rates, effective temperatures and luminosities. For the atomic wind/jet flow, we determine the mass loss rate, yielding observationally determined values of the ratio of the mass loss to the mass accretion rate, f. For the X-ray emitting region in the northern jet, we have obtained the jet-velocity and derive the extinction and the densities on different spatial scales. Examining the observational evidence within the framework of the x-wind theory leads us to conclude that these models are indeed potentially able to account for the observational data for this deeply embedded source.

René Liseau; C. V. Malcolm Fridlund; Bengt Larsson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Transmission of broad W/Rh and W/Al (target/filter) x-ray beams operated at 25-49 kVp through common shielding materials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To provide transmission data for broad 25-39 kVp (kilovolt peak) W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al (target/filter, W-tungsten, Rh-rhodium, and Al-aluminum) x-ray beams through common shielding materials, such as lead, concrete, gypsum wallboard, wood, steel, and plate glass. Methods: The unfiltered W-target x-ray spectra measured on a Selenia Dimensions system (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA) set at 20-49 kVp were, respectively, filtered using 50-{mu}m Rh and 700-{mu}m Al, and were subsequently used for Monte Carlo calculations. The transmission of broad x-ray beams through shielding materials was simulated using Geant4 low energy electromagnetic physics package with photon- and electron-processes above 250 eV, including photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, and Rayleigh scattering. The calculated transmission data were fitted using Archer equation with a robust fitting algorithm. Results: The transmission of broad x-ray beams through the above-mentioned shielding materials was calculated down to about 10{sup -5} for 25-39 kVp W/Rh and 25-49 kVp W/Al. The fitted results of {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} in Archer equation were provided. The {alpha} values of kVp Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 40 were approximately consistent with those of NCRP Report No. 147. Conclusions: These data provide inputs for the shielding designs of x-ray imaging facilities with W-anode x-ray beams, such as from Selenia Dimensions.

Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Medical Resident FICA Refund Claim Information The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently announced that it will refund the employer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Resident FICA Refund Claim Information The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently announced that it will refund the employer and employee portion of FICA taxes paid for medical residents of all of our medical schools and medical centers for tax periods dating back to January 1, 1995. FICA

Russell, Lynn

437

arXiv:0903.5172v1[cs.IR]30Mar2009 Delocalization transition for the Google matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:0903.5172v1[cs.IR]30Mar2009 Delocalization transition for the Google matrix Olivier Giraud,1 (Dated: March 30, 2009) We study the localization properties of eigenvectors of the Google matrix by Google-type search is strongly affected in the phase of delocalized PageRank. PACS numbers: 89.20.Hh, 89

Shepelyansky, Dima

438

Free Tax Filing! VITA is a free program sponsored by the IRS which can prepare simple or low  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Tax Filing! VITA is a free program sponsored by the IRS which can prepare simple or low income (under $58,000 per household) tax returns for FREE! Free tax filing starts on February 27th and ends our free tax filing events, please call 657-278-8681 or email csufvita@gmail.com to verify that you

de Lijser, Peter

439

Hidrofobiškumo ?taka dažikli? sorbcijai vilnos pluošte ir dažini? fizikin?ms savyb?ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Baigiamojo darbo tikslas – ištirti vilnos pluošto paviršiaus hidrofobiškumo ?tak? dažikli? sorbcijai vilnos pluošte ir dažini? fizikin?ms savyb?ms. Nauj? antrachinonini? dažikli? RB 5-37 M?lynojo ir… (more)

Gr?bli?nait?,; Egl?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Comparisons of Clear-Sky Outgoing Far-IR Flux Inferred from Satellite Observations and Computed from the Three Most Recent Reanalysis Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The far-IR spectrum plays an important role in the earth’s radiation budget and remote sensing. The authors compare the near-global (80°S–80°N) outgoing clear-sky far-IR flux inferred from the collocated Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and ...

Xiuhong Chen; Xianglei Huang; Norman G. Loeb; Heli Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High Hydrogen Concentrations Detected In The Underground Vaults For RH-TRU Waste At INEEL Compared With Calculated Values Using The INEEL-Developed Computer Code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

About 700 remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste drums are stored in about 144 underground vaults at the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory’s (INEEL’s) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These drums were shipped to the INEEL from 1976 through 1996. During recent monitoring, concentrations of hydrogen were found to be in excess of lower explosive limits. The hydrogen concentration in one vault was detected to be as high as 18% (by volume). This condition required evaluation of the safety basis for the facility. The INEEL has developed a computer program to estimate the hydrogen gas generation as a function of time and diffusion through a series of layers (volumes), with a maximum five layers plus a sink/environment. The program solves the first-order diffusion equations as a function of time. The current version of the code is more flexible in terms of user input. The program allows the user to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the different layers of a configuration and then change the configuration after a given time; e.g.; installation of a filter on an unvented drum or placed in a vault or in a shipping cask. The code has been used to predict vault concentrations and to identify potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. The code has generally predicted higher hydrogen concentrations than the measured values, particularly for the drums older than 20 year, which could be due to uncertainty and conservative assumptions in drum age, heat generation rate, hydrogen generation rate, Geff, and diffusion rates through the layers.

