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1

Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Abstract: In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of...

2

Cd doping effects in the heavy-fermion compounds Ce2MIn8 (M=Rh and Ir)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-temperature magnetic properties of Cd-doped Ce2MIn8 (M=Rh and Ir) single crystals are investigated. Experiments of temperature-dependent magnetic-susceptibility, heat-capacity, and electrical-resistivity measurements revealed that Cd doping enhances the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering temperature from TN=2.8?K (x=0) to TN=4.8?K (x=0.21) for Ce2RhIn8?xCdx and induces long-range AFM ordering with TN=3.8?K (x=0.21) for Ce2IrIn8?xCdx. Additionally, x-ray and neutron magnetic scattering studies showed that Cd-doped samples present below TN a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector ??=(12,12,0). The resolved magnetic structures for both compounds indicate that the Cd doping tends to rotate the direction of the ordered magnetic moments toward the ab plane. This result suggests that the Cd doping affects the Ce3+ ground-state single-ion anisotropy modifying the crystalline electrical field (CEF) parameters at the Ce3+ site. Indications of CEF evolution induced by Cd doping were also found in the electrical-resistivity measurements. Comparisons between our results and the general effects of Cd doping on the related compounds CeMIn5 (M=Co, Rh, and Ir) confirms the claims that the Cd doping induced electronic tuning is the main effect favoring AFM ordering in these compounds.

C. Adriano; C. Giles; E. M. Bittar; L. N. Coelho; F. de Bergevin; C. Mazzoli; L. Paolasini; W. Ratcliff; R. Bindel; J. W. Lynn; Z. Fisk; P. G. Pagliuso

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

EXAFS and FT-IR Characterization of Mn and Li Promoted Titania-Supported Rh Catalysts for CO Hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

The effect of Li and Mn promoters on the structure and selectivity of supported Rh catalysts for CO hydrogenation reaction was examined. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray absorption were used to investigate the adsorption of reactants and local structure of Rh. These techniques were used in combination with reactivity, H{sub 2} chemisorption, and temperature programmed studies to correlate structural characteristics with activity and selectivity during CO hydrogenation of unpromoted Rh/TiO{sub 2} and three promoted Rh catalysts: Rh-Li/TiO{sub 2}, Rh-Mn/TiO{sub 2}, and Rh-Li-Mn/TiO{sub 2}. The presence of a promoter slightly decreases the Rh clusters size; however, no evidence for an electronic effect induced by the presence of Li and Mn was found. Higher turnover frequencies were found for the promoted catalysts, which also showed the lower dispersion. The Li promoter introduces a weakened CO adsorption site that appears to enhance the selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates. The selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates varies inversely with the reducibility of Rh metal, that is, the lower the Rh reducibility, the higher the selectivity.

V Schwartz; A Campos; A Egbebi; J Spivey; S Overbury

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

X-ray absorption studies of the local structure and f-level occupancy in CeIr(1-x)Rh(x)In(5)  

SciTech Connect

The CeIr{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}In{sub 5} series exhibits a range of interesting phenomena, including heavy-fermion superconductivity, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and concomitant antiferromagnetism (AF) and superconductivity (SC). In the low-Rh concentration range (0.1 {ge} x {ge} 0.5), specific heat measurements show a broad anomaly, suggestive of gross phase separation. We have performed x-ray absorption experiments at the Ce L{sub III}, Ir L{sub III}, and Rh K-edges as a function of Rh concentration and temperature. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements indicate that cerium is close to trivalent in this system, with no measurable change with temperature from 20-300 K, consistent with a heavy-fermion material. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements as a function of temperature from all measured edges indicate the local crystal structure of all samples is well ordered, with no gross phase separation observed, even for samples with x = 0.125 and x = 0.25. These results therefore suggest that the anomalous specific heat behavior in the 0.1 {ge} x {ge} 0.5 range have some other explanation, and some possibilities are discussed.

