Sample records for rh ir mt

  1. The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates. The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates....

  2. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed 2 nm Rh and 1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the...

  3. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matthew D.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850?C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR activity on the supported highly dispersed Rh catalyst can be rationalized by the thermodynamic limitation for the very first C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst. The C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst is highly endothermic although the barrier is competitive with the barriers of both the C-C and the C-H bond-breakings on the small Rh50 catalyst. The calculations also imply that, for the supported Rh catalysts the C-C and C-H bond scissions are competitive, independently of the Rh cluster sizes. After the initial dissociation step via either the C-C or the C-H bond scission, the C-H bond breaking seems to be more favorable rather than the C-C bond breaking on the larger Rh terrace surface. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Biomass Program’s. Computing time was granted by a user project at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  4. Thermodynamics and superconductivity of Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lashley, Jason C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisher, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expanding the temperature range of previous specific-heat measurements on the Th7(Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Ir)3 system, we measure the effect of transition-metal substitution on total entropy (S{sub 298 k}), electronic specific heat ({gamma}), and Debye temperature ({Theta}D). In addition we measure the pressure dependence, up to 10 kbar, of the superconducting transition.

  5. Syntheses, crystal structures, and properties of EuRhIn, EuIr{sub 2}, and EuIrSn{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poettgen, R.; Hoffmann, R.D.; Moeller, M.H.; Kotzyba, G.; Kuennen, B.; Rosenhahn, C.; Mosel, B.D. [Univ. Muenster (Germany)] [Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The title compounds were prepared from the elements by reactions in sealed tantalum tubes in a high-frequency furnace. Their structures were refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data: Pnma, a = 744.4(1) pm, b = 434.15(9) pm, c = 845.5(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0433, 658 F{sup 2} values, 20 variables for EuRhIn, Rd3m, a = 756.5(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0349, 94 F{sup 2} values, 5 variables for EuIr{sub 2}, and Cmcm, a = 434.78(3) pm, b = 1124.0(1) pm, c = 751.20(5) pm, wR2 = 0.0561, 565 F{sup 2} values, 16 variables for EuIrSn{sub 2}. EuRhIn crystallizes with a TiNiSi type structure that consists of strongly puckered Rh{sub 3}In{sub 3} hexagons. The europium atoms fill the channels within the three-dimensional [RhIn] polyanion. EuRhIn orders ferromagnetically at 22.0(5) K with a saturation magnetic moment of 6.7(1) {mu}{sub B}/Eu at 4 k and 5.5 T. The divalent character of the europium atoms in EuRhIn was determined from temperature dependent susceptibility (7.9 {mu}{sub B}/Eu in the high-temperature part) and {sup 151}Eu Moessbauer spectroscopic experiments. The latter show an isomer shift of {delta} = {minus}8.30(2) mm/s at 78 K. At 4.2 K full magnetic hyperfine field splitting subjected to significant quadrupole splitting of {Delta}E{sub Q} = 8 mm/s is observed. EuRhIn is a metallic conductor with a room temperature value of 58 {micro}{Omega}cm for the specific resistivity. The structure of the Laves phase EuIr{sub 2} is confirmed on the basis of single crystal X-ray data. The iridium atoms form a tetrahedral network with Ir-Ir distances of 268 pm. EuIrSn{sub 2} adopts a MgCuAl{sub 2} type structure that may be described as an iridium-filled variant of a distorted CaIn{sub 2}-like sublattice of composition EuSn{sub 2}. The tin atoms in the distorted and puckered hexagonal network have shorter (303 and 322 pm) and longer (343 pm) tin-tin contacts. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structure of the Quaternary Magnetic EuTAl4Si2 (T = Rh and Ir) Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurya, Arvind [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research; Thamizhavel, Arumugam [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research; Provino, Alessia [University of Genova; Pani, Marcella [University of Genova; Manfrinetti, Pietro [University of Genova; Paudyal, Durga [Ames Laboratory; Dhar, Sudesh Kumar [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of the quaternary europium compounds EuRhAl4Si2 and EuIrAl4Si2 were synthesized by using the Al–Si binary eutectic as a flux. The structure of the two quaternary compounds has been refined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds are stoichiometric and adopt an ordered derivative of the ternary KCu4S3 structure type (tetragonal tP8, P4/mmm). The two compounds reported here represent the first example of a quaternary and truly stoichiometric 1:1:4:2 phase crystallizing with this structure type. In light of our present results, the structure of the BaMg4Si3 compound given in literature as representing a new prototype is actually isotypic with the KCu4S3 structure. Local spin density approximation including the Hubbard U parameter (LSDA + U) calculations show that Eu ions are in the divalent state, with a significant hybridization between the Eu 5d, Rh (Ir) 4d (5d), Si 3p and Al 3p states. Magnetic susceptibility measured along the [001] direction confirms the divalent nature of the Eu ions in EuRhAl4Si2 and EuIrAl4Si2, which order magnetically near 11 and 15 K, respectively.

  7. Ternary lithium stannides Li{sub x}T{sub 3}Sn{sub 7-x} (T=Rh, Ir)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreeraj, Puravankara [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, and Sonderforschungsbereich 458, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Kurowski, Daniel [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, and Sonderforschungsbereich 458, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, and Sonderforschungsbereich 458, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Wu Zhiyun [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, and Sonderforschungsbereich 458, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Poettgen, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, NRW Graduate School of Chemistry, and Sonderforschungsbereich 458, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany)]. E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.de

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ternary stannides Li{sub x}Rh{sub 3}Sn{sub 7-x} (x=0.45, 0.64, 0.80) and Li{sub x}Ir{sub 3}Sn{sub 7-x} (x=0.62 and 0.66) were synthesized from the elements in sealed tantalum tubes in a water-cooled sample chamber of an induction furnace. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction on powders and single crystals. The stannides adopt the cubic Ir{sub 3}Ge{sub 7}-type structure (space group Im3-bar m, Z=4). In this structure type the tin atoms occupy the Wyckoff positions 12d and 16f and form two interpenetrating frameworks consisting of cubes and square antiprisms. The rhodium and iridium atoms center the square antiprisms and are arranged in pairs. With increasing lithium substitution the lattice parameter of Ir{sub 3}Sn{sub 7} (936.7) decreases via 932.2pm (x=0.62) to 931.2pm (x=0.66), while the Ir-Ir distance remains almost the same (290pm). A similar trend is observed for the rhodium compounds. The lithium atoms substitute Sn on both framework sites. However, the 16f site shows a substantially larger preference for Li occupation. This is in contrast to the isotypic magnesium based compounds.

  8. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Kovarik, Libor; Wan, Haiying; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gerber, Mark A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of stable MgAl2O4 spinel-supported Rh and Ir catalysts for the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Firstly, catalytic performance for a series of noble metal catalysts supported on MgAl2O4 spinel was evaluated for SMR at 600-850°C. Turnover rate at 850°C follows the order: Pd > Pt > Ir > Rh > Ru > Ni. However, Rh and Ir were found to have the best combination of activity and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed ~2 nm Rh and ~1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the MgAl2O4 spinel support. Scanning Transition Electron Microscopy (STEM) images show that excellent dispersion was maintained even under challenging high temperature conditions (e.g. at 850°C in the presence of steam) while Ir and Rh catalysts supported on Al2O3 were observed to sinter at increased rates under the same conditions. These observations were further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations which find that ~1 nm Rh and Ir particles (50-atom cluster) bind strongly to the MgAl2O4 surfaces via a redox process leading to a strong metal-support interaction, thus helping anchor the metal clusters and reduce the tendency to sinter. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that these supported smaller Rh and Ir particles have a lower work function than larger more bulk-like ones, which enables them to activate both water and methane more effectively than larger particles, yet have a minimal influence on the relative stability of coke precursors. In addition, theoretical mechanistic studies were used to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. Consistent with the experimental observations, our theoretical modeling results also suggest that the small spinel-supported Ir particle catalyst is more active than the counterpart of Rh catalyst for SMR. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute. Computing time was granted by a user proposal at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) located at PNNL. Part of the computational time was provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  9. Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Jeremy Kua and William A. Goddard III* Contribution from functional theory (B3LYP)], we calculated the 13 most likely intermediate species for methanol oxidation

  10. RH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure provides operating instructions for the RH-TRU 72-B Road Cask, Waste Shipping Package. In this document, ''Packaging'' refers to the assembly of components necessary to ensure compliance with the packaging requirements (not loaded with a payload). ''Package'' refers to a Type B packaging that, with its radioactive contents, is designed to retain the integrity of its containment and shielding when subject to the normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident test conditions set forth in 10 CFR Part 71. Loading of the RH 72-B cask can be done two ways, on the RH cask trailer in the vertical position or by removing the cask from the trailer and loading it in a facility designed for remote-handling (RH). Before loading the 72-B cask, loading procedures and changes to the loading procedures for the 72-B cask must be sent to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval.

  11. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the "RH-TRU 72-B cask") and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

  12. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

  13. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions, LLC

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. The C of C states: ''...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, ''Operating Procedures,'' of the application.'' It further states: ''...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, ''Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR {section} 71.11, ''Deliberate Misconduct.'' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARP. This document is available on the Internet at: ttp://www.ws/library/t2omi/t2omi.htm. Users are responsible for ensuring they are using the current revision and change notices. Sites may prepare their own document using the word-for-word steps in th is document, in sequence, including Notes and cautions. Site specific information may be included as necessary. The document, and revisions, must then be submitted to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval. A copy of the approval letter from CBFO shall be available for audit purposes. Users may develop site-specific procedures addressing preoperational activities, quality assurance (QA), hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used with the instructions contained in this document. Users may recommend changes to this document by submitting their recommendations (in writing) to the WIPP M&O Contractor RH Packaging Maintenance Engineer for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by ALL users. Before first use and every 12 months after, user sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance. They will also be audited within one year from the effective date of revisions to this document.

  14. Rh-Based Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts: Characterization and Computational Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Karl O.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Varga, Tamas; Colby, Robert J.; Jaffe, John E.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Mei, Donghai; Windisch, Charles F.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Gray, Michel J.; Hart, Todd R.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting a program focused on developing a process for the conversion of biomass to bio-based fuels and co-products. Biomass-derived syngas is converted thermochemically within a temperature range of 240 to 330°C and at elevated pressure (e.g., 1200 psig) over a catalyst. Ethanol is the desired reaction product, although other side compounds are produced, including C3 to C5 alcohols; higher (i.e., greater than C1) oxygenates such as methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, acetic acid and acetaldehyde; and higher hydrocarbon gases such as methane, ethane/ethene, propane/propene, etc. Saturated hydrocarbon gases (especially methane) are undesirable because they represent a diminished yield of carbon to the desired ethanol product and represent compounds that must be steam reformed at high energy cost to reproduce CO and H2. Ethanol produced by the thermochemical reaction of syngas could be separated and blended directly with gasoline to produce a liquid transportation fuel. Additionally, higher oxygenates and unsaturated hydrocarbon side products such as olefins also could be further processed to liquid fuels. The goal of the current project is the development of a Rh-based catalyst with high activity and selectivity to C2+ oxygenates. This report chronicles an effort to characterize numerous supports and catalysts to identify particular traits that could be correlated with the most active and/or selective catalysts. Carbon and silica supports and catalysts were analyzed. Generally, analyses provided guidance in the selection of acceptable catalyst supports. For example, supports with high surface areas due to a high number of micropores were generally found to be poor at producing oxygenates, possibly because of mass transfer limitations of the products formed out of the micropores. To probe fundamental aspects of the complicated reaction network of CO with H2, a computational/ theoretical investigation using quantum mechanical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations was initiated in 2009. Computational investigations were performed first to elucidate understanding of the nature of the catalytically active site. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that Mn likely exists as a metallic alloy with Rh in Rh-rich environments under reducing conditions at the temperatures of interest. After determining that reduced Rh-Mn alloy metal clusters were in a reduced state, the activation energy barriers of numerous transition state species on the catalytically active metal particles were calculated to compute the activation barriers of several reaction pathways that are possible on the catalyst surface. Comparison of calculations with a Rh nanoparticle versus a Rh-Mn nanoparticle revealed that the presence of Mn enabled the reaction pathway of CH with CO to form an adsorbed CHCO species, which was a precursor to C2+ oxygenates. The presence of Mn did not have a significant effect on the rate of CH4 production. Ir was observed during empirical catalyst screening experiments to improve the activity and selectivity of Rh-Mn catalysts. Thus, the addition of Ir to the Rh-Mn nanoparticles also was probed computationally. Simulations of Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles revealed that, with sufficient Ir concentrations, the Rh, Mn and Ir presumably would be well mixed within a nanoparticle. Activation barriers were calculated for Rh-Mn-Ir nanoparticles for several C-, H-, and O-containing transitional species on the nanoparticle surface. It was found that the presence of Ir opened yet another reactive pathway whereby HCO is formed and may undergo insertion with CHx surface moieties. The reaction pathway opened by the presence of Ir is in addition to the CO + CH pathway opened by the presence of Mn. Similar to Mn, the presence of Ir was not found to not affect the rate of CH4 production.

  15. Comment on "Catalytic Activity of the Rh Surface Oxide: CO Oxidation over Rh(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    . Obviously, heating Rh in pure oxygen to T ) 230 °C and above will lead to the formation of surface Rh oxideComment on "Catalytic Activity of the Rh Surface Oxide: CO Oxidation over Rh(111) under Realistic suggest the importance of a surface oxide phase for high CO2 formation in CO-O2 reactions. However

  16. Characterization of Rh films on Ta(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, L.Q.; Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface and electronic structure of Rh films on Ta(110) up to several monolayers thick on Ta(110) are characterized by photoemission, Auger emission, low energy electron diffraction and low energy ion scattering. From the variation of the Rh Auger peak-to-peak intensity as a function of evaporation time, Rh/Ta(110) appears to grow in the Stranski-Krastanov mode at room temperature. However, the LEIS data show that the Rh adatoms begin to cluster on Ta(110) before growth of the monolayer is completed. Diffuse LEED scattering suggests that the Rh films are disordered. Photoemission shows that Rh chemisorption on Ta(110) generates two peaks located at 1.2 and 2. 5 eV binding energy during the initial phase of thin film growth (0 < {Theta} < 0.5 ML). By 0.75 ML Rh coverage, those states merge into a broad structure centered near 2 eV binding energy. Photoemission peaks typical of a Rh(111) surface are seen at higher coverages ({Theta} > 3.7 ML). Photoemission data for CO covered surfaces show that CO dissociates on the Rh/Ta(110) surface for Rh coverages less than 2.5 ML and also show that the Rh clusters develop at least one site capable of molecular CO adsorption above 0.3 ML Rh coverage. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  18. Check for chirality in {sup 102}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Yavahchova, M. S.; Petkov, P.; Angelis, G. de; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Marinov, Ts. K.; Brant, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria) and INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Nuclear Physics Department, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam (India); Department of Physics, Punjab University, Chandigarh (India); Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Department of Physics, Punjab University, Chandigarh (India); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, New Delhi (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb University, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states in {sup 102}Rh, populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 94}Zr({sup 11}B,3n){sup 102}Rh at a beam energy of 36 MeV, were studied using the INGA spectrometer at IUAC, New Delhi. The angular correlations and the electromagnetic character of some of the gamma-ray transitions observed were investigated in details. A new chiral candidate sister band was found in the level-scheme of {sup 102}Rh. Lifetimes of exited states in {sup 102}Rh were measured by means of the Doppler-shift attenuation technique. The experimental results do not support the presence of static chirality in {sup 102}Rh.

  19. M.T. Thomas Recipient Named | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M.T. Thomas Recipient Named M.T. Thomas Recipient Named EMSL Recognizes Patrick Roach for Postdoc Achievement Dr. Patrick Roach Patrick Roach, now an environmental scientist at...

  20. Origin of room temperature ferromagnetic moment in Rh-rich Rh/Fe multilayer thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    films of FeRh was done by electron beam melting on amorphous substrates3 but the low extent of ordering

  1. Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Meng [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Cullen, David A [ORNL; Sasaki, Kotaro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Marinkovic, N. [University of Delaware; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Adzic, Radoslav R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

  2. Microsoft Word - MtRichmond_CX

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Mt. Richmond property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, BPA-007071 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from...

  3. Agassiz Glacier Glacier National Park, MT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agassiz Glacier Glacier National Park, MT Greg Pederson photo USGS USGS Repeat Photography Project Glacier Glacier National Park, MT Greg Pederson photo USGS USGS Repeat Photography Project http://nrmsc.usgs.gov/repeatphoto/ 2005 M. V. Walker photo courtesy of GNP archives1943 #12;Blackfoot ­ Jackson Glacier Glacier National

  4. ALSEP-MT-06 APOLLO LUNAR SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ALSEP-MT-06 APOLLO LUNAR SURFACE EXPERIMENTS PACKAGE (ALSEP) APOLLO 16 ALSEP ARRAY D FLIGHT July 1971 A #12;ALSEP-MT-06 INTRODUCTION The Apollo 16 LWlar Surface Expe riments Package (ALSEP of the Moon consistent with the scientific objectives of the Apollo Program. The measur ement data

  5. Perpendicular exchange bias effect in sputter-deposited CoFe/IrMn bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. Y., E-mail: chenjy02@gmail.com; Thiyagarajah, Naganivetha; Xu, H. J.; Coey, J. M. D. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    CoFe/IrMn bilayers with perpendicular magnetization for various IrMn layer thicknesses exhibit unusual two-step hysteresis loops with both positive and negative loop shifts. Observed at room temperature in the as-grown state, they provide direct evidence of large antiferromagnetic domain formation at the IrMn interface. The exchange bias field reaches 100?mT with an IrMn layer thickness of 4?nm after field annealing at 200?°C–300?°C in 800?mT, which is at least three times as large as the coercivity, and may be useful for reference layers of spin-valves or magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  6. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  7. University Policy No.: RH8100 Classification: Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    1 University Policy No.: RH8100 Classification: Research Approving Authority: Board of Governors RESEARCH POLICY Effective Date: January 2010 Supersedes: June 2002 Last Editorial Change: Mandated Review: January 2017 PURPOSE 1.00 The purpose of this policy is to set out the manner in which research

  8. Mt Wheeler Power, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountain ElectricMt Princeton HotMt

  9. Mt. Baker Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformationMtMt. Baker

  10. Magnetic order in the frustrated Ising-like chain compound Sr3NiIrO6 E. Lefranois,1, 2, 3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in CsCoCl3 for instance3 . The most studied compound in the frustrated regime is Ca3Co2O6 because of its show that Ca3CoRhO6 5 , Sr3CoIrO6 6 , Sr3NiRhO6 7 and Sr3NiIrO6 6,8,9 have a similar behavior to Ca3Co2 of their unconventional magnetic properties due to the interplay between low dimensionality, magnetic frustration

  11. MT STROMLO OBSERVATORY VISITOR GUIDE & WALK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    to the Observatory and construction of a new Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre was begun. You can watch, the University of NSW, and the Faulkes Telescope Project. Mt Stromlo began operation as the Commonwealth Solar Optical Munitions Factory. After the war, the Observatory changed from solar to stellar astronomy

  12. IR Kuiper Belt Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teplitz, V L; Anderson, J D; Rosenbaum, D C; Scalise, R J; Wentzler, P; Teplitz, Vigdor L.; Anderson, John D.; Rosenbaum, Doris; Scalise, Randall J.; Wentzler, Paul

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the temperature and IR signal of particles of radius $a$ and albedo $\\alpha$ at heliocentric distance $R$, taking into account the emissivity effect, and give an interpolating formula for the result. We compare with analyses of COBE DIRBE data by others (including recent detection of the cosmic IR background) for various values of heliocentric distance, $R$, particle radius, $a$, and particle albedo, $\\alpha$. We then apply these results to a recently-developed picture of the Kuiper belt as a two-sector disk with a nearby, low-density sector (40IR spectra for various parameter v...

  13. Spin-orbit tuned metal-insulator transitions in single-crystal Sr?Ir1–xRhxO? (0?x?1)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qi, T. F.; Korneta, O. B.; Li, L.; Butrouna, K.; Cao, V. S.; Wan, Xiangang; Schlottmann, P.; Kaul, R. K.; Cao, G.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sr?IrO? is a magnetic insulator driven by spin-orbit interaction (SOI) whereas the isoelectronic and isostructural Sr?RhO? is a paramagnetic metal. The contrasting ground states have been shown to result from the critical role of the strong SOI in the iridate. Our investigation of structural, transport, magnetic, and thermal properties reveals that substituting 4d Rh?? (4d?) ions for 5d Ir?? (5d?) ions in Sr?IrO? directly reduces the SOI and rebalances the competing energies so profoundly that it generates a rich phase diagram for Sr?Ir1–xRhxO? featuring two major effects: (1) Light Rh doping (0 ? x ? 0.16) prompts a simultaneous and precipitous drop in both the electrical resistivity and the magnetic ordering temperature TC, which is suppressed to zero at x = 0.16 from 240 K at x = 0. (2) However, with heavier Rh doping [0.24 1–xRhxO? is further highlighted by comparison with Sr?Ir1–xRuxO? where Ru?? (4d?) drives a direct crossover from the insulating to metallic states.

  14. Anomalous emissions of 103mRh biphoton transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the anomalous emissions, centered on the one half transition energy 39.76/2 keV, are observed from the long-lived Mossbauer state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung exposure. Strong coupling with identical nuclei in Rh crystals opens cascade channels for biphoton transitions.

  15. A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol. A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol. Abstract: Rh and Co-based catalyst performance was compared...

  16. Mt Signal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVistaZephyr)Mountain AirPeak UtilityMt

  17. Mt Rainier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformationMt Rainier

  18. Mt Ranier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformationMt RainierRanier

  19. ,"Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  20. ,"Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  1. ,"Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Babb, MT...

  2. ,"Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Havre, MT...

  3. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976)...

  4. Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980. [Pt/Rh, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ni/Rh, Rh/Re, Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalysts are being screened to steam reform hydrocarbons in an autothermal reformer (STR). Twenty-one samples have been screened in a 1-in.-diam (ATR) reactor using No. 2 oil as the hydrocarbon feed. A series of platinum-rhodium catalysts were evaluated to study the effect of varying compositions. A sample containing 1.7% Pt/0.3% Rh was most active but the difference among the samples was within the range of test variability. Development of a more realistic test has been started. The effect of O/sub 2//C level on the gas composition leaving the catalytic partial oxidation section has been determined. The amount of unreacted oil increases as O/sub 2//C level decreases. The unreacted oil is more aromatic than the feedstock. The gas composition contains considerably more olefins as the O/sub 2//C level decreases. Post-run catalyst characterization indicates that the catalyst carrier does not deteriorate in the ATR test. A drastic decrease in CO chemisorption is noted on the Pt/Rh samples. This decline in CO chemisorption could either be due to metal sintering or to carbon deposition on the metal. Other analysis are required to determine which is causing the decline in CO chemisorption. Very low coke levels were found on Pt, Rh, and Pt/Rh samples. Addition of Rh to nickel reduces the coke level over that observed for nickel catalysts.

  5. WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montanaâ??s vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQâ??s wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the stateâ??s university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

  6. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for August 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  7. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for June 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  8. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  9. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  10. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for October 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  11. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for July 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  12. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  13. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for October 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  14. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for July 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  15. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for July 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  16. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  17. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for May 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  18. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  19. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for October 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  20. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for November 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  1. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  2. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for June 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  3. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  4. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  5. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  6. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for June 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  7. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for November 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  8. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  9. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for April 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  10. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for March 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

  11. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  12. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  13. Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for August 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

  14. Models for Multiband IR Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong Xu; Carol J. Lonsdale; David L. Shupe; JoAnn O'Linger; Frank Masci

    2001-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical 'backward' galaxy evolution models for IR-bright galaxies are constrained using multiband IR surveys. A new Monte-Carlo algorithm is developed for this task. It exploits a large library of realistic Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of 837 local IR galaxies (IRAS 25$\\mu m$ selected) from the UV (1000{\\AA}) to the radio (20cm), including ISO-measured 3--13$\\mu m$ unidentified broad features (UIBs). The basic assumption is that the local correlation between SEDs and Mid-Infrared (MIR) luminosities can be applied to earlier epochs of the Universe. Three populations of IR sources are considered in the evolution models. These include (1) starburst galaxies, (2) normal late-type galaxies, and (3) galaxies with AGN. A set of models so constructed are compared with data from the literature. Predictions for number counts, confusion limits, redshift distributions, and color-color diagrams are made for multiband surveys using the upcoming SIRTF satellite.

  15. Evidence for Methane -Complexes in Reductive Elimination Reactions from TpRh(L)(CH3)H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    , the methyl deuteride complex TpRh(L)(CH3)D is observed to rearrange to TpRh(L)(CH2D)H prior to loss of CH3D

  16. Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-based/SiO2 catalysts: A...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthesis from syngas over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and theoretical modeling study. Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined...

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notes Gravity low associated with Mt. Princeton Batholith; density contrast of -0.5 gcm3 of valley-fill sediments relative to batholith References J.E. Case, R.F. Sikora...

  18. Integrated Dense Array and Transect MT Surveying at Dixie Valley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Deep Fluid Sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Integrated Dense Array and Transect MT Surveying at Dixie Valley...

  19. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Averill, Frank [ORNL] [ORNL; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  20. LEED crystallography studies of the structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Ir, Pt and Rh crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koestner, R.J.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have only been a few Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) intensity analyses carried out to determine the structure of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces; most surface crystallography studies concentrated on the structure of clean unreconstructed or atomic adsorbate-covered transition metal faces. The few molecular adsorption systems already investigated by dynamical LEED are CO on Ni(100), Cu(100) and Pd(100) as well as C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ adsorbed on Pt(111). The emphasis of this thesis research has been to extend the applicability of LEED crystallography to the more complicated unit cells found in molecular overlayers on transition metals or in there constructed surfaces of clean transition metals.

  1. Mechanism of olefin production on Pt, Rh, and Pd catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, M.; Schmidt, L.D. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The partial oxidation of ethylene, propylene, and butylene in an autothermal reactor at atmospheric pressure with contact times less that {approximately}10 milliseconds leads to high selectivities to mono-olefins over Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, synthesis gas over Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and rapid carbon deposition and deactivation over Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at complete oxygen conversion and high alkane conversion. In all cases, thermodynamics predicts carbon deposition. We will show how the product distributions vary with choice of catalyst and reaction conditions. We will use an elementary step model based on surface reaction rates on the various metals obtained from the surface science literature to simulate these experimental results. The dominant reaction pathways on the different metals can be explained by the relative preference for {beta} elimination reactions on Pt, nearly even split between {alpha} and {beta} elimination on Rh, and rapid {alpha} elimination on Pd.

  2. Your FAFSA and the IRS Data Retrieval Tool What is the IRS Data Retrieval Tool?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Your FAFSA and the IRS Data Retrieval Tool What is the IRS Data Retrieval Tool? The U.S. Department of Education and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) have collaborated to develop a tool that simplifies the completion of the FAFSA application. The IRS Data Retrieval tool allows FAFSA applicants and parents

  3. Towards tailoring the magnetocaloric response in FeRh-based ternary compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barua, Radhika, E-mail: barua.r@husky.neu.edu; Jiménez-Villacorta, Félix; Lewis, L. H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrate that the magnetocaloric response of FeRh-based compounds may be tailored for potential magnetic refrigeration applications by chemical modification of the FeRh lattice. Alloys of composition Fe(Rh{sub 1?x}A{sub x}) or (Fe{sub 1?x}B{sub x})Rh (A?=?Cu, Pd; B?=?Ni; 0?Rh-based systems were determined using isothermal M(H) curves measured in the vicinity of the magnetostructural temperature (T{sub t}). It is found that the FeRh working temperature range (?T{sub FWHM}) may be chemically tuned over a wide temperature range, 100?K???T???400?K. While elemental substitution consistently decreases the magnetic entropy change (?S{sub mag}) of the FeRh-based ternary alloys from that of the parent FeRh compound (?S{sub mag},{sub FeRh}???17?J/kg?K; ?S{sub mag,FeRh-ternary?=}?7–14?J/kg?K at H{sub app}?=?2?T), the net refrigeration capacity (RC), defined as the amount of heat that can be transferred during one magnetic refrigeration cycle, of the modified systems is significantly higher (RC{sub FeRh}???150?J/kg; RC{sub FeRh-ternary?=}?170–210?J/kg at H{sub app}?=?2?T). These results are attributed to stoichiometry-induced changes in the FeRh electronic band structure and beneficial broadening of the magnetostructural transition due to local chemical disorder.

  4. m_T2 : the truth behind the glamour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan Barr; Christopher Lester; Phil Stephens

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the kinematic variable, m_T2, which is in some ways similar to the more familiar `transverse-mass', but which can be used in events where two or more particles have escaped detection. We define this variable and describe the event topologies to which it applies, then present some of its mathematical properties. We then briefly discuss two case studies which show how m_T2 is vital when reconstructing the masses of supersymmetric particles in mSUGRA-like and AMSB-like scenarios at the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformationMt RainierRanierMt

  6. Mn Monolayer Modified Rh for Syngas-to-Ethanol Conversion: A First-Principles Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fengyu [University of Puerto Rico; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Zeng, X.C. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chen, Zhongfang [University of Puerto Rico

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rh is unique in its ability to convert syngas to ethanol with the help of promoters. We performed systematic first-principles computations to examine the catalytic performance of pure and Mn modified Rh(100) surfaces for ethanol formation from syngas. CO dissociation on the surface as well as CO insertion between the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} and the surface are the two key steps. The CO dissociation barrier on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is remarkably lowered by {approx}1.5 eV compared to that on Rh(100). Moreover, the reaction barrier of CO insertion into the chemisorbed CH{sub 3} group on the Mn monolayer modified Rh(100) surface is 0.34 eV lower than that of methane formation. Thus the present work provides new mechanistic insight into the role of Mn promoters in improving Rh's selectivity to convert syngas to ethanol.

  7. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  8. Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT, USA Avalanche Path Atlas Erich H. Peitzsch Daniel..................................................................................................................................... 2 Overview of Red Rock Group avalanche paths, Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT................................................................................................................................................... 3 Overview of Lower GTSR group avalanche paths, Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT

  9. Phylogeography of pipistrelle-like bats within the Canary Islands, based on mtDNA sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard

    Phylogeography of pipistrelle-like bats within the Canary Islands, based on mtDNA sequences J January 2002; received in revised form 7 July 2002 Abstract Evolution of three Canary Island by comparison of 1 kbp of mtDNA (from cytochrome b and 16S rRNA genes) between islands. mtDNA reveals that both

  10. Note: Large area deposition of Rh single and Rh/W/Cu multilayer thin films on stainless steel substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika, E-mail: alika@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mirror like thin films of single layer Rh and multilayer Rh/W/Cu are deposited on highly polished 50 mm diameter stainless steel substrate by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique for first mirror application in fusion reactors. For this, the conventional PLD technique has been modified by incorporating substrate rastering stage for large area deposition via PLD. Process optimization to achieve uniformity of deposition as estimated from fringe visibility and thickness is also discussed.

  11. Resource Assessment Edited by J.R. Hatch and R.H. Affolter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter D Resource Assessment Edited by J.R. Hatch and R.H. Affolter Chapter D of Resource.S. Geological Survey National Coal Resource Assessment Click here to return to Disc 1 Volume Table of Contents........................................................................................ 3 Previous Resource Assessments of Illinois Basin Coals, by J.R. Hatch and R.H. Affolter

  12. Carbon supported PtRh catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Carbon supported PtRh catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell S and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 26 carbon supported PtRh catalysts and compare their catalytic activities with that of Pt/C in alkaline

  13. Surface Science Letters P) reactions with small alkenes adsorbed on Rh, Au, and ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    Surface Science Letters O(3 P) reactions with small alkenes adsorbed on Rh, Au, and ice K.D. Gibson the reaction of O(3 P) with 1- and 2-butene on the surface of Rh(111) and ice, and propene on the surface of Au(111) and amorphous ice and propene adsorbed on Au(111). These experiments were done at cryogenic

  14. Dissociation of water on oxygen-covered Rh^111 A. Shavorskiy,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnadt, Joachim

    to the somewhat unusual situation that these water layers are actually hydrophobic due to the lack of hydrogenDissociation of water on oxygen-covered Rh^111 A. Shavorskiy,1 T. Eralp,1 E. Ataman,2 C. Isvoranu,2 November 2009; published online 4 December 2009 The adsorption of water and coadsorption with oxygen on Rh

  15. High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen K. D. Gibson, Mark Viste, Errol C. Sanchez, and S. J. Sibener The James Franck Institute; accepted 30 November 1998 Exposure of Rh 111 to atomic oxygen leads to the facile formation of a full

  16. Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

  17. Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M. (eds.)