Rajiv Bhatt; Soli Khericha

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Visualizing the Surface Infrastructure Used to Move 2 MtCO2/year from the Dakota Gasification Company to the Weyburn CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Project: Version of July 1, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Google Earth Pro has been employed to create an interactive flyover of the world’s largest operational carbon dioxide capture and storage project. The visualization focuses on the transport and storage of 2 MtCO2/year which is captured from the Dakota Gasification Facility (Beula, North Dakota) and transported 205 miles and injected into the Weyburn oil field in Southeastern Saskatchewan.

Dooley, James J.

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

443

SIZE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN THE FAR-IR SPECTRA OF WATER ICE PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

Spectra of water-ice aerosol particles have been measured in the far-IR region using synchrotron radiation. The particles in the nanoscale size regime of 1-100 nm were formed by rapid collisional cooling at temperatures ranging from 4 to 190 K. The spectra show the characteristic bands centered near 44 {mu}m (230 cm{sup -1}) and 62 {mu}m (160 cm{sup -1}) associated with the intermolecular lattice modes of crystalline ice at all temperatures, in contrast to previous studies of thin films formed by vapor deposition where amorphous ice is generated below 140 K. The bands shift to higher wavenumber values as the temperature is reduced, consistent with the trend seen in earlier studies, but in our experiments the actual peak positions in the aerosol particle spectra are consistently higher by ca. 4 cm{sup -1}. This finding has implications for the potential use of these spectral features as a temperature probe. The particle sizes are small enough for their spectra to be free of scattering effects, and therefore provide a means to assess imaginary refractive index values obtained through Kramers-Kronig analyses of thin film spectra.

Medcraft, Chris; McNaughton, Don; Thompson, Chris D. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Appadoo, Dominique [Australian Synchrotron, Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Bauerecker, Sigurd [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Robertson, Evan G., E-mail: E.Robertson@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU(90%), HEU(36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average {sup 235}U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm{sup 3} in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU(90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU(36%) IRT-3M FA.

Deen, J. R.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

445

High-Resolution Observations in B1-IRS: ammonia, CCS and water masers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of the structure and dynamics of the star forming region B1-IRS (IRAS 03301+3057) using the properties of different molecules at high angular resolution (~4''). We have used VLA observations of NH3, CCS, and H2O masers at 1 cm. CCS emission shows three clumps around the central source, with a velocity gradient from red to blueshifted velocities towards the protostar, probably due to the interaction with outflowing material. Water maser emission is elongated in the same direction as a reflection nebula detected at 2micron by 2MASS, with the maser spots located in a structure of some hundreds of AU from the central source, possibly tracing a jet. We propose a new outflow model to explain all our observations, consisting of a molecular outflow near the plane of the sky. Ammonia emission is extended and anticorrelated with CCS. We have detected for the first time this anticorrelation at small scales (1400 AU) in a star forming region.

De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Gómez, J F; Kuiper, T B H; Torrelles, J M; Anglada, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANICS TOWARD THE HIGH-MASS YSO NGC 7538 IRS9  

SciTech Connect

Complex molecules have been broadly classified into three generations dependent on the mode of formation and the required formation temperature (<25, 25-100 K, and >100 K). Around massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), icy grain mantles and gas are exposed to increasingly higher temperatures as material accretes from the outer envelope in toward the central hot region. The combination of this temperature profile and the generational chemistry should result in a changing complex molecular composition with radius around MYSOs. We combine IRAM 30 m and Submillimeter Array observations to explore the spatial distribution of organic molecules around the high-mass young stellar object NGC 7538 IRS9, whose weak complex molecule emission previously escaped detection. We find that emission from N-bearing organics and CH{sub 3}OH present substantial increases in emission around 8000 AU and R < 3000 AU, while unsaturated O-bearing molecules and hydrocarbons do not. The increase in line flux for some complex molecules in the envelope, around 8000 AU or 25 K, is consistent with recent model predictions of an onset of complex ice chemistry at 20-30 K. The emission increase for many of the same molecules at R < 3000 AU suggests the presence of a weak hot core, where thermal ice evaporation and hot gas-phase reactions drive the chemistry. Complex organics thus form at all radii and temperatures around this protostar, but the composition changes dramatically as the temperature increases, which is used together with an adapted gas-grain astrochemical model to constrain the chemical generation(s) to which different classes of molecules belong.

Oeberg, Karin I. [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Boamah, Mavis D. [Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481 (United States); Fayolle, Edith C. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Garrod, Robin T. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van der Tak, Floris, E-mail: oberg@virginia.edu [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure Julio C. Morales 1 , Amy Rommel 1 , Konstantin Leskov 2 , Walter M. Hittelman 3 , David A. Boothman 1# 1 Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. 3 Department of Experimental Therapeutics, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. # To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: David.Boothman@utsouthwestern.edu Eukaryotic cells can respond to DNA double strand breaks created by low doses of IR by activating homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end- joining (NHEJ) pathways to repair DNA. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Ku70 as

448

New mechanism for nonlocality from string theory: UV-IR quantum entanglement and its imprints on the CMB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Puff field theories (PFT) arise as the decoupling limits of D3 branes in a Melvin universe and exhibit spatially nonlocal dynamics. Unlike other realizations of nonlocality in string theory, PFTs have full SO(3) rotational symmetry. In this work, we analyze the strongly coupled regime of a PFT through gravitational holography. We find a novel mechanism at the heart of the phenomenon of nonlocality: a quantum entanglement of UV and IR dynamics. In the holographic bulk, this translates to an apparent horizon splitting the space into two regions--with the UV completion of the PFT sitting at the horizon. We unravel this intricate UV-IR setting and devise a prescription for computing correlators that extends the original dictionary of holographic renormalization group. We then implement a cosmological scenario where PFT correlators set the initial conditions for primordial fluctuations. We compute the associated power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and find that the scenario allows for a distinct stringy signature.