Daniel, M.; Han, S.-W.; Booth, C.H.; Cornelius, A.L.; Pagliuso, P.G.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Superconductivity in amorphous T5T9 transition-metal alloys (T5=Nb,Ta;T9=Rh,Ir)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The superconducting transition temperature Tc has been measured for amorphous T5T9 alloys (where T5=Nb or Ta , T9=Rb or Ir ) as a function of composition. Nb and Ta dominated the Tc behavior with Tc for Nb alloys ? 4.8-5.1 K and Tc for Ta alloys ? 3.1-3.3 K. Changing the average group number by varying the T5T9 ratio had little effect on Tc within the ? 10 at.% range of composition in which the amorphous alloys form. Tc decreased approximately linearly with x for (Nb1-xTax)55Rh45 and (Nb1-xTax)55Ir45. The electrical resistivity ?n and the upper critical field Bc2 were measured as functions of temperature. The Sommerfeld constant ? was calculated from ?n and dBc2dT|Tc using the Ginzburg-Landau-Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory. The Debye temperature ?D was calculated from measurements of Young's modulus. The above parameters allowed calculations to be made of N(EF), the density of electronic states at the Fermi level, and ?, the electron-phonon coupling constant. It was found that ? more accurately reflected the Tc behavior than did N(EF) and that both electronic and phonon contributions had to be considered in the determination of ?.

C. C. Koch; D. M. Kroeger; J. O. Scarbrough; B. C. Giessen

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Role of support in adsorption and catalysts on supported metals. II. IR spectroscopic study of adsorption of CO and CO/sub 2/ on Rh/ZrO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

IR spectroscopy has been used in a study of the adsorption of CO on Rh/ZrO/sub 2/. It has been found that, the same as in the case of Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, complexes of CO are formed on the surface of this system, these complexes being coordinated simultaneously by atoms of the metal and surface atoms of the support. This was demonstrated in experiments on selective blockage of the support surface by adsorbed CO/sub 2/.

Bredikhin, M.N.; Lokhov, Yu.A.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Structure and electrical transport properties of the ordered skutterudites MGe{sub 1.5}S{sub 1.5} (M=Co, Rh, Ir)  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution powder neutron diffraction data collected for the skutterudites MGe{sub 1.5}S{sub 1.5} (M=Co, Rh, Ir) reveal that these materials adopt an ordered skutterudite structure (space group R3-bar ), in which the anions are ordered in layers perpendicular to the [111] direction. In this ordered structure, the anions form two-crystallographically distinct four-membered rings, with stoichiometry Ge{sub 2}S{sub 2}, in which the Ge and S atoms are trans to each other. The transport properties of these materials, which are p-type semiconductors, are discussed in the light of the structural results. The effect of iron substitution in CoGe{sub 1.5}S{sub 1.5} has been investigated. While doping of CoGe{sub 1.5}S{sub 1.5} has a marked effect on both the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, these ternary skutterudites exhibit significantly higher electrical resistivities than their binary counterparts. - Graphical abstract: The MGe{sub 1.5}S{sub 1.5} phases exhibit an ordered skutterudite structure, in which the anions form diamond-like four-membered Ge{sub 2}S{sub 2} rings.

Vaqueiro, Paz [Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: chepv@hw.ac.uk; Sobany, Gerard G.; Stindl, Martin [Department of Chemistry, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Role of support in adsorption and catalysis on supported metals. I. IR spectroscopic study of adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/ on Rh/SiO/sub 2/, Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect

With the aim of studying the influence of the nature of the support on the properties of supported rhodium-containing catalysts, the adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/ on Rh/SiO/sub 2/, Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has been investigated. It has been found that in the case of Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, along with the surface complexes that are characteristic for Rh/SiO/sub 2/ and Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, new surface compounds of adsorbed CO and H/sub 2/ are formed. On the basis of an analysis of the spectrochemical properties of these boundary with the participation of the metal atoms and also the atoms of the support.