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of Rh-based lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores for higher alcohol synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelsayed, Victor; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Poston, James A., Jr.; Spivey, James J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}; LZ) were prepared by Pechini method and tested for higher alcohols selectivity. In one, Rh was substituted into the pyrochlore lattice (LRZ, 1.7 wt%) while for the second, Rh was supported on an unsubstituted La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R/LZ, 1.8 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results show that the surface reducibility depends on whether the Rh is in (or supported on) the LZ pyrochlore. Rhodium in the LRZ is more reducible than rhodium supported on the R/LZ pyrochlore, likely due to the presence of a perovskite phase (LaRhO{sub 3}; identified by XRD), in which rhodium is more reducible. The formation of the perovskite accompanies that of the pyrochlore. CO hydrogenation results show higher ethanol selectivity for R/LZ than LRZ, possibly due to the strong interaction between Rh and LZ on the R/LZ, forming atomically close Rh{sup +}/Rh{sup 0} sites, which have been suggested to favor ethanol production.

  19. Properties of MT2 in the massless limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin H. Lally; Christopher G. Lester

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Although numerical methods are required to evaluate the stransverse mass, MT2, for general input momenta, non-numerical methods have been proposed for some special clases of input momenta. One special case, considered in this note, is the so-called `massless limit' in which all four daughter objects (comprising one invisible particle and one visible system from each `side' of the event) have zero mass. This note establishes that it is possible to construct a stable and accurate implementation for evaluating MT2 based on an analytic expression valid in that massless limit. Although this implementation is found to have no significant speed improvements over existing evaluation strategies, it leads to an unexpected by-product: namely a secondary variable, that is found to be very similar to MT2 for much of its input-space and yet is much faster to calculate. This is potentially of interest for hardware applications that require very fast estimation of a mass scale (or QCD background discriminant) based on a hypothesis of pair production -- as might be required by a high luminosity trigger for a search for pair production of new massive states undergoing few subsequent decays (eg di-squark or di-slepton production). This is an application to which the contransverse mass MCT has previously been well suited due to its simplicity and ease of evaluation. Though the new variable requires a quadratic root to be found, it (like MCT) does not require iteration to compute, and is found to perform better then MCT in circumstances in which the information from the missing transverse momentum (which the former retains and the latter discards) is both reliable and useful.

  20. MT Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECO Auger <SmarTurbineMIT-MRINewMT Energie

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/17-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDaUT-ab <-MT-b

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/17-MT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDaUT-ab <-MT-bd

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/5-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <caMT-a <

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/9-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpMT-a <

  5. City of Mt Pleasant, Utah (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban TransportMartinsville,Minidoka,City ofIowaMt Pleasant,

  6. Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountain ElectricMt Princeton Hot Springs

  7. Mt Wheeler Power, Inc (Utah) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountain ElectricMt Princeton Hot

  8. Mt Carmel Public Utility Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformation Biofuels,(RECP)Mt

  9. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,Spurr GeothermalInformationMt

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/1-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirect page JumpAK-aHI-aMT-a

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/13-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a < RAPID‎ID-a <MT-a

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/4-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-b <aibHI-aMT-a

  13. Executive Summary By J.R. Hatch and R.H. Affolter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter A Executive Summary By J.R. Hatch and R.H. Affolter Chapter A of Resource Assessment Coal Resource Assessment Click here to return to Disc 1 Volume Table of Contents #12;AII Contents) ............................... 5 Coal Resource Assessment

  14. Policy and practice concerning women with an RhD negative blood type : a midwifery perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harkness, Mairi

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2002 the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) made the recommendation that all pregnant women with an RhD negative blood type should be offered routine antenatal anti-D immunoglobulin (Ig) prophylaxis ...

  15. Monitoring and Targeting (M&T): A Low Investment, Low Risk Approach to Energy Cost Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMullan, A.; Rutkowski, M.; Karp, A.

    Monitoring and Targeting (M&T): A Low Investment, Low Risk Approach to Energy Cost Savings Andrew McMullan Mike Rutkowski Alan Karp Vice President President Manager Bus. Development VERITECH, INC. Sterling, VA ABSTRACT Monitoring... and Targeting (M&T) is a disciplined approach to energy management that ensures that energy resources are used to their maximmn economic advantage. M&T serves two principal functions: ? Ongoing, day-to-day control of energy use ? Planned improvements...

  16. ,"Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  17. IRS Data Retrieval Tool 2012-2013 FAFSA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 IRS Data Retrieval Tool 2012-2013 FAFSA Financial Aid Office University of California, San Diego #12;2 What is the IRS Data Retrieval Tool? · The IRS Retrieval Tool gives FAFSA applicants and parents the ability to transfer their data from the IRS to the FAFSA · The Retrieval Tool saves time and increases

  18. MT-SDF: Scheduled Dataflow Architecture with mini-threads Domenico Pace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    MT-SDF: Scheduled Dataflow Architecture with mini-threads Domenico Pace University of Pisa Pisa Dataflow (SDF) architecture. We call the new architecture MT-SDF. We introduce mini-threads to execute and quantitative comparison of the mini-threads with the original SDF architecture, and out-of-order superscalar

  19. An assessment of regional climate trends and changes to the Mt. Jaya glaciers of Irian Jaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kincaid, Joni L.

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Mt. Jaya glaciers has been lacking since the early 1970s. Using IKONOS satellite images, the ice extents of the Mt. Jaya glaciers in 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 were mapped. The mapping indicates that the recessional trend which began in the mid...

  20. Intraspecific evolution of Canary Island Plecotine bats, based on mtDNA sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard

    Intraspecific evolution of Canary Island Plecotine bats, based on mtDNA sequences J Pestano1 , RP investigated in the endemic Canary Island bat Plecotus teneriffae, based on B1 kb of mtDNA from the 16S r of differentiation between Canary Islands were quite high relative to Pipis- trelle-like bats, consistent

  1. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  2. A MT System from Turkmen to Turkish Employing Finite State and Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    between close language pairs can be relatively easier and can still benefit from simple(r) paradigms in MT with a disambiguation post-processing stage based on statistical language models. The very productive inflectionalA MT System from Turkmen to Turkish Employing Finite State and Statistical Methods A. Cüneyd TANTU

  3. A comparison of LH responses to intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous and intravenous administration of small doses of GnRH in cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rund, Lauretta Ann

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Small Doses of GnRH in Cattle. (August 1982) Lauretta Ann Rund, B. S. , University of Illinois Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Max Amoss The majority of studies investigating gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) control of gonadotropin secreti.... on in cattle have utilized large doses of GnRH. The magnitude of endogenous pulsatile LH release would suggest that a much smaller amount of GnRH would produce the desired LH release. In an effort to determine the optimum dose and method of administration...

  4. IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program Trial Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    the height is determined by the lengths of the blades of grass. This was not affected by Pendulum. The width was supported through funding from the USDA IR-4 Program, Western Region based at UC Davis, Davis, CA. Personnel (plant culture, data collection). The materials being tested were supplied by the manufacturer

  5. IRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Impact: OTRS requires contributions on total compensation (salary plus benefits) without regardIRS Contribution Limits and OSU Retirement Programs The OSU Defined Contribution Plan (DCP), (for Revenue Code 401(a). The Internal Revenue Code restrictions on employer-paid contributions make

  6. Behavior of trace and companion elements of ULC-IF steel grades during RH-treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungreithmeier, A.; Viertauer, A.; Presslinger, H. [Voest-Alpine Stahl Linz GmbH (Austria)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of metallurgical reactions are caused by lowering the partial pressure during vacuum treatment. One of these reactions is the volatilization of elements with high vapor pressure. The concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment mostly changes because of cooling scrap, deoxidation agents and ferro-alloy additions, slag/metal reactions, vaporization and also because of reactions with the RH-vessel lining. These changes in the concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment are exemplified for ULC-IF (ultra low carbon--interstitial free) steel grades. The elements which are considered are chromium, nickel, molybdenum, copper, vanadium, tin, zinc, lead, phosphorus, sulfur and nitrogen. Calculations of the theoretical equilibrium solubility using thermodynamic data--in dependence of pressure and temperature--correspond well with the values obtained during steel production operations. 67 refs.

  7. Impact of monsoons, temperature, and CO2 on the rainfall and ecosystems of Mt. Kenya during the Common Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    Impact of monsoons, temperature, and CO2 on the rainfall and ecosystems of Mt. Kenya during Leaf waxes Glacial and early Holocene-age sediments from lakes on Mt. Kenya have documented strong and atmospheric CO2 concentra- tions. However, little is known about climate and ecosystem variations on Mt. Kenya

  8. Cooling effect in emissions of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Bing Xia; Chinping Chen

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear characteristic emissions of K alpha, K beta and gamma with a significant triplet splitting at room temperature are observed from the long-lived nuclear state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung irradiation. A pronounced phase-transition-like narrowing of the emission profiles occurs immediately after the sample is cooled down to 77 K. The room temperature profiles reappear again abruptly and almost reversibly as the temperature drifts freely back to approximately the ice point after the filling of liquid nitrogen is stopped. These emission properties at 300 K and at low temperature may indicate that the 103mRh nuclei are in collective states.

  9. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis Conditions on CuSiO2. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: IR Thermography...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IR Thermography as a Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Tool for Lithium-Ion Battery Manufacturing Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: IR Thermography as a Non-Destructive...

  11. MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

  12. Extreme Galactic-Winds and Starburst in IR Mergers and IR QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Lipari; D. Sanders; R. Terlevich; S. Veilleux; R. Diaz; Y. Taniguchi; W. Zheng; D. Kim; Z. Tsvetanov; G. Carranza; H. Dottori

    2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report -as a part of a long-term study of mergers and IR QSOs- detailed spectroscopic evidences for outflow (OF) and/or Wolf Rayet features in: (i) low velocity OF in the ongoing mergers NGC 4038/39 and IRAS 23128-5919; (ii) extreme velocity OF (EVOF) in the QSOs IRAS 01003-2238 and IRAS 13218+0552; (iii) OF and EVOF in a complete sample of ultra-luminous IR galaxies/QSOs ("The IRAS 1 Jy MKO-KPNO Survey", of 118 objects). We found EVOF in IRAS 11119+3257, 14394+5332, 15130+1958 and 15462-0450. The OF components detected in these objects were mainly associated to starburst processes: i.e., to galactic-winds generated in multiple type II SN explosions and massive stars. The EVOF were detected in objects with strong starburst plus obscured IR QSOs; which suggest that interaction of both processes could generate EVOF. In addition, we analyze the presence of Wolf Rayet features in the large sample of Bright PG-QSOs (Boroson and Green 1992), and nearby mergers and galactic-wind galaxies. We found clear WR features in the Fe II QSOs (type I): PG 1244+026, 1444+407, 1448+273, 1535+547; and in the IR merger Arp 220. HST archive images of IR+BAL QSOs show in practically all of these objects "arc or shell" features probably associated to galactic-winds (i.e., to multiple type II SN explosions) and/or merger processes. Finally, we discuss the presence of extreme starburst and galactic wind as a possible evolutive link between IR merger and IR QSOs; where the relation between mergers and extreme starburst (with powerful galactic-winds) plays in important role, in the evolution of galaxies.

  13. DIGESTION DURING PREGNANCY AND LACTATION IN SHEEP R.H. WESTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DIGESTION DURING PREGNANCY AND LACTATION IN SHEEP R.H. WESTON C. S. /. R. O., Division of Animal on changes in the digestive function in the sheep during pregnancy and lactation although such information) digestion in the stomach and intestines. Some of the data are reported here and the studies will be reported

  14. Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Rh-Pd and Pt-Pd Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Feng; Grass, Michael E.; Zhang, Yawen; Butcher, Derek R.; Renzas, James R.; Liu, Zhi; Chung, Jen Y.; Mun, Bongjin S.; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and composition of core-shell Rh{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5} and Pt{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5} nanoparticle catalysts were studied in situ, during oxidizing, reducing, and catalytic reactions involving NO, O{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2} using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the Torr pressure range. The Rh{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5} nanoparticles undergo dramatic and reversible changes in composition and chemical state in response to oxidizing or reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions the Rh atoms segregate to the shell region while in reducing atmospheres the Pd atoms diffuse to the shell region. In contrast no significant segregation of Pd or Pt atoms was found in Pt{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5} nanoparticles. The distinct behavior in restructuring and chemical response of Rh{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5} and Pt{sub 0.5}Pd{sub 0.5} nanoparticle catalysts under the same reaction conditions illustrates the flexibility and tunability of the structure of bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts during catalytic reactions.

  15. Structural and dynamic properties of propane coordinated to TpRh(CNR) from a confrontation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    Structural and dynamic properties of propane coordinated to TpRh(CNR) from a confrontation between] in interaction with propane. Two complexes have been found as minima coordinated through either a methyl the methylene complex of propane into a methyl complex of pro- pane. This latter reaction has a much lower

  16. Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Ritsche, Michael

    Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH. The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere, and the wind speed and direction.

  17. L mt i tng nghin cu, qu v c nhng quyn li sau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    . Quyt nh này s không nh hng ti dch v chm sóc mà quý v nhn c ti bnh vin. c nhn mt bn sao ca mu chp thun

  18. TIME-VARIABLEFILTERING OF MtTLTI[CHANNELSIGNALS USING MULTIPLE WINDOWS COHERENCEAND THE WEYL TRANSFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandsten, Maria

    TIME-VARIABLEFILTERING OF MtTLTI[CHANNELSIGNALS USING MULTIPLE WINDOWS COHERENCEAND THE WEYL between all channel pairs. Time-frequency coherence functions are estimated using the multiple window

  19. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukat, Alexandra [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Edgar, Daniel [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Bratic, Ivana [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Maiti, Priyanka [Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany)] [Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Trifunovic, Aleksandra, E-mail: aleksandra.trifunovic@ki.se [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. {yields} This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. {yields} Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O{sub 2}) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  20. Association of intracellular calcium oscillations with release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from GT1-1 neuronal cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Chrystal Dawn

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the relationship of GnRH release with [Ca²?][] oscillations using the GT1-1 neuronal cell line. GnRH release was measured by radioimmunoassay of media incubated with GT1-1 neuronal cells for 1 hr with control or test substances to induce release of GnRH. [Ca...

  1. Effect of prostaglandin E? (PGE?) on the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from infundibular explants of cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Tyler Paul

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GnRH neuronal terminals located in the infundibulum of rodents have been shown to release GnRH when stimulated with PGE? in vivo and in vitro. The effect of PGE? on the release of GnRH has not been determined in cattle. Thus, the objective...

  2. Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental interest in that they add to a growing body of evidence indicating that certain, appropriately ligated, coordinatively unsaturated, subnanometer M4 transition-metal clusters can be relatively robust catalysts. Also demonstrated herein is that Rh4 clusters are poisoned by Hg(0), demonstrating for the first time that the classic Hg(0) poisoning test of 'homogeneous' vs 'heterogeneous'catalysts cannot distinguish Rh4-based subnanometer catalysts from Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysts, at least for the present examples of these two specific, Rh-based catalysts.

  3. Investigation of CaIr1-xPtxO3 and CaIr0.5Rh0.5O3 : structural properties, physical properties and stabilising conditions for post-perovskite oxides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirai, Shigeto

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Our understanding of the nature of Earth’s D” region was changed significantly by a recent finding by Murakami et al. (2004), who revealed a phase transition from perovskite to post-perovskite structure in MgSiO3 at about 125 GPa and 2500 K...

  4. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of heterocycles, including azoles, azolines, dihydroquinazolines, pyridines, and quinolines, with a wide range of functionalized olefins. They demonstrated the utility of this methodology in the synthesis of natural products, drug candidates, and other biologically active molecules. In addition, they developed conditions to directly arylate these heterocycles with aryl halides. The initial conditions that used PCy{sub 3} as a ligand were successful only for aryl iodides. However, efforts designed to avoid catalyst decomposition led to the development of ligands based on 9-phosphabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane (Phoban) that also facilitated the coupling of aryl bromides. They then replicated the unique coordination environment, stability, and catalytic activity of this complex using the much simpler tetrahydrophosphepine ligands and developed conditions that coupled aryl bromides bearing diverse functional groups without the use of a glovebox or purified reagents. With further mechanistic inquiry, they anticipate that researchers will better understand the details of the aforementioned Rh-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization reactions, resulting in the design of more efficient and robust catalysts, expanded substrate scope, and new transformations.

  5. Magnetism and superconductivity in U?PtxRh(1–x)C?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1–x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Néel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. In addition, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x.more »The reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.« less

  6. On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technology for RSW quality monitoring based on infrared (IR) thermography that can be adopted reliably and cost-effectively in high-volume...

  7. On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (NDE) technology for resistance spot weld (RSW) quality monitoring based on infrared (IR) thermography that can be adopted reliably and cost-effectively in high-volume...

  8. Colloidally Synthesized Monodisperse Rh Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Size- and Pretreatment-Dependent Studies of CO Oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grass, Michael E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    303 K for sorption measurements with H 2 (Praxair, 99.999%)or CO (Praxair, 99.99%). As-synthesized Rh(X)/SBA-15 samplesFlow rates of oxygen ( Praxair, 99.995%), carbon monoxide (

  9. Adequacy of a Small Quantity Site RH-TRU Waste Program in Meeting Proposed WIPP Characterization Objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biedscheid, J.; Stahl, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Peters, K.; Eide, J.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The first remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste is expected to be permanently disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The first RH-TRU waste shipments are scheduled from the Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) to WIPP in order to facilitate compliance with BCL Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) milestones. Milestones requiring RH-TRU waste containerization and removal from the site by 2004 in order to meet a 2006 site closure goal, established by Congress in the Defense Facilities Closure Projects account, necessitated the establishment and implementation of a site-specific program to direct the packaging of BCLDP RH-TRU waste prior to the finalization of WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements. The program was designed to collect waste data, including audio and videotape records of waste packaging, such that upon completion of waste packaging, comprehensive data records exist from which compliance with final WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements can be demonstrated. With the BCLDP data records generated to date and the development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) of preliminary documents proposing the WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization program, it is possible to evaluate the adequacy of the BCLDP program with respect to meeting proposed characterization objectives. The BCLDP characterization program uses primarily acceptable knowledge (AK) and visual examination (VE) during waste packaging to characterize RH-TRU waste. These methods are used to estimate physical waste parameters, including weight percentages of metals, cellulosics, plastics, and rubber in the waste, and to determine the absence of prohibited items, including free liquids. AK combined with computer modeling is used to estimate radiological waste parameters, including total activity on a waste container basis, for the majority of BCLDP RH-TRU waste. AK combined with direct analysis is used to characterize radiological parameters for the small populations of the RH-TRU waste generated by the BCLDP. All characterization based on AK is verified. Per its design for comprehensive waste data collection, the BCLDP characterization program using AK and waste packaging procedures, including VE during packaging, meets the proposed WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization objectives. The conservative program design implemented generates certification data that will be adequate to meet any additional program requirements that may be imposed by the CBFO.

  10. Colloidally Synthesized Monodisperse Rh Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Size- and Pretreatment-Dependent Studies of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grass, Michael E.; Joo, Sang Hoon; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle size dependence for CO oxidation over rhodium nanoparticles of 1.9-11.3 nm has been investigated and determined to be modified by the existence of the capping agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). The particles were prepared using a polyol reduction procedure with PVP as the capping agent. The Rh nanoparticles were subsequently supported on SBA-15 during hydrothermal synthesis to produce Rh/SBA-15 supported catalysts for size-dependent catalytic studies. CO oxidation by O{sub 2} at 40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2} was investigated over two series of Rh/SBA-15 catalysts: as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15 covering the full range of Rh sizes and the same set of catalysts after high temperature calcination and reduction. The turnover frequency at 443 K increases from 0.4 to 1.7 s{sup -1} as the particle size decreases from 11.3 to 1.9 nm for the as-synthesized catalysts. After calcination and reduction, the turnover frequency is between 0.1 and 0.4 s{sup -1} with no particle size dependence. The apparent activation energy for all catalysts is {approx}30 kcal mol{sup -1} and is independent of particle size and thermal treatment. Infrared spectroscopy of CO on the Rh nanoparticles indicates that the heat treatments used influence the mode of CO adsorption. As a result, the particle size dependence for CO oxidation is altered after calcination and reduction of the catalysts. CO adsorbs at two distinct bridge sites on as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15, attributable to metallic Rh(0) and oxidized Rh(I) bridge sites. After calcination and reduction, however, CO adsorbs only at Rh(0) atop sites. The change in adsorption geometry and oxidation activity may be attributable to the interaction between PVP and the Rh surface. This capping agent affect may open new possibilities for the tailoring of metal catalysts using solution nanoparticle synthesis methods.

  11. Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir(V), Ir(VI), or Ir(VII)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir: Density functional calculations are used to revisit the reaction mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed oxidation at higher oxidation state even though it can also promote O-O bond formation. Therefore, [(bpy

  12. Moving Object Detection and Compression in IR Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Amit

    infrared (IR) sensors. The aim is to use IR image sequences to detect moving objects (humans or vehicles computational power of computing devices attached to the sensor, the algorithms should be computationally simple implemented in C/C++ and their performance has been evaluated the using Hitachi's SH4 platform with software

  13. Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1 ,, Alpha T. N'Diaye1 §, Martin Engler1 , Carsten Busse a renewed interest as a route towards high quality graphene prepared in a reproducible manner. Here we employ two growth methods for graphene on Ir(111), namely room temperature adsorption and thermal

  14. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  15. Transitions between the $4f$-core-excited states in Ir$^{16+}$, Ir$^{17+}$, and Ir$^{18+}$ ions for clock applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. I. Safronova; V. V. Flambaum; M. S. Safronova

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Iridium ions near $4f$-$5s$ level crossings are the leading candidates for a new type of atomic clocks with a high projected accuracy and a very high sensitivity to the temporal variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. To identify spectra of these ions in experiment accurate calculations of the spectra and electromagnetic transition probabilities should be performed. Properties of the $4f$-core-excited states in Ir$^{16+}$, Ir$^{17+}$, and Ir$^{18+}$ ions are evaluated using relativistic many-body perturbation theory and Hartree-Fock-Relativistic method (COWAN code). We evaluate excitation energies, wavelengths, oscillator strengths, and transition rates. Our large-scale calculations includes the following set of configurations: $4f^{14-k}5s^{m}5p^{n}$ with $(k+m+n)$ equal to 3, 2, and 1 for the Ir$^{16+}$, Ir$^{17+}$, and Ir$^{18+}$ ions, respectively. The $5s-5p$ transitions are illustrated by the synthetic spectra in the 180 - 200 \\AA range. Large contributions of magnetic-dipole transitions to lifetimes of low-lying states in the region below 2.5 Ry are demonstrated.

  16. PARTICLE FILTER WITH EFFICIENT IMPORTANCE SAMPLING AND MODE TRACKING (PF-EIS-MT) AND ITS APPLICATION TO LANDMARK SHAPE TRACKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaswani, Namrata

    PARTICLE FILTER WITH EFFICIENT IMPORTANCE SAMPLING AND MODE TRACKING (PF-EIS-MT) AND ITS a practically implementable particle filtering (PF) method called "PF-EIS-MT" for tracking on large dimensional dimensions and (b) direct application of PF requires an impractically large number of particles. PF-EIS

  17. MSU Human Resources 19 Montana Hall ~ PO Box 172520 ~ Bozeman, MT 59717-2520

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    MSU Human Resources 19 Montana Hall ~ PO Box 172520 ~ Bozeman, MT 59717-2520 Tel (406) 994 with the Social Security Administration and State policies, the Human Resources procedure for Name and Address changes has been modified. The Human Resources Department uses two separate forms ­ one for name changes

  18. Dr. Joseph A. Shaw Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept., Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Dr. Joseph A. Shaw Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept., Montana State University, Bozeman, MT M.S. Electrical Engineering University of Utah 1987 B.S. Electrical Engineering University of Alaska Experience: 2008 ­ present Professor ­ Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) Department, Montana State

  19. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Receptive Field Positions in Area MT during Slow Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krekelberg, Bart

    Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Receptive Field Positions in Area MT during Slow Eye Movements Till S across eye movements. We first tested the hypothesis that motion signals are integrated by neurons whose receptive fields (RFs) do not move with the eye but stay fixed in the world. Specifically, we measured

  20. Hybrid Rule-Based Example-Based MT: Feeding Apertium with Sub-sentential Translation Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Way, Andy

    Hybrid Rule-Based ­ Example-Based MT: Feeding Apertium with Sub-sentential Translation Units Felipe S´anchez-Mart´inez Mikel L. Forcada Andy Way Dept. Llenguatges i Sistemes Inform`atics Universitat University Dublin 9, Ireland {mforcada,away}@computing.dcu.ie Abstract This paper describes a hybrid machine

  1. Job submission to grid computing environments RP Bruin, TOH White, AM Walker, KF Austen, MT Dove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Job submission to grid computing environments RP Bruin, TOH White, AM Walker, KF Austen, MT Dove Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS Abstract The problem of enabling scientist users to submit jobs to grid scientists to work with raw Globus job-submission commands ­ in the end they are likely to end up

  2. The School for Marine Science and The Heat Budget for Mt. Hope Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    SMAST, UMassD SMAST Technical Report No. SMAST-03-0801 The School for Marine Science and Technology not hold during the summer, when heat losses due to tidal exchanges between MHB and NB/SR may be important-fuel-fired electrical generating facility at Brayton Point, Massachusetts, on the Mt. Hope Bay ecosystem. Recent studies

  3. MS2a: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology -16MT Recommended Prerequisites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    MS2a: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology - 16MT Recommended Prerequisites None. In particular of statistical analysis and modelling to be properly interpreted. The fields of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology have this as their subject matter and there is no sharp boundary between them. Bioinformatics has

  4. Mid- and Far-Infrared Reflection/Absorption Spectroscopy (IRAS) Studies of NO on Rh Single Crystal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peden, Charles HF; He, Ting; Pilling, M.; Hirschmugl, Carol J.; Gardner, P.

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NO/CO reaction over Rh metal in automobile catalytic converters is critical to the control of emissions of these pollutant molecules. As part of a program to determine the elementary mechanism(s) of this reaction, we have been performing mid- and far-infrared reflection/absorption spectroscopic (IRAS) measurements of the adsorption and co-adsorption and co-adsorption of NO and CO on Rh single crystal surfaces. Of particular interest is the low-frequency range of the IRAS spectra where we hoped to observe features due to metal-N stretching and/or bending vibrational motions. In particular, we hoped to obtain information regarding the site-requirements for the dissociation of the NO molecule on various Rh single crystal surfaces. An important result from our earlier work is that the selectivity of the reaction for the two nitrogen-containing products, N2 and N2O, is a strong function of the Rh surface structure. On the basis of ancillary data, we suggested that the location of adsorbed NO and N-atoms (formed from dissociation of adsorbed NO) on various Rh surfaces could, perhaps account for the selectivity differences.

  5. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO? for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO? cubes and CeO? rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO?-cubes > RhPd/CeO? -rods > RhPd/CeO?- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO?-cubes and RhPd/CeO? -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic -more »oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria« less

  6. Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenyu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scheme 2) and pyrrole hydrogenation (Scheme 3). Synthesis ofSynthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole

  7. Exchange interaction in hexagonal MnRhP from first-principles studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X. B., E-mail: liuxubo@uta.edu; Zhang, Qiming; Ping Liu, J., E-mail: pliu@uta.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Yue, M. [College of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100022 Beijing (China); Altounian, Z. [Centre for the Physics of Materials and Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties for MnRhP have been studied from a first-principles density functional calculation. The calculated lattice constants, a?=?6.228 Å and c?=?3.571?Å, are in good agreement with the experimental values of a?=?6.223 Å and c?=?3.585?Å. The calculated moment of Mn is 3.1 ?{sub B}/atom, resulting in a total moment of 3.0 ?{sub B}/atom due to small moments induced at Rh and P sites. The magnetic moment of Mn decreases with unit cell size. The exchange interactions are dominated by positive Mn-Mn exchange coupling (J{sub Mn?Mn}), implying a stable ferromagnetic ordering in Mn sublattice. In particular, J{sub Mn?Mn} shows a maximum value (1.5 mRy) at the the optimized unit cell size. The structural distortion or unit cell size change will affect J{sub Mn?Mn}, which is intimately related to the magneto-elastic and magneto-caloric effect.

  8. Three-minute oscillations above sunspot umbra observed with SDO/AIA and NoRH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reznikova, V E; Sych, R A; Nakariakov, V M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-minute oscillations over sunspot's umbra in AR 11131 were observed simultaneously in UV/EUV emission by SDO/AIA and in radio emission by Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). We use 24-hours series of SDO and 8-hours series of NoRH observations to study spectral, spatial and temporal variations of pulsations in the f = 5 - 9 mHz range at different layers of solar atmosphere. High spatial and temporal resolution of SDO/AIA in combination with longduration observations allowed us to trace the variations of the cut-off frequency and spectrum of oscillations across the umbra. We found that higher frequency oscillations are more pronounced closer to the umbra's center, while the lower frequencies concentrate to the peripheral parts. We interpreted this discovery as a manifestation of variation of the magnetic field inclination across the umbra at the level of temperature-minimum. This interpretation has been used for diagnostics of sunspot atmosphere on this level.

  9. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-La/C Catalyzed Carbonylatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-LaC Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol to Acetates. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-LaC Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol...

  10. On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technology for spot weld quality monitoring based on infrared (IR) thermography that can be adopted reliably and cost-effectively in high-volume...

  11. Ir. Charles Mussche 8 Spruce St, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ir. Charles Mussche 8 Spruce St, New York 10038 NYC Mobile: +1 (347 at an industrial solar-energy project developer. Function: Autonomy Auditing New business in Renewable Energy Ecole Des Mines ParisTech ­ Kassel University First Semester

  12. DWEA Webinar: IRS Guidance for Small Wind Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued Notice 2015-4 providing new performance and quality standards of small wind turbines – defined as having a nameplate capacity of up to 100 kW – in...

  13. IR-laser initiated combustion -- A step toward complete combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laghai, A.; Nabavi, S.H.; Servati, H.B.; Syed, F.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new global environmental regulations for reducing the engine emissions from both moving and stationary sources, as well as improvement in fuel economy are the major motifs to obtain a perfect combustion process and exhaust aftertreatment methods. Infrared (IR)-Laser initiated combustion provides a very high initial temperature, which produces propagation of a turbulent thermopressure pulse that results in a fast burning and improved combustion. The role of IR is to maximize the heat generation efficiency.

  14. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C. (Fairfield, OH); Taylor, Larry T. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  15. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  16. LOCA simulation in NRU program: data report for the fourth materials experiment (MT-4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.L.; Mohr, C.L.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Russcher, G.E.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This experiment (MT-4) was funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate ballooning and rupture during adiabatic heatup in the temperature range of 1033 to 1200K (1400 to 1700/sup 0/F). The 12 rest rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 4.62 MPa (670 psia) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 test rods ruptured with an average strain of 43.7% at the maximum flow blockage elevation of 2.68 m (105.4 in.). Experimental data for the MT-4 transient experiment and post-test measurements and photographs of the fuel are presented in this report.

  17. Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around {sup 192}Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 55, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate {sup 192}Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate ({approx}0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a {sup 192}Ir wire source.

  18. Altered Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling in Response to mtDNA Depletion or a Ketogenic Diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selfridge, Jennifer Eva

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    kinase kinase MCI Mild cognitive impairment MCT Monocarboxylate transporter Mfn Mitofusin mtDNA Mitochondrial DNA mTOR Mammalian target of rapamycin mTORC1 mTOR complex 1 MRC Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex NAD(H) Nicotinamide adenine...; Smith et al., 1991; Sultana et al., 2010). Many studies suggest that oxidative damage is also present in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a syndromic state that in many cases represents a very early AD clinical stage (Aluise et al...