Minton, Gregory; Sahakian, Vatche [Harvey Mudd College, Physics Department, 241 Platt Boulevard, Claremont, California 91711 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

The role of the (111) texture on the exchange bias and interlayer coupling effects observed in sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic properties of sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers grown on different seed layers (Cu or Ta) deposited on Si (100) substrates were investigated by magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. Exchange bias effect and magnetic spring behavior have been studied by changing the IrMn thickness. As shown by X-ray diffraction, Ta and Cu seed layers provoke different degrees of (111) fcc-texture that directly affect the exchange bias and indirectly modify the exchange spring coupling behavior. Increasing the IrMn thickness, it was observed that the coupling angle between the Co and NiFe ferromagnetic layers increases for the Cu seed system, but it reduces for the Ta case. The results were explained considering (i) different anisotropies of the Co and IrMn layers induced by the different degree of the (111) texture and (ii) the distinct exchange bias set at the NiFe/IrMn and IrMn/Co interfaces in both systems. The NiFe and Co interlayer coupling angle is strongly correlated with both exchange bias and exchange magnetic spring phenomena. It was also shown that the highest exchange bias field occurs when an unstressed L1{sub 2} IrMn structure is stabilized.

Castro, I. L.; Nascimento, V. P.; Passamani, E. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Larica, C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES 29075-910 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES 29075-910 (Brazil); Tafur, M. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Campus Itabira, Itabira, MG 37500-903 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Campus Itabira, Itabira, MG 37500-903 (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Universidade Federal de Goias, Goiania, GO 74001-970 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal de Goias, Goiania, GO 74001-970 (Brazil)

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

The near-IR Surface Brightness Method applied to six Cepheids in the young LMC cluster NGC1866  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new near-IR light curves for six Cepheids in the young blue LMC cluster NGC1866 as well as high precision radial velocity curves for ten Cepheids in NGC1866 and two in NGC2031. For the six Cepheids in NGC1866 with new J and K light curves we determine distances and absolute magnitudes by applying the near-IR surface brightness method. We find that the formal error estimates on the derived distances are underestimated by about a factor of two. We find excellent agreement between the absolute magnitudes for the low metallicity LMC Cepheids with the Period-Luminosity (P-L) relation determined by the near-IR surface brightness (ISB) method for Galactic Cepheids suggesting that the slope of the P-L relations for low metallicity and solar metallicity samples could be very similar in contrast to other recent findings. Still there appears to be significant disagreement between the observed slopes of the OGLE based apparent P-L relations in the LMC and the slopes derived from ISB analysis of Galactic Cepheids, and by inference for Magellanic Cloud Cepheids, indicating a possible intrinsic problem with the ISB method itself. Resolving this problem could reaffirm the P-L relation as the prime distance indicator applicable as well to metallicities significantly different from the LMC value.

Jesper Storm; Wolfgang P. Gieren; Pascal Fouque; Thomas G. Barnes III; Matias Gomez

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

451

Multi-fluid shocks in clusters of galaxies: entropy, sigma_ v-T, M-T and L_x-T scalings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nonthermal phenomena in clusters of galaxies are considered in the context of the hierarchical model of cosmic structure formation by accretion and merging of the dark matter (DM) substructures.Accretion and merging processes produce large-scale gas shocks. The plasma shocks are expected to be collisionless. In the course of cluster's aggregation, the shocks, being the main gas-heating agent, generate turbulent magnetic fields and accelerate energetic particles via collisionless multi-fluid plasma relaxation processes. The intracluster gas heating and entropy production rate by a collisionless shock may differ significantly from that in a single-fluid collisional shock. Simple scaling relations for postshock ion temperature and entropy as functions of shock velocity in strong collisionless multi-fluid shocks are presented. We show that the multi-fluid nature of the collisionless shocks results in high gas compression, reduced entropy production and modified sigma_v-T, M-T and L_x-T scalings. The scaling i...

Bykov, A M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Multi-fluid shocks in clusters of galaxies: entropy, sigma_ v-T, M-T and L_x-T scalings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nonthermal phenomena in clusters of galaxies are considered in the context of the hierarchical model of cosmic structure formation by accretion and merging of the dark matter (DM) substructures.Accretion and merging processes produce large-scale gas shocks. The plasma shocks are expected to be collisionless. In the course of cluster's aggregation, the shocks, being the main gas-heating agent, generate turbulent magnetic fields and accelerate energetic particles via collisionless multi-fluid plasma relaxation processes. The intracluster gas heating and entropy production rate by a collisionless shock may differ significantly from that in a single-fluid collisional shock. Simple scaling relations for postshock ion temperature and entropy as functions of shock velocity in strong collisionless multi-fluid shocks are presented. We show that the multi-fluid nature of the collisionless shocks results in high gas compression, reduced entropy production and modified sigma_v-T, M-T and L_x-T scalings. The scaling indexes estimated for a simple model of a strong accretion multi-fluid shock are generally consistent with observations. Soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet photons dominate the emission of strong accretion shock precursors that appear as large-scale filaments. Magnetic fields, turbulence and energetic particles constitute the nonthermal components contributing into the pressure balance, energy transport and emission of clusters. Nonthermal emission of energetic particles could be a test to constrain the cluster properties.