Bredikhin, M.N.; Lokhov, Yu.A.; Kuznetsov, V.L.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

RH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides operating instructions for the RH-TRU 72-B Road Cask, Waste Shipping Package. In this document, ''Packaging'' refers to the assembly of components necessary to ensure compliance with the packaging requirements (not loaded with a payload). ''Package'' refers to a Type B packaging that, with its radioactive contents, is designed to retain the integrity of its containment and shielding when subject to the normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident test conditions set forth in 10 CFR Part 71. Loading of the RH 72-B cask can be done two ways, on the RH cask trailer in the vertical position or by removing the cask from the trailer and loading it in a facility designed for remote-handling (RH). Before loading the 72-B cask, loading procedures and changes to the loading procedures for the 72-B cask must be sent to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

Mt Playfair Blair Athol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Norwich Park Epping Forest Yatton Outstation Injune Lockington Augathella Crystalbrook Bluff Dysart Saraji CALDERVALE BABBILOORA MT MOFFATT FRANKFIELD WETLANDS MT PLAYFAIR LOCHINVAR PENJOBE TM FOREST VALE TM/MAN DERBYSHIRE DOWNS BILLABOO AL CHESTERTON TM/MAN GLEN ROCK AL SPRINGSURE TM/(SYN) ECHO HILLS AL GREEN VALLEY AL

Greenslade, Diana

11

MT 300 POZEN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In September 2003, POZEN announced that it had formed a commercialisation agreement with Xcel Pharmaceuticals. Under the terms of the agreement Xcel will have exclusive rights to commercialise MT...1

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the "RH-TRU 72-B cask") and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are conducted. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions or equivalent approved instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations meet the requirements of the SARP.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

RH_SRS_Shipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Trucks Delivering First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste WIPP Trucks Delivering First Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste from the Savannah River Site CARLSBAD, N.M., June 11, 2012- Photo caption: On June 7, 2012, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) trucks approach the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico, with the first shipment of defense- related remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. TRU waste consists of materials contaminated with radioactive elements that have atomic numbers greater than uranium, including tools, rags, protective clothing, sludge and soil. That shipment and two contact- handled TRU waste shipments were released by SRS at the same time The three shipments consisted of (left to right) a TRUPACT-III, a RH-72B and one with

17

RH Packaging Program Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. The C of C states: ''...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, ''Operating Procedures,'' of the application.'' It further states: ''...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, ''Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR {section} 71.11, ''Deliberate Misconduct.'' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the RH-TRU 72-B packaging. This Program Guidance standardizes instructions for all users. Users shall follow these instructions. Following these instructions assures that operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARP. This document is available on the Internet at: ttp://www.ws/library/t2omi/t2omi.htm. Users are responsible for ensuring they are using the current revision and change notices. Sites may prepare their own document using the word-for-word steps in th is document, in sequence, including Notes and cautions. Site specific information may be included as necessary. The document, and revisions, must then be submitted to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval. A copy of the approval letter from CBFO shall be available for audit purposes. Users may develop site-specific procedures addressing preoperational activities, quality assurance (QA), hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used with the instructions contained in this document. Users may recommend changes to this document by submitting their recommendations (in writing) to the WIPP M&O Contractor RH Packaging Maintenance Engineer for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by ALL users. Before first use and every 12 months after, user sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance. They will also be audited within one year from the effective date of revisions to this document.

Washington TRU Solutions, LLC

2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Execution Monitoring in MT Icon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MT Icon allows the execution of multiple Icon programs in almost any configuration, including execution ... monitoring. As motivated in Chapter 4, MT Icon characterizes monitoring as a special case of ... languag...

Clinton L. Jeffery

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

IR-2003-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 www.IRS.gov/newsroom Public Contact: 800.829.1040 $1 BILLION IN TAX CREDITS ALLOCATED TO CLEAN COAL PROJECTS IR-2006-184, Nov. 30, 2006 WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service announced that it has allocated nearly $1 billion of tax credits to nine planned clean coal projects. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorized $1.65 billion in tax credits for clean coal projects. The Act allocated $800 million of credits to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) projects, $500 million to non-IGCC advanced coal electricity generation projects and $350 million to gasification projects. The $800 million allocated to IGCC projects is required to be allocated in relatively equal amounts among bituminous coal,

20

Category:Billings, MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT MT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Billings, MT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVHospital Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVHospital Billings MT... 62 KB SVLargeHotel Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVLargeHotel Billings ... 62 KB SVLargeOffice Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVLargeOffice Billings... 62 KB SVMediumOffice Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVMediumOffice Billing... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVMidriseApartment Bil... 63 KB SVOutPatient Billings MT NorthWestern Corporation.png SVOutPatient Billings ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