  19. Global analysis of genetic variation in human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujihara, Junko [Department of Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane (Japan); Soejima, Mikiko [Department of Forensic Medicine and Human Genetics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Toshihiro [Division of Medical Genetics and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui (Japan); Koda, Yoshiro [Department of Forensic Medicine and Human Genetics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka (Japan); Agusa, Tetsuro [Department of Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane (Japan); Kunito, Takashi [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan); Tongu, Miki; Yamada, Takaya [Department of Experimental Animals, Center for Integrated Research in Science, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo (Japan); Takeshita, Haruo, E-mail: htakeshi@med.shimane-u.ac.j [Department of Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane (Japan)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of the AS3MT gene at the global level. The distribution of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AS3MT was performed in 827 individuals from 10 populations (Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Mongolian, Tibetans, Sri Lankan Tamils, Sri Lankan Sinhalese, Nepal Tamangs, Ovambo, and Ghanaian). In the African populations, the A allele in A6144T was not observed; the allele frequencies of C35587 were much lower than those in other populations; the allele frequencies of A37616 and C37950 were relatively higher than those in other populations. Among Asian populations, Mongolians showed a different genotype distribution pattern. A lower C3963 and T6144 frequencies were observed, and, in the C37616A and T37950C polymorphism, the Mongolian population showed higher A37616 and C37950 allele frequencies than other Asian populations, similarly to the African populations. A total of 66 haplotypes were observed in the Ovambo, 48, in the Ghanaian, 99, in the Japanese, 103, in the Korean, 103, in the South Chinese, 20, in the Sri Lankan Tamil, 12, in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese, 21, in the Nepal Tamang, 50, in the Tibetan, and 45, in the Mongolian populations. The D' values between the SNP pairs were extremely high in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese population. Relatively higher D' values were observed in Mongolian and Sri Lankan Tamil populations. Network analysis showed two clusters that may have different origins, African and Asians (Chinese and/or Japanese). The present study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a world wide distribution of 18 SNPs in AS3MT.

  20. Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of Ce(Ru0.67Rh0.33)4Sb12. Geoff D. Staneff1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asimow, Paul D.

    Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of Ce(Ru0.67Rh0.33)4Sb12. Geoff D. Staneff1 , Paul D compositions show promise for thermoelectric applications. Current work was undertaken with a nominal composition of Ce(Ru0.67Rh0.33)4Sb12 to experimentally verify its potential as an n-type thermoelectric

  1. Tidally dominated depositional environment for the Mt. Simon Sandstone in central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, M.L.; Lasemi, Z. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several hundred feet of core from the upper part of the Mt. Simon in central Illinois have been examined macroscopically. Grain sizes and their systematics, bedding characteristics, sedimentary structures, and relationships among beds show that the upper Mt. Simon Sandstone is composed of a series of fining-upward cycles up to 10 m (30 feet) thick. A typical cycle consists, in ascending order, of a sandy subtidal facies, a mixed sand and mud intertidal-flat facies, and a muddy upper tidal-flat facies upward through the succession, the maximum and average grain size becomes progressively finer and the cycles thinner. The lower sandstone of each cycle contains beds that are massive to cross bedded and cross laminated; some beds show scoured reactivation surfaces. A few cycles contain a middle unit characterized by flaser and lenticular bedding and abundant mudcracks. Mudcracks also are common in the shale beds at the top of each cycle. Sedimentary structures such as reactivation surfaces, flaser and lenticular bedding, and mudcracks suggest that these cycles were deposited in peritidal environments. The presence of Skolithos in some cycles suggests very shallow marine conditions. The within-cycle upward fining is caused by regression or progradation that reflects a progressive decrease in current velocity from subtidal to intertidal parts of the tidal flat. Frequent flooding of the tidal flat resulted in repeated fining-upward cycles within the upper part of the Mt. Simon Sandstone.

  2. Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of the novel A-site deficient Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Yuta [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Kakemoto, Hirofumi [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Nishiyama, Shin [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Irie, Hiroshi, E-mail: hirie@yamanashi.ac.jp [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel thermoelectric material, A-site-deficient spinel Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}, was prepared by subtracting Li ions from Li{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} immersed in a K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} aqueous solution. The electric conductivity ({sigma}) increased 6-fold after extracting Li ({sigma}=8.8 S/cm (Li{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}), 50 S/cm (Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 600 Degree-Sign C), whereas the Seebeck coefficient (S) only slightly increased (S=203 {mu}V/K (Li{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}), 216 {mu}V/K (Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 600 Degree-Sign C). In Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}, a mixed-valence configuration of Rh{sup 3+} and Rh{sup 4+} at a ratio of 1 to 1 and a half-deficient A-site were realized, resulting in high {sigma} and even slightly increased S, which were likely attributed to the rather high power factor of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} W/m K{sup 2} at 600 Degree-Sign C. Our findings demonstrate that controlling the Rh{sup 4+}/Rh{sup 3+} ratio is a promising method for enhancing the thermoelectric properties. - Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of power factor (PF) of Li{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Li{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-site-deficient Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4} was prepared by subtracting Li from Li{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Rh{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixed-valence configuration with a Rh{sup 4+}/Rh{sup 3+} ratio of 1 was likely realized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such a configuration lead to an enhanced {sigma} of 50S/cm and S of 216 {mu}V/K at 600 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlling the Rh{sup 4+}/Rh{sup 3+} ratio is a candidate for enhancing the thermoelectricity.

  3. GnRH-induced LH release in heifers: effect of nutrient restriction during gestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killen, James Harold

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF GESTATION Seasonal r SG2 Variabl m SE mean CS 32 31 a 3 2 a 5. 6 28. 95 1. 15 b 26 2. 9 ~ 1 b 26 4 ' 9 . 1 a 21 17. 97 1. 48 SGwhei fera in SGI entered the study on or before June 8, 1981 and heifer s in SG2 entered the study on or after... SG2 a iable an SE n m SE LHPK LHCX LHlf 12 12 48. 92 13. 89 86. 86 22. 52 21. 98 5. 75 18 49. 94 14. 34 ie 94. 78 18 24 ~ 21 6. 38 LHPmpeak LH response to GnRH&ngr'm1) ~ LHC=area under the LH response curve in units. L~ean LH r esponse...

  4. Energetics of C-H Bond Activation of Fluorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using a [TpRh(CNneopentyl)] Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    Energetics of C-H Bond Activation of Fluorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using a [Tp activation of fluorinated aromatic hydrocarbons by [TpRh(CNneopentyl)] resulted in the formation of products of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts to activate and functionalize C-H bonds of hydrocarbons for industrial

  5. RH-TRU Waste Shipments from Battelle Columbus Laboratories to the Hanford Nuclear Facility for Interim Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, J.; Baillieul, T. A.; Biedscheid, J.; Forrester, T,; McMillan, B.; Shrader, T.; Richterich, L.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds by 2006, as directed by Congress. Most of the resulting waste (approximately 27 cubic meters [m3]) is remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The BCL, under a contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Ohio Field Office, has initiated a plan to ship the TRU waste to the DOE Hanford Nuclear Facility (Hanford) for interim storage pending the authorization of WIPP for the permanent disposal of RH-TRU waste. The first of the BCL RH-TRU waste shipments was successfully completed on December 18, 2002. This BCL shipment of one fully loaded 10-160B Cask was the first shipment of RH-TRU waste in several years. Its successful completion required a complex effort entailing coordination between different contractors and federal agencies to establish necessary supporting agreements. This paper discusses the agreements and funding mechanisms used in support of the BCL shipments of TRU waste to Hanford for interim storage. In addition, this paper presents a summary of the efforts completed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the 10-160B Cask system. Lessons learned during this process are discussed and may be applicable to other TRU waste site shipment plans.

  6. ETME 422 -REFRIGERATION & HVAC SYSTEMS FALL 2011 LEC -10:00 -10:50am M W F RH 312

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    10/31/2011 ETME 422 - REFRIGERATION & HVAC SYSTEMS FALL 2011 LEC - 10:00 - 10:50am M W F RH 312. -- Refrigeration and heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) for comfort and industrial applications, low temperature refrigeration cycles; air distribution and fan-duct analysis, design/selection of HVAC

  7. Ternary PtSnRhSnO2 nanoclusters: synthesis and electroactivity for ethanol oxidation fuel cell reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenkel, Anatoly

    Ternary PtSnRh­SnO2 nanoclusters: synthesis and electroactivity for ethanol oxidation fuel cell. Ethanol becomes an attractive fuel in the fuel cell reactions compared with methanol and hydrogen, because­4 A major impediment to the commercialization of ethanol fuel cell stacks is the difficulty in designing

  8. Investigation of the Mechanism of Alkane Reductive Elimination and Skeletal Isomerization in TpRh(CNneopentyl)(R)H Complexes: The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    metal deuteride complexes, TpRh- (L)(R)D, and the scrambling of the deuterium label into the R elimination are shown to be the result of an inverse equilibrium isotope effect between the alkyl hydride(deuteride exchange between a metal deuteride complex and its alkyl ligands prior to reductive elimination,7

  9. Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon supports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Xinhe

    Catalytic conversion of syngas into C2 oxygenates over Rh-based catalysts--Effect of carbon synthesis other than grain fermentation, e.g. from syngas, because syngas can be conveniently manufactured we first undertake a brief overview of the catalyst development for syngas conversion to C2

  10. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemore »of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.« less

  11. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Wang, Kefeng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Amato, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Khasanov, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Luetkens, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Petrovic, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cook, R. M. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Lees, M. R. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Morenzoni, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??² with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  12. EXPERIENCE FROM TWO SMALL QUANTITY RH-TRU WASTE SITES IN NAVIGATING THROUGH AN EVOLVING REGULATORY LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biedscheid, Jennifer; Devarakonda, Murthy; Eide, Jim; Kneff, Dennis

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Two small quantity transuranic (TRU) waste generator sites have gained considerable experience in navigating through a changing regulatory landscape in their efforts to remove the TRU waste from their sites and proceed with site remediation. The Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) has the objectives of decontaminating nuclear research buildings and associated grounds and remediating to a level of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. As directed by Congress, BCLDP must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006. This schedule requires the containerization of all TRU waste in 2002. BCLDP will generate a total of approximately 27 cubic meters (m3) of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Similarly, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is scheduled to close in 2006 pursuant to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Boeing Canoga Park, the management and operating contractor for ETEC. ETEC had 11.0 m3 of RH-TRU and contact-handled (CH) TRU waste in storage, with the requirement to remove this waste in 2002 in order to meet their site closure schedule. The individual milestones for BCLDP and ETEC necessitated the establishment of site-specific programs to direct packaging and characterization of RH-TRU waste before the regulatory framework for the WIPP disposal of RH-TRU waste is finalized. The lack of large infrastructure for characterization activities, as well as the expedited schedules needed to meet regulatory milestones, provided both challenges and opportunities that are unique to small quantity sites. Both sites have developed unique programs for waste characterization based on the same premise, which directs comprehensive waste data collection efforts such that additional characterization will not be required following the finalization of the WIPP RH-TRU waste program requirements. This paper details the BCLDP program evolution in terms of strategy, innovative solutions to waste characterization, and development of alternative transportation options. Preliminary indications from various regulatory and oversight agencies and professional organizations are that the BCLDP RH-TRU waste characterization program is the ''model WIPP certification program'' and will satisfy anticipated regulatory expectations. This paper also summarizes how BCLDP lessons learned and their development of new resources were applied to the RH-TRU waste characterization and disposition program at ETEC.

  13. Review of potential technologies for the treatment of Methyl tertiary butyl Ether (MtBE) in drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Browne, T.E. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Devinny, J.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, the state of knowledge on effective treatment technologies for MtBE in drinking water, and groundwater in general, is limited. Research by others is focusing on the remediation of MtBE close to the point of release. The City of Santa Monica, MWD, Komex and USC are currently conducting research into different technologies that could be used to remove MtBE from drinking water supplies. The objectives of the research are to evaluate different treatment technologies to identify cost-effective and technically feasible alternatives for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. The evaluation is considering moderate to high water flow rates (100 to 2,000+ gpm) and low to moderate MtBE concentrations (<2,000 {mu}g/l). The research program includes four phases: (1) Literature Review; (2) Bench Scale Study; (3) Field Scale Pre-pilot Study; and (4) Summary Evaluation. This paper presents some preliminary information and findings from the first phase of this research - the literature review. The review discusses the chemical properties of MtBE and how they affect remediation and thus, an evaluation of alternative treatment technologies. The review of available literature, and the applicability and limitations of the following technologies are presented in detail.

  14. The Michigan Recreational Angler Survey Tracking status and trends of Michiga ir resource use ir resource use n's anglers and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Michigan Recreational Angler Survey Tracking status and trends of Michiga ir resource use ir of angling effort for all of Michigan's fisheries · · Method · Monthly, statewide mail survey of Michigan's licensed anglers Priority Outcomes & Management Applications glers · s · Baseline

  15. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min [Harvard School of Public Health

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  16. Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MtBE) contamination of the City of Santa Monica drinking water supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Farrow, J.R.C. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R.A. [City of Santa Monica, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 1996, the City of Santa Monica ceased pumping groundwater from two Well Fields (Charnock and Arcadia) used for public drinking water supply due to persistent and increasing concentrations of MtBE in all seven municipal water supply wells. This lost production accounted for 50% of the City`s total drinking water supply. In late 1996, the City, in cooperation with State and Federal agencies, initiated an investigation of MtBE contamination at the two well fields. The objectives of the investigation were as follows: (1) Review available data on the production, use, chemical characteristics, fate and transport, toxicology, and remediation of MtBE; (2) Identify locations of potential sources of MtBE groundwater contamination at the well fields; (3) Develop an understanding of the hydrologic pathways from the potential sources to the drinking water wells; and (4) Evaluate alternative treatment technologies for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. In addition to a review of available information about MtBE, the investigation included an extensive review of literature and available data relevant to the well fields, including well field production histories, site and regional hydrogeology, all well logs and production in the groundwater basins, general groundwater quality, and the record of MtBE detection. Based upon the review of background information, conceptual hydrogeologic models were developed. A detailed review of agency files for over 45 potential source sites was conducted. The information from this review was summarized, and source site screening and ranking criteria were developed. A field program was conducted at the major well field (Charnock), including soil gas surveys, CPTs, soil borings and well installations, geophysics, and aquifer testing. The field program provided site data which allowed the conceptual hydrogeologic model to be refitted to actual site conditions.

  17. The Investigation on Fibrous Veins and Their Host from Mt. Ida, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jae Won

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of the host is given by: ?* = 3b/(16kBV0B) (2) where b is the radius of rock sphere containing one vein or spherical crystal, ?* is the critical value of surrounding host rock viscosity, k is a constant in kinetic law for precipitation/dissolution... goal to test some of these implications. 7 2. GEOLOGY Samples of fibrous veins were collected from Paleozoic Womble Shale around Mt. Ida, Arkansas (Fig. 2). The study area lies within the Benton Uplift of eastern Arkansas. The Benton Uplift...

  18. Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpen EnergyKauaiMt Ranier Area (Frank,

  19. Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpen EnergyKauaiMt Ranier Area

  20. Structural and magnetic properties in the polymorphs of CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Deepti; Subbarao, Udumula [New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore-560064 (India); Rayaprol, Sudhindra [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, R-5 Shed, B.A.R.C Campus, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Peter, Sebastian C., E-mail: sebastiancp@jncasr.ac.in [New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore-560064 (India)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the structural and magnetic properties in the polymorphs of a new compound CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5}. Depending upon the starting materials, and the slightly different synthesis method, we find that CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} compound exists in two different space groups. The first compound, ?-CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} crystallizes in tetragonal ?-ThSi{sub 2} structure type in space group I4{sub 1}/amd with lattice parameters, a=4.2034(6) Å and c=14.770(3) Å. In this structure, the cerium atoms occupy the position between the Rh/Ge tetrahedral layers. On the other hand, the second compound, namely ?-CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} crystallizes in the AlB{sub 2} type hexagonal structure in space group P6/mmm, with lattice parameters, a=4.2615(7) Å and c=4.1813(9) Å. The crystal structure of ?-CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} consists of two dimensional Rh/Ge hexagonal units and the cerium atoms are sandwiched between them. Magnetization studies exhibit magnetic ordering, as evident from a sharp peak in the plot of magnetic susceptibility measured as a function of temperature in a fixed magnetic field, in ?-CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} and ?-CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} at 3.6 K and 12 K, respectively. Structural and magnetic properties of both compounds are presented and discussed here. - Graphical abstract: Two polymorphs of a new compound CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} in the ?-ThSi{sub 2} and AlB{sub 2} structure types were synthesized by arc melting. The magnetic measurements of both CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} phases suggest spin-glass behavior. - Highlights: • A new compound CeRh{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 1.5} in two difference phases was synthesized by arc melting. • The crystal structure of both compounds was determined from the single crystal XRD. • Isothermal relaxation measurements suggesting spin-glass like anomalies in both phases.

  1. Scientific Coordination Prof. dr. ir. Michel De Paepe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    govern- ments) in order to reduce CO2 emissions and the use of fossil fuels. Ten years later we seeScientific Coordination Prof. dr. ir. Michel De Paepe Department of Flow, heat and combustion that fuel prices have doubled and energy saving has reached a point of economic importance in the whole span

  2. UV/IR duality in noncommutative quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Fischer; Richard J. Szabo

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the construction of renormalizable noncommutative euclidean phi(4)-theories based on the UV/IR duality covariant modification of the standard field theory, and how the formalism can be extended to scalar field theories defined on noncommutative Minkowski space.

  3. The nature of the first order isostructural transition in GdRhSn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sachin [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay; Suresh, K G [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay; Nigam, A K [Tara Institute of Fundamental Resarch; Mudryk, Y [Ames Laboratory; Paudyal, D [Ames Laboratory; Pecharsky, V K [Ames Laboratory; Gschneidner, Karl A [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present structural, magnetic, thermal, magnetocaloric, and electrical transport properties of polycrystalline GdRhSn. Magnetization data show that it orders antiferromagnetically at TN = 16.2 K. The compound has the ZrNiAl type hexagonal crystal structure at room temperature and undergoes a first order iso-structural transition in the paramagnetic state at 245 K. The unit cell volume change at the transition is small (-0.07 %) but discontinuous, in agreement with the first-order nature of the transition observed by magnetic, transport, and heat capacity measurements. The anisotropic changes of the lattice parameters are ?a/a = 0.28 % and ?c/c = -0.64 % on cooling. A substantial change in the 4f and conduction electron hybridization, giving rise to an increased integrated DOS, occurs when the high temperature phase transforms to the low temperature phase. A moderate magnetocaloric effect at TN (?SM = -6.5 J/kg K and ?Tad = 4.5 K for ?H= 50 kOe) has been measured using both magnetization and heat capacity data

  4. R.H. Saunders GS concrete growth mitigation project instrumentation and finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeghe, L.; Hindy, A.; Ho, M.S. [Hydroelectric Business Unit, Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, concrete expansion due to Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR), was diagnosed as the cause of operational and structural problems at R.H. Saunders Generating Station. Reestablishment of contraction joints between the generating units by cutting slots was initiated in January 1993 to relieve accumulated stresses and allow further expansion without deforming the turbine-generators. An integral part of the remedial measure is the installation of an extensive instrumentation system and development of detailed finite element models of the powerhouse structures. In total, two hundred and thirty five instruments have been installed. The instruments include surface extensometers, borehole extensometers, crackmeters, stressmeters, pendulums, thermocouples, borehole convergence meters and strain gauges. All the instruments are monitored continuously by an Automatic Data Acquisition System (ADAS) which allows instrument data to be evaluated remotely. This instrumentation system is being used to collect data on the structural concrete expansion and response to slot cutting. To complement the instrumentation data, three different finite element models have been developed for use. The models range from a very detailed representation of a single powerhouse unit to a less detailed model of the sixteen-unit powerhouse. The finite element models have been calibrated to reflect measured data and subsequently used to estimate the location and frequency of future cuts.

  5. Magnetism and superconductivity in U?PtxRh(1–x)C?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeham, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ni, Ni [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Bauer, E. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thompson, J. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tegtmeier, E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ronning, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U?PtxRh(1–x)C?, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Néel temperature of U?Rh?C? of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. In addition, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ? 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. The reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.

  6. Asymmetric “melting” and “freezing” kinetics of the magnetostructural phase transition in B2-ordered FeRh epilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vries, M. A. de, E-mail: m.a.devries@ed.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Loving, M.; Lewis, L. H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); McLaren, M.; Brydson, R. M. D. [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Liu, X. [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China); Langridge, S. [ISIS, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marrows, C. H., E-mail: c.h.marrows@leeds.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to study the phase transformation processes during the magnetostructural transition in a B2-ordered FeRh (001)-oriented epilayer grown on MgO by sputtering. Out-of-plane lattice constant measurements within the hysteretic regime of the transition reveal a microstructure consistent with the coexistence of lattice-expanded and contracted phases in spatially distinct regions. It was found that the phase separation is more pronounced during cooling than heating. Furthermore, whilst lattice-expanded domains that span the height of the film can be undercooled by several kelvins, there is no equivalent superheating. This asymmetry between the cooling and heating processes in FeRh is consistent with the difference in the kinetics of generic freezing and melting transitions.

  7. Structural and functional studies of a phosphatidic acid-binding antifungal plant defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR motif governing fungal cell entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagaram, Uma S.; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghoottama; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly conserved plant defensin MtDef4 potently inhibits the growth of a filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. MtDef4 is internalized by cells of F. graminearum. To determine its mechanism of fungal cell entry and antifungal action, NMR solution structure of MtDef4 has been determined. The analysis of its structure has revealed a positively charged patch on the surface of the protein consisting of arginine residues in its ?-core signature, a major determinant of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. Here, we report functional analysis of the RGFRRR motif of the ?-core signature of MtDef4. The replacement of RGFRRR to AAAARR or to RGFRAA not only abolishes fungal cell entry but also results in loss of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. MtDef4 binds strongly to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Mutations of RGFRRR which abolish fungal cell entry of MtDef4 also impair its binding to PA. Our results suggest that RGFRRR motif is a translocation signal for entry of MtDef4 into fungal cells and that this positively charged motif likely mediates interaction of this defensin with PA as part of its antifungal action.

  8. Investigation of microstructure, surface morphology, and hardness properties of PtIr films by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chao-Te; Liu, Bo-Heng; Chang, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yu-Wei [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pt{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x} films with x varying from 22.76 to 63.25 at. % are deposited on (100) Si wafer substrates at 400 deg. C by magnetron sputtering deposition. The effects of the Ir concentration on the microstructure, morphology, and hardness of PtIr films are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and nanoindentation system. The columnar structures are observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that PtIr films have preferred orientation along Pt(111) when the Ir concentration is below 50.84 at. %. When the Ir content is more than 50.84 at. %, the PtIr film shifts to another preferred orientation, Ir(111). The surface morphology is analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The roughness of the PtIr films decreases with increasing Ir content. The hardness of all the PtIr films is below 20 GPa. The maximum hardness of the PtIr films is about 14.9 GPa when the Ir concentration is 57.9 at. %.

  9. A COMPARATIVE ASTROCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTELLAR OBJECTS NGC 7538 IRS 9 AND IRS 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barentine, John C.; Lacy, John H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a spectroscopic study of the high-mass protostellar object NGC 7538 IRS 9 and compare our observations to published data on the nearby object NGC 7538 IRS 1. Both objects originated in the same molecular cloud and appear to be at different points in their evolutionary histories, offering an unusual opportunity to study the temporal evolution of envelope chemistry in objects sharing a presumably identical starting composition. Observations were made with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, a sensitive, high spectral resolution (R {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx_equal} 100,000) mid-infrared grating spectrometer. Forty-six individual lines in vibrational modes of the molecules C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CO were detected, including two isotopologues ({sup 13}CO, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O) and one combination mode ({nu}{sub 4} + {nu}{sub 5} C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). Fitting synthetic spectra to the data yielded the Doppler shift, excitation temperature, Doppler b parameter, column density, and covering factor for each molecule observed; we also computed column density upper limits for lines and species not detected, such as HNCO and OCS. We find differences among spectra of the two objects likely attributable to their differing radiation and thermal environments. Temperatures and column densities for the two objects are generally consistent, while the larger line widths toward IRS 9 result in less saturated lines than those toward IRS 1. Finally, we compute an upper limit on the size of the continuum-emitting region ({approx}2000 AU) and use this constraint and our spectroscopy results to construct a schematic model of IRS 9.

  10. NO Adsorption and Dissociation on Rh(111): PM-IRAS Study W. T. Wallace, Y. Cai, M. S. Chen, and D. W. Goodman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    -modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy to study the adsorption/ dissociation of NO on Rh(111). While that the N atoms may diffuse into the near-surface metal region. The latter conclusion followed because

  11. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts....

  12. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of...

  13. Novel Techniques for Single-Pulse Spectrum and Pulsewidth Measurements for an IR-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemans, W.P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ofthe LBL/Stanford diagnostics. FEL Thespectral andtemporalMeasurements for an IR-FEL W.P. Leemans, J.A. Edighoffer, K-Measurements for an IR-FEL* W. P. Leemans, J. A. Edighoffer,

  14. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  15. THERMAL FLUID MODELING OF BEPCII IR QUADRUPOLE MAGNET CRYOSTAT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG.L.; TANG,H.M.; ZHANG,X.B.; YANG,G.D.; JIA,L.X.

    2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of superconducting interaction region quadrupole magnets for BEPCII was designed and fabricated at Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA. The cryogenic system for the IR magnets was designed at Harbin Institute of Technology, China. This paper provides the results of thermal fluid modeling for the magnet cryostat. The numerical analyses were carried out for two types of cooling methods, the subcooled liquid helium and the supercritical helium flow. The pressure and temperature changes in the cooling circuits are given.

  16. Rational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (0)3 85 59 53 85 E-mail: anna.dupleix@ensam.eu Abstract Heating green wood logs by infrared (IR-line IR heating system installed on the peeling lathe. Keywords: green wood; heating; infrared; modelingRational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments Anna

  17. Uncooled thin film pyroelectric IR detector with aerogel thermal isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncooled pyroelectric IR imaging systems, such as night vision goggles, offer important strategic advantages in battlefield scenarios and reconnaissance surveys. Until now, the current technology for fabricating these devices has been limited by low throughput and high cost which ultimately limit the availability of these sensor devices. We have developed and fabricated an alternative design for pyroelectric IR imaging sensors that utilizes a multilayered thin film deposition scheme to create a monolithic thin film imaging element on an active silicon substrate for the first time. This approach combines a thin film pyroelectric imaging element with a thermally insulating SiO{sub 2} aerogel thin film to produce a new type of uncooled IR sensor that offers significantly higher thermal, spatial, and temporal resolutions at a substantially lower cost per unit. This report describes the deposition, characterization and optimization of the aerogel thermal isolation layer and an appropriate pyroelectric imaging element. It also describes the overall integration of these components along with the appropriate planarization, etch stop, adhesion, electrode, and blacking agent thin film layers into a monolithic structure. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. UV/IR mode mixing and the CMB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palma, Gonzalo A. [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Physics Department, FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Patil, Subodh P. [Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well understood that spatial noncommutativity, if indeed realized in nature, is a phenomenon whose effects are not just felt at energy scales comparable to the noncommutativity scale. Loop effects can transmit signatures of any underlying noncommutativity to macroscopic scales (a manifestation of a phenomenon that has come to be known as UV/IR mode mixing) and offer a potential lever to constrain the amount of noncommutativity present in nature, if present at all. Field theories defined on noncommutative spaces (realized in string theory when D-branes are coupled to backgrounds of nontrivial RR background flux), can exhibit strong UV/IR mode mixing, manifesting in a nonlocal one-loop effective action. In the context of inflation in the presence of any background noncommutativity, we demonstrate how this UV/IR mixing at the loop level can allow us to place severe constraints on the scale of noncommutativity if we presume inflation is responsible for large-scale structure. We demonstrate that any amount of noncommutativity greatly suppresses the cosmic microwave background power at all observable scales, independent of the scale of inflation, and independent of whether or not the noncommutativity tensor redshifts during inflation, therefore nullifying a very salient and successful prediction of inflation.

  19. MT1-MMP promotes cell growth and ERK activation through c-Src and paxillin in three-dimensional collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takino, Takahisa; Tsuge, Hisashi; Ozawa, Terumasa [Department of Molecular Virology and Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Virology and Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sato, Hiroshi, E-mail: vhsato@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Virology and Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Virology and Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is essential for tumor invasion and growth. We show here that MT1-MMP induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in cancer cells cultured in collagen gel, which is indispensable for their proliferation. Inhibition of MT1-MMP by MMP inhibitor or small interfering RNA suppressed activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK in MT1-MMP-expressing cancer cells, which resulted in up-regulation of p21{sup WAF1} and suppression of cell growth in collagen gel. Cell proliferation was also abrogated by the inhibitor against ERK pathway without affecting FAK phosphorylation. MT1-MMP and integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} were shown to be involved in c-Src activation, which induced FAK and ERK activation in collagen gel. These MT1-MMP-mediated signal transductions were paxillin dependent, as knockdown of paxillin reduced cell growth and ERK activation, and co-expression of MT1-MMP with paxillin induced ERK activation. The results suggest that MT1-MMP contributes to proliferation of cancer cells in the extracellular matrix by activating ERK through c-Src and paxillin.

  20. EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

  1. Retreat of Glaciers in Glacier National Park In Glacier National Park (GNP), MT some effects of global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retreat of Glaciers in Glacier National Park In Glacier National Park (GNP), MT some effects of global climate change are strikingly clear. Glacier recession is underway, and many glaciers have already disappeared. The retreat of these small alpine glaciers reflects changes in recent climate as glaciers respond

  2. Hydrocarbon emission features in the IR spectra of warm supergiants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.H. Jr.; Cohen, M.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Werner, M.W.; Bregman, J.D. (NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in the 3-13 micron range are presented for two objects possessing the unidentified 21-micron feature, IRAS 22272 and IRAS 07134, which were obtained in the course of search for circumstellar aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission bands. The 3.3 and 6.2 micron bands are attributed to circumstellar PAH molecules, and the 6-9 micron plateau and the 12- and 6.9-micron lines are attributed to larger, aromatic hydrocarbon clusters. These are the coolest stars known to exhibit the IR emission bands. The 21-micron feature is conjectured to also originate in a carbonaceous carrier. 29 refs.

  3. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinai, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Moritz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Université de Lorraine, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Bandiera, S. [Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  4. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  5. CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  6. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masud, Jahangir [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Nguyena, Trung V. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Singh, Nirala [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); McFarland, Eric [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Ikenberry, Myles [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Hohn, Keith [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Pan, Chun-Jern [National Taiwan University of Science & Technology, Tapei (Taiwan); Hwang, Bing-Joe [National Taiwan University of Science & Technology, Tapei (Taiwan)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchange current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.

  7. Development of CO2 measurement system in a remote area under harsh observation environment -a case of Mt. Fuji

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) GlassBottle 7/27 11007/27 1100 7/30 11007/30 1100 8/12 17008/12 1700 Measurement; a case of Mt. Fuji summer start at 3,9,15,21(JST) once / day starting at 15:00 (from 16/08/2009) (Glass bottle sampling (1L JMA facilities. We appreciate for their help with the glass bottle sampling and our activities

  8. Assignment 4 BS4a Actuarial Science Oxford MT 2011 IX A.4 Inflation, taxation and project appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkel, Matthias

    Assignment 4 ­ BS4a Actuarial Science ­ Oxford MT 2011 IX A.4 Inflation, taxation and project are indexed by reference to the value of a retail price index with a time lag of 8 months. The retail price index value in September 1996 was Q(-8/12) = 200 and in March 1997 was Q(-2/12) = 206. The issue price

  9. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  10. Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnets for the LHC IR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbi, G.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Coccoli, M.; Dietderich, D.r.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.R.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of insertion quadrupoles with 205 T/m gradient and 90 mm bore represents a promising strategy to achieve the ultimate luminosity goal of 2.5 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At present, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor which can meet these requirements. Since Nb{sub 3}Sn is brittle, and considerably more strain sensitive than NbTi, the design concepts and fabrication techniques developed for NbTi magnets need to be modified appropriately. In addition, IR magnets must provide high field quality and operate reliably under severe radiation loads. The results of conceptual design studies addressing these issues are presented.

  11. Figure S1.Technical diagram of the 1-by-3 tandem differential mobility analyzer (cf. schematic diagram shown in Figure 1). Relative humidity sensors are located at positions RH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DMAmono, and after the efflorescence test of RH0 - back to RH0 ( = 5). The three rows successively show mobility diameter. Distributions having aqueous particles are shown in red and those having solid particles humidity generation a. Aerosol generation 20 20 Ejector Pump Excess Nebulizer OR Mixing region ORVB VB

  12. Dark Matter Particle Spectroscopy at the LHC: Generalizing M(T2) to Asymmetric Event Topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konar, Partha; /Florida U.; Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.; ,

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider SUSY-like missing energy events at hadron colliders and critically examine the common assumption that the missing energy is the result of two identical missing particles. In order to experimentally test this hypothesis, we generalize the subsystem M{sub T2} variable to the case of asymmetric event topologies, where the two SUSY decay chains terminate in different 'children' particles. In this more general approach, the endpoint M{sub T2(max)} of the M{sub T2} distribution now gives the mass {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}) of the parent particles as a function of two input children masses {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)} and {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}. We propose two methods for an independent determination of the individual children masses M{sub c}{sup (a)} and M{sub c}{sup (b)}. First, in the presence of upstream transverse momentum PUTM the corresponding function {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}, P{sub UTM}) is independent of P{sub UTM} at precisely the right values of the children masses. Second, the previously discussed MT2 'kink' is now generalized to a 'ridge' on the 2-dimensional surface {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}). As we show in several examples, quite often there is a special point along that ridge which marks the true values of the children masses. Our results allow collider experiments to probe a multi-component dark matter sector directly and without any theoretical prejudice.