A. M. Bykov

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd): Crystal structures with nets of Ir atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystal structures of the new ternary compounds Sm{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} and LaIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} were determined and refined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. They belong to the Ho{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (oP52, Pmmn) and CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} (hP5, P6/mmm) structure types, respectively. The formation of isotypic compounds R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} with R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} with R=Ce, Pr, Nd, was established by powder X-ray diffraction. The RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds exist only in as-cast samples and decompose during annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C with the formation of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9}. The structure of Sm{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting, slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms (4{sup 4})(4{sup 3}.6){sub 2}(4.6{sup 2}){sub 2} and (4{sup 4}){sub 2}(4{sup 3}.6){sub 4}(4.6{sup 2}){sub 2} that are perpendicular to [0 1 1] as well as to [0 -1 1] and [0 0 1]. The Ir atoms are surrounded by Ge atoms that form tetrahedra or square pyramids (where the layers intersect). The Sm and additional Ir atoms (in trigonal-planar coordination) are situated in channels along [1 0 0] (short translation vector). In the structure of LaIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets (3.6.3.6) perpendicular to [0 0 1]. These nets alternate along the short translation vector with layers of La and Ge atoms. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures contain the nets of Ir atoms as main structural motif: R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms, whereas in the structure of RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ir-rich ternary germanides R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd) have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} compounds exist only in as-cast samples and decompose during annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C with the formation of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the structure of RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets.

Yarema, Maksym [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA), Ueberlandstr. 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Zaremba, Oksana; Gladyshevskii, Roman [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Hlukhyy, Viktor, E-mail: viktor.hlukhyy@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Faessler, Thomas F. [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

DOE/EIS-0026-SA-4: Supplement Analysis for Use of the 10-160B Transportation Cask for RH-TRU Waste Shipments to WIPP (12/17/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH 1-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH ID,5052347038 PAGE 3/15 [TX/RX NO 6044] 141003 08/31/2004 TOE 15:22 PAGE 4/15 IC,5052347038 AUG-31-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH PAGE 1 of 9 Supplement Analysis for USE OF THE IO-160B TRANSPORTATION CASK FOR RH-TRUWASTE SHIPMENTS TO WIPP 1.0 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is propo~ing to use the CNS lO-160B, Type B Shipping Cask (referred to in this document simply as the lO-160B) to transport remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE originally examined the impacts ofWlPP operations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-OO26-S-2, (SEIS~II). This Supplement Analysis (SA) discusses environmental impacts associated with

455

Experimental and statistical requirements for developing a well-defined K/sub IR/ curve. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Further development of a statistically well-defined reference fracture toughness curve to verify and compliment the K/sub IR/ curve presently specified in Appendix G, Section III of the ASME Code was accomplished by performing critical experiments in small specimen fracture mechanics and improving techniques for statistical analysis of the data. Except for cleavage-initiated fracture, crack initiation was observed to occur prior to maximum load for all of the materials investigated. Initiation fracture toughness values (K/sub Jc/) based on R-curve heat-tinting studies were up to 50 percent less than the previously reported equivalent energy values (K*/sub d/). At upper shelf temperatures, the initiation fracture toughness (K/sub Jc/) generally increased with stress intensification rate. Both K/sub Jc/--Charpy V-notch and K/sub Ic/--specimen strength ratio correlations are promising methods for predicting thick-section behavior from small specimens. The previously developed tanh curve fitting procedure was improved to permit estimates of the variances and covariances of the regression coefficients to be computed. The distribution of the fracture toughness data was determined as a function of temperature. Instrumented precracked Charpy results were used to normalize the larger specimen fracture toughness data. The transformed large specimen fracture toughness data are used to generate statistically based lower-bound fracture toughness curves for either static or dynamic test results. A comparison of these lower bound curves with the K/sub IR/ curve shows that the K/sub IR/ curve is more conservative over most of its range. 143 figures, 26 tables.

Server, W.L.; Oldfield, W.; Wullaert, R.A.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Miniature MT optical assembly (MMTOA)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical assembly (10) includes a rigid mount (12) with a recess (26) proximate a first side thereof, a substrate (14), and an optical die (16) flip-chip bonded to the substrate (14). The substrate (14) is secured to the first side of the mount and includes a plurality of die bonding elements (40), a plurality of optical apertures (32), and a plurality of external bonding elements (42). A plurality of traces (44) interconnect the die bonding elements (40) and the external bonding elements (42). The optical die (16) includes a plurality of optical elements, each element including an optical signal interface (48), the die being bonded to the plurality of die bonding elements (40) such that the optical signal interface (48) of each element is in registry with an optical aperture (32) of the substrate (14) and the die (16) is at least partially enclosed by the recess (26).

Laughlin, Daric (Overland Park, KS); Abel, Phillip (Overland Park, KS)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

EMSL: News - MT Thomas Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accomplishments that include seminal and novel theoretical advancements in understanding electron transfer reactions at environmental interfaces and its impact on the field of...