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr. (comps.) [comps.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  14. Systematics of the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity in Ba(Fe1-xMx)?As? (M=Co, Rh, Ni, and Pd)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tanatar, M. A.; Ni, N.; Thaler, A.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Prozorov, R.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature-dependent interplane resistivity ?c(T) was measured systematically as a function of transition-metal substitution in the iron-arsenide superconductors Ba(Fe1-xMx)?As?, M=Ni, Pd, Rh. The data are compared with the behavior found in Ba(Fe1-xCox)?As?, revealing resistive signatures of pseudogap. In all compounds we find resistivity crossover at a characteristic pseudogap temperature T* from nonmetallic to metallic temperature dependence on cooling. Suppression of T* proceeds very similarly in cases of Ni and Pd doping and much faster than in similar cases of Co and Rh doping. In cases of Co and Rh doping an additional minimum in the temperature-dependent ?c emerges for high dopings, when superconductivity is completely suppressed. These features are consistent with the existence of a charge gap covering part of the Fermi surface. The part of the Fermi surface affected by this gap is notably larger for Ni- and Pd-doped compositions than in Co- and Rh-doped compounds.

  15. Photocytotoxicity of a New Rh2(II,II) Complex: Increase in Cytotoxicity upon Irradiation Similar to That of PDT Agent Hematoporphyrin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Claudia

    Photocytotoxicity of a New Rh2(II,II) Complex: Increase in Cytotoxicity upon Irradiation Similar, Texas 77842, and Food and Drug Administration, College Park, Maryland 20740 Received January 17, 2005- calating complex 1 towards Hs-27 human skin cells in the dark and upon irradiation with visible light

  16. Tuning the Curie temperature of L1{sub 0} ordered FePt thin films through site-specific substitution of Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Dongbin, E-mail: dongbin.xu@seagate.com [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Sun, Cheng-Jun, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov, E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Heald, Steve M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, Gan Moog, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov, E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhou, Tie-Jun [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Bergman, Anders; Sanyal, Biplab [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In structurally ordered magnetic thin films, the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of ferromagnetic films depends on the exchange integral of the short range ordered neighboring atoms. The exchange integral may be adjusted by controlling the elemental substitutional concentration at the lattice site of interest. We show how to control the T{sub C} in high anisotropy L1{sub 0} Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} magnetic thin films by substituting Rh into the Pt site. Rh substitution in L1{sub 0} FePt modified the local atomic environment and the corresponding electronic properties, while retaining the ordered L1{sub 0} phase. The analysis of extended x-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra shows that Rh uniformly substitutes for Pt in L1{sub 0} FePt. A model of antiferromagnetic defects caused by controlled Rh substitution of the Pt site, reducing the T{sub C,} is proposed to interpret this phenomenon and its validity is further examined by ab initio density functional calculations.

  17. Mechanism of Homogeneous Ir(III) Catalyzed Regioselective Arylation of Olefins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    . On the basis of this mechanism, we suggest new catalysts expected to have improved activity. Initiation by reduction. Recently, Matsumoto2-4 and Periana5 reported the synthesis of a novel Ir complex, [Ir (turn- over-frequency (TOF) of 10-3 s-1 at 200 °C), but there are also problems with selectivity, cost

  18. A Comparison of LSA, WordNet and PMI-IR for Predicting User Click Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornof, Anthony

    A Comparison of LSA, WordNet and PMI-IR for Predicting User Click Behavior Ishwinder Kaur. This paper discusses a comparison of three semantic systems--LSA, WordNet and PMI-IR--to evaluate their performance in predicting the link that people would select given an information goal and a webpage. PMI

  19. The Nature of OH/IR Stars in the Galactic Centre Region Joris Blommaert,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sjouwerman, Loránt

    The Nature of OH/IR Stars in the Galactic Centre Region Joris Blommaert, Sterrewacht Leiden, P, 439 92 Onsala, Sweden Abstract. We report on infrared observations of stars in a field of 30 0 near distinct populations of OH/IR stars near the galactic centre is addressed. The dust­to­gas mass loss ratio

  20. The development of in-situ calibration method for divertor IR thermography in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeuchi, M.; Sugie, T.; Ogawa, H.; Takeyama, S.; Itami, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For the development of the calibration method of the emissivity in IR light on the divertor plate in ITER divertor IR thermography system, the laboratory experiments have been performed by using IR instruments. The calibration of the IR camera was performed by the plane black body in the temperature of 100–600 degC. The radiances of the tungsten heated by 280 degC were measured by the IR camera without filter (2.5–5.1 ?m) and with filter (2.95 ?m, 4.67 ?m). The preliminary data of the scattered light of the laser of 3.34 ?m that injected into the tungsten were acquired.

  1. Observations of roAp stars at the Mt. Dushak-Erekdag station of Odessa Astronomical Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. N. Dorokhova; N. I. Dorokhov

    1998-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1992, observations of roAp stars have been carried out using the dual-channel photometer attached to the 0.8m telescope, which is situated in Central Asia, at the Mt. Dushak-Erekdag station of Odessa Astronomical Observatory. Some results of observations of gamma Equ and of HD 134214 are presented. 5 stars were investigated as roAp candidates. The Fourier spectra of 4 stars did not show any variability in the high-frequency region. The Fourier spectrum of HD 99563 revealed a peak at a frequency f=128.9 c/d and with a semi-amplitude of 3.98 mmag.

  2. Stretching and bending with flexible FT-IR process monitors, probes and software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.C. [KVB/Analect, Utica, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    FT-IR process analyzers continue to gain recognition for reliable and accurate on-line analyses on a broad variety of processes around the world. When fast analyses are required, on-line FT-IR analyzers offer speed and specificity for many applications. The use of FT-IR spectroscopy, either in the Mid-IR region or Near IR region offers fundamental advantages over other technologies. These advantages make calibrations exceptionally stable for an analyzer over time and offer improved ease of calibration transfer between similar analyzers. Spectral region selection criteria are reviewed, to help define when to use the Mid-IR region or the Near-IR region (or even when to use parts of both) for a given sample stream. New fiber optic sampling probes for transmission, attenuated total reflection, diffuse reflection and web sensing have solved nagging problems. What many process analyzer specialists are discovering is that new probes are becoming available each month, offering newer process tolerance (can tolerate higher temp or pressure) or even new sampling approaches altogether. This paper describes on-line applications in pharmaceuticals, specialty chemicals, polymer production and refinery production which demonstrate the range of techniques used to appropriately optimize the on-line analyzer. In addition, calibration transfer issues will be discussed, demonstrating the importance of the software tools to help sort out the causes for cal errors (spectral contamination, etc.).

  3. An infrared study of galactic OH/IR stars. I. An optical/near-IR atlas of the Arecibo sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. M. Jiménez-Esteban; L. Agudo-Mérida; D. Engels; P. García-Lario

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present optical and near-infrared finding charts, accurate astrometry (~1") and single-epoch near-infrared photometry for 371 IRAS sources, 96% of those included in the so-called Arecibo sample of OH/IR stars (Eder et al. 1988; Lewis et al. 1990a; Chengalur et al. 1993). The main photometric properties of the stars in the sample are presented and discussed as well as the problems found during the process of identification of the optical/near-infrared counterparts. In addition, we also identify suitable reference stars in each field to be used for differential photometry purposes in the future. We find that 39% of the sources (144 in number) have no optical counterpart, 8 of them being invisible even at near infrared wavelengths. The relative distribution of sources with and without optical counterpart in the IRAS two-colour diagram and their characteristic near infrared colours are interpreted as the consequence of the increasing thickness of their circumstellar shells. Among the objects not detected at near infrared wavelengths four non-variable sources are proposed to be heavily obscured post-AGB stars which have just very recently left the AGB. Eight additional objects with unusually bright and/or blue near-infrared colours are identified as candidate post-AGB stars and/or proto-planetary nebulae.

  4. A polymorphism in metallothionein 1A (MT1A) is associated with cadmium-related excretion of urinary beta 2?microglobulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Lijian [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China) [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi (China); Chang, Xiuli [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Rentschler, Gerda [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden); Tian, Liting [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Guoying; Chen, Xiao [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Jin, Taiyi, E-mail: tyjinster@gmail.com [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Broberg, Karin, E-mail: karin.broberg_palmgren@med.lu.se [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-22185, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: Cadmium (Cd) toxicity of the kidney varies between individuals despite similar exposure levels. In humans Cd is mainly bound to metallothioneins (MT), which scavenge its toxic effects. Here we analyzed whether polymorphisms in MT genes MT1A and MT2A influence Cd-related kidney damage. Methods: In a cross-sectional study N = 512 volunteers were selected from three areas in South-Eastern China, which to varying degree were Cd-polluted from a smelter (control area [median Cd in urine U-Cd = 2.67 ?g/L], moderately [U-Cd = 4.23 ?g/L] and highly [U-Cd = 9.13 ?g/L] polluted areas). U-Cd and blood Cd (B-Cd) concentrations were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MT1A rs11076161 (G/A), MT2A rs10636 (G/C) and MT2A rs28366003 (A/G) were determined by Taqman assays; urinary N-Acetyl-beta-(D)-Glucosaminidase (UNAG) by spectrometry, and urinary ?2-microglobulin (UB2M) by ELISA. Results: Higher B-Cd (natural log-transformed) with increasing number of MT1A rs11076161 A-alleles was found in the highly polluted group (p-value trend = 0.033; all p-values adjusted for age, sex, and smoking). In a linear model a significant interaction between rs11076161 genotype and B-Cd was found for UNAG (p = 0.001) and UB2M concentrations (p = 0.001). Carriers of the rs11076161 AA genotype showed steeper slopes for the associations between Cd in blood and natural log-transformed UB2M (? = 1.2, 95% CI 0.72–1.6) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.30, 95% CI 0.15–0.45). Also for UNAG (natural log-transformed) carriers of the AA genotype had steeper slopes (? = 0.55, 95% CI 0.27–0.84) compared to GG carriers (? = 0.018, 95% CI ? 0.79–0.11). Conclusions: MT1A rs11076161 was associated with B-Cd concentrations and Cd-induced kidney toxicity at high exposure levels. -- Highlights: ? Cadmium is toxic to the kidney but the susceptibility differs between individuals. ? The toxic effect of cadmium is scavenged by metallothioneins. ? A common variant of metallothionein 1A was genotyped in 512 cadmium exposed humans. ? Variant carriers of this polymorphism showed more kidney damage from cadmium. ? The frequency of these variants needs to be taken into account in risk assessment.

  5. US-LARP Progress on LHC IR Upgrades Tanaji Sen, John Johnstone, Nikolai Mokhov, FNAL, Batavia, IL 60510

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tanaji

    of a long-range interaction on the beams. IR DESIGNS Design and construction of next generation IR magnets in determining these parameters. The required field quality is another key input to the magnet designers. An IR to higher luminosity. In the designs to be presented here, we consider the inner triplet magnets

  6. Recap Clustering: Introduction Clustering in IR K-means Evaluation How many clusters? Introduction to Information Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    Recap Clustering: Introduction Clustering in IR K-means Evaluation How many clusters? Introduction;Recap Clustering: Introduction Clustering in IR K-means Evaluation How many clusters? Overview 1 Recap 2 Clustering: Introduction 3 Clustering in IR 4 K-means 5 Evaluation 6 How many clusters? Sch¨utze: Flat

  7. COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir IRAN Isfahn University of Technology 08.03.2007 http://www.iut.ac.ir IRAN The University of Isfahn 15/03/2011 http://www.ui.ac.ir IRAN Shahid Bahonar University of Kermn 06.06.2005 http

  8. Searches for supersymmetry using the MT2 variable in hadronic events produced in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) are performed using a sample of hadronic events produced in 8 TeV pp collisions at the CERN LHC. The searches are based on the MT2 variable, which is a measure of the transverse momentum imbalance in an event. The data were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. Two related searches are performed. The first is an inclusive search based on signal regions defined by the value of the MT2 variable, the hadronic energy in the event, the jet multiplicity, and the number of jets identified as originating from bottom quarks. The second is a search for a mass peak corresponding to a Higgs boson decaying to a bottom quark-antiquark pair, where the Higgs boson is produced as a decay product of a SUSY particle. For both searches, the principal backgrounds are evaluated with data control samples. No significant excess over the expected number of background events is observed, and exclusion limits on various SUSY models are derived.

  9. LOCA simulation in the national research universal reactor program: postirradiation examination results for the third materials experiment (MT-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, W.N.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. The third materials experiment (MT-3) was the sixth in the series of thermal-hydraulic and materials deformation/rutpure experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The main objective of the experiment was to evaluate ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling in the temperature range from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F (1030 to 1090 K). The 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 550 psi (3.8 MPa) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 of the rods ruptured, with an average peak bundle strain of approx. 55%. The UKAEA also funded destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) of several of the ruptured rods from the MT-3 experiment. This report describes the work performed and presents the PIE results. Information obtained during the PIE included cladding thickness measurements metallography, and particle size analysis of the cracked and broken fuel pellets.

  10. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Ba/Rh NOx Traps for Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Harold; Vemuri Balakotaiah

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project a combined experimental and theoretical approach was taken to advance our understanding of lean NOx trap (LNT) technology. Fundamental kinetics studies were carried out of model LNT catalysts containing variable loadings of precious metals (Pt, Rh), and storage components (BaO, CeO{sub 2}). The Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor provided transient data under well-characterized conditions for both powder and monolith catalysts, enabling the identification of key reaction pathways and estimation of the corresponding kinetic parameters. The performance of model NOx storage and reduction (NSR) monolith catalysts were evaluated in a bench scale NOx trap using synthetic exhaust, with attention placed on the effect of the pulse timing and composition on the instantaneous and cycle-averaged product distributions. From these experiments we formulated a global model that predicts the main spatio-temporal features of the LNT and a mechanistic-based microkinetic models that incorporates a detailed understanding of the chemistry and predicts more detailed selectivity features of the LNT. The NOx trap models were used to determine its ability to simulate bench-scale data and ultimately to evaluate alternative LNT designs and operating strategies. The four-year project led to the training of several doctoral students and the dissemination of the findings as 47 presentations in conferences, catalysis societies, and academic departments as well 23 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals. A condensed review of NOx storage and reduction was published in an encyclopedia of technology.

  11. Improved Correction of IR Loss in Diffuse Shortwave Measurements: An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, K; Long, CN

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple single black detector pyranometers, such as the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, are known to lose energy via infrared (IR) emission to the sky. This is especially a problem when making clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements, which are inherently of low magnitude and suffer the greatest IR loss. Dutton et al. (2001) proposed a technique using information from collocated pyrgeometers to help compensate for this IR loss. The technique uses an empirically derived relationship between the pyrgeometer detector data (and alternatively the detector data plus the difference between the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures) and the nighttime pyranometer IR loss data. This relationship is then used to apply a correction to the diffuse SW data during daylight hours. We developed an ARM value-added product (VAP) called the SW DIFF CORR 1DUTT VAP to apply the Dutton et al. correction technique to ARM PSP diffuse SW measurements.

  12. FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

  13. Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

    We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

  14. Estimated IR and phosphorescence emission fluxes for specific Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Red Rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mulas; G. Malloci; C. Joblin; D. Toublanc

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the tentative identification of the blue luminescence in the Red Rectangle by Vijh et al. (2005), we compute absolute fluxes for the vibrational IR emission and phosphorescence bands of three small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The calculated IR spectra are compared with available ISO observations. A subset of the emission bands are predicted to be observable using presently available facilities, and can be used for an immediate, independent, discriminating test on their alleged presence in this well-known astronomical object.

  15. DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL D. Douglas, S. V, Newport News, VA23606, USA Abstract An upgrade of the Jefferson Lab IR FEL [1] is now un- der construction. It will provide 10 kW output light power in a wavelength range of 2­10 µm. The FEL will be driven by a modest

  16. Wiedemann-Franz law and nonvanishing temperature scale across the field-tuned quantum critical point of YbRh2Si2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, J.-Ph. [Universite de Sherbrooke; Tanatar, Makariy [Ames Laboratory; Daou, R. [Universite de Sherbrooke; Hu, Rongwei [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Petrovic, C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Taillefer, Louis [Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-plane thermal conductivity kappa and electrical resistivity rho of the heavy-fermion metal YbRh2Si2 were measured down to 50 mK for magnetic fields H parallel and perpendicular to the tetragonal c axis, through the field-tuned quantum critical point H-c, at which antiferromagnetic order ends. The thermal and electrical resistivities, w L0T/kappa and rho, show a linear temperature dependence below 1 K, typical of the non-Fermi-liquid behavior found near antiferromagnetic quantum critical points, but this dependence does not persist down to T = 0. Below a characteristic temperature T-star similar or equal to 0.35 K, which depends weakly on H, w(T) and rho(T) both deviate downward and converge as T -> 0. We propose that T-star marks the onset of short-range magnetic correlations, persisting beyond H-c. By comparing samples of different purity, we conclude that the Wiedemann-Franz law holds in YbRh2Si2, even at H-c, implying that no fundamental breakdown of quasiparticle behavior occurs in this material. The overall phenomenology of heat and charge transport in YbRh2Si2 is similar to that observed in the heavy-fermion metal CeCoIn5, near its own field-tuned quantum critical point.

  17. Thermodynamic Studies of [H2Rh(diphosphine)2]+ and [HRh(diphosphine)2(CH3CN)]2+ Complexes in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaron D. Wilson; Alexander J. M. Miller; Daniel L. DuBois; Jay A. Labinger; John E. Bercaw

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic studies of a series of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ and [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes have been carried out in acetonitrile. Seven different diphosphine (PP) ligands were selected to allow variation of the electronic properties of the ligand substituents, the cone angles, and the natural bite angles (NBAs). Oxidative addition of H2 to [Rh(PP)2]+ complexes is favored by diphosphine ligands with large NBAs, small cone angles, and electron donating substituents, with the NBA being the dominant factor. Large pKa values for [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes are favored by small ligand cone angles, small NBAs, and electron donating substituents with the cone angles playing a major role. The hydride donor abilities of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ complexes increase as the NBAs decrease, the cone angles decrease, and the electron donor abilities of the substituents increase. These results indicate that if solvent coordination is involved in hydride transfer or proton transfer reactions, the observed trends can be understood in terms of a combination of two different steric effects, NBAs and cone angles, and electron-donor effects of the ligand substituents.

  18. Thermodynamic Studies of [H2Rh(diphosphine)2]+ and [HRh(diphosphine)2(CH3CN)]2+ Complexes in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Aaron D.; Miller, Alexander J.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Labinger, Jay A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic studies of a series of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ and [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes have been carried out in acetonitrile. Seven different diphosphine (PP) ligands were selected to allow variation of the electronic properties of the ligand substituents, the cone angles, and the natural bite angles (NBAs). Oxidative addition of H2 to [Rh(PP)2]+ complexes is favored by diphosphine ligands with large NBAs, small cone angles, and electron donating substituents, with the NBA being the dominant factor. Large pKa values for [HRh(PP)2(CH3CN)]2+ complexes are favored by small ligand cone angles, small NBAs, and electron donating substituents with the cone angles playing a major role. The hydride donor abilities of [H2Rh(PP)2]+ complexes increase as the NBAs decrease, the cone angles decrease, and the electron donor abilities of the substituents increase. These results indicate that if solvent coordination is involved in hydride transfer or proton transfer reactions, the observed trends can be understood in terms of a combination of two different steric effects, NBAs and cone angles, and electron-donor effects of the ligand substituents. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  19. Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979. [Pt/Rh, Ni/Rh, Ni/Pt/Rh, Ni, Ni/Ru, Ni/Pt, Ni/Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S; Mayer, C P

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelve steam reforming catalysts were evaluated using an autothermal reforming screening unit. Duplicate tests were run with two samples to determine test variability. The samples tested contained either base metals, precious metals, or combinations of base and precious metals. The test was capable of distinguishing among samples where gross variations in composition are the main factor; for example, catalysts containing 2% by weight precious metals are more active than catalysts containing 15% by weight nickel. The results show a decrease in hydrocarbon breakthrough as the weight of nickel charged to the constant volume reactor increases. A commercial nickel catalyst, G90C, appears slightly better than some Engelhard prepared samples of equal nickel concentrations due to the higher density of G90C. Visual observation of the used catalysts show that samples containing only precious metals (Pt/Rh) did not coke during the run. The samples containing only base metals (nickel, cobalt) were coked and were magnetic. Samples containing 14.5% nickel by weight with 0.5% precious metals by weight added were not coked, were not magnetic, and had a blue colored core as compared to the black core of the virgin samples. Some speculation about deactivation mechanisms based on these observations are made.

  20. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erikat, I. A., E-mail: ihsanas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Jerash University, Jerash-26150 (Jordan); Hamad, B. A. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75?ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  1. Comment on ``A modified leapfrog scheme for shallow water equations'' by Wen-Yih Sun and Oliver M.T. Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    Commentary Comment on ``A modified leapfrog scheme for shallow water equations'' by Wen-Yih Sun and Oliver M.T. Sun Paul D. Williams Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK a r t i c l e i n f integration of the shallow-water equa- tions using the leapfrog time-stepping scheme [Sun Wen-Yih, Sun Oliver

  2. The mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway is capable of mediating nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk through the PPAR system of transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parl, Angelika; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Clay, Hayley B.; Reiss, Sara; Li, Zhen; Murdock, Deborah G., E-mail: deborah.murdock@vanderbilt.edu

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •The function of the mitochondria fatty acid synthesis pathway is partially unknown. •Overexpression of the pathway causes transcriptional activation through PPARs. •Knock down of the pathway attenuates that activation. •The last enzyme in the pathway regulates its own transcription. •Products of the mtFASII pathway are able to drive nuclear transcription. -- Abstract: Mammalian cells contain two fatty acid synthesis pathways, the cytosolic FASI pathway, and the mitochondrial FASII pathway. The selection behind the conservation of the mitochondrial pathway is not completely understood, given the presence of the cytosolic FAS pathway. In this study, we show through heterologous gene reporter systems and PCR-based arrays that overexpression of MECR, the last step in the mtFASII pathway, causes modulation of gene expression through the PPAR pathway. Electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate that overexpression of MECR causes increased binding of PPARs to DNA, while cell fractionation and imaging studies show that MECR remains localized to the mitochondria. Interestingly, knock down of the mtFASII pathway lessens the effect of MECR on this transcriptional modulation. Our data are most consistent with MECR-mediated transcriptional activation through products of the mtFASII pathway, although we cannot rule out MECR acting as a coactivator. Further investigation into the physiological relevance of this communication will be necessary to better understand some of the phenotypic consequences of deficits in this pathway observed in animal models and human disease.

  3. MID-IR LUMINOSITIES AND UV/OPTICAL STAR FORMATION RATES AT z < 1.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salim, Samir; Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Michael Rich, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Charlot, Stephane [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Lee, Janice C. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G. [Departamento de AstrofIsica, Facultad de CC. FIsicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Noeske, Kai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Papovich, Casey; Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Faber, S. M. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ivison, Rob J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Frayer, David T. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Walton, Josiah M. [University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)], E-mail: samir@noao.edu

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) nonionizing continuum and mid-infrared (IR) emission constitute the basis of two widely used star formation (SF) indicators at intermediate and high redshifts. We study 2430 galaxies with z < 1.4 in the Extended Groth Strip with deep MIPS 24 {mu}m observations from FIDEL, spectroscopy from DEEP2, and UV, optical, and near-IR photometry from the AEGIS. The data are coupled with dust-reddened stellar population models and Bayesian spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to estimate dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). In order to probe the dust heating from stellar populations of various ages, the derived SFRs were averaged over various timescales-from 100 Myr for 'current' SFR (corresponding to young stars) to 1-3 Gyr for long-timescale SFRs (corresponding to the light-weighted age of the dominant stellar populations). These SED-based UV/optical SFRs are compared to total IR luminosities extrapolated from 24 {mu}m observations, corresponding to 10-18 {mu}m rest frame. The total IR luminosities are in the range of normal star-forming galaxies and luminous IR galaxies (10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L{sub sun}). We show that the IR luminosity can be estimated from the UV and optical photometry to within a factor of 2, implying that most z < 1.4 galaxies are not optically thick. We find that for the blue, actively star-forming galaxies the correlation between the IR luminosity and the UV/optical SFR shows a decrease in scatter when going from shorter to longer SFR-averaging timescales. We interpret this as the greater role of intermediate age stellar populations in heating the dust than what is typically assumed. Equivalently, we observe that the IR luminosity is better correlated with dust-corrected optical luminosity than with dust-corrected UV light. We find that this holds over the entire redshift range. Many so-called green valley galaxies are simply dust-obscured actively star-forming galaxies. However, there exist 24 {mu}m detected galaxies, some with L{sub IR}>10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, yet with little current SF. For them a reasonable amount of dust absorption of stellar light (but presumably higher than in nearby early-type galaxies) is sufficient to produce the observed levels of IR, which includes a large contribution from intermediate and old stellar populations. In our sample, which contains very few ultraluminous IR galaxies, optical and X-ray active galactic nuclei do not contribute on average more than {approx}50% to the mid-IR luminosity, and we see no evidence for a large population of 'IR excess' galaxies.

  4. COII/tRNA[sup Lys] intergenic 9-bp deletion and other mtDNA markers clearly reveal that the Tharus (Southern Nepal) have oriental affinities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passarino, G.; Semino, O.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A.S.; Modiano, G. (Universita di Tor Vergata (Romania))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors searched for the East Asian mtDNA 9-bp deletion in the intergenic COII/tRNA[sup Lys] region in a sample of 107 Tharus (50 from central Terai and 57 from eastern Terai), a population whose anthropological origin has yet to be completely clarified. The deletion, detected by electrophoresis of the PCR-amplified nt 7392-8628 mtDNA fragment after digestion with HaeIII, was found in about 8% of both Tharu groups but was found in none of the 76 Hindus who were examined as a non-Oriental neighboring control population. A complete triplication of the 9-bp unit, the second case so far reported, was also observed in one eastern Tharu. All the mtDNAs with the deletion, and that with the triplication, were further characterized (by PCR amplification of the relevant mTDNA fragments and their digestion with the appropriate enzymes) to locate them in the Ballinger et al. phylogeny of East Asian mtDNA haplotypes. The deletion was found to be associated with four different haplotypes, two of which are reported for the first time. One of the deletions and especially the triplication could be best explained by the assumption of novel length-change events. Ballinger's classification of East Asian mtDNA haplotypes is mainly based on the phenotypes for the DdeI site at nt 10394 and the AluI site at nt 10397. Analysis of the entire Tharu sample revealed that more than 70% of the Tharus have both sites, the association of which has been suggested as an ancient East Asian peculiarity. These results conclusively indicate that the Tharus have a predominantly maternal Oriental ancestry. Moreover, they show at least one and perhaps two further distinct length mutations, and this suggests that the examined region is a hot spot of rearrangements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  6. Microsoft Word - ORNL RH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE LMI-EFRCAddendum 1April 1,5 BONNEVILLE2NEWS

  7. Microsoft Word - SRS RH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT2 3.670TheFOR

  8. RH TRU Waste Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmart SensorsData -Madison Physics

  9. RH_SRS_Shipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December 11,

  10. Co layer thickness dependence of exchange biasing for IrMnCo and FeMnCo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Anne

    Co layer thickness dependence of exchange biasing for IrMnÕCo and FeMnÕCo K. A. Seua) and H. Huang) in IrMn/Co and FeMn/Co bilayers using the magneto-optical Kerr effect. Samples are sputtered wedges on silicon with Co thicknesses ranging from 1 to 17 nm. The IrMn/Co with exchange bias interface energy of 0

  11. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apreutesei, Mihai [Centro de Física, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal and MATEIS Laboratory-INSA de Lyon, Bât. B. Pascal, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco, E-mail: fmacedo@fisica.uminho.pt [Centro de Física, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Borges, Joel [Centro de Física, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal and SEG-CEMUC Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  12. UV/IR Mixing for Noncommutative Complex Scalar Field Theory, II (Interaction with Gauge Fields)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ya. Aref'eva; D. M. Belov; A. S. Koshelev; O. A. Rytchkov

    2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider noncommutative analogs of scalar electrodynamics and N=2 D=4 SUSY Yang-Mills theory. We show that one-loop renormalizability of noncommutative scalar electrodynamics requires the scalar potential to be an anticommutator squared. This form of the scalar potential differs from the one expected from the point of view of noncommutative gauge theories with extended SUSY containing a square of commutator. We show that fermion contributions restore the commutator in the scalar potential. This provides one-loop renormalizability of noncommutative N=2 SUSY gauge theory. We demonstrate a presence of non-integrable IR singularities in noncommutative scalar electrodynamics for general coupling constants. We find that for a special ratio of coupling constants these IR singularities vanish. Also we show that IR poles are absent in noncommutative N=2 SUSY gauge theory.

  13. Hermitian Analyticity, IR/UV Mixing and Unitarity of Noncommutative Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong-Sun Chu; Jerzy Lukierski; Wojtek J. Zakrzewski

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR/UV mixing and the violation of unitarity are two of the most intriguing aspects of noncommutative quantum field theories. In this paper the relation between these two phenomena is explained and established. We start out by showing that the S-matrix of noncommutative field theories is hermitian analytic. As a consequence, a noncommutative field theory is unitary if the discontinuities of its Feynman diagram amplitudes agree with the expressions calculated using the Cutkosky formulae. These unitarity constraints relate the discontinuities of amplitudes with physical intermediate states; and allow us to see how the IR/UV mixing may lead to a breakdown of unitarity. Specifically, we show that the IR/UV singularity does not lead to the violation of unitarity in the space-space noncommutative case, but it does lead to its violation in a space-time noncommutative field theory. As a corollary, noncommutative field theory without IR/UV mixing will be unitary in both the space-space and space-time noncommutative case. To illustrate this, we introduce and analyse the noncommutative Lee model--an exactly solvable quantum field theory. We show that the model is free from the IR/UV mixing in both the space-space and space-time noncommutative cases. Our analysis is exact. Due to absence of the IR/UV mixing one can expect that the theory is unitary. We present some checks supporting this claim. Our analysis provides a counter example to the generally held beliefs that field theories with space-time noncommutativity are non-unitary.

  14. Mechanism of Efficient Anti-Markovnikov Olefin Hydroarylation Catalyzed by Homogeneous Ir(III) Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalla, Gaurav; Bischof, Steven M; Ganesh, Somesh K; Liu, Xiang Y; Jones, C J; Borzenko, Andrey; Tenn, William J; Ess, Daniel H; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Lokare, Kapil S; Leung, Chin Hin; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of the hydroarylation reaction between unactivated olefins (ethylene, propylene, and styrene) and benzene catalyzed by [(R)Ir(?-acac-O,O,C{sup 3})-(acac-O,O){sub 2}]{sub 2} and [R-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}(L)] (R = acetylacetonato, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ph, or CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, and L = H{sub 2}O or pyridine) Ir(III) complexes was studied by experimental methods. The system is selective for generating the anti-Markovnikov product of linear alkylarenes (61:39 for benzene + propylene and 98:2 for benzene + styrene). The reaction mechanism was found to follow a rate law with first-order dependence on benzene and catalyst, but a non-linear dependence on olefin. {sup 13}C-labelling studies with CH{sub 3}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}-Ir-Py showed that reversible ?-hydride elimination is facile, but unproductive, giving exclusively saturated alkylarene products. The migration of the {sup 13}C-label from the ? to ?-positions was found to be slower than the C–H activation of benzene (and thus formation of ethane and Ph-d{sub 5}-Ir-Py). Kinetic analysis under steady state conditions gave a ratio of the rate constants for CH activation and ?-hydride elimination (k{sub CH}: k{sub ?}) of ~0.5. The comparable magnitude of these rates suggests a common rate determining transition state/intermediate, which has been shown previously with B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, the mechanism of hydroarylation proceeds through a series of pre-equilibrium dissociative steps involving rupture of the dinuclear species or the loss of L from Ph-Ir-L to the solvento, 16-electron species, Ph-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}-Sol (where Sol refers to coordinated solvent). This species then undergoes trans to cisisomerization of the acetylacetonato ligand to yield the pseudo octahedral species cis-Ph-Ir-Sol, which is followed by olefin insertion (the regioselective and rate determining step), and then activation of the C–H bond of an incoming benzene to generate the product and regenerate the catalyst.

  15. Origin of the phase transition in IrTe2: structural modulation and local bonding instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Yan, Jiaqiang [ORNL; Zhou, Haidong [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Mandrus, D. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL; Chen, Xin [ORNL; Yang, Hui [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used X-ray/neutron diffraction to determine the low temperature (LT) structure of IrTe2. A structural modulation was observed with a wavevector of k =(1/5, 0, 1/5) below Ts285 K, accompanied by a structural transition from a trigonal to a triclinic lattice. We also performed the first principles calculations for high temperature (HT) and LT structures, which elucidate the nature of the phase transition and the LT structure. A local bonding instability associated with the Te 5p states is likely the origin of the structural phase transition in IrTe2.

  16. Association of intracellular calcium oscillations with release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from GT1-1 neuronal cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Chrystal Dawn

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was back in Texas. Juliana Paschoal for the trips to the Camp Cooley Ranch, making sure I went out, and her friendship. I had a great time Nann Greene who is a wonderful person that was always willing to help and knew the PREP section forwards... AND SUMMARY. REFERENCES. . VITA. 4 6 7 9 11 12 15 17 20 20 21 24 24 29 32 37 38 43 58 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE I Release of CmRH from GT1-I neuronal cells during nondepolarization and depolarization ? a comparison of four separate...

  17. RAMAN AND IR STUDY OF NARROW BANDGAP A-SIGE AND C-SIGE FILMS DEPOSITED USING DIFFERENT HYDROGEN DILUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    amorphous to microcrystalline transition. The onset of the phase transition occurs at RH about 180) substrates using rf (13.56 MHz) PECVD in a ultrahigh-vacuum, multi-chamber, load- locked deposition system recorded from the films on 7059 glass and n-i-p cell devices on stainless steel, upon the excitation

  18. Public Health Pesticide Inventory IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 7:22 AM 2 Public Health Pesticide Inventory IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 7:22 AM 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stici f Too ide ols fo s or #12; Public Health Pesticide Inventory ©IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 7:22 AM 2 #12; Public Health Pesticide Inventory ©IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 7 semiochemicals can be used effectively, safety, and legally for vector control. This inventory of public health

  19. Public Health Pesticide Inventory IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 9:54 AM 2 Public Health Pesticide Inventory IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 9:54 AM 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To stici of ools ide for s #12; Public Health Pesticide Inventory ©IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 9:54 AM 2 #12; Public Health Pesticide Inventory ©IR4/Karl MalamudRoam 4/11/2012 9. This inventory of public health pesticides is intended to address two primary questions: 1) what chemical tools

  20. Thermal measurements of active semiconductor micro-structures acquired through the substrate using near IR thermoreflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which precludes the use of typical surface thermal characterization techniques. A near infrared microscopy (SThM), or optical techniques such as infrared (IR) microscopy, or thermoreflectance to be able to measure the heating of devices in flip chip bonded integrated circuit's (IC) and other

  1. Fractal Plasmonics: Fabrication of "Cayley Tree Nanoantennas" and Characterization of Their Near-IR Plasmon Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GP-B-18 Fractal Plasmonics: Fabrication of "Cayley Tree Nanoantennas sensing, photothermal therapy, and wave guiding. In our present study structures with fractal and self into the visible and near-IR regions of the spectrum. Additionally, fractal geometries may give rise to multiple

  2. Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical ExchangeVed: January 12, 2010 Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution

  3. On the difference between type E and A OH/IR stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. He; P. S. Chen

    2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed SEDs of a sample of 60 OH/IR stars are fitted using a radiative transfer model of a dusty envelope. Among the whole sample, 21 stars have reliable phase-lag distances while the others have less accurate distances. L*-P,Mlr-P and Mlr-L* relations have been plotted for these stars. It is found that type E (with emission feature at 10um and type A (with absorption feature at 10um) OH/IR stars have different L*-P and Mlr-L* relations while both of them follow a single Mlr-P relation. The type E stars are proven to be located in the area without large scale dense interstellar medium while the type A stars are located probably in dense interstellar medium. It is argued here that this may indicate the two types of OH/IR stars have different chemical composition or zero age main sequence mass and so evolve in different ways. This conclusion has reinforced the argument by Chen et al.(2001) who reached a similar conclusion from the galactic distribution of about 1000 OH/IR stars with the IRAS low-resolution spectra (LRS).

  4. ELSEVIER International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 17 (1996) 285-290 Ir~ernattonatlournalc~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radwin, Robert G.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELSEVIER International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 17 (1996) 285-290 Ir~ernattonatlournalc~ Industrial Ergonomics Short communication A new method for extending the range of conductive polymer sensors measurement instruments are important for providing ergonomics practitioners with a quantitative means

  5. Next Generation Optical Fiber for IR Applications: Novel Materials and NanoScale Textures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Next Generation Optical Fiber for IR Applications: Novel Materials and NanoScale Textures Axel, Orlando, FL 32816, USA #12;Outline · Impact of fiber optics · What are next generation optical fibers achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication" Charles K. Kao Brief

  6. Interplay of IR-Improved DGLAP-CS Theory and NLO Parton Shower MC Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, B F L; Yost, S A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the interplay between the new IR-improved DGLAP-CS theory and the precision of NLO parton shower/ME matched MC`s as it is realized by the new MC Herwiri1.031 in interface to MC@NLO. We discuss phenomenological implications using comparisons with recent LHC data on single heavy gauge boson production.

  7. Application of Wavelet Packet Transform in Pattern Recognition of Near-IR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrini, Carla

    . Construction of the pattern space: selection of representative training data. Data pretreatment: reduction is not methodical; it is a matter of common sense to select meaningful objects and variables. Data pretreat- ment, they are related to Fourier transformation, which has also been suggested for pretreating near-IR data.11 DWT

  8. Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR RECEIVED ON FEBRUARY 3, 2009 C O N S P E C T U S Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species

  9. Intern report ; IR 2008-01 Site speci c hazard estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Intern report ; IR 2008-01 Site speci c hazard estimates for the LNG energy plant in the Europoort for the LNG energy plant in the Europoort area T. van Eck, F.H. Goutbeek, B. Dost De Bilt, February 2008 #12 differ significantly. Figure 1. Situation overview. The site of the LNG plant situated in the center

  10. A Touch Panel using Silicone Rubber with embedded IR-LEDs Yuichiro Sakamoto,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    LED LED FTIR FTIR FTIR FTIR FTIR LED LED A Touch Panel using Silicone Rubber with embedded Shizuki and Jiro Tanaka In this paper, we present a novel touch panel using silicone rubber with embedded are difficult to detect for one made of acryl panel Moreover, it integrates IR-LEDs silicone rubber for multi

  11. CONSTRUCTING AN ELASTIC TOUCH PANEL WITH EMBEDDED IR-LEDS USING SILICONE RUBBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    CONSTRUCTING AN ELASTIC TOUCH PANEL WITH EMBEDDED IR-LEDS USING SILICONE RUBBER Yuichiro Sakamoto a technique for the construction of an elastic touch panel using silicone rubber. The technique is similar is made of transparent silicone rubber rather than acrylic. Moreover, we embedded infrared LEDs within

  12. Deposition dynamics and chemical properties of size-selected Ir clusters on TiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott L.

    reserved. Keywords: Iridium; Clusters; Titanium oxide; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; Low energy ion report a study of Irn/TiO2 samples prepared by size and energy-selected deposition of Irþ n (n ¼ 1, 2, 5 in the zero oxidation state, and there are no significant shifts in Ir 4f binding energy with cluster size

  13. Minimizing Energy Consumption in IR-UWB Based Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    Minimizing Energy Consumption in IR-UWB Based Wireless Sensor Networks Tianqi Wang, Wendi communications systems, where transmit power can be flexibly adjusted to minimize the energy consumption [3] [4 Heinzelman and Alireza Seyedi Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester

  14. Ionwater hydrogen-bond switching observed with 2D IR vibrational echo chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Ion­water hydrogen-bond switching observed with 2D IR vibrational echo chemical exchange for review November 8, 2008) The exchange of water hydroxyl hydrogen bonds between anions and water oxygens of anion­ water hydroxyl hydrogen bond switching under thermal equilib- rium conditions as Taw 7 1 ps. Pump

  15. The chemical instability of Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krizan, J.W., E-mail: jkrizan@princeton.edu; Roudebush, J.H.; Fox, G.M.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} decomposes rapidly in laboratory air. • The decomposition requires the simultaneous presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. • Decomposition results in a dramatic change in the magnetic properties. • Second 5 K feature in magnetic susceptibility not previously reported. - Abstract: We report that Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}, which has a layered honeycomb iridium oxide sublattice interleaved by Na planes, decomposes in laboratory air while maintaining the same basic crystal structure. The decomposition reaction was monitored by time-dependent powder X-ray diffraction under different ambient atmospheres, through which it was determined that it occurs only in the simultaneous presence of both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. A hydrated sodium carbonate is the primary decomposition product along with altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}. The diffraction signature of the altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} is quite similar to that of the pristine material, which makes the detection of decomposition difficult in a sample handled under ordinary laboratory conditions. The decomposed samples show a significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility and the disappearance of the low temperature antiferromagnetic transition considered to be characteristic of the phase. Samples that have never been exposed to air after synthesis display a previously unreported magnetic transition at 5 K.

  16. Neuroglobin dynamics observed with ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Neuroglobin dynamics observed with ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo spectroscopy Haruto Ishikawa Contributed by Michael D. Fayer, August 15, 2007 (sent for review July 25, 2007) Neuroglobin (Ngb), a protein energy minimum. myoglobin mutants protein dynamics energy landscape Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a recently

  17. Report BNL-98726-2012-IR Tech. Note C-AD/AP/470

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Report BNL-98726-2012-IR Tech. Note C-AD/AP/470 Oct. 2012 ZGOUBI USERS' GUIDE ZGOUBI ON WEB : http://sourceforge.net/projects/zgoubith EDITION (1997) 13 INTRODUCTION 15 1 NUMERICAL CALCULATION OF MOTION AND FIELDS 17 1.1 zgoubi Frame

  18. MID-INFRARED IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF NGC 7331: A FIRST LOOK AT THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES SURVEY (SINGS) LEGACY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draine, Bruce T.

    MID-INFRARED IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF NGC 7331: A FIRST LOOK AT THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES to 38 m using all modules of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). A strong new dust emission feature with standard photodissociation region (PDR) models. Either additional PDR heating or shocks are required

  19. Big picture Ads Duplicate detection Spam Web IR Size of the web Web Search and Text Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Alexander

    Big picture Ads Duplicate detection Spam Web IR Size of the web Web Search and Text Mining http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~agray/6240spr11 IIR 19: Web Search Basics Alexander Gray Georgia Institute of Technology, College of Computing 2011 Gray: Web Search Basics 1 / 117 #12;Big picture Ads Duplicate detection Spam Web IR Size

  20. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of O-Donor Ir(III) Complexes: C-H Activation Studies with Benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    with Benzene Gaurav Bhalla, Xiang Yang Liu, Jonas Oxgaard, William A. Goddard, III, and Roy A. Periana. All the R-Ir-Py complexes undergo quantitative, intermolecular CH activation reactions with benzene to benzene to generate a discrete benzene complex, cis-R-Ir-PhH; and (D) rapid C-H cleavage. Kinetic isotope

  1. GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

  2. Acute and chronic effects of exposure to a 1-mT magnetic field on the cytoskeleton, stress proteins, and proliferation of astroglial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodega, G. [Departamento de Biologia Celular y Genetica, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: guillermo.bodega@uah.es; Forcada, I. [Departamento de Biologia Celular y Genetica, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Suarez, I. [Departamento de Biologia Celular y Genetica, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, B. [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the effects of exposure to static, sinusoidal (50 Hz), and combined static/sinusoidal magnetic fields on cultured astroglial cells. Confluent primary cultures of astroglial cells were exposed to a 1-mT sinusoidal, static, or combined magnetic field for 1 h. In another experiment, cells were exposed to the combined magnetic field for 1, 2, and 4 h. The hsp25, hsp60, hsp70, actin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein contents of the astroglial cells were determined by immunoblotting 24 h after exposure. No significant differences were seen between control and exposed cells with respect to their contents of these proteins, neither were any changes in cell morphology observed. In a third experiment to determine the effect of a chronic (11-day) exposure to a combined 1-mT static/sinusoidal magnetic field on the proliferation of cultured astroglial cells, no significant differences were seen between control, sham-exposed, or exposed cells. These results suggest that exposure to 1-mT sinusoidal, static, or combined magnetic fields has no significant effects on the stress, cytoskeletal protein levels in, or proliferation of cultured astroglial cells.

  3. Structural and tectonic implications of pre-Mt. Simon strata -- or a lack of such -- in the western part of the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, M.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a pre-Mt. Simon lithic arenite (arkose) in southwestern Ohio has lead to reevaluation of many basement tests in the region. Several boreholes in adjacent states have been reexamined by others and are now believed to bottom in the Middle Run Formation. Seismic-reflection sections in western Ohio and Indiana have indicated pre-Mt. Simon basins filled with layered rocks that are interpreted to be Middle Run, however, the pre-Mt. Simon basins and east of Illinois. Samples from Illinois basement tests were reexamined to determine whether they had encountered similar strata. All reported crystalline-basement tests in Illinois show diagnostic igneous textures and mineralogical associations. Coarsely crystalline samples in cores show intergrown subhedral grains of quartz, microcline, and sodic plagioclase. Medium-crystalline rocks in cuttings samples show numerous examples of micrographic intergrowths of quartz and K-feldspar. This texture cannot be authigenically grown in a sediment and probably could not have survived a single cycle of erosion and deposition. Aphanitic rocks show porphyritic and spherulitic textures that are distinctly igneous and would be destroyed by weathering. Substantial relief on the Precambrian crystalline surface in Illinois is postulated for major structural features like the LaSalle Anticlinorium, the Sparta Shelf, the Ste. Genevieve Fault zone, etc. Paleotopographic relief up to 300 m (1,000 feet) is documented from drilling on the western flank of the basin.

  4. Overexpression of IRS2 in isolated pancreatic islets causes proliferation and protects human {beta}-cells from hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, S. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Spinas, G.A. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Maedler, K. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Zuellig, R.A. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Lehmann, R. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Donath, M.Y. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Trueb, T. [Universitaetsverwaltung, Stab fuer Sachmittel-Kredite, KUN110, Kuenstlergasse 15, 8001 Zurich (Switzerland); Niessen, M. [Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: markus.niessen@usz.ch

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in vivo indicate that IRS2 plays an important role in maintaining functional {beta}-cell mass. To investigate if IRS2 autonomously affects {beta}-cells, we have studied proliferation, apoptosis, and {beta}-cell function in isolated rat and human islets after overexpression of IRS2 or IRS1. We found that {beta}-cell proliferation was significantly increased in rat islets overexpressing IRS2 while IRS1 was less effective. Moreover, proliferation of a {beta}-cell line, INS-1, was decreased after repression of Irs2 expression using RNA oligonucleotides. Overexpression of IRS2 in human islets significantly decreased apoptosis of {beta}-cells, induced by 33.3 mM D-glucose. However, IRS2 did not protect cultured rat islets against apoptosis in the presence of 0.5 mM palmitic acid. Overexpression of IRS2 in isolated rat islets significantly increased basal and D-glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as determined in perifusion experiments. Therefore, IRS2 is sufficient to induce proliferation in rat islets and to protect human {beta}-cells from D-glucose-induced apoptosis. In addition, IRS2 can improve {beta}-cell function. Our results indicate that IRS2 acts autonomously in {beta}-cells in maintenance and expansion of functional {beta}-cell mass in vivo.

  5. The determination of Os and Ir by delayed X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillay, A.E.; Mashilo, N. (Univ. of Witwatersrand (South Africa))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed X-ray spectrometry preceded by fast neutron activation, is a relatively novel application and its capabilities as an analytical tool for the specific determination of Os and Ir in small powdered samples was evaluated. The investigation took the form of a feasibility study which relied heavily on the high sensitivity of the detector used. Detection of the delayed X-rays was achieved with a 100 mm{sup 2} Ge detector whose ability to produce optimum photopeak-to-noise ratios formed the basis exploited in this investigation. Analytical conditions are demonstrated over a range of concentrations for the elements of interest and the potential of the technique for application to the general routine analysis of Os and Ir is discussed. The authors indicate that interferences from the sample matrix can be suppressed to a degree which makes the method almost independent of the matrix. This and other attractive features make the technique a strong rival to conventional activation analysis.

  6. Linear dichroism amplification: Adapting a long-known technique for ultrasensitive femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehault, Julien; Helbing, Jan [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Zanirato, Vinicio [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita di Ferrara, via Fossato di Mortara 17-19, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Olivucci, Massimo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Siena, via Aldo Moro 2, I-53100 Siena (Italy) and Chemistry Department, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 (United States)

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate strong amplification of polarization-sensitive transient IR signals using a pseudo-null crossed polarizer technique first proposed by Keston and Lospalluto [Fed. Proc. 10, 207 (1951)] and applied for nanosecond flash photolysis in the visible by Che et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 224, 145 (1994)]. We adapted the technique to ultrafast pulsed laser spectroscopy in the infrared using photoelastic modulators, which allow us to measure amplified linear dichroism at kilohertz repetition rates. The method was applied to a photoswitch of the N-alkylated Schiff base family in order to demonstrate its potential of strongly enhancing sensitivity and signal to noise in ultrafast transient IR experiments, to simplify spectra and to determine intramolecular transition dipole orientations.

  7. Elimination of IR/UV via Gravity in Noncommutative Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kersting; J. Yan

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of particle physics with Noncommutative Geometry (NCG) generally suffer from a manifestly non-Wilsonian coupling of infrared and ultraviolet degrees of freedom known as the "IR/UV Problem" which would tend to compromise their phenomenological relevance. In this Letter we explicitly show how one may remedy this by coupling NCG to gravity. In the simplest scenario the Lagrangian gets multiplied by a nonconstant background metric; in $\\phi-4$ theory the theorem that $\\int d^4 x \\phi \\star \\phi = \\int d^4 x \\phi^2$ is no longer true and the field propagator gets modified by a factor which depends on both NCG and the variation of the metric. A suitable limit of this factor as the propagating momentum gets asymptotically large then eradicates the IR/UV problem. With gravity and NCG coupled to each other, one might expect anti-symmetric components to arise in the metric. Cosmological implications of such are subsequently discussed.

  8. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Qiao, Liang [ORNL] [ORNL; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL] [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL] [ORNL; Shao-Horn, Yang [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  9. Role of dipolar correlations in the IR spectra of water and ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chen; Manu Sharma; Raffaele Resta; Giulia Galli; Roberto Car

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report simulated infrared spectra of deuterated water and ice using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with maximally localized Wannier functions. Experimental features are accurately reproduced within the harmonic approximation. By decomposing the lineshapes in terms of intra and intermolecular dipole correlation functions we find that short-range intermolecular dynamic charge fluctuations associated to hydrogen bonds are prominent over the entire spectral range. Our analysis reveals the origin of several spectral features and identifies network bending modes in the far IR range.

  10. UV/IR mixing via a Seiberg-Witten map for noncommutative QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raasakka, Matti [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tureanu, Anca [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider quantum electrodynamics in noncommutative spacetime by deriving a Seiberg-Witten map, nonperturbative in {theta}, with fermions in the fundamental representation of the gauge group as an expansion in the coupling constant. Accordingly, we demonstrate the persistence of UV/IR mixing in noncommutative QED with charged fermions via a Seiberg-Witten map, extending the results of Schupp and You [P. Schupp and J. You, J. High Energy Phys. 08 (2008) 107.].

  11. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  12. Electronic structure of Ce?RhIn?: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Rui; Petrovic, C.; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the 2D heavy fermion superconductor, Ce?RhIn?. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q-vector of (0.32, 0.32) ?/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f-electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersion and location of the Fermimore »sheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. Our data paves the way for improving the band structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.« less

  13. Sign change of exchange bias in [Pt/Co]{sub 3}/IrMn multilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Seungha; Kwon, Joonhyun; Cho, B. K., E-mail: chobk@gist.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 123 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of exchange bias in a multilayer of [Pt(1.0?nm)/Co(1.0?nm)]{sub 2}/Pt(t{sub Pt} nm)/Co(1.0?nm)/ IrMn(12.0?nm) were investigated with a variation of Pt layer thickness, t{sub Pt}. For t{sub Pt}???1.6?nm, it was typically observed that Co layers were ferromagnetically coupled while IrMn layer exhibited negative exchange bias. With increasing Pt thickness, antiferromagnetic (AF) interlayer coupling strength increased and caused AF spin configuration between the Co layers. With further increasing of Pt thickness (t{sub Pt}?=?2.5?nm), the exchange bias between Co and IrMn layers was changed from negative to positive. Therefore, a large enhancement of AF interlayer coupling induced the sign change of exchange bias from negative to positive and resulted in a drastic change of switching behavior in a magnetization reversal. Both extraordinary Hall-effect and magnetoresistance were measured to verify the exchange bias direction and spin configurations upon magnetization reversal.

  14. The a-WO{sub 3}/a-IrO{sub 2} electrochromic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D. [EIC Labs., Inc., Norwood, MA (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the electrochemistry and optical switching performance of variable transmittance electrochromic devices based on the a-WO{sub 3}/a-IrO{sub 2} (a = amorphous) combination of electrochromic materials. The review concentrates on past research at EIC Laboratories on a-WO{sub 3}/a-IrO{sub 2} devices containing polymeric proton (H{sup +}) conductors with an ancillary discussion of devices using c-K{sub x}WO{sub 3+(x/2)} and the mixed oxide a-Mo{sub x}W{sub 1{minus}x}O{sub 3} as the primary electrochromic material. Approximately one half of the data presented has not been published previously, with the remaining data taken from articles in earlier SPIE volumes and the journal Solar Energy Materials. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the development of electrochromic devices for control of solar throughput in building windows and for automotive applications. This review is concerned with complementary electrochromic windows based on cathodically coloring WO{sub 3} in combination with anodically coloring IrO{sub 2}. In the complementary configuration, both electrochromic materials participate in the coloration process, enhancing the efficiency of optical modulation while providing intrinsic charge-balance.

  15. Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

    1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

  16. versity (MT Assistant o

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discipline um vitae, s and contac electronica cmsearch@ 2011, an trategic Fac nitiative ates are en rsities

  17. Analysis ofRH TRU Wastes for Containment in Lead Shielded Containers INV-SAR-08, Revision 0 Page I Of~'P~8tJ},f1-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 Cellulose, Plastic, Rubber, Steel and Lead Associated with Shielded Container Emplacement 6 4.3 Number of 30-gallon Containers, 3-Packs and Stacks for Shielded Containers 8 4.4 Mass of Plastic, Steel, and LeadAnalysis ofRH TRU Wastes for Containment in Lead Shielded Containers INV-SAR-08, Revision 0 Page I

  18. Scanning mid-IR-laser microscopy: an efficient tool for materials studies in silicon-based photonics and photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astafiev, O V; Yuryev, V A; 10.1016/S0022-0248(99)00711-3

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of scanning mid-IR-laser microscopy has recently been proposed for the investigation of large-scale electrically and recombination-active defects in semiconductors and non-destructive inspection of semiconductor materials and structures in the industries of microelectronics and photovoltaics. The basis for this development was laid with a wide cycle of investigations on low-angle mid-IR-light scattering in semiconductors. The essence of the technical idea was to apply the dark-field method for spatial filtering of the scattered light in the scanning mid-IR-laser microscope together with the local photoexcitation of excess carriers within a small domain in a studied sample, thus forming an artificial source of scattering of the probe IR light for the recombination contrast imaging of defects. The current paper presents three contrasting examples of application of the above technique for defect visualization in silicon-based materials designed for photovoltaics and photonics which demonstrate that this...

  19. PECULIAR OPTICAL AND IR BEHAVIOUR IN TYPE I SUPERNOVAE, AND THE ORIGIN OF THE 1.2 ABSORPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, J.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wheeler, le. , 1984. In "Supernovae as distance indicators",lR. , 1985. In "Dust in supernovae and supernova remnants",and IR behaviour in type I supernovae, and the origin of the

  20. Frying Doughnuts: What can the reprocessing of X-rays to IR tell us about the AGN environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. McKernan; K. E. S. Ford; N. Chang; C. S. Reynolds

    2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) produce vast amounts of high energy radiation deep in their central engines. X-rays either escape the AGN or are absorbed and re-emitted mostly as IR. By studying the dispersion in the ratio of observed mid-IR luminosity to observed 2-10keV X-ray luminosity (R_{ir/x}) in AGN we can investigate the reprocessing material (possibly a torus or donut of dust) in the AGN central engine, independent of model assumptions. We studied the ratio of observed mid-IR and 2-10keV X-ray luminosities in a heterogeneous sample of 245 AGN from the literature. We found that when we removed AGN with prominent jets, ~90% of Type I AGN lay within a very tight dispersion in luminosity ratio (1cloud cover, turbulent disk, opening angle of absorbing structures such as dusty tori) must span a very narrow range of parameters. We also found that the far-IR(100um) to mid-IR (12um) observed luminosity ratio is an effective descriminator between heavily obscured AGN and relatively unobscured AGN.

  1. WATER ICE IN HIGH MASS-LOSS RATE OH/IR STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Young-Joo, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate water-ice features in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high mass-loss rate OH/IR stars. We use a radiative transfer code which can consider multiple components of dust shells to make model calculations for various dust species including water ice in the OH/IR stars. We find that the model SEDs are sensitively dependent on the location of the water-ice dust shell. For two sample stars (OH 127.8+0.0 and OH 26.5+0.6), we compare the detailed model results with the infrared observational data including the spectral data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For the two sample stars, we reproduce the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 3.1 {mu}m and 11.5 {mu}m; emission at 44 and 62 {mu}m) observed by ISO using a separate component of the water-ice dust shell that condensed at about 84-87 K (r {approx} 1500-1800 AU) as well as the silicate dust shell that condensed at about 1000 K (r {approx} 19-25 AU). For a sample of 1533 OH/IR stars, we present infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) using the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and AKARI data compared with theoretical model results. We find that the theoretical models clearly show the effects of the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 11.5 {mu}m and emission at 62 {mu}m) on the 2CDs.

  2. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, S.T.

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  3. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, Soli T

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to ~42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5% as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: ~50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies (@ ~40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches ~40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  4. Integrating Interactive Visualizations in the Search Process of Digital Libraries and IR Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hienert, Daniel; Schaer, Philipp; Mayr, Philipp

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactive visualizations for exploring and retrieval have not yet become an integral part of digital libraries and information retrieval systems. We have integrated a set of interactive graphics in a real world social science digital library. These visualizations support the exploration of search queries, results and authors, can filter search results, show trends in the database and can support the creation of new search queries. The use of weighted brushing supports the identification of related metadata for search facets. We discuss some use cases of the combination of IR systems and interactive graphics. In a user study we verify that users can gain insights from statistical graphics intuitively and can adopt interaction techniques.

  5. Bismuth-doped optical fibres: A new breakthrough in near-IR lasing media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results demonstrate that bismuth-doped optical fibres have considerable potential as near-IR active lasing media. This paper examines bismuth-doped fibres intended for the fabrication of fibre lasers and optical amplifiers and reviews recent results on the luminescence properties of various types of bismuth-doped fibres and the performance of bismuth-doped fibre lasers and optical amplifiers for the spectral range 1150 - 1550 nm. Problems are discussed that have yet to be solved in order to improve the efficiency of the bismuth lasers and optical amplifiers. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  6. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  7. Macroscopic screening of 1/r potentials from UV/IR-mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helling, Robert C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the static potential in a non-commutative theory including a term due to UV/IR-mixing. As a result, the potential decays exponentially fast with distance rather than like a power law Coulomb type potential due to the exchange of massless particles. This shows that when quantum effects are taken into account the introduction of non-commutativity not only modifies physics at short distances but has dramatic macroscopic consequences as well. As a result, we give a lower bound on the scale of non-commutativity (if present at all) to be compatible with observations.

  8. UV and IR laser ablation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.R.; Koppenaal, D.W.; Farmer, O.T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation particle plume compositions are characterized using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS). This study evaluates the mass response characteristics peculiar to ICP/MS detection as a function of laser fluence and frequency. Evaluation of the ICP/MS mass response allows deductions to be made concerning how representative the laser ablation produced particle plume composition is relative to the targeted sample. Using a black glass standard, elemental fractionation was observed, primarily for alkalis and other volatile elements. The extent of elemental fractionation between the target sample and the sampled plume varied significantly as a function of laser fluences and IR and UV laser frequency.

  9. An Optical Offgas Sensor Network Incorporating a HG Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer and IR Diode Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George P. Miller

    2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-element cavity ringdown system was evaluated with the objective of developing an intelligent sensor network to be incorporated into the control systems for advanced coal combustion facilities. Using a combination of a YAG-pumped dye laser and a tunable NIR/IR laser a dual cavity was constructed and a labview program was developed to provide multi-channel, real-time data to permit the real-time monitoring of typical exhaust emission gases, (for example: CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and mercury) of concern to the next generation of coal-powered facilities.

  10. Observations of the 6 Centimeter Lines of OH in Evolved (OH/IR) Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Laura K. Zschaechner; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlström; Mark J. Claussen

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observational and theoretical advances have called into question traditional OH maser pumping models in evolved (OH/IR) stars. The detection of excited-state OH lines would provide additional constraints to discriminate amongst these theoretical models. In this Letter, we report on VLA observations of the 4750 MHz and 4765 MHz lines of OH toward 45 sources, mostly evolved stars. We detect 4765 MHz emission in the star forming regions Mon R2 and LDN 1084, but we do not detect excited-state emission in any evolved stars. The flux density and velocity of the 4765 MHz detection in Mon R2 suggests that a new flaring event has begun.

  11. A synthesis and review of geomorphic surfaces of the boundary zone Mt. Taylor to Lucero uplift area, West-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G. [NEOTEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mt. Taylor volcanic field and Lucero uplift of west-central New Mexico occur in a transitional-boundary zone between the tectonically active Basin-and Range province (Rio Grande rift) and the less tectonically active Colorado plateau. The general geomorphology and Cenozoic erosional history has been discussed primarily in terms of a qualitative, descriptive context and without the knowledge of lithospheric processes. The first discussion of geomorphic surfaces suggested that the erosional surface underlying the Mt. Taylor volcanic rocks is correlative with the Ortiz surface of the Rio Grande rift. In 1978 a study supported this hypothesis with K-Ar dates on volcanic rocks within each physiographic province. The correlation of this surface was a first step In the regional analysis of the boundary zone; however, little work has been done to verify this correlation with numerical age dates and quantitatively reconstruct the surface for neotectonic purposes. Those geomorphic surfaces inset below and younger than the ``Ortiz`` surface have been studied. This report provides a summary of this data as well as unpublished data and a conceptual framework for future studies related to the LANL ISR project.

  12. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

  13. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Newaz, Golam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

  14. "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) Herschel Observations of GSS30-IRS1 in Ophiuchus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Je, Hyerin; Lee, Seokho; Green, Joel D; Evans, Neal J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) key program on Herschel, we observed GSS30-IRS1, a Class I protostar located in Ophiuchus (d = 120 pc), with Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). More than 70 lines were detected within a wavelength range from 50 micron to 200 micron, including CO, H2O, OH, and two atomic [O I] lines at 63 and 145 micron. The [C II] line, known as a tracer of externally heated gas by the interstellar radiation field, is also detected at 158 micron. All lines, except [O I] and [C II], are detected only at the central spaxel of 9.4" X 9.4". The [O I] emissions are extended along a NE-SW orientation, and the [C II] line is detected over all spaxels, indicative of external PDR. The total [C II] intensity around GSS30 reveals that the far-ultraviolet radiation field is in the range of 3 to 20 G0, where G0 is in units of the Habing Field, 1.6 X 10^{-3} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. This enhanced external radiation field heats the envelope of GSS30-IRS1, causing the...