458

An infrared study of galactic OH/IR stars. II. The `GLMP sample' of red oxygen-rich AGB stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical and near-infrared finding charts taken from the DSS and 2MASS surveys of 94 IRAS sources selected from the GLMP catalogue (Garc\\'{\\i}a-Lario 1992), and accurate astrometry (~0.2") for most of them. Selection criteria were very red IRAS colours representative for OH/IR stars with optically thick circumstellar shells and the presence of variability according to the IRAS variability index (VAR>50). The main photometric properties of the stars in this `GLMP sample' are presented, discussed and compared with the correspondent properties of the `Arecibo sample' of OH/IR stars studied in Jim\\'enez-Esteban et al. (2005a). We find that 37% of the sample (N=34) have no counterpart in the 2MASS, implying extremely high optical depths of their shells. Most of the sources identified in the 2MASS are faint (K>~8) and of very red colour in the near-infrared, as expected. The brightest 2MASS counterpart (K=5.3mag) was found for IRAS 18299--1705. Its blue colour H--K=1.3 suggests that IRAS 8299--1705 is a p...

Jiménez-Esteban, F M; Engels, D; Calderón, J V P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Molecular origin of the difference in the HOH bend of the IR spectra between liquid water and ice  

SciTech Connect

The intensity of the HOH bend in the IR spectrum of ice is significantly smaller than the corresponding one in liquid water. This difference in the IR intensities of the HOH bend in the two systems is investigated using MD simulations with the flexible, polarizable, ab-initio based TTM3-F model for water, a potential that correctly reproduces the experimentally observed increase of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice from the water monomer value. We have identified two factors that are responsible for the difference in the intensity of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice: (i) the decrease of the intensity of the HOH bend in ice caused by the strong anti-correlation between the permanent dipole moment of a molecule and the induced dipole moment of a neighboring hydrogen bond acceptor molecule and (ii) the weakening of this anti-correlation by the disordered hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The presence of the anti-correlation in ice is further confirmed by ab initio electronic structure calculations of water pentamer clusters extracted from the trajectories of the MD simulations for ice and liquid water.

Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

LABORATORY IR STUDIES AND ASTROPHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS OF C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-CONTAINING BINARY ICES  

SciTech Connect

Studies of molecular hot cores and protostellar environments have shown that the observed abundance of gas-phase acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) cannot be matched by chemical models without the inclusion of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules subliming from icy grain mantles. Searches for infrared (IR) spectral features of solid-phase acetylene are under way, but few laboratory reference spectra of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in icy mixtures, which are needed for spectral fits to observational data, have been published. Here, we report a systematic study of the IR spectra of condensed-phase pure acetylene and acetylene in ices dominated by carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and water (H{sub 2}O). We present new spectral data for these ices, including band positions and intrinsic band strengths. For each ice mixture and concentration, we also explore the dependence of acetylene's {nu}{sub 5}-band position (743 cm{sup -1}, 13.46 {mu}m) and FWHM on temperature. Our results show that the {nu}{sub 5} feature is much more cleanly resolved in ices dominated by non-polar and low-polarity molecules, specifically CO, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}, than in mixtures dominated by H{sub 2}O-ice. We compare our laboratory ice spectra with observations of a quiescent region in Serpens.

Knez, C. [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Moore, M. H.; Hudson, R. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrochemistry Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ferrante, R. F., E-mail: Claudia.Knez@jhuapl.edu [Chemistry Department, U.S. Naval Academy, 572 Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The ITER VIS/IR wide angle viewing system: Challenges and on-going R and D  

SciTech Connect

The ITER tokamak is the next generation fusion device which will allow studying burning plasma obtained by a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fusion reaction during hundreds of seconds. ITER vacuum vessel real-time protection will be mandatory during plasma operation to avoid water leaks and critical plasma facing components degradation. The protection system will be based on a wide angle viewing system (WAVS) composed with 18 visible (VIS) and 18 infrared (IR) cameras covering 80 % of the vacuum vessel which will be one of the major imaging systems of ITER. Compared to protection systems routinely used on current tokamaks and based on imaging (VIS and/or IR), new constraints must be taken into account because of their influence on the system performance: the harsh environment (high neutron flux) and the metallic plasma facing components (both first wall and divertor). In this new demanding context, we have achieved three mandatory R and D studies starting from the understanding of the source of signals by using realistic photonic simulation up to real-time processing strategy taken into account first order optical design constraints to define what type of performance could be reached for ITER vacuum vessel protection. (authors)