  15. Study of Plasma Interaction with Titanium Coated Ferritic Steel in IR-T1 Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Talebitaher, A.; Arvin, R.; Mohammadi, S.; Nikmohamadi, A.; Milani, M.; Salem, M. K.; Sari, A. H.; Yousefi, M. R.; Shokouhi, A. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorshid, P. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saboohi, S. [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Tehran Central Campus (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of plasma interaction with titanium coated ferritic steel is performed on IR-T1 tokamak. Titanium coating is one of the candidates for the plasma facing materials in a tokomak. Titaniumization is carried out by a sputtering method. Some of the samples were baked (3 hours at 460 deg. C) before sputtering. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses before and after discharge in r/a = l .04 carried out. The samples (with distinctive titanium layers) were placed at different depths inside the vacuum vessel of the IR-T1 tokamak in the SOL region. A comparison of the titanium coated steel with bare ferritic steel exposed to plasma tokamak and glow discharges is made in this research. Depth of impurity penetration and retention, and the surface roughness are measured by using surface analysis methods. Rutherford backscattering method is used to measure the content of nitrogen, oxygen and titanium, before and after discharges. The result is shown a change in roughness with respect to position of samples.

  16. Spatially Resolved Spitzer-IRS Spectral Maps of the Superwind in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beirão, P; Lehnert, M D; Guillard, P; Heckman, T; Draine, B; Hollenbach, D; Walter, F; Sheth, K; Smith, J D; Shopbell, P; Boulanger, F; Surace, J; Hoopes, C; Engelbracht, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with $Spitzer-IRS$. The spectral regions covered include the H$_2 S(1)-S(3)$, [NeII], [NeIII] emission lines and PAH features. We estimate the total warm H$_2$ mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between $M_{warm}\\sim5-17\\times10^6$ M$_{\\odot}$ and $E_{K}\\sim6-20\\times10^{53}$ erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 micron PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of five across the wind region. The Northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disk or the Southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH f...

  17. Understanding the two-dimensional ionization structure in luminous infrared galaxies. A near-IR integral field spectroscopy perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colina, Luis; Arribas, Santiago; Riffel, Rogerio; Riffel, Rogemar A; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Pastoriza, Miriani; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Sales, Dinalva

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the 2D excitation structure of the ISM in a sample of LIRGs and Seyferts using near-IR IFS. This study extends to the near-IR the well-known optical and mid-IR emission line diagnostics used to classify activity in galaxies. Based on the spatially resolved spectroscopy of prototypes, we identify in the [FeII]1.64/Br$\\gamma$ - H_2 1-0S(1)/Br$\\gamma$ plane regions dominated by the different heating sources, i.e. AGNs, young MS massive stars, and evolved stars i.e. supernovae. The ISM in LIRGs occupy a wide region in the near-IR diagnostic plane from -0.6 to +1.5 and from -1.2 to +0.8 (in log units) for the [FeII]/Br$\\gamma$ and H_2/Br$\\gamma$ line ratios, respectively. The corresponding median(mode) ratios are +0.18(0.16) and +0.02(-0.04). Seyferts show on average larger values by factors ~2.5 and ~1.4 for the [FeII]/Br$\\gamma$ and H_2/Br$\\gamma$ ratios, respectively. New areas and relations in the near-IR diagnostic plane are defined for the compact, high surface brightness regions dominated by ...

  18. CLEAN-ROOM AND C02 -LASER PROCESSING OF ULTRA HIGH-PURITY AL2 0 3 P.A. Morris , R.H. French*, R.L. Coble*, F.N. Tebbe*, U. Chowdhry**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    79 CLEAN-ROOM AND C02 -LASER PROCESSING OF ULTRA HIGH-PURITY AL2 0 3 P.A. Morris , R.H. French*ý, R of the material. The microstructure of a C02 - laser ultra high-purity A12 03 is illustrated. Densification with a C02 -laser. The microstructure of the laser fired ultra high purity A1 2 03 is discussed. Chemical

  19. EPR and IR studies of [Ru(NH?)?]³+-Y and [Ru(NH?)?N?]²+-Y type zeolites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leubner, Raymond Leon

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH ) ] -Y 3 6 AND [Ru(NE ) N ] -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia1 fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Chemistry EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH3) ] -Y 3+ AND [Ru(NH3) N ) -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ 3&2 A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ (Head of Department) (Memb...

  20. Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

  1. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in?process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

  2. Graphene-silicon layered structures on single-crystalline Ir(111) thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Que, Yande D.; Tao, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yeliang L.; Wu, Lijun J.; Zhu, Yimei M.; Kim, Kisslinger; Weinl, Michael; Schreck, Matthias; Shen, Chengmin M.; et al

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal crystals, such as Ru,?¹?³? Ir,????? and Ni,??? provides large-area, uniform graphene layers with controllable defect density, which is crucial for practical applications in future devices. To decrease the high cost of single-crystalline metal bulks, single-crystalline metal films are strongly suggested as the substrates for epitaxial growth large-scale high-quality graphene.???¹?? Moreover, in order to weaken the interactions of graphene with its metal host, which may result in a suppression of the intrinsic properties of graphene,?¹¹ ¹²? the method of element intercalation of semiconductors at the interface between an epitaxial graphene layer and a transitionmore »metal substrate has been successfully realized.?¹³?¹??« less

  3. Structural features of alkali and barium aluminofluorophosphate glasses studied by IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urusovskaya, L.N.; Smirnova, E.V. [Research and Technological Institute of Optical Materials Science, State Scientific Center, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IR reflection spectra of the Al(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}-MeF{sub x} glasses (Me=Li, Na, K, Ba) with the maximum content of fluoride varied for each specific glass within certain concentration limits are considered. Analysis of the spectra for glasses obtained upon variation in the content of alkali metal fluoride introduced into these glasses has demonstrated that the increase in the MeF{sub x} content leads to breaking the chain groupings and forming the [PO{sub 3}F]{sup 2-} groups, whereas the rise in concentration of barium fluoride in the Al(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}-BaF{sub 2} glasses brings about the stabilization of the chain structures.

  4. Express quality analysis of coal concentrates by diffuse reflection IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.N. Egorov; I.I. Mel'nikov; N.A. Tarasov; V.I. Butakova; Y.M. Posokhov [ZAO RMK (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing quality monitoring of coal concentrates is important today on account of instability in the raw materials for coking at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK) and the variable composition of the coal batch for enrichment plants. Currently, numerous standardized methods permit the determination of the classificational and quality characteristics of coal and batch. These methods are slow, laborious, and relatively ineffective in industrial conditions. In May 2005, an automated Spektrotest express-analysis system developed by ECCI was installed in the coke laboratory at ZAO RMK in order to determine the quality of the coal concentrate and batch. The basic equipment is an IR spectrometer with a unit for Fourier transformation and a special optical module yielding the reflect on spectra of the pulverized coal. A control station based on a high-speed computer runs an algorithm for information analysis and storage and for printing out the test protocol. The Spektrotest system includes complex algorithms and software specially developed at ECCI.

  5. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A 15 T, 120 MM BORE IR QUADRUPOLE MAGNET FOR LARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Sabbi, G. S.; Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Kashikhin, V.; Pasholk, D.; Zlobin, A.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Pushing accelerator magnets beyond 10 T holds a promise of future upgrades to machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor is at the present time the only practical superconductor capable of generating fields beyond 10 T. In support of the LHC Phase-II upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is developing a large bore (120 mm) IR quadrupole (HQ) capable of reaching 15 T at its conductor peak field and a peak gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K. While exploring the magnet performance limits in terms of gradient, forces and stresses the 1 m long two-layer coil will demonstrate additional features such as alignment and accelerator field quality. In this paper we summarize the design and report on the magnet construction progress.

  6. Near-IR adaptive optics imaging of nuclear spiral structure in the Seyfert galaxy, NGC3227

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott C. Chapman; Simon L. Morris; Gordon A. H. Walker

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high spatial resolution, near-IR images in J, H, K of the nucleus of NGC3227, obtained with the Adaptive Optics bonnette on CFHT. The ~0.15 arcsec (17pc) resolution allows structures to be probed in the core region. Dust obscuration becomes significantly less pronounced at longer wavelengths, revealing the true geometry of the core region. We are able to identify two main features in our maps: (i) a spiraling association of knots with a counterpart in an HST F606W image; (ii) a smaller scale annulus, orthogonal to the spiral of knots. These features may provide a means to transport material inwards to fuel the active nucleus.

  7. Neutronic safety and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deen, J. R.; Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.; Egorenkov, P. M.; Nasonov, V. A.

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic parameters, isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients and three transients for the IR-8 research reactor cores loaded with either HEU(90%), HEU(36%), or LEU (19.75%) fuel assemblies (FA) were calculated using three dimensional diffusion theory flux solutions, RELAP5/MOD3.2 and PARET. The prompt neutron generation time and effective delayed neutron fractions were calculated for fresh and beginning-of-equilibrium-cycle cores. Isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated for changes in coolant density, coolant temperature and fuel temperature in fresh and equilibrium cores. These kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients were used in transient analysis models to predict power histories, and peak fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. The transients modeled were a rapid and slow loss-of-flow, a slow reactivity insertion, and a fast reactivity insertion.

  8. OCCULTATION OF THE QUIESCENT EMISSION FROM Sgr A* BY IR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Wardle, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Bushouse, H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dowell, C. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Roberts, D. A. [Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, 1300 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)

    2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the nature of flare emission from Sgr A* during multi-wavelength observations of this source that took place in 2004, 2005, and 2006. We present evidence for dimming of submillimeter and radio flux during the peak of near-IR flares. This suggests that the variability of Sgr A* across its wavelength spectrum is phenomenologically related. The model explaining this new behavior of flare activity could be consistent with adiabatically cooling plasma blobs that are expanding but also partially eclipsing the background quiescent emission from Sgr A*. When a flare is launched, the plasma blob is most compact and is brightest in the optically thin regime whereas the emission in radio/submillimeter wavelengths has a higher opacity. Absorption in the observed light curve of Sgr A* at radio/submillimeter flux is due to the combined effects of lower brightness temperature of plasma blobs with respect to the quiescent brightness temperature and high opacity of plasma blobs. This implies that plasma blobs are mainly placed in the magnetosphere of a disk-like flow or further out in the flow. The depth of the absorption being larger in submillimeter than in radio wavelengths implies that the intrinsic size of the quiescent emission increases with increasing wavelength which is consistent with previous size measurements of Sgr A*. Lastly, we believe that occultation of the quiescent emission of Sgr A* at radio/submillimeter by IR flares can be used as a powerful tool to identify flare activity at its earliest phase of its evolution.

  9. Synthesis, structure and chemical bonding of CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x=0, 1.32, and 2) and SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlukhyy, Viktor, E-mail: viktor.hlukhyy@lrz.tu-muenchen.de; Hoffmann, Andrea V.; Fässler, Thomas F.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The finding of superconductivity in Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} put the attention on the investigation of compounds that crystallize with ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type such as AT{sub 2}X{sub 2} (A=alkali/alkaline earth/rare earth element; T=transition metal and X=element of the 13–15th group). In this context the silicides CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, CaFe{sub 0.68(6)}Rh{sub 1.32(6)}Si{sub 2}, CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been synthesized by reaction of the elements under an argon atmosphere. Single crystals were obtained by special heat treatment in welded niobium/tantalum ampoules. The compounds were investigated by means of powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. All compounds crystallize in the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure with space group I4/mmm (No. 139): a=3.939(1) Å, c=10.185(1) Å, R{sub 1}=0.045, 85 F{sup 2} values, 8 variable parameters for CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}; a=4.0590(2) Å, c=9.9390(8) Å, R{sub 1}=0.030, 90 F{sup 2} values, 10 variable parameters for CaFe{sub 0.68(6)}Rh{sub 1.32(6)}Si{sub 2}; a=4.0695(1) Å, c=9.9841(3) Å, R{sub 1}=0.031, 114 F{sup 2} values, 9 variable parameters for CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}; and a=3.974(1) Å, c=10.395(1) Å, R{sub 1}=0.036, 95 F{sup 2} values, 8 variable parameters for SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. The structure of SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} contains isolated [Co{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} 2D-layers in the ab-plane whereas in CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} the [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}] layers (T=Fe and Rh) are interconnected along the c-axis via Si3Si bonds resulting in a three-dimentional (3D) [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} polyanions and therefore belong to the so-called collapsed form of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. The SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are isoelectronic to the parent 122 iron–pnictide superconductors AeFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (Ae=alkaline earth elements), whereas CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is a full substituted variant (As/Si) of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The crystal chemistry and chemical bonding in the title compounds are discussed in terms of LMTO band structure calculations and a topological analysis using the Electron Localization Function (ELF). - Graphical abstract: The SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x==0, 1.32, and 2) crystallize in the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type. The structure of SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} contains isolated [Co{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} layers in the ab-plane, whereas the [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}] layers in CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} are interconnected along the c-axis via Si3Si bonds resulting in a [T{sub 2}Si{sub 2}]{sup 2?} network. - Highlights: • Synthesis and structure of ternary silicides SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaFe{sub 2?x}Rh{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x=0, 1.32, and 2). • The SrCo{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and CaRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are isoelectronic to the parent 122 iron–pnictide superconductors AeFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. • CaFe{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is a full substituted variant (As/Si) of superconductor CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. • The title compounds demonstrate the tunable Si3Si distances.

  10. Incident IR Bandwidth Effects on Efficiency and Shaping for Third Harmonic Generation of Quasi-Rectangular UV Longitudinal Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The photocathode of the proposed LCLS RF Photoinjector will be irradiated by uv laser light which is generated as the third harmonic of incident fundamental ir laser light. We have investigated quantitatively the effect of input ir spectral bandwidth on the exiting longitudinal intensity profiles, energy conversion efficiencies and spectral bandwidths that characterize the third harmonic generation (THG) process with a pair of crystals. These profiles, efficiencies and bandwidths include the residual fundamental and residual second harmonic light exiting the second crystal. The intrinsic acceptance bandwidth for THG is determined by crystal material and thickness as well as the type of phase matching that is used. For our case of BBO material with type I phase matching these bandwidths are approximately 0.9 nm*cm and 0.1 nm*cm for second and third harmonic generation respectively. Consequently for fixed crystal thicknesses and a fixed input ir longitudinal profile, the specified input ir bandwidth will determine the profiles, efficiencies and bandwidths exiting the second crystal. The results reported here are predictions of the SNLO code that is available as 'freeware' from the Sandia National Laboratories. It has been modified for this work. It is critical to note that this modification has enabled us to generate SNLO predictions of the 'coupled' case in which the output of the first crystal is used as input to the second crystal. Our focus is the dependence of uv longitudinal intensity profile and THG efficiency on the input ir bandwidth and crystal thicknesses. We include here cases that best illustrate input bandwidth effects. The criteria for selection of reported cases are highest efficiency generation of quasi-rectangular uv profiles with proportional intensity ripple less than 5% rms on the plateau of the pulse. Maximizing THG efficiency typically amounts to maximizing the crystal thicknesses with the longitudinal profile constraint. The specified incident ir longitudinal profile is quasi-rectangular (i.e. nonzero risetime and falltime with small intensity variation on the plateau) with a 10 psec pulse duration (FWHM). By assumption, this profile has been established upstream of the crystals at the fundamental ir wavelength. The simplest possible optical configuration is used in this work as shown in figure 1. The first crystal is the site of second harmonic generation (SHG) driven by the incident ir irradiation of central wavelength, 800nm. Downstream of the first crystal, the second crystal is the site of third harmonic generation (THG) which occurs by sum frequency mixing. Inter-crystal optics (such as a half waveplate) are assumed to be lossless at the fundamental and second harmonic wavelengths. As shown in figure 1, a portion of the incident ir irradiation is not sequestered from the first crystal for subsequent THG in the second crystal. Also, quasi-phase matching configurations and other complex compensation schemes have not been investigated at this point. The simplistic geometry better elucidates the intrinsic acceptance bandwidth limitations imposed by the crystals. Our goal in this endeavor has been to conduct a quantitative assessment of incident ir bandwidth effects on the THG process for BBO material of varied thicknesses and not, at this stage, to comply with all uv pulse specifications for the LCLS RF Photoinjector. Nonetheless, our results can be compared with LCLS photoinjector uv pulse requirements which call for a nominal 10 psec FWHM with 1 psec risetime and falltime and a nominally flat plateau (allowing for slope adjustments) with no more than a 5% rms proportional intensity variation. Furthermore, the results of this work can be used to suggest crystal thicknesses that would likely comply with all uv pulse requirements given the appropriate longitudinal profile and bandwidth for an input ir pulse.

  11. Visualizing the Surface Infrastructure Used to Move 2 MtCO2/year from the Dakota Gasification Company to the Weyburn CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Project: Version of July 1, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Google Earth Pro has been employed to create an interactive flyover of the world’s largest operational carbon dioxide capture and storage project. The visualization focuses on the transport and storage of 2 MtCO2/year which is captured from the Dakota Gasification Facility (Beula, North Dakota) and transported 205 miles and injected into the Weyburn oil field in Southeastern Saskatchewan.

  12. Arnaud Rykner, L'incomprhensible dans le tapis (Sur Henry James) , in L'Incomprhensible. Littrature, rel, visuel, sous la dir. de M.-T. Mathet, Paris, L'Harmattan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    'Incompréhensible. Littérature, réel, visuel, sous la dir. de M.-T. Mathet, Paris, L'Harmattan, coll. Champs visuels, 2003, p.-T. Mathet, Paris, L'Harmattan, coll. Champs visuels, 2003, p. 137-165. 2 Georges Didi-Huberman et dans un

  13. High Hydrogen Concentrations Detected In The Underground Vaults For RH-TRU Waste At INEEL Compared With Calculated Values Using The INEEL-Developed Computer Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajiv Bhatt; Soli Khericha

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 700 remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste drums are stored in about 144 underground vaults at the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory’s (INEEL’s) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These drums were shipped to the INEEL from 1976 through 1996. During recent monitoring, concentrations of hydrogen were found to be in excess of lower explosive limits. The hydrogen concentration in one vault was detected to be as high as 18% (by volume). This condition required evaluation of the safety basis for the facility. The INEEL has developed a computer program to estimate the hydrogen gas generation as a function of time and diffusion through a series of layers (volumes), with a maximum five layers plus a sink/environment. The program solves the first-order diffusion equations as a function of time. The current version of the code is more flexible in terms of user input. The program allows the user to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the different layers of a configuration and then change the configuration after a given time; e.g.; installation of a filter on an unvented drum or placed in a vault or in a shipping cask. The code has been used to predict vault concentrations and to identify potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. The code has generally predicted higher hydrogen concentrations than the measured values, particularly for the drums older than 20 year, which could be due to uncertainty and conservative assumptions in drum age, heat generation rate, hydrogen generation rate, Geff, and diffusion rates through the layers.

  14. Ultrafast UV Pump/IR Probe Studies of C-H Activation in Linear, Cyclic, and Aryl Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Charles B.

    Ultrafast UV Pump/IR Probe Studies of C-H Activation in Linear, Cyclic, and Aryl Hydrocarbons, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbon solvents on a femtosecond to microsecond time scale. These results have revealed that the structure of the hydrocarbon substrate affects the final C-H bond activation step, which

  15. Report No. C-SAFE-CD-IR-04-001 MPM VALIDATION: SPHERE-CYLINDER IMPACT TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Report No. C-SAFE-CD-IR-04-001 MPM VALIDATION: SPHERE-CYLINDER IMPACT TESTS: ENERGY BALANCE B, 2004 ABSTRACT This report discusses the energy balance results observed during the simulation. Banerjee Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA August 04

  16. Diamond and Related Materials, 3 (1994) 939-941 939 CVD diamond growth on germanium for IR window applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [ Chemistry, Unil,ersity of Bristol, Cantock 's Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (UK) N. M. Everitt Department o[Aerospace with ition times. An alternative is to coat existing IR window epitaxial layers of Si-Ge alloy 2 Bm thick

  17. Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational@stanford.edu Abstract: Weak hydrogen-bonded solute/solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen-bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen

  18. PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes_020312

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes in their work. The data entry team searched for photos/videos of music faculty online and found a few about PRO and will use the PRO website user guide and FAQs to respond to questions. Returning

  19. Symmetry Analysis for Tetrahedrane Tetrahedrane, C4H4, belongs to the Td point group. Use group theory to predict the number of IR and Raman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    Symmetry Analysis for Tetrahedrane Tetrahedrane, C4H4, belongs to the Td point group. Use group have three IR active modes (3T2) and seven Raman active modes (2A1 + 2E + 3T2). Two of the IR modes

  20. IRS Data Retrieval Tool Data is available within 1-2 weeks of electronically filing your taxes or 6-8 weeks of filling a paper tax return.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    IRS Data Retrieval Tool Data is available within 1-2 weeks of electronically filing your taxes or 6: How to Use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool 1. Go to www.fafsa.ed.gov and click "Start Here". Enter you want to use the Data Retrieval tool for the STUDENT ONLY, press "next" at the bottom of the page

  1. Comparison of junction temperature evaluations in a power IGBT module using an IR camera and three thermo-sensitive electrical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and electrical methods. The main optical methods are local infrared sensors [3,4], optical fibers [5], infraredComparison of junction temperature evaluations in a power IGBT module using an IR camera and three information of the actual chip temperature distribution. In this paper, we propose to use infrared (IR

  2. Ferromagnetic Exchange Anisotropy from Antiferromagnetic Superexchange in the Mixed 3d 5d Transition-Metal Compound Sr3CuIrO6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China 3 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois of the unusual ferromagnetism in the one- dimensional copper-iridium oxide Sr3CuIrO6. Utilizing Ir L3 edge-insulator tran- sition was shown to exist in a variety of 5d iridium oxides [2­14]. An important consequence

  3. A car-borne highly sensitive near-IR diode-laser methane detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezin, A G; Ershov, Oleg V; Shapovalov, Yu P [Natural Science Center, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly sensitive automated car-borne detector for measuring methane concentration in real time is designed, developed and tested under laboratory and field conditions. Measurements were made with the help of an uncooled tunable near-IR 1.65-{mu}m laser diode. The detector consists of a multipass optical cell with a 45-m long optical path and a base length of 0.5 m. The car-borne detector is intended for monitoring the methane concentration in air from the moving car to reveal the leakage of domestic gas. The sensitivity limit (standard deviation) under field conditions is 1 ppm (20 ppb under laboratory conditions) for a measuring time of 0.4 s. The measuring technique based on the detection of a single methane line ensured a high selectivity of methane detector relative to other gases. The methane detector can be easily modified for measuring other simple-molecule gases (e.g., CO, CO{sub 2}, HF, NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) by replacing the diode laser and varying the parameters of the control program. (special issue devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

  4. SIZE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN THE FAR-IR SPECTRA OF WATER ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medcraft, Chris; McNaughton, Don; Thompson, Chris D. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Appadoo, Dominique [Australian Synchrotron, Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Bauerecker, Sigurd [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Robertson, Evan G., E-mail: E.Robertson@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra of water-ice aerosol particles have been measured in the far-IR region using synchrotron radiation. The particles in the nanoscale size regime of 1-100 nm were formed by rapid collisional cooling at temperatures ranging from 4 to 190 K. The spectra show the characteristic bands centered near 44 {mu}m (230 cm{sup -1}) and 62 {mu}m (160 cm{sup -1}) associated with the intermolecular lattice modes of crystalline ice at all temperatures, in contrast to previous studies of thin films formed by vapor deposition where amorphous ice is generated below 140 K. The bands shift to higher wavenumber values as the temperature is reduced, consistent with the trend seen in earlier studies, but in our experiments the actual peak positions in the aerosol particle spectra are consistently higher by ca. 4 cm{sup -1}. This finding has implications for the potential use of these spectral features as a temperature probe. The particle sizes are small enough for their spectra to be free of scattering effects, and therefore provide a means to assess imaginary refractive index values obtained through Kramers-Kronig analyses of thin film spectra.

  5. IPHAS A-type Stars with Mid-IR Excesses in Spitzer Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hales, Antonio S; Drew, Janet E; Unruh, Yvonne C; Greimel, Robert; Irwin, Michael J; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have identified 17 A-type stars in the Galactic Plane that have mid-IR excesses at 8 micron. From the observed colors in the (r'-H_alpha)-(r'-i') plane, we first identified 23050 early A-type main sequence (MS) star candidates in the Isaac Newton Photometric H-Alpha Survey (IPHAS) point source database that are located in Spitzer GLIMPSE Galactic Plane fields. Imposing the requirement that they be detected in all seven 2MASS and IRAC bands led to a sample of 2692 candidate A-type stars with fully sampled 0.6 to 8 micron SEDs. Optical classification spectra of 18 of the IPHAS candidate A-type MS stars showed that all but one could be well fitted using main sequence A-type templates, with the other being an A-type supergiant. Out of the 2692 A-type candidates 17 (0.6%) were found to have 8-micron excesses above the expected photospheric values. Taking into account non-A-Type contamination estimates, the 8-micron excess fraction is adjusted to ~0.7%. The distances to these sources range from 0.7-2.5 kpc. Only...

  6. Setting temperature effect in polycrystalline exchange-biased IrMn/CoFe bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez-Outon, L. E.; Araujo Filho, M. S.; Araujo, R. E.; Ardisson, J. D.; Macedo, W. A. A. [Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of atomic interdiffusion on the exchange bias of polycrystalline IrMn/({sup 57}Fe + CoFe) multilayers due to the thermal setting process of exchange coupling during field annealing. Depth-resolved {sup 57}Fe conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to quantify atomic interdiffusion. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to monitor the variation of exchange bias and magnetisation. It was found that interface sharpness is only affected above {approx}350 Degree-Sign C. Three different stages for the setting of exchange bias can be inferred from our results. At the lower setting temperatures (up to 350 Degree-Sign C), the effect of field annealing involves alignment of spins and interfacial coupling due to the setting of both antiferromagnetic (AF) bulk and interface without significant interdiffusion. At a second stage (350-450 Degree-Sign C), where AF ordering dominates over diffusion effects, atomic migration and increased setting of AF spins co-exist to produce a peak in exchange bias field and coercivity. On a third stage (>450 Degree-Sign C), severe chemical intermixing reduces significantly the F/AF coupling.

  7. Vacuum-UV to IR supercontinuum in hydrogen-filled photonic crystal fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belli, Federico; Chang, Wonkeun; Travers, John C; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although supercontinuum sources are readily available for the visible and near infrared, and recently also for the mid-IR, many areas of biology, chemistry and physics would benefit greatly from the availability of compact, stable and spectrally bright deep ultraviolet (DUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) supercontinuum sources. Such sources have however not yet been developed. Here we report the generation of a bright supercontinuum, spanning more than three octaves from 124 nm to beyond 1200 nm, in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e-style hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (kagom\\'e-PCF). Few-{\\mu}J, 30 fs pump pulses at wavelength 805 nm are launched into the fiber, where they undergo self-compression via the Raman-enhanced Kerr effect. Modeling indicates that before reaching a minimum sub-cycle pulse duration of ~1 fs, much less than one period of molecular vibration (8 fs), nonlinear reshaping of the pulse envelope, accentuated by self-steepening and shock formation, creates an ultrashort feature that causes impulsi...

  8. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Late-Time IR Line Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penney, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the imprint of magnetic fields B on late-time IR line profiles and light curves of Type Ia Supernovae. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass M_{Ch White Dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 1E9G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 mu can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. Subsequently, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. By day 500, the profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B and directional dependent for dipole fields. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. After about 200 days, persistent broad-line, flat-topped or stumpy profiles require high density burning which is the signature of a WD close to M_Ch. Narrow peaked profiles are a signature of chemical mixing or sub-...

  9. WATER ABSORPTION FROM GAS VERY NEAR THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR AFGL 2136 IRS 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seifahrt, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Richter, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ground-based observations of the ?{sub 1} and ?{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 2}O toward the massive protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1, identifying absorption features due to 47 different ro-vibrational transitions between 2.468 ?m and 2.561 ?m. Analysis of these features indicates the absorption arises in warm (T = 506 ± 25 K), very dense (n(H{sub 2}) > 5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}) gas, suggesting an origin close to the central protostar. The total column density of warm water is estimated to be N(H{sub 2}O) = (1.02 ± 0.02) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}, giving a relative abundance of N(H{sub 2}O)/N(H{sub 2}) ? 10{sup –4}. Our study represents the first extensive use of water vapor absorption lines in the near infrared, and demonstrates the utility of such observations in deriving physical parameters.

  10. Tuning the Jeff=1/2 insulating state via electron doping and pressure in the double-layered iridate Sr3Ir2O7

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, L.; Kong, P. P.; Qi, T. F.; Jin, C. Q.; Yuan, S. J.; DeLong, L. E.; Schlottmann, P.; Cao, G.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sr3Ir2O7 exhibits a novel Jeff=12 insulating state that features a splitting between Jeff=1/2 and 3/2 bands due to spin-orbit interaction. We report a metal-insulator transition in Sr3Ir2O7 via either dilute electron doping (La3+ for Sr2+) or application of high pressure up to 35 GPa. Our study of single-crystal Sr3Ir2O7 and (Sr1?xLax)3Ir2O7 reveals that application of high hydrostatic pressure P leads to a drastic reduction in the electrical resistivity by as much as six orders of magnitude at a critical pressure PC = 13.2 GPa, manifesting a closing of the gap; but further increasing P up to 35 GPa produces no fully metallic state at low temperatures, possibly as a consequence of localization due to a narrow distribution of bonding angles ?. In contrast, slight doping of La3+ ions for Sr2+ ions in Sr3Ir2O7 readily induces a robust metallic state in the resistivity at low temperatures; the magnetic ordering temperature is significantly suppressed but remains finite for (Sr0.95La0.05)3Ir2O7 where the metallic state occurs. The results are discussed along with comparisons drawn with Sr2IrO4, a prototype of the Jeff=1/2 insulator.

  11. New mechanism for nonlocality from string theory: UV-IR quantum entanglement and its imprints on the CMB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minton, Gregory; Sahakian, Vatche [Harvey Mudd College, Physics Department, 241 Platt Boulevard, Claremont, California 91711 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Puff field theories (PFT) arise as the decoupling limits of D3 branes in a Melvin universe and exhibit spatially nonlocal dynamics. Unlike other realizations of nonlocality in string theory, PFTs have full SO(3) rotational symmetry. In this work, we analyze the strongly coupled regime of a PFT through gravitational holography. We find a novel mechanism at the heart of the phenomenon of nonlocality: a quantum entanglement of UV and IR dynamics. In the holographic bulk, this translates to an apparent horizon splitting the space into two regions--with the UV completion of the PFT sitting at the horizon. We unravel this intricate UV-IR setting and devise a prescription for computing correlators that extends the original dictionary of holographic renormalization group. We then implement a cosmological scenario where PFT correlators set the initial conditions for primordial fluctuations. We compute the associated power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and find that the scenario allows for a distinct stringy signature.

  12. X-ray-induced electronic structure change in CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gretarsson, H.; Kim, Young-June [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada); Kim, Jungho; Casa, D.; Gog, T. [CMC-XOR, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Choi, K. R. [l-PEM, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, S. W. [l-PEM, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); R-CEM and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} is investigated using various bulk-sensitive x-ray spectroscopic methods near the Ir L{sub 3} edge: resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the partial fluorescence yield mode, and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy. A strong RIXS signal (0.75 eV) resulting from a charge-density-wave gap opening is observed below the metal-insulator transition temperature of 230 K. The resultant modification of electronic structure is consistent with the density functional theory prediction. In the spin- and charge-dimer disordered phase induced by x-ray irradiation below 50 K, we find that a broad peak around 0.4 eV appears in the RIXS spectrum.

  13. Relation of SiO maser emission to IR radiation in evolved stars based on the MSX observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. W. Jiang

    2002-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the space MSX observation in bands A(8$\\mu$m), C(12$\\mu$m), D(15$\\mu$m) and E(21$\\mu$m), and the ground SiO maser observation of evolved stars by the Nobeyama 45-m telescope in the v=1 and v=2 J=1-0 transitions, the relation between SiO maser emission and mid-IR continuum radiation is analyzed. The relation between SiO maser emission and the IR radiation in the MSX bands A, C, D and E is all clearly correlated. The SiO maser emission can be explained by a radiative pumping mechanism according to its correlation with infrared radiation in the MSX band A.

  14. A Chandra Snapshot Survey of IR-bright LINERs: A Possible Link Between Star Formation, AGN Fueling, and Mass Accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Dudik; S. Satyapal; M. Gliozzi; R. M. Sambruna

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a high resolution X-ray imaging study of nearby LINERs observed by Chandra. This study complements and extends previous X-ray studies of LINERs, focusing on the under-explored population of nearby dust-enshrouded infrared-bright LINERs. The sample consists of 15 IR-bright LINERs (L_FIR/L_B > 3), with distances that range from 11 to 26 Mpc. Combining our sample with previous Chandra studies we find that ~ 51% (28/55) of the LINERs display compact hard X-ray cores. The nuclear 2-10 keV luminosities of the galaxies in this expanded sample range from ~ 2 X 10^38 ergs s^-1 to ~ 2 X 10^44 ergs s^-1. We find an intriguing trend in the Eddington ratio vs. L_FIR and L_FIR/L_B for the AGN-LINERs in the expanded sample that extends over seven orders of magnitude in L/L_Edd. This correlation may imply a link between black hole growth, as measured by the Eddington ratio, and the star formation rate (SFR), as measured by the far-IR luminosity and IR-brightness ratio. If the far-IR luminosity is an indicator of the molecular gas content in our sample of LINERs, our results may further indicate that the mass accretion rate scales with the host galaxy's fuel supply. We discuss the potential implications of our results in the framework of black hole growth and AGN fueling in low luminosity AGN. (Abridged)

  15. Al fraction induced effects on the capacitance characteristics -GaN/AlxGa1-xN IR detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    substrate. As shown in Fig. 1(a), the device structures consist of a 0.2 m n+ -GaN top contact (emitter.1117/12.828156 Proc. of SPIE Vol. 7467 74670W-1 #12;(a) Sapphire Substrate n GaN Bottom Contact AlxGa1-xN Barrier n GaNAl fraction induced effects on the capacitance characteristics of n+ -GaN/AlxGa1-xN IR detectors

  16. The AGN content in luminous IR galaxies at z\\sim2 from a global SED analysis including Herschel data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pozzi, F; Gruppioni, C; Feltre, A; Fritz, J; Fadda, D; Andreani, P; Berta, S; Cimatti, A; Delvecchio, I; Lutz, D; Magnelli, B; Maiolino, R; Nordon, R; Popesso, P; Rodighiero, G; Rosario, D; Santini, P; Vaccari, M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Herschel-PACS far-infrared data, combined with previous multi-band information and mid-IR spectra, to properly account for the presence of an active nucleus and constrain its energetic contribution in luminous infrared (IR) sources at z\\sim2. The sample is composed of 24 sources in the GOODS-South field, with typical IR luminosity of 10^{12} Lo. Data from the 4 Ms Chandra X-ray imaging in this field are also used to identify and characterize AGN emission. We reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution (SED), decomposed into a host-galaxy and an AGN component. A smooth-torus model for circum-nuclear dust is used to account for the direct and re-processed contribution from the AGN. We confirm that galaxies with typical L_{8-1000um}\\sim10^{12}Lo at z\\sim2 are powered predominantly by star-formation. An AGN component is present in nine objects (\\sim35% of the sample) at the 3sigma confidence level, but its contribution to the 8-1000 um emission accounts for only \\sim5% of the energy budget. The AGN...

  17. Anisotropic magnetodielectric coupling behavior of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 1.4}Rh{sub 0.6}O{sub 6} due to geometrically frustrated magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Tathamay; Iyer, Kartik K.; Singh, Kiran; Mukherjee, K.; Paulose, P. L.; Sampathkumaran, E. V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the magnetic, dielectric, and magnetodielectric (MDE) behavior of a geometrically frustrated spin-chain system, Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 1.4}Rh{sub 0.6}O{sub 6} (related to Ca{sub 3}CoRhO{sub 6}), in the single crystalline form for different orientations. The results bring out that the magnetic behavior of this compound is by itself interesting in the sense that this compound exhibits an anisotropic glassy-like magnetic behavior with a huge frequency (?) dependence of ac susceptibility (?) peak for an orientation along the spin-chain in the range of 30–60?K; this behavior is robust to applications of large external magnetic fields (H) unlike in canonical spin-glasses. The temperature dependence of dielectric constant also shows strong ?-dependence with similar robustness to H. The isothermal H-dependent dielectric results at low temperatures establish anisotropic MDE coupling. It is intriguing to note that there is a “step” roughly at one-third of saturation values as in the case of isothermal magnetization curves for same temperatures (for orientation along spin-chain), a correlation hitherto unrealized for geometrically frustrated systems.

  18. R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd): Crystal structures with nets of Ir atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarema, Maksym [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA), Ueberlandstr. 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Zaremba, Oksana; Gladyshevskii, Roman [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla i Mefodiya Str, 6, UA-79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Hlukhyy, Viktor, E-mail: viktor.hlukhyy@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Faessler, Thomas F. [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)] [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structures of the new ternary compounds Sm{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} and LaIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} were determined and refined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. They belong to the Ho{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (oP52, Pmmn) and CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} (hP5, P6/mmm) structure types, respectively. The formation of isotypic compounds R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} with R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} with R=Ce, Pr, Nd, was established by powder X-ray diffraction. The RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds exist only in as-cast samples and decompose during annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C with the formation of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9}. The structure of Sm{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting, slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms (4{sup 4})(4{sup 3}.6){sub 2}(4.6{sup 2}){sub 2} and (4{sup 4}){sub 2}(4{sup 3}.6){sub 4}(4.6{sup 2}){sub 2} that are perpendicular to [0 1 1] as well as to [0 -1 1] and [0 0 1]. The Ir atoms are surrounded by Ge atoms that form tetrahedra or square pyramids (where the layers intersect). The Sm and additional Ir atoms (in trigonal-planar coordination) are situated in channels along [1 0 0] (short translation vector). In the structure of LaIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets (3.6.3.6) perpendicular to [0 0 1]. These nets alternate along the short translation vector with layers of La and Ge atoms. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures contain the nets of Ir atoms as main structural motif: R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms, whereas in the structure of RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ir-rich ternary germanides R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) and RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd) have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} compounds exist only in as-cast samples and decompose during annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C with the formation of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of R{sub 4}Ir{sub 13}Ge{sub 9} contains intersecting slightly puckered nets of Ir atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the structure of RIr{sub 3}Ge{sub 2} the Ir atoms form planar Kagome nets.

  19. IR/PS is the only graduate school of international relations in the world-renowned University of California system. Our professional degree programs are based upon a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    , politics, economics, and public policies of the Asia-Pacific region including Latin America. IR Service · Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command · U.S. Department of Labor · National Renewable Energy

  20. AN UNBIASED SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD R CrA IRS7B IN THE 345 GHz WINDOW WITH ASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E. [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. (Denmark); Jorgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O. (Denmark)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 332-364 GHz region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope toward R CrA IRS7B, a low-mass protostar in the Class 0 or Class 0/I transitional stage. We have also performed some supplementary observations in the 450 GHz band. In total, 16 molecular species are identified in the 332-364 GHz region. Strong emission lines of CN and CCH are observed, whereas complex organic molecules and long carbon-chain molecules, which are characteristics of hot corino and warm carbon-chain chemistry (WCCC) source, respectively, are not detected. The rotation temperature of CH{sub 3}OH is evaluated to be 31 K, which is significantly lower than that reported for the prototypical hot corino IRAS 16293-2422 ({approx}85 K). The deuterium fractionation ratios for CCH and H{sub 2}CO are obtained to be 0.038 and 0.050, respectively, which are much lower than those in the hot corino. These results suggest a weak hot corino activity in R CrA IRS7B. On the other hand, the carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, are found to be abundant. However, this source cannot be classified as a WCCC source, since long carbon-chain molecules are not detected. If WCCC and hot corino chemistry represent the two extremes in chemical compositions of low-mass Class 0 sources, R CrA IRS7B would be a source with a mixture of these two chemical characteristics. The UV radiation from the nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA may also affect the chemical composition. The present line survey demonstrates further chemical diversity in low-mass star-forming regions.

  1. Miniature MT optical assembly (MMTOA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, Daric (Overland Park, KS); Abel, Phillip (Overland Park, KS)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical assembly (10) includes a rigid mount (12) with a recess (26) proximate a first side thereof, a substrate (14), and an optical die (16) flip-chip bonded to the substrate (14). The substrate (14) is secured to the first side of the mount and includes a plurality of die bonding elements (40), a plurality of optical apertures (32), and a plurality of external bonding elements (42). A plurality of traces (44) interconnect the die bonding elements (40) and the external bonding elements (42). The optical die (16) includes a plurality of optical elements, each element including an optical signal interface (48), the die being bonded to the plurality of die bonding elements (40) such that the optical signal interface (48) of each element is in registry with an optical aperture (32) of the substrate (14) and the die (16) is at least partially enclosed by the recess (26).

  2. Generation of tunable mid-IR radiation by second harmonic in a CdGeAs{sub 2} crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S [Laser Laboratory, Department of Physics, Burdwan University, Burdwan (India)

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tunable mid-IR radiation is obtained during second harmonic generation of tunable CO{sub 2}-laser radiation using a CdGeAs{sub 2} crystal. Its angular tuning characteristics at the CO{sub 2}- laser wavelength, angular acceptance angle and spectral acceptance are measured. For second harmonic generation at 10.6 {mu}m, the conversion efficiency in the CdGeAs{sub 2} crystal is 90 times higher than that in the ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal.

  3. Role of the reaction intermediates in determining PHIP (parahydrogen induced polarization) effect in the hydrogenation of acetylene dicarboxylic acid with the complex [Rh (dppb)]{sup +} (dppb: 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reineri, F.; Aime, S. [Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, University of Torino, Via Nizza 52, 10123 Torino (Italy)] [Department of Molecular Biotechnologies and Health Sciences, University of Torino, Via Nizza 52, 10123 Torino (Italy); Gobetto, R.; Nervi, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This study deals with the parahydrogenation of the symmetric substrate acetylene dicarboxylic acid catalyzed by a Rh(I) complex bearing the chelating diphosphine dppb (1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane). The two magnetically equivalent protons of the product yield a hyperpolarized emission signal in the {sup 1}H-NMR spectrum. Their polarization intensity varies upon changing the reaction solvent from methanol to acetone. A detailed analysis of the hydrogenation pathway is carried out by means of density functional theory calculations to assess the structure of hydrogenation intermediates and their stability in the two solvents. The observed polarization effects have been accounted on the basis of the obtained structures. Insights into the lifetime of a short-lived reaction intermediate are also obtained.

  4. Characterizing the Habitable Zones of Exoplanetary Systems with a Large Ultraviolet/Visible/Near-IR Space Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    France, Kevin; Linsky, Jeffrey; Roberge, Aki; Ayres, Thomas; Barman, Travis; Brown, Alexander; Davenport, James; Desert, Jean-Michel; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Fleming, Brian; Fontenla, Juan; Fossati, Luca; Froning, Cynthia; Hallinan, Gregg; Hawley, Suzanne; Hu, Renyu; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kasting, James; Kowlaski, Adam; Loyd, Parke; Mauas, Pablo; Miguel, Yamila; Osten, Rachel; Redfield, Seth; Rugheimer, Sarah; Schneider, Christian; Segura, Antigona; Stocke, John; Tian, Feng; Tumlinson, Jason; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wood, Brian; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the surface and atmospheric conditions of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of low-mass stars is currently one of the greatest astronomical endeavors. Knowledge of the planetary effective surface temperature alone is insufficient to accurately interpret biosignature gases when they are observed in the coming decades. The UV stellar spectrum drives and regulates the upper atmospheric heating and chemistry on Earth-like planets, is critical to the definition and interpretation of biosignature gases, and may even produce false-positives in our search for biologic activity. This white paper briefly describes the scientific motivation for panchromatic observations of exoplanetary systems as a whole (star and planet), argues that a future NASA UV/Vis/near-IR space observatory is well-suited to carry out this work, and describes technology development goals that can be achieved in the next decade to support the development of a UV/Vis/near-IR flagship mission in the 2020s.

  5. Overluminous HNC Line Emission in Arp220, NGC4418 and Mrk231 - Global IR Pumping or XDRs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Aalto; M. Spaans; M. C. Wiedner; S. Huttemeister

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that the HNC J=3-2 emission is brighter than the HCN 3-2 emission by factors of 1.5 to 2.3 in the ultraluminous mergers Arp220 and Mrk231 and the luminous IR galaxy NGC4418. We furthermore report the detection of HNC J=4-3 in Mrk231. Overluminous HNC emission is unexpected in warm molecular gas in ultraluminous galaxies since I(HNC)>I(HCN) is usually taken as a signature of cold (10 - 20 K) dark clouds. Since the molecular gas of the studied galaxies is warm (T_k > 40 K) we present two alternative explanations to the overluminous HNC: a) HNC excitation is affected by pumping of the rotational levels through the mid-infrared continuum and b) XDRs (X-ray Dominated Regions) influence the abundances of HNC. HNC may become pumped at 21.5 micron brightness temperatures of 50 K, suggesting that HNC-pumping could be common in warm, ultraluminous galaxies with compact IR-nuclei.On the other hand, all three galaxies are either suspected of having buried AGN - or the presence of AGN is clear (Mrk231) - indicating that X-rays may affect the ISM chemistry. We conclude that both the pumping and XDR alternatives imply molecular cloud ensembles distinctly different from those of typical starforming regions in the Galaxy, or the ISM of less extreme starburst galaxies. The HNC molecule shows the potential of becoming an additional important tracer of extreme nuclear environments.

  6. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ?SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (?SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  7. Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton 20122012 CSUF Mihaylo University, Fullerton An Overview and Analysis of Inland Empire Exports #12;novEmbEr 2011 InstItUtE for EconomIc and EnvIronmEntal stUdIEs33 #12;Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty f

  8. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan); Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Kawamura, Shinji [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol. Due to the simple but accurate assembly, the sandwich measurement method is useful for daily dose management of {sup 192}Ir sources.

  9. Energy-beam processing studies on Ta/U and Ir/Ta systems. [Laser-and electron-beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, E.N.; Peercy, P.S.; Jacobson, D.C.; Draper, C.W.; Huegel, F.J.; Echer, C.J.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Balser, J.D.

    1983-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Films of Ta metal on uranium and of Ir metal on tantalum have been irradiated and melted by pulses from Q-switched Ruby and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers to investigate the nature of the resulting mixtures in light of the very different binary-phase diagrams of the two systems. In addition, a two-phase Ir-Ta alloy has been surface-processed with CW CO/sub 2/-laser radiation and with an electron beam in order to study microstructure refinement and test the advantage of using alloys as opposed to film-on-substrate combinations for the development of claddings.

  10. Ordered vs. disordered perovskites; structural studies of Fe-doped SrIrO{sub 3} and SrRuO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qasim, Ilyas; Blanchard, Peter E.R.; Liu, Samuel; Tang, Chunguang [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kennedy, Brendan J., E-mail: B.Kennedy@chem.usyd.edu.au [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Avdeev, Maxim [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Kimpton, Justin A. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures of the two Fe containing perovskites Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} and SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} have been established using a combination of synchrotron and neutron diffraction methods. Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} and SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} are shown to be monoclinic I2/m and tetragonal I4/mcm respectively The former exhibits a rock-salt like ordering of the Fe and Ir cations and displays a sequence of phase transitions associated with the loss of the octahedral tilts upon heating; 12/m?I4/m?Fm3{sup ¯}m. The Fe and Ru cations are disordered in SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} and this shows a single structural phase transition upon heating due to the loss of the in-phase tilts, viz. I4/mcm?Pm3{sup ¯}m. In both cases XANES measurements show partial oxidation of the Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 4+}. The difference in the structures between the two is remarkable given the similar size of Ir{sup 5+} and Ru{sup 5+}, and this is reflected in their magnetic properties. - Graphical abstract: Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} and SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} are shown, using a combination of synchrotron and neutron diffraction, to be monoclinic I2/m with cation ordering and tetragonal I4/mcm with disordered Fe and Ir, respectively. Both undergo phase transitions upon heating due to the loss of the octahedral tilts. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} shown to be monoclinic and shows the transitions upon heating I2/m?I4/m? Fm3{sup ¯}m. • SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} is tetragonal and shows a single I4/mcm?Pm3m transition upon heating. • The Fe and Ru cations are disordered in SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} but ordered in Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6}. • XANES measurements show partial oxidation of the Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 4+}.

  11. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr?IrO? using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; et al

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr?IrO?, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore »RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  12. Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  13. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr?IrO? using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Dean, M. P. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chiuzbaian, S. G. [Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Jaouen, N. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Nicolaou, A. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin (France); Yin, W. G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rayan Serrao, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ramesh, R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ding, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics (BNLCP-CAS); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Hill, J. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr?IrO?, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.

  14. WatSen: Design and testing of a prototype mid-IR spectrometer and microscope package for Mars exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolters, Stephen D; Sund, Arnt T; Bohman, Axel; Guthery, William; Sund, Bjornar T; Hagermann, Axel; Tomkinson, Tim; Romstedt, Jens; Morgan, Geraint H; Grady, Monica M; 10.1007/s10686-012-9328-8

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and built a compact breadboard prototype instrument called WatSen: a combined ATR mid-IR spectrometer, fixed-focus microscope, and humidity sensor. The instrument package is enclosed in a rugged cylindrical casing only 26mm in diameter. The functionality, reliability and performance of the instrument was tested in an environment chamber set up to resemble martian surface conditions. The effective wavelength range of the spectrometer is 6.2 - 10.3 micron with a resolution delta-wavelength/wavelength = 0.015. This allows detection of silicates and carbonates, including an indication of the presence of water (ice). Spectra of clusters of grains < 1mm across were acquired that are comparable with spectra of the same material obtained using a commercial system. The microscope focuses through the diamond ATR crystal. Colour images of the grains being spectroscopically analysed are obtainable with a resolution of ~ 20 micron.

  15. List of codes Language abbreviation codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portugal MT Malta GR Greece SE Sweden TR Turkey Country codes for the ERASMUS Institutional Identification codes A Austria IR L Ireland BG Bulgaria LV Latvia B Belgium IS Iceland CY Cyprus MT Malta D Germany L

  16. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Ping

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (R{sub s} = 10 ohms/square ({Omega}#2;/?)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2{Omega}#2;/?. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  17. [sup 27]Al NMR, GT-IR and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD characterization of fluorided alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCanio, E.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States) Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Bruno, J.W. (Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Nero, V.P.; Edwards, J.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New environmental legislation in the United States requiring reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels is making its necessary to develop better, alternative acid catalysts for alkylation and isomerization reactions, and for hydrotreating catalysts for sulfur and nitrogen removal from refinery streams. A series of F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples (wt % F = 0 to 20) has been studied using a combination of solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR, FT-IR, and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD techniques. Solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR is particularly sensitive to amorphous phases or small crystallites present on the catalyst surface, many of which cannot be detected by XRD. [sup 27]Al NMR shows the presence of three types of AlF[sub 3](H[sub 2]O)[sub n] species (with n varying between 0 and 3) on fluorided alumina. FT-IR studies of ethanol adsorption show that fluoride blocks the sites required for dissociative chemisorption of ethanol. A similar analysis of adsorbed pyridine shows an increase in the number of Broensted acid sites with the addition of up to 10 wt % fluoride. However, increasing the fluoride loading to 20 wt % decreases the number of Broensted acid sites. The TPD of ethanol-[sup 18]O from F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples shows that at low levels fluoride serves to block Lewis acid sites, but at higher levels its predominant role is to increase the Broensted acidity of the alumina surface. The pyridine adsorption and TPD experiments show that fluoride strengthens the remaining Lewis acid sites. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Growth of Dome-Shaped Carbon Nanoislands on Ir(111): The Intermediate between Carbidic Clusters and Quasi-Free-Standing Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfè, Dario

    and Quasi-Free-Standing Graphene Paolo Lacovig,1 Monica Pozzo,2 Dario Alfe`,2 Paolo Vilmercati,3 of a long-range ordered graphene layer on Ir(111) assume a peculiar domelike shape. The understanding coupled carbidic carbon and a quasi-free-standing graphene layer, can provide information for a rational

  19. arXiv:1307.1718v1[cs.IR]5Jul2013 Graph-based Approach to Automatic Taxonomy Generation (GraBTax)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    arXiv:1307.1718v1[cs.IR]5Jul2013 Graph-based Approach to Automatic Taxonomy Generation (Gra in optimizing the structure of the taxonomy. To automatically generate topic-dependent taxonomies from a large with Wikipedia categories. 1 Introduction A taxonomy organizes concepts into a hierarchical structure, where

  20. Title Distributed Multi-Microphone Speech Enhancement Contact Info Dr. ir. R.C. Hendriks (r.c.hendriks@tudelft.nl)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title Distributed Multi-Microphone Speech Enhancement Contact Info Dr. ir. R.C. Hendriks (r and interferences is to use multi- microphone speech enhancement methods like beamforming or multi-microphone Wiener of new multi-microphone speech enhancement algorithms that can run in such a distributed setup. The goal

  1. Title Source Localization for Multi-Microphone Speech Enhancement Dr. ir. R.C. Hendriks (r.c.hendriks@tudelft.nl)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title Source Localization for Multi-Microphone Speech Enhancement Contact Info Dr. ir. R environmental noise and interferences is to use multi- microphone speech enhancement methods like beamforming.C. Hendriks (r.c.hendriks@tudelft.nl) Short Description Speech processing applications, such as hearing aids

  2. Optical constants of silicon carbide for astrophysical applications. II. Extending optical functions from IR to UV using single-crystal absorption spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofmeister, A M; Goncharov, A F; Speck, A K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory measurements of unpolarized and polarized absorption spectra of various samples and crystal stuctures of silicon carbide (SiC) are presented from 1200--35,000 cm$^{-1}$ ($\\lambda \\sim$ 8--0.28 $\\mu$m) and used to improve the accuracy of optical functions ($n$ and $k$) from the infrared (IR) to the ultraviolet (UV). Comparison with previous $\\lambda \\sim$ 6--20 $\\mu$m thin-film spectra constrains the thickness of the films and verifies that recent IR reflectivity data provide correct values for $k$ in the IR region. We extract $n$ and $k$ needed for radiative transfer models using a new ``difference method'', which utilizes transmission spectra measured from two SiC single-crystals with different thicknesses. This method is ideal for near-IR to visible regions where absorbance and reflectance are low and can be applied to any material. Comparing our results with previous UV measurements of SiC, we distinguish between chemical and structural effects at high frequency. We find that for all spectral re...

  3. High performance of a carbon supported ternary PdIrNi catalyst for ethanol electro-oxidation in anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    -oxidation in anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells Shuiyun Shen, T. S. Zhao,* Jianbo Xu and Yinshi Li-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells (AEM DEFCs). We demonstrate that the use of the ternary PdIrNi catalyst for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells (AEM DEFCs) offers

  4. IR mass-resolved spectroscopy of complexes without chromophore: Cyclohexanol·(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, n = 1–3 and cyclohexanol dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    León, Iker; Montero, Raúl; Longarte, Asier; Fernández, José A., E-mail: josea.fernandez@ehu.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country-UPV/EHU, Barrio Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass-resolved IR spectra of cyclohexanol-water clusters and cyclohexanol dimer in supersonic expansions are presented for the first time. A combination of ns and fs IR lasers made possible recording such spectra without inclusion of a chromophore or a messenger atom. Furthermore, employment of the recently developed IR{sup 3} technique [I. León, R. Montero, F. Castaño, A. Longarte, and J. A. Fernández, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 6798 (2012)] allowed us to discriminate between the contribution of different species to the IR spectrum. Comparison of the experimental spectra with the predictions at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) calculation level confirmed the assignment of the spectrum of cyclohexanol·(H{sub 2}O){sub 1} to a structure in which water is accepting a proton from cyclohexanol's OH group, and those of cyclohexanol·(H{sub 2}O){sub 2,3} to structures with cyclic hydrogen bond networks. A comparative analysis of the results obtained with those reported on other aromatic alcohols is also offered.

  5. Observing Conditions and Mid-IR Data Quality Rachel Masona, Andre Wonga, b, Tom Geballea, Kevin Volka, Tom Haywardc, Matt Dillmana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    . These data can be used to illustrate the effect of factors such as water vapour column, airmass, cloud cover these effects is important for the efficiency of mid-IR queue observing, the ability of classical observers imaging observations, and which can safely be neglected. Keywords: infrared radiation, infrared

  6. The influence of the spectral emissivity of flat-plate calibrators on the calibration of IR thermometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E. [Centro Nacional de Metrología, CENAM Km 4.5 Carretera a los Cués, El Marqués, Querétaro, 76246 (Mexico)] [Centro Nacional de Metrología, CENAM Km 4.5 Carretera a los Cués, El Marqués, Querétaro, 76246 (Mexico)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat Calibrators (FC) are an option for calibration of infrared thermometers (IT) with a fixed large target. FCs are neither blackbodies, nor gray-bodies; their spectral emissivity is lower than one and depends on wavelength. Nevertheless they are used as gray-bodies with a nominal emissivity value. FCs can be calibrated radiometrically using as reference a calibrated IR thermometer (RT). If an FC will be used to calibrate ITs that work in the same spectral range as the RT then its calibration is straightforward: the actual FC spectral emissivity is not required. This result is valid for any given fixed emissivity assessed to the FC. On the other hand, when the RT working spectral range does not match with that of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC then it is required to know the FC spectral emissivity as part of the calibration process. For this purpose, at CENAM, we developed an experimental setup to measure spectral emissivity in the infrared spectral range, based on a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Not all laboratories have emissivity measurement capability in the appropriate wavelength and temperature ranges to obtain the spectral emissivity. Thus, we present an estimation of the error introduced when the spectral range of the RT used to calibrate an FC and the spectral ranges of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC do not match. Some examples are developed for the cases when RT and IT spectral ranges are [8,13] ?m and [8,14] ?m respectively.

  7. The effect of emissive biased limiter on the magnetohydrodynamic modes in the IR-T1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghasemloo, M.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salem, M. K.; Arvin, R.; Mohammadi, S.; Nik Mohammadi, A. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P. O. Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A moveable emissive biased limiter (EBL) for the investigation of spatial and temporal structure of MHD modes in IR-T1 tokamak, based on mirnov oscillations, was designed and constructed. The biasing has been considered to improve the global confinement by setting up an electric field at the plasma edge. Radial electric field (E{sub r}) modifies edge plasma turbulence, plasma rotation, and transport. Mirnov oscillations using singular value decomposition (SVD) and wavelet techniques were analyzed. SVD algorithm has been employed to analyze the frequency and wavenumber harmonics of the MHD fluctuations. The time-resolved frequency component analysis has been performed using wavelets. The EBL was applied to plasma at 10 ms with negative polarity. The results show that after applying EBL, the m = 2 mode is grown, m = 3 mode is suppressed, and H{sub {alpha}} radiation is decreased. Furthermore, results of the wavelet analysis of mirnov coil in the time range of 8-12 ms indicate that 1.5 ms after applying EBL, the MHD frequency is reduced from 45 kHz to 25 kHz.

  8. Best values of parameters for interacting HDE with GO IR-cutoff in Brans-Dicke cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Khodam-Mohammadi; E. Karimkhani; A. Sheykhi

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the interacting holographic dark energy (HDE) with Granda-Oliveros (GO) IR-cutoff in the framework of Brans-Dicke (BD) cosmology. We obtain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of HDE, $w_D$, the effective EoS parameter $w_{\\mathrm{eff}}$, the deceleration parameter $q $ and the squared of sound speed $v_s^2$ in a flat FRW universe. We show that at late time the cosmic coincidence problem can be alleviated. Also we show that for non-interacting case, HDE can give a unified dark matter-dark energy profile in BD cosmology, except that it cannot solve the coincidence problem in the future. By studying the equation of state parameter, we see that the phantom divide may be crossed. Using the latest observational data, we calculate the best values of the parameters for interacting HDE in BD framework. Computing the deceleration parameter implies that the transition from deceleration to the acceleration phase occurred for redshift $z\\geq 0.5$. Finally, we investigate the sound stability of the model, and find that HDE with GO cutoff in the framework of BD cosmology can lead to a stable DE-dominated universe favored by observations, provided we take $\\beta=0.44$ and $b^2<0.35$. This is in contrast to HDE model in Einstein gravity which does not lead to a stable DE dominated universe.

  9. Noncollinear ferromagnetic easy axes in Py/Ru/FeCo/IrMn spin valves induced by oblique deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bueno, T. E. P.; Parreiras, D. E.; Gomes, G. F. M.; Krambrock, K.; Paniago, R. [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Michea, S.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L. [Centro de Investigación en Nanotecnología y Materiales Avanzados “CIEN-UC,” Pontifícia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile); Filho, M. S. Araújo; Macedo, W. A. A. [Laboratório de Física Aplicada, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an investigation on the magnetic properties of Py/Ru/FeCo/IrMn spin valves grown by dc magnetron sputtering. The sample fabrication setup has two important features, (i) the five magnetron sputtering sources are placed in a cluster flange 72° from each other, and (ii) each source is tilted with respect to the sample normal. In-plane angular dependence of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was used to obtain the relevant magnetic anisotropies, such as uniaxial and exchange bias fields. The oblique deposition geometry employed has induced non-collinear easy axes of the two ferromagnetic (FM) layers, with high uniaxial field strengths. The symmetry shift of the angular dependence of the FMR resonances of the two FM layers gives us directly the angle between the easy axes of FM{sub 1} (Py) and FM{sub 2} (FeCo), which turned out to be the angle between two adjacent sputtering sources. The observations of the present study suggest that, by combining oblique deposition and appropriate angles of incidence of the deposition flux, the uniaxial (and unidirectional) axes of individual FM layers can be precisely engineered in spin valve fabrication.

  10. Epitaxial Ba{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} thin-films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, J., E-mail: john.nichols@uky.edu; Korneta, O. B.; Terzic, J.; Cao, G.; Brill, J. W.; Seo, S. S. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have synthesized epitaxial Ba{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} (BIO) thin-films on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition and studied their electronic structure by dc-transport and optical spectroscopic experiments. We have observed that BIO thin-films are insulating but close to the metal-insulator transition boundary with significantly smaller transport and optical gap energies than its sister compound, Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}. Moreover, BIO thin-films have both an enhanced electronic bandwidth and electronic-correlation energy. Our results suggest that BIO thin-films have great potential for realizing the interesting physical properties predicted in layered iridates.

  11. A quantum cascade laser-based mid-IR frequency metrology system with ultra-narrow linewidth and $1\\times 10^{-13}$-level absolute frequency stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Michael G; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Schiller, Stephan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a powerful tool for high-resolution mid-IR spectroscopy and frequency metrology with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). We have implemented frequency stabilization of a QCL to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) reference cavity, via upconversion to the near-IR spectral range, at a level of $1\\times10^{-13}$. The absolute frequency of the QCL is measured relative to a hydrogen maser, with instability $<1\\times10^{-13}$ and inaccuracy $5\\times10^{-13}$, using a frequency comb phase-stabilized to an independent ultrastable laser. The QCL linewidth is determined to be 60 Hz, dominated by fiber noise. Active suppression of fiber noise could result in sub-10 Hz linewidth.

  12. Emission intensity in the visible and IR spectral ranges from Si-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with erbium (Er) and europium (Eu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezdrogina, M. M., E-mail: margaret.m@mail.ioffe.ru; Kostina, L. S.; Beliakova, E. I.; Kuzmin, R. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photo- and electroluminescence spectra of silicon-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with rare-earth metals are studied. It is shown that emission in the visible and IR spectral ranges can be obtained from n-Si:Er/p-Si and n-Si:Eu/p-Si structures fabricated by the method suggested in the study. The results obtained make this method promising for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  13. /sup 194/ /sup 196/ /sup 198/Pt(t,. cap alpha. )/sup 193/ /sup 195/ /sup 197/Ir reactions with polarized tritons. [17 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cizewski, J.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Sunier, J.W.; Brown, R.E.; Burke, D.G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The /sup 194/ /sup 196/ /sup 198/Pt(t vector, ..cap alpha..)/sup 193/ /sup 195/ /sup 197/Ir reactions were measured. Angular distributions of cross sections and analyzing powers for levels up to approx. 2.5 MeV in each residual nuclide were obtained, and comparisons with DWBA predictions allowed spins, parities, and pickup spectroscopic strengths to be determined. The results are being analyzed with the aim of testing the existence of supersymmmetric structures in nature. 2 figures.

  14. THE HST EXTREME DEEP FIELD (XDF): COMBINING ALL ACS AND WFC3/IR DATA ON THE HUDF REGION INTO THE DEEPEST FIELD EVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P. A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Gonzalez, V., E-mail: gdi@ucolick.org [University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from 10 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernovae follow-up, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12, have contributed additional imaging data across this region. However, these images have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep image dataset. We combine them now with the XDF program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3/IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths, ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5? in a 0.''35 diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The combined image therefore reaches to 31.2 AB mag 5? (32.9 at 1?) for a flat f {sub ?} source. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ?130 to ?240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ?0.1 mag. Our 5? (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14,140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF.