Travere, J. M.; Aumeunier, M. H.; Joanny, M.; Jouve, M.; Martin, V.; Moncada, V.; Salasca, S. [CEA DSM, IRFM, F-13018 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Marot, L. [Univ. of Basel, Dept. of Physics, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Chabaud, D. [OPTIS, ZE de la Farlede, F-83078 Toulon Cedex 9 (France); Ferme, J. J. [SESO, Pole d'Activite d'Aix en Provence, 305 Rue Louis Armand, F-13792 Aix en Provence Cedex 3 (France); Bremond, F.; Thonnat, M. [INRIA, 2004 route des Lucioles, F-06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Improved $^{192,194,195,196}$Pt($n,?$) and $^{192}$Ir($n,?$) astrophysical reactions rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$^{192}$Pt is produced solely by the slow neutron capture (\\textit{s}) nucleosynthesis process and hence an accurate ($n$,$\\gamma $) reaction rate for this nuclide would allow its use as an important calibration point near the termination of the \\textit{s}-process nucleosynthesis flow. For this reason, we have measured neutron capture and total cross sections for $% ^{192,194,195,196,nat}$Pt in the energy range from 10 eV to several hundred keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Measurements on the other Pt isotopes were, in part, necessitated by the fact that only a relatively small $^{192}$Pt sample of modest enrichment was available. Astrophysical $% ^{192,194,195,196}$Pt($n,\\gamma $) reaction rates, accurate to approximately 3%--5 %, were calculated from these data. No accurate reaction rates have been published previously for any of these isotopes. At \\textit{s}-process temperatures, previously recommended rates are larger (by as much as 35%) and have significantly different shapes as functions of temperature, than our new rates. We used our new Pt results, together with $^{191,193}$Ir(n,$% \\gamma $) data, to calibrate nuclear statistical model calculations and hence obtain an improved rate for the unmeasured \\textit{s}-process branching-point isotope $^{192}$Ir.

P. E. Koehler; K. H. Guber

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

464

Revealing molecular structure and dynamics through high-order harmonic generation driven by mid-IR fields  

SciTech Connect

High-order harmonic generation (HHG) from molecules produces spectra that are modulated by interferences that encode both the static structure and the electron dynamics initiated by interaction with the laser field. Using a midinfrared (mid-IR) laser at 1300 nm, we are able to study the region of the harmonic spectrum containing such interferences in CO{sub 2} over a wide range of intensities. This allows for isolation and characterization of interference minima arising due to subcycle electronic dynamics triggered by the laser field, which had previously been identified but not systematically separated. Our experimental and theoretical results demonstrate important steps toward combining attosecond temporal and angstrom-scale spatial resolution in molecular HHG imaging.

Torres, R.; Siegel, T.; Brugnera, L.; Ivanov, M. Yu.; Marangos, J. P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Procino, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Underwood, Jonathan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Altucci, C.; Velotta, R. [Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Naples (Italy); Springate, E.; Froud, C.; Turcu, I. C. E. [Central Laser Facility, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Patchkovskii, S. [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Smirnova, O. [Max-Born-Institute, 2a Max-Born-Strasse, Berlin D-12489 (Germany)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

W51 IRS 2: A Massive Jet Emerging from a Molecular Cloud into an H II Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have mapped [Ne II] (12.8um) and [S IV] (10.5um) emission from W51 IRS 2 with TEXES on Gemini North, and we compare these data to VLA free-free observations and VLT near-infrared images. With 0.5" spatial and 4 km/s spectral resolution we are able to separate the ionized gas into several components: an extended H II region on the front surface of the molecular cloud, several embedded compact H II regions, and a streamer of high velocity gas. We interpret the high velocity streamer as a precessing or fan-like jet, which has emerged from the molecular cloud into an OB star cluster where it is being ionized.

J. H. Lacy; D. T. Jaffe; Q. Zhu; M. J. Richter; M. A. Bitner; T. K. Greathouse; K. Volk; T. R. Geballe; D. M. Mehringer

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

466

Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain  

SciTech Connect

A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

467

Exchange bias of spin valve structure with a top-pinned Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/IrMn  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the exchange bias of a directly top-pinned Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/IrMn structure. An exchange bias was realized on the as-deposited samples, in which Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20} exhibits a fully amorphous structure. A current-in-plane giant magnetoresistance effect was demonstrated on simple Ru/CoFeB/Cu/CoFeB/IrMn/Ru stacks prior to and after annealing. The amorphous CoFeB layer partially crystallized from the interface with a Cu spacer layer after annealed at 280 deg. C.

You, C. Y.; Furubayashi, T.; Takahashi, Y. K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Goripati, H. S. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 Japan (Japan); Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

Highly IR-transparent microfluidic chip with surface-modified BaF2 optical windows for Infrared Microspectroscopy of living cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution we present the first example of a microfluidic chip based on BaF"2 for Infrared Microspectroscopy (IRMS) of living cells. The advantage in using barium fluoride as platform relies on its high IR transparency, especially in the spectral ... Keywords: Barium fluoride, IRMS, Living cells, Microfluidic

E. Mitri, A. Pozzato, G. Coceano, D. Cojoc, L. Vaccari, M. Tormen, G. Grenci

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Direct evidence of a zigzag spin-chain structure in the honeycomb lattice: A neutron and x-ray diffraction investigation of single-crystal Na2IrO3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have combined single crystal neutron and x-ray diffractions to investigate the magnetic and crystal structures of the honeycomb lattice $\\rm Na_2IrO_3$. The system orders magnetically below $18.1(2)$~K with Ir$^{4+}$ ions forming zigzag spin chains within the layered honeycomb network with ordered moment of $\\rm 0.22(1)~\\mu_B$/Ir site. Such a configuration sharply contrasts the N{\\'{e}}el or stripe states proposed in the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. The structure refinement reveals that the Ir atoms form nearly ideal 2D honeycomb lattice while the $\\rm IrO_6$ octahedra experience a trigonal distortion that is critical to the ground state. The results of this study provide much-needed experimental insights into the magnetic and crystal structure crucial to the understanding of the exotic magnetic order and possible topological characteristics in the 5$d$-electron based honeycomb lattice.