  15. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis Conditions on Cu/SiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The coverages and surface lifetimes of copper-bound formates on Cu/SiO2 catalysts, and the steady-state rates of reverse water-gas shift and methanol synthesis have been measured simultaneously by mass (MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopies under a variety of elevated pressure conditions at temperatures between 140 and 160°C. DCOO lifetimes under steady state catalytic conditions in CO2:D2 atmospheres were measured by 12C – 13C isotope transients (SSITKA). The values range from 220s at 160°C to 660s at 140°C. The catalytic rates of both reverse water gas shift (RWGS) and methanol synthesis are ~100-fold slower than this formate removal rate back to CO2+1/2 H2, and thus they do not significantly influence the formate lifetime or coverage at steady state. The formate coverage is instead determined by formate’s rapid production / decomposition equilibrium with gas phase CO2+H2. The results are consistent with formate being an intermediate in methanol synthesis, but with the rate-controlling step being after formate production (for example, its further hydrogenation to methoxy). A 2-3 fold shorter life time (faster decomposition rate) was observed for formate under reactions conditions when both D2 and CO2 are present than in pure Ar or D2+Ar alone, attributed to effects of coadsorbates (produced in D2 and CO2) on adsorbed formate reaction pathways. The carbon which appears in the methanol product spends a longer time on the surface than the formate species, 1.8 times as long at 140°C. The additional delay on the surface is attributed in part to readsorption of methanol on the catalyst, thus obscuring the mechanistic link between formate and methanol.

  16. C2D Spitzer-IRS spectra of disks around T Tauri stars: I. Silicate emission and grain growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Kessler-Silacci; J. -C. Augereau; C. P. Dullemond; V. Geers; F. Lahuis; N. J. Evans II; E. F. van Dishoeck; G. A. Blake; A. C. A. Boogert; J. Brown; J. K. Jorgensen; C. Knez; K. M. Pontoppidan

    2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared ~5--35 um spectra for 40 solar-mass T Tauri stars and 7 intermediate-mass Herbig Ae stars with circumstellar disks were obtained using the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the c2d IRS survey. This work complements prior spectroscopic studies of silicate infrared emission from disks, which were focused on intermediate-mass stars, with observations of solar-mass stars limited primarily to the 10 um region. The observed 10 and 20 um silicate feature strengths/shapes are consistent with source-to-source variations in grain size. A large fraction of the features are weak and flat, consistent with um-sized grains indicating fast grain growth (from 0.1--1.0 um in radius). In addition, approximately half of the T Tauri star spectra show crystalline silicate features near 28 and 33 um indicating significant processing when compared to interstellar grains. A few sources show large 10-to-20 um ratios and require even larger grains emitting at 20 um than at 10 um. This size difference may arise from the difference in the depth into the disk probed by the two silicate emission bands in disks where dust settling has occurred. The 10 um feature strength vs. shape trend is not correlated with age or Halpha equivalent width, suggesting that some amount of turbulent mixing and regeneration of small grains is occurring. The strength vs. shape trend is related to spectral type, however, with M stars showing significantly flatter 10 um features (larger grain sizes) than A/B stars. The connection between spectral type and grain size is interpreted in terms of the variation in the silicate emission radius as a function of stellar luminosity, but could also be indicative of other spectral-type dependent factors (e.g, X-rays, UV radiation, stellar/disk winds, etc.).

  17. Scattering IR SNOM | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Biomineralization, Contamination transport and Bioremediation, Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Interfaces, Multiferroics Instrument ID: 34144...

  18. Ir I L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _c m y 7I_ - *- -I

  19. I\r'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c*1r' (

  20. Hf-irJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 sGwen Nu+'.nop-s'

  1. Ir I L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7635U: .' .LIST OF

  2. IPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernucleiNORTHWEST GEYSERSSummary This

  3. A STUDY OF HEATING AND COOLING OF THE ISM IN NGC 1097 WITH HERSCHEL-PACS AND SPITZER-IRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beirao, P.; Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Helou, G. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smith, J.-D. T.; Croxall, K. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mail Drop 111, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wolfire, M. G.; Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Sandstrom, K. M.; Groves, B.; Schinnerer, E.; Rix, H.-W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Crocker, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hinz, J. L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C., E-mail: pedro@ipac.caltech.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NGC 1097 is a nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy with a bright circumnuclear starburst ring, a strong large-scale bar, and an active nucleus. We present a detailed study of the spatial variation of the far-infrared (FIR) [C II]158 {mu}m and [O I]63 {mu}m lines and mid-infrared H{sub 2} emission lines as tracers of gas cooling, and of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands as tracers of the photoelectric heating, using Herschel-PACS and Spitzer-IRS infrared spectral maps. We focus on the nucleus and the ring, and two star-forming regions (Enuc N and Enuc S). We estimated a photoelectric gas heating efficiency ([C II]158 {mu}m+[O I]63 {mu}m)/PAH in the ring about 50% lower than in Enuc N and S. The average 11.3/7.7 {mu}m PAH ratio is also lower in the ring, which may suggest a larger fraction of ionized PAHs, but no clear correlation with [C II]158 {mu}m/PAH(5.5-14 {mu}m) is found. PAHs in the ring are responsible for a factor of two more [C II]158 {mu}m and [O I]63 {mu}m emission per unit mass than PAHs in the Enuc S. spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling indicates that at most 25% of the FIR power in the ring and Enuc S can come from high-intensity photodissociation regions (PDRs), in which case G{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 2.3} and n{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 3.5} cm{sup -3} in the ring. For these values of G{sub 0} and n{sub H}, PDR models cannot reproduce the observed H{sub 2} emission. Much of the H{sub 2} emission in the starburst ring could come from warm regions in the diffuse interstellar medium that are heated by turbulent dissipation or shocks.

  4. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, Aaron C., E-mail: Aaron.Spalding@nortonhealthcare.org [Kosair Children's Hospital and Brain Tumor Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children's Hospital, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Providence, Rhode Island and Seattle, Washington (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Arndt, Carola A.S. [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  5. 1 E N V IR O N M E N T A L C H E MIS T R Y Ja n u a ry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    13 19 94 1 1 E N V IR O N M E N T A L C H E MIS T R Y V of 1 3, Ja n u a ry N o 1 19 9 4 ( , , 2 10 0 0 8 ) ( ) (M E T ) , M E T , , . , M E T , M E T . , M E T ; M E T , , . : , , , . (M el ti E ffe ct T r i ~ le , M E T ) , : P ac 10 b u t r ~ 1 . M E T 3 , , _ L , , . W il h a m s (1 9 8 3) ME

  6. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm{sup 3} prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k{sub L}= (?9.43 × 10{sup ?5}× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using {sup 60}Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a formal RPC audit program. Trial audits of four Nucletron sources and four Varian sources revealed an average RPC-to-institution dose ratio of 1.000 (standard deviation = 0.011).Conclusions: The authors have created an OSLD-based {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source remote audit tool which offers sufficient dose measurement accuracy to allow the RPC to establish a remote audit program with a ±5% acceptance criterion. The feasibility of the system has been demonstrated with eight trial audits to date.

  7. Thermoelectric performance of nanostructured p-type Zr{sub 0.5}Hf{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.4}Rh{sub 0.6}Sb{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} half-Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maji, Pramathesh; Makongo, Julien P.A. [Laboratory for Emerging Energy and Electronic Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Chi, Hang; Uher, Ctirad [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Poudeu, Pierre F.P., E-mail: ppoudeup@umich.edu [Laboratory for Emerging Energy and Electronic Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several compositions of the p-type half-Heusler alloys Zr{sub 0.5}Hf{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.4}Rh{sub 0.6}Sb{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} (0?x?0.4) were synthesized by mechanically alloying high purity elemental powders using hardened steel jars and balls on a high energy shaker mill. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations of several aliquots taken after regularly spaced milling time suggested that single phase products with half-Heusler (HH) structure can be obtained after 10 h. However, XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of several specimens obtained from compacted polycrystalline powders of Zr{sub 0.5}Hf{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.4}Rh{sub 0.6}Sb{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} alloys using a uniaxial hot press (HP) revealed the presence of CoSb inclusions with various sizes embedded inside the HH matrix. Hall effect, electrical conductivity, and thermopower data collected between 300 K and 775 K on several compositions suggested that electronic transport in the synthesized Zr{sub 0.5}Hf{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.4}Rh{sub 0.6}Sb{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x}/CoSb composites strongly depends on the average size and/or mole fraction of the embedded CoSb inclusions rather than the fraction (x) of Sn substituting for Sb. Among the samples investigated, the nanocomposite with x=0.2, which contains nanometer-scale CoSb inclusions, showed the largest power factor (800 ?W/K{sup 2} m at 775 K) and the lowest lattice thermal conductivity (?2.2 W/m K at 775 K) leading to a six-fold enhancement in the figure of merit when compared to the Zr{sub 0.5}Hf{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.4}Rh{sub 0.6}Sb{sub 0.99}Sn{sub 0.01} bulk matrix. - Graphical abstract: CoSb nanoinclusions embedded into a p-type Zr{sub 0.5}Hf{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.4}Rh{sub 0.6}Sb{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} half-Heusler matrix simultaneously boost the thermopower and carrier mobility leading to a drastic enhancement of the power factor of the resulting bulk nanostructured materials. - Highlights: • The phase composition of half-Heusler (HH) alloy is very sensitive to the synthesis method. • Mechanical alloying (MA) of elements results in bulk HH matrix with CoSb inclusions. • CoSb nanoinclusions simultaneously boost the thermopower and carrier mobility with the HH matrix. • The MA process reduces lattice thermal conductivity due to high density of grain boundaries.

  8. Putative quantum criticality in the (Cr{sub 90}Ir{sub 10}){sub 100?y}V{sub y} alloy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernando, P. R.; Prinsloo, A. R. E., E-mail: alettap@uj.ac.za; Sheppard, C. J. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Lodya, L. [Sasol Technology, Research and Development, 1 Klasie Havenga Road, Sasolburg 1947 (South Africa)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum criticality (QC) in spin-density-wave antiferromagnetic Cr and Cr alloy systems is a topic of current interest. In the present study, V was used as a tuning parameter to drive the Néel transition temperature (T{sub N}) of the (Cr{sub 90}Ir{sub 10}){sub 100?y}V{sub y} alloy series with 0???y???14.3 to zero and search for effects of QC in the process. The magnetic properties and possible QC behaviour (QCB) in this alloy system were investigated through electrical resistivity (?), specific heat (C{sub p}), and susceptibility (?) measurements as a function of temperature (T), indicating that T{sub N} is suppressed to zero at a critical concentration y{sub c}???9. The Sommerfeld coefficient (?) is considered a key indicator of QCB and a peak is observed in ?(y) at y{sub c} on decreasing y through this concentration, followed by a sharp decreasing trend. This behaviour is reminiscent of that observed for ? of the prototypical Cr{sub 100?x}V{sub x} QC system and allows for the classification of y{sub c} in the (Cr{sub 90}Ir{sub 10}){sub 100?y}V{sub y} alloy system as a possible QC point.

  9. MULTIMODE quantum calculations of vibrational energies and IR spectrum of the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) cluster using accurate potential energy and dipole moment surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homayoon, Zahra, E-mail: zhomayo@emory.edu [Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation and Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, full (nine)-dimensional potential energy surface and dipole moment surface to describe the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) cluster is reported. The PES is based on fitting of roughly 32?000 CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVTZ electronic energies. The surface is a linear least-squares fit using a permutationally invariant basis with Morse-type variables. The PES is used in a Diffusion Monte Carlo study of the zero-point energy and wavefunction of the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) and NO{sup +}(D{sub 2}O) complexes. Using the calculated ZPE the dissociation energies of the clusters are reported. Vibrational configuration interaction calculations of NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) and NO{sup +}(D{sub 2}O) using the MULTIMODE program are performed. The fundamental, a number of overtone, and combination states of the clusters are reported. The IR spectrum of the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) cluster is calculated using 4, 5, 7, and 8 modes VSCF/CI calculations. The anharmonic, coupled vibrational calculations, and IR spectrum show very good agreement with experiment. Mode coupling of the water “antisymmetric” stretching mode with the low-frequency intermolecular modes results in intensity borrowing.

  10. The Spectral Signature of Dust Scattering and Polarization in the Near IR to Far UV. I. Optical Depth and Geometry Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor G. Zubko; Ari Laor

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectropolarimetry from the near IR to the far UV of light scattered by dust provides a valuable diagnostic of the dust composition, grain size distribution and spatial distribution. To facilitate the use of this diagnostic, we present detailed calculations of the intensity and polarization spectral signature of light scattered by optically thin and optically thick dust in various geometries. The polarized light radiative transfer calculations are carried out using the adding-doubling method for a plane-parallel slab, and are extended to an optically thick sphere by integrating over its surface. The calculations are for the Mathis, Rumple & Nordsieck Galactic dust model, and cover the range from 1 $\\mu m$ to 500 \\AA. We find that the wavelength dependence of the scattered light intensity provides a sensitive probe of the optical depth of the scattering medium, while the polarization wavelength dependence provides a probe of the grain scattering properties, which is practically independent of optical depth. We provide a detailed set of predictions, including polarization maps, which can be used to probe the properties of dust through imaging spectropolarimetry in the near IR to far UV of various Galactic and extragalactic objects. In a following paper we use the codes developed here to provide predictions for the dependence of the intensity and polarization on grain size distribution and composition.

  11. Announcements Pick up old homework & MT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    -REPLICATING, ENCAPSULATED, CHEMICAL SYSTEM THAT UNDERGOES DARWINIAN EVOLUTION" Important points to examine: -What/Archean transition 4.0 ­ 3.5 billion years ago #12;At this time the solar system was bombarded with comets

  12. Babb, MT Natural Gas Export to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSame MonthLease3.01 12.33CubicMillion0

  13. Havre, MT Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAIN EIA PRODUCTS AND2,504

  14. Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <Stevens Jump to:source History View New

  15. Mt Peak Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. Mt Poso Cogeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump

  18. Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Category:Billings, MT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Mt Rainier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. IRS Data Retrieval Tool Data is available within 1-2 weeks of electronically filing your taxes or 6-8 weeks of filling a paper tax return. These

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    IRS Data Retrieval Tool Data is available within 1-2 weeks of electronically filing your taxes or 6 Data Retrieval Tool 1. Go to www.fafsa.ed.gov and click "Start Here". Enter requested information the Data Retrieval tool for the STUDENT ONLY, press "next" at the bottom of the page. To use

  2. Title Efficient and Reliable Balanced Codes Contact Info Dr. ir. J.H. Weber, j.h.weber@tudelft.nl, tel. 015-2781698, office HB11.300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title Efficient and Reliable Balanced Codes Contact Info Dr. ir. J.H. Weber, j.h.weber. Inf. Theory, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 51-53, Jan. 1986. [2] J.H. Weber, K.A. Schouhamer Immink, and H. 2012. More Info Upon appointment with dr. Weber #12;

  3. Title Multi-Rate Random Network Codes Contact Info Dr. ir. J.H. Weber, j.h.weber@tudelft.nl, tel. 015-2781698, office HB11.300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    networks. Furthermore, based on the findings, decentralized coding strategies different from the one proposed in [3] may be designed and analyzed. For the evaluation, analytical and/or simulation methods canTitle Multi-Rate Random Network Codes Contact Info Dr. ir. J.H. Weber, j.h.weber@tudelft.nl, tel

  4. Phenomenological Study of the Interplay between IR-Improved DGLAP-CS Theory and the Precision of an NLO ME Matched Parton Shower MC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, A; Yost, S A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a phenomenological study of the current status of the application of our approach of {\\it exact} amplitude-based resummation in quantum field theory to precision QCD calculations, by realistic MC event generator methods, as needed for precision LHC physics. We discuss recent results as they relate to the interplay of the attendant IR-Improved DGLAP-CS theory of one of us and the precision of exact NLO matrix-element matched parton shower MC's in the Herwig6.5 environment as determined by comparison to recent LHC experimental observations on single heavy gauge boson production and decay. The level of agreement between the new theory and the data continues to be a reason for optimism. In the spirit of completeness, we discuss as well other approaches to the same theoretical predictions that we make here from the standpoint of physical precision with an eye toward the (sub-)1% QCD \\otimes EW total theoretical precision regime for LHC physics.

  5. The Ionized Absorber and Nuclear Environment of IRAS 13349+2438: Multi-wavelength insights from coordinated Chandra HETGS, HST STIS, HET, and Spitzer IRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Julia C; Chakravorty, Susmita; Rahoui, Farid; Young, Andrew J; Brandt, William N; Hines, Dean C; Ogle, Patrick M; Reynolds, Christopher S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a coordinated IR-to-X-ray spectral campaign of the QSO IRAS 13349+2438. Optical spectra reveal extreme Eigenvector-1 characteristics, but the H-beta line width argues against a NLS1 classification; we refine z=0.10853 based on [O III]. We estimate a BH mass=10^9 Msun using 2 independent methods (H-beta line width & SED fits). Blue-shifted absorption (-950km/s & -75km/s) is seen for the 1st time in STIS UV spectra from Ly-alpha, NV, & CIV. The higher velocity UV lines are coincident with the lower-ionisation (xi~1.6) X-ray warm absorber lines. A dusty multiple ionization absorber blueshifted by 700-900km/s is required to fit the X-ray data. Theoretical models comparing different ionising SEDs reveal that a UV-inclusive (i.e., the accretion disc) ionising continuum strongly impacts conclusions for the thermodynamic stability of the warm absorber. Specific to IRAS13349, an Xray-UV ionising SED favors a continuous distribution of ionisation states in a smooth flow (this paper),...

  6. (51) Int. Cl. H01M 4/86 (2006.01)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    , () . 3. 1 , (b) 300 , (c) 300 . 4. 1 , (Pt), (Ru), (Rh), (Pd), (Au), (Au , 2 1 2 1 10 (membrane electrode assembly: MEA). 12. 11 (MEA) . 13. 12) , . , (Pt) . , (Ru), (Rh), (Pd), (Au), (Au), (Ir), (Os) 2 . () , 1 10nm , 1.5 5

  7. Penetration depth and absorption mechanisms of spin currents in Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} and Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 50} polycrystalline films by ferromagnetic resonance and spin pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merodio, P.; Ghosh, A.; Lemonias, C.; Gautier, E.; Ebels, U.; Chshiev, M.; Béa, H., E-mail: vincent.baltz@cea.fr, E-mail: helene.bea@cea.fr; Baltz, V., E-mail: vincent.baltz@cea.fr, E-mail: helene.bea@cea.fr [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CNRS/INAC-CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble-INP, F-38054 Cedex (France); Bailey, W. E., E-mail: web54@columbia.edu [Mat. Sci. and Engn. Program, Department of Appl. Phys. and Appl. Math., Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spintronics relies on the spin dependent transport properties of ferromagnets (Fs). Although antiferromagnets (AFs) are used for their magnetic properties only, some fundamental F-spintronics phenomena like spin transfer torque, domain wall motion, and tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance also occur with AFs, thus making AF-spintronics attractive. Here, room temperature critical depths and absorption mechanisms of spin currents in Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} and Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 50} are determined by F-resonance and spin pumping. In particular, we find room temperature critical depths originating from different absorption mechanisms: dephasing for Ir{sub 20}Mn{sub 80} and spin flipping for Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 50}.

  8. Measurement of the 187Re(?,n)190Ir reaction cross section at sub-Coulomb energies using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Scholz; A. Endres; A. Hennig; L. Netterdon; H. W. Becker; J. Endres; J. Mayer; U. Giesen; D. Rogalla; F. Schlüter; S. G. Pickstone; K. O. Zell; A. Zilges

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in adopted models of particle+nucleus optical-model potentials directly influence the accuracy in the theoretical predictions of reaction rates as they are needed for reaction-network calculations in, for instance, {\\gamma}-process nucleosynthesis. The improvement of the {\\alpha}+nucleus optical-model potential is hampered by the lack of experimental data at astrophysically relevant energies especially for heavier nuclei. Measuring the Re187({\\alpha},n)Ir190 reaction cross section at sub-Coulomb energies extends the scarce experimental data available in this mass region and helps understanding the energy dependence of the imaginary part of the {\\alpha}+nucleus optical-model potential at low energies. Applying the activation method, after the irradiation of natural rhenium targets with {\\alpha}-particle energies of 12.4 to 14.1 MeV, the reaction yield and thus the reaction cross section were determined via {\\gamma}-ray spectroscopy by using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup and the method of {\\gamma}{\\gamma} coincidences. Cross-section values at five energies close to the astrophysically relevant energy region were measured. Statistical model calculations revealed discrepancies between the experimental values and predictions based on widely used {\\alpha}+nucleus optical-model potentials. However, an excellent reproduction of the measured cross-section values could be achieved from calculations based on the so-called Sauerwein-Rauscher {\\alpha}+nucleus optical-model potential. The results obtained indicate that the energy dependence of the imaginary part of the {\\alpha}+nucleus optical-model potential can be described by an exponential decrease. Successful reproductions of measured cross sections at low energies for {\\alpha}-induced reactions in the mass range 141{\\leq}A{\\leq}187 confirm the global character of the Sauerwein-Rauscher potential.

  9. IR-2003- | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOralGovernment Vehicle Utilization atMITIGATIONIR-2003-

  10. ARM - Datastreams - goes7ir

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (SeeCenterARM MobileSeptemberir Documentation XDC

  11. Microsoft Word - S07118_IR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, Disposal SiteRadiological AssessmentAnnual Inspection of

  12. IBm1024 Inteligncia Artificial 2 Semestre/2013 Nmero Nome P1 P2 Sub MP T1 T2 T2' T3 MT L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 L7 L8 L9 L10 E1 E2 L+E F %F MF Situao Rec MR Situao aps Rec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baranauskas, José Augusto

    L4 L5 L6 L7 L8 L9 L10 E1 E2 L+E F %F MF Situação Rec MR Situação após Rec 7961541 Amir do NascimentoIBm1024 Inteligência Artificial 2º Semestre/2013 Número Nome P1 P2 Sub MP T1 T2 T2' T3 MT L1 L2 L3 Elemam 1.4 3.5 4.4 4.0 0.0 10.0 10.0 0.0 6.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1.1 5 83% 5.1

  13. SU-E-T-223: Investigation of the Accuracy of Two-Dimensional Dose Distributions Measurement From High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Ir-192 Source Using Multiple-Diode-Array Detector (MapCheck2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taguenang, J; De La Fuente, T Herman; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [Oklahoma Univ. Health Science Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric accuracy of multiple-diode-array detector (Mapcheck2) for high-dose-rate brachytherapy Ir-192 source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 were validated with EBT2 Gafchromic film measurement and AAPM task-group- 43 (TG-43) modeling. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from Ir-192 source were measured with MapCheck2 and EBT2-films. MapCheck2 response was corrected for effects: directional dependence, diode and phantom heterogeneity. Optical density growth of the film was controlled by synchronized scanning of the film exposed to Ir-192 and calibration films exposed to 6 MV linac beams. Similarly, MapCheck2 response was calibrated to dose using 6 MV beams. An empirical model was developed for the dose distributions measured with Mapcheck2 that considered directional, diode and phantom heterogeneity corrections. The dose deposited in solid-state-detectors was modeled using a cavity theory model for the diode. This model was then validated with measurements using EBT2-films and calculations with TG-43. Results: The response of MapCheck2 has been corrected for different effects including: (a) directional dependence of 0–20% over angular range 0o–90o, (b) phantom heterogeneity (3%) and (c) diode heterogeneity (9%). The corrected dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 agreed well with the measured dose distributions from EBT2-film and with calculations using TG-43 within 5% over a wide range of dose levels and rates. The advantages of MapCheck2 include less noisy, linear and stable response compared with film. The response of MapCheck2 exposed to 192Ir-source showed no energy dependence similar to its response to MV energy beam. Detection spatial-resolution of individual diodes was 0.8×0.8 mm2, however, 2DMapCheck2 resolution is limited by distance between diodes (7.07 mm). Conclusion: The dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 agreed well within 5% with that measured using EBT2-films; and calculations with TG- 43. Considering correction of artifacts, MapCheck2 provides a compact, practical and accurate dosimetric tool for measurement of 2D-dose distributions for brachytherapy Ir-192.

  14. Ternary rare-earth ruthenium and iridium germanides RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu; M=Ru, Ir)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliynyk, Anton O.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Through arc-melting reactions of the elements and annealing at 800 °C, the ternary rare-earth germanides RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} and RE{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} have been prepared for most of the smaller RE components (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu). In the iridium-containing reactions, the new phases RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2} were also generally formed as by-products. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic Hf{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}-type structures (space group Cmcm, Z=4) for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (M=Ru, Ir) and monoclinic Sc{sub 2}CoSi{sub 2}-type structures (space group C2/m, Z=4) for RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2}. Full crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for all members of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2477(6) Å, b=10.7672(16) Å, c=13.894(2) Å for RE=Y; a=4.2610(3)–4.2045(8) Å, b=10.9103(8)–10.561(2) Å, c=14.0263(10)–13.639(3) Å in the progression of RE from Gd to Lu) and for Tb{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2937(3) Å, b=10.4868(7) Å, c=14.2373(10) Å). Both structures can be described in terms of CrB- and ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs built from Ge-centred trigonal prisms. However, band structure calculations on Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} support an alternative description for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} based on [M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}] layers built from linked MGe{sub 4} tetrahedra, which emphasizes the strong M–Ge covalent bonds present. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} generally indicates metallic behaviour but with low-temperature transitions visible for some members (RE=Gd, Tb, Dy) that are probably associated with magnetic ordering of the RE atoms. Anomalously, Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} exhibits semiconductor-like behaviour of uncertain origin. Magnetic measurements on Dy{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} reveal antiferromagnetic ordering at 3 K and several unusual field-dependent transitions suggestive of complex spin reorientation processes. - Graphical abstract: RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (M=Ru, Ir) adopts the Hf{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}-type structure containing slabs built up from Ge-centred trigonal prisms. - Highlights: • Crystal structures of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu) and Tb{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} were determined. • Strong M–Ge covalent bonds were confirmed by band structure calculations. • Most RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} members except Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} exhibit metallic behaviour. • Dy{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} displays unusual field-dependent magnetic transitions.

  15. 20to2-3T5m2+5: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/26/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Optimization Research Engineering (M.O.R.E.), LLC; 1/26/2014 Fig. 1. On-axis field profiles of 20-T magnets20to2-3T5m2+5: 16-cm I.R., 46-cm O.D., 8.6 MW, Optimized Cooling Robert J. Weggel; Magnet of 16-cm I.R. The copper magnet generates 5 T at 8.6 MW with five tightly-nested two-layer coils

  16. Androgen Receptor Repression of GnRH Gene Transcription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellon, Pamela L.

    , and progesterone receptor (PR)A (4­6). The AR is a ligand-activated transcription factor, a member of the nuclear November 10, 2011 Abbreviations: AR, Androgen receptor; ChIP, chromatin immunoprecipitation; cs, char- coal

  17. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Feb2011_final_rh.docx

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information Administration2 U.S.and Winter Fuels8 1 071 12

  18. ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheatProductsISDACProductsRadiative Flux Analysis

  19. WIPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Notice To Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural Public Reading* (star)8Notice To Users The

  20. The distribution and chemical control of species of Senecio, Astragalus and Baileya in the highlands range area of West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Jonathan J.

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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  1. Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot Alg`ebre Annee 2007-08 M1 mathematiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merel, Loïc - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    ¦§i ¡¥ ¼ E¸ °5° ¾¤Eh°Q«E%ªEºV¦§¤E¥6 m¥¥b¤h%ªE¦§h¾« o¢¤h °y m¦®T¦ m¦§h ¡ib5 ¡r¤h³¥ Ãæf¾° Ë 5°¹ m¥«h º

  2. Reactivity of low-valent nickel-1,3-BIS (o-Diphenylphosphinophenylthio) propane (arom-PSSP) with small molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jeehee

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Ru(NHs)4CI(SO2)]CI 2, 072 [Rh(Cp)(C2Hg)SO2] 2 096 1. 462, 1. 394 1. 442, 1. 430 113. 8 114. 4 Pyramidal [IrCI(CO)(SOs)(PPhs)p] 2. 488 [RhCI(CO)(SO2)(PPhs)s] 2, 450 1. 412, 1. 472 1. 446, 1. 456 117. 1 113. 8 [Ni(SO2)(nPs)] 2. 336 1. 312...

  3. Geothermometry At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Pearl...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basis Temperature estimation of valley-fill hydrothermal reservoir Notes Si, Na-K, & Na-K-Ca geothermometry estimates yielded a reservoir temperature range of 97 to 188...

  4. 3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  5. REVIEW FOR MT3 ANSWER KEY MATH 2373, FALL 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Greg W.

    Problem 6 We consider two brine tanks. Initially: · Tank A contains 150 gallons of water and 37 pounds of salt. · Tank B contains 250 gallons of water and 43 pounds of salt. Starting at time t = 0: · Brine at a concentration 3 lb gal of salt is pumped at 5 gal min into tank A. · Brine is pumped from tank A to tank B

  6. REVIEW FOR MT3 MATH 2373, FALL 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Greg W.

    two brine tanks. Initially: · Tank A contains 150 gallons of water and 37 pounds of salt. · Tank B contains 250 gallons of water and 43 pounds of salt. Starting at time t = 0: · Brine at a concentration 3 lb gal of salt is pumped at 5 gal min into tank A. · Brine is pumped from tank A to tank B at a rate

  7. SOFTWARE Open Access MT-Toolbox: improved amplicon sequencing using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Jeff

    maximization. It can be run in serial on a standard personal computer or in parallel on a Load Sharing Facility from sequences sharing the same tag enables inference of original template molecules thereby reducing quantification of sequences. To ad- dress these limitations several methods have been devel- oped where randomly

  8. Microsoft Word - CX Hillside and Squeque MT Land Acquisitions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Hillside Road and Squeque Properties Acquisition Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007585 Categorical...

  9. *MT 4S1SGOO ^ Ris-M-2672

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 Real-time 26 Engine fluids 26 7.3. Non-industrial applications 27 Biology, medicine and dentistry. Because of this it is possible to detect hydrogen in zirconium. Conversly, dense materials such as lead

  10. MSc Programme In the programme, MT engineers acquire a thorough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    such as ship hydromechanics, ship and offshore structures, marine systems design and ship production as exemplified by various students working on wind propulsion for commercial shipping. Courses cover topics such as cavitation of propellers and sailing yacht performance. · Ship and Offshore Structures focuses

  11. School of Mathematics and Statistics MT5824 Topics in Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    .] Deduce that GpG (G). Use the previous question to show that (G) = GpG. Show that G can be generated

  12. Strategic Planning Notes MT AHEC/MORH Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Communities Assuring there is a strong healthcare infrastructure Access to care Quality Improving health Scholarships o Building a pipeline in K-12 Workforce for population health and implementation of healthcare reform Serving as a model for how Montana can work together on a complex issue 2. Healthy Montana

  13. ,"Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Port of Morgan,...

  14. MT3DMS v5.3 Supplemental User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    The University of Alabama #12;i Technical Report February 2010 MMTT33DDMS vv55..33 a modular three-dimensional multispecies transport model for simulation of advection, dispersion and chemical reactions of contaminants information or to report program errors, please contact: Chunmiao Zheng Department of Geological Sciences

  15. Nakayasu named 2013 M.T. Thomas award recipient | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    first drug that can efficiently kill Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, - the "superbug." Deputy Division Director Joshua Adkins, PNNL Biological Science,...

  16. Analysis of borehole temperature data from the Mt. Princeton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado (abstract only) Author P. Morgan Conference AAPG Rocky Mountain Meeting; Salt Lake County, Utah; 10811 Published AAPG Rocky Mountain Meeting, 2013 DOI Not Provided...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff (2000) Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  18. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fraser Goff (1995) Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCompounda...

  19. DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) At Mt Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2008 - 2010 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determination of groundwater flux patterns Notes Researchers measured DC resistivity and produced 12 resistivity...

  20. Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Richards...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2008 - 2010 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determination of groundwater flux patterns Notes Researchers collected 2700 SP measurements. Equilibrium...

  1. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  2. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet)

  3. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet)Cubic

  4. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic

  5. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubicper Thousand

  6. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubicper

  7. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubicper8 2009 2010

  8. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubicper8 2009

  9. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubicper8

  10. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubicper8Feet)

  11. Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV JumpFederalInformation Jump

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the area References J. Held, F. Henderson (2012) New developments in Colorado geothermal energy projects Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  13. 3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00 U.S. National Software

  14. Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSame MonthLease3.01 12.33 11.85

  15. Babb, MT Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSame MonthLease3.01

  16. File:INL-geothermal-mt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdf Jump to: navigation,hi.pdfmt.pdf

  17. Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYear Jan 2011 2012 20139,195

  18. Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the NationalPennsylvania |FebruaryEnergy5, 20148,

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/11-MT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublicQuanlightR3(2) <HI-a <c <

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory andb