Ye, Feng [ORNL; Chi, Songxue [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Qi, Tongfei [University of Kentucky; Korneta, O. B. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Cao, Gang [University of Kentucky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Ir I L  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

*- -I ..' -I I... "- II .- (1 "^ 1 6 7 8 9 10 11 LIST O F FIGURES General location of the Granite City Steel Facility , Granite City , Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 View of the betatron building, look ing south . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 View of the betatron building, look ing west . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Diagram of the ground floor of the betatron building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Photo showing the larger of the two betatrons (no. 1, Fig. 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 View of transformer s torage area ins ide the betatron building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

471

Ir I L  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF FIGURES 1 2 General location of the Granite City Steel Facility' Granite City, Illinois . . . View of the betatron building, looking south . ' ' 3 View o[ the betatron building, looking west . ' ' ' ' ' 11 4 Diagram of the ground floor of the betatron building ' 5 Photo showing the larger of the two betatrons (no. 1, Fig. ) 6 View of transformer storage area inside the betatron building 7 Directly measured radiation levels inside the betatron building, first level 8 Results of directly measured radiation levels taken in the betatron building, second level . Industrial vacuum cleaner having elevated radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations . I-ocations of smears, and indoor dust and debris samples Results of direct radiation measurements and locations

472

Phototoxic effect of conjugates of plasmon-resonance nanoparticles with indocyanine green dye on Staphylococcus aureus induced by IR laser radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of IR laser radiation ({lambda} = 805 - 808 nm) on the bacteria of the strain Staphylococcus aureus 209 P, incubated in indocyanine green solutions, is studied, as well as that of colloid gold nanoshells, nanocages and their conjugates with indocyanine green. It is found that the S. aureus 209 P cells are equally subjected to the IR laser radiation ({lambda} = 805 nm) after preliminary sensitisation with indocyanine green and gold nanoparticles separately and with conjugates of nanoparticles and indocyanine green. The enhancement of photodynamic and photothermal effects by 5 % is observed after 30 min of laser illumination ({lambda} = 808 nm) of bacteria, treated with conjugates of indocyanine green and nanocages. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

Tuchina, E S; Tuchin, Valerii V; Khlebtsov, B N; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

473

The properties of (sub)millimetre-selected galaxies as revealed by CANDELS HST WFC3/IR imaging in GOODS-South  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have exploited the HST CANDELS WFC3/IR imaging to study the properties of (sub-)mm galaxies in GOODS-South. After using the deep radio and Spitzer imaging to identify galaxy counterparts for the (sub-)mm sources, we have used the new CANDELS data in two ways. First, we have derived improved photometric redshifts and stellar masses, confirming that the (sub-)mm galaxies are massive (=2.2x10^11 M_solar) galaxies at z=1-3. Second, we have exploited the depth and resolution of the WFC3/IR imaging to determine the sizes and morphologies of the galaxies at rest-frame optical wavelengths, fitting two-dimensional axi-symmetric Sersic models. Crucially, the WFC3/IR H-band imaging enables modelling of the mass-dominant galaxy, rather than the blue high-surface brightness features which often dominate optical (rest-frame UV) images of (sub-)mm galaxies, and can confuse visual morphological classification. As a result of this analysis we find that >95% of the rest-frame optical light in almost all of the (sub-)mm gala...

Targett, T A; Cirasuolo, M; McLure, R J; Bruce, V A; Fontana, A; Galametz, A; Paris, D; Davé, R; Dekel, A; Faber, S M; Ferguson, H C; Grogin, N A; Kartaltepe, J S; Kocevski, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Kurczynski, P; Lai, K; Lotz, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

sp2 Carbon-Hydrogen Bond (C-H) Functionalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 (p-NMe 2 )PhPMe 2 [IrCl(cod)] 2 PCy 3 a 5 mol % ligand (1:RhCl(coe) 2 ] 2 and [RhCl(cod)] 2 precatalysts gave goodwe elected to use [RhCl(cod)] 2 for all subsequent studies

Yotphan, Sirilata

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Terrace-like structure in the above-threshold ionization spectrum of an atom in an IR+XUV two-color laser field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the frequency-domain theory, we investigate the above-threshold ionization (ATI) process of an atom in a two-color laser field with infrared (IR) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) frequencies, where the photon energy of the XUV laser is close to or larger than the atomic ionization threshold. By using the channel analysis, we find that the two laser fields play different roles in an ionization process, where the XUV laser determines the ionization probability by the photon number that the atom absorbs from it, while the IR laser accelerates the ionized electron and hence widens the electron kinetic energy spectrum. As a result, the ATI spectrum presents a terrace-like structure. By using the saddle-point approximation, we obtain a classical formula which can predict the cutoff of each plateau in the terrace-like ATI spectrum. Furthermore, we find that the difference of the heights between two neighboring plateaus in the terrace-like structure of the ATI spectrum increases as the frequency of the XUV lase...

Zhang, Kui; Fu, Panming; Yan, Zong-Chao; Wang, Bingbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Very blue UV-continuum slopes of low luminosity z~7 galaxies from WFC3/IR: Evidence for extremely low metallicities?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the ultra-deep WFC3/IR data over the HUDF and the Early Release Science WFC3/IR data over the CDF-South GOODS field to quantify the broadband spectral properties of star-forming galaxies at z~7. We determine the UV-continuum slope beta in these galaxies, and compare the slopes with galaxies at later times to measure the evolution in beta. For luminous L*(z=3) galaxies, we measure a mean UV-continuum slope beta of -2.0+/-0.2, which is comparable to the beta~-2 derived at similar luminosities at z~5-6. However, for the lower luminosity 0.1L*(z=3) galaxies, we measure a mean beta of -3.0+/-0.2. This is substantially bluer than is found for similar luminosity galaxies at z~4, just 800 Myr later, and even at z~5-6. In principle, the observed beta of -3.0 can be matched by a very young, dust-free stellar population, but when nebular emission is included the expected beta becomes >~-2.7. To produce these very blue beta's (i.e., beta~-3), extremely low metallicities and mechanisms to reduce the red nebular emi...

Bouwens, R J; Oesch, P A; Trenti, M; Stiavelli, M; Carollo, M; Franx, M; Van Dokkum, P G; Labbé, I; Magee, D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Mass spectrometric study of high-temperature dehydroxylation of disperse silicas and the interpretation of their IR spectra in the region of Si-O stretching vibrations  

SciTech Connect

Field-desorption mass spectrometry has been used to determine the lower boundary of the temperature interval for the removal of surface hydroxyl groups of aerosil. Both in the regime of cation desorption and in the regime of anion desorption, at temperatures above 900/sup 0/K, OH ions of the corresponding sign are registered. It is concluded that the thermal decomposition of the surface bonds triple bond Si-OH is homolytic in character. A mechanism is proposed for the dehydroxylation of SiO/sub 2/, according to which the initially formed radical centers triple bond Si and triple bond SiO change into ions: triple bond Si/sup +/ (I) and triple bond SiO/sup -/ (II). The bands at 888 and 908 cm/sup -1/ in the IR spectra of silicas obtained at high temperatures are assigned to vibrations of Si-O bonds in I and II, respectively.

Nazarenko, V.A.; Furman, V.I.; Guzikevich, A.G.; Gorlov, Yu.I.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 eV ionization shift in Ir K{alpha}{sub 2} from a near-coincident Lu K-edge  

SciTech Connect

Close to an x-ray filter's K-edge the transmission depends strongly on the photon energy. For a few atom pairs, the K-edge of one is only a few tens of eV higher than a K-line energy of another, so that a small change in the line's energy becomes a measurable change in intensity behind such a matching filter. Lutetium's K-edge is Asymptotically-Equal-To 27 eV above iridium's K{alpha}{sub 2} line, Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV for cold Ir. A Lu filter reduces this line's intensity by Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 % when it is emitted by a plasma, indicating an ionization shift {Delta}E Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV.

Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc, P.O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22150 (United States); Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D.; Schumer, J. W. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Seely, J. F. [Artep Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Ct, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Carroll, J. J. [Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20873 (United States); VanHoy, J. R. [United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States); Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

MT paper-2 column.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GT2005-68203 INSERTION OF SHOCK WAVE COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY INTO MICRO TURBINES FOR INCREASED EFFICIENCY AND REDUCED COSTS ABSTRACT The following analysis is presented to serve as a preliminary design guide for micro turbine engine designers to consider the potential advantages of incorporating the Rampressor into their recuperated engine designs. It is shown that the increase in compressor efficiency and the shift in optimum pressure will increase the efficiency of the engine and lower the recuperator inlet temperature and specific cost. This also provides the opportunity to increase the turbine inlet temperature and specific power without incorporating more costly air-cooled metal or ceramic components into the turbine design.

480

Mt Wheeler Power, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Utility Id 13073 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GS (Small General Service) Commercial H-1(Metered Residential or Commercial Electric Heat) Residential H-2 (Unmetered Residential Electric Heat Rate) Residential Irrigation Rate (Annual Charge) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Demand Charge) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Kilowatt Hour Rate) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Load Factor Rate) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Off-Peak Rate) Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Improving AMBER, an MT evaluation metric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent paper described a new machine translation evaluation metric, AMBER. This paper describes two changes to AMBER. The first one is incorporation of a new ordering penalty; the second one is the use of the downhill simplex algorithm to tune the ...

Boxing Chen; Roland Kuhn; George Foster

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Methane Hydrates - Mt. Elbert Well Log Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more. Project background information - Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization - DE-FC26-01NT41332 More information on the National Methane Hydrates R&D Program...

483

WIND DATA REPORT Ragged Mt Maine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. This report covers wind Average Wind Speeds, September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007. January 22, 2008 Renewable Energy Research ­ Turbulence Intensity vs. Wind Speed, September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007. January 22, 2008 Renewable Energy

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

484

MT@TMS Frequently Asked Questions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For some Web browsers, a yellow message will appear, requesting you to allow scripted windows. Click on the yellow message bar. A gray message bar will ...

485

Babb, MT Natural Gas Export to Canada  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011...

486

OpenMT12 Evaluation Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NJU, Nanjing University, China, Yes, NRC, NRC Canada, Canada, Yes, Yes, OSU, Ohio State University, USA, Yes, Yes, ... NRC, NRC Canada, Canada ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

487