Miloshevich, Larry

22

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Mt. Vernon Tap : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Mt. Vernon project would consist of the construction of a substation and transmission line by the Springfield Utility Board (SUB) to the south of the boundary of the City of Springfield in Lane County, Oregon. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) would participate in the project by furnishing equipment for the project and modifying its transmission lines to provide a new point of delivery to SUB, its public utility customer at the new site. This document addresses the environmental impacts of various alternative solutions. 3 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Chiral Degeneracy in Triaxial Rh104  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chiral doublet bands based on the ?g9/2??h11/2 configuration that achieve degeneracy at spin I=17 in the odd-odd triaxial Rh104 nucleus have been observed. Experimental verification of the interpretation has been tested against specific fingerprints of chirality in the intrinsic system.

C. Vaman; D. B. Fossan; T. Koike; K. Starosta; I. Y. Lee; A. O. Macchiavelli

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlled Source Audio MT Controlled Source Audio MT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Controlled Source Audio MT Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 1,866.44186,644 centUSD

26

ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements 2000.01.01 - 2005.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92).

27

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area (Redirected from Marysville Mt Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

28

On AgRhO{sub 2}, and the new quaternary delafossites AgLi{sub 1/3}M{sub 2/3}O{sub 2}, syntheses and analyses of real structures  

SciTech Connect

Two new quaternary delafossite type oxides with the general formula Ag(Li{sub 1/3}M{sub 2/3})O{sub 2}, M=Rh, Ir, have been synthesized, and their structures characterized. Based on X-ray and electron diffraction analyses the structural similarity with AgRhO{sub 2} delafossite, has been evidenced. The real structures of the quaternary delafossites have been revealed, which has allowed to fully explain the diffuse scattering as observed in X-ray powder diffraction. AgRhO{sub 2} is thermally stable up to 1173 K, the behavior of the two quaternary compounds AgLi{sub 1/3}Rh{sub 2/3}O{sub 2} and AgLi{sub 1/3}Ir{sub 2/3}O{sub 2} is comparable, and they decompose above 950 and 800 K, respectively. AgRhO{sub 2} shows temperature independent paramagnetism, while for the other two an effective magnetic moment of 1.77{mu}{sub B} for Ir, and 1.70{mu}{sub B} for Rh were determined, applying the Curie-Weiss law. All compounds are semiconducting with activation energies of 4.97 kJ mol{sup -1} (AgLi{sub 1/3}Rh{sub 2/3}O{sub 2}), 11.42 kJ mol{sup -1} (AgLi{sub 1/3}Ir{sub 2/3}O{sub 2}) and 17.58 kJ mol{sup -1} (AgRhO{sub 2}). -- graphical abstract: Two new quaternary delafossite type oxides with the general formula Ag(Li{sub 1/3}M{sub 2/3})O{sub 2}, M=Rh, Ir, have been synthesized, and their structures characterized. The real structures of the quaternary delafossites have been revealed, which has allowed to fully explain the diffuse scattering as observed in X-ray powder diffraction. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields}Analysis of the real structures of the Ag(Li{sub 1/3}Rh{sub 2/3})O{sub 2} and Ag(Li{sub 1/3}Ir{sub 2/3})O{sub 2}. {yields} Diffuse scattering has been rationalized by severe disorder in the stacking sequences. {yields} The oxygen atom layer stacking sequence needs to change.

Todorova, V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Leineweber, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstr. 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kienle, L. [Institute of Materials Research, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Duppel, V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Jansen, M., E-mail: M.Jansen@fkf.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

IR-2003- | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IR-2003- IR-2003- IR-2003- More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy...

30

High-spin level structure of {sup 115}Rh: Evolution of triaxiality in odd-even Rh isotopes  

SciTech Connect

High-spin excited states in the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 115}Rh have been identified for the first time by studying prompt {gamma} rays from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with the Gammasphere detector array. A new yrast band and a sideband are built in {sup 115}Rh. This level scheme is proposed to be built on the 7/2{sup +} ground state. The existence of a large signature splitting and an yrare band in {sup 115}Rh shows typical features of a triaxially deformed nucleus. The rigid triaxial rotor plus particle model is used to interpret the level structure of {sup 115}Rh. The level energies, the {gamma} branching ratios, the large signature splitting in the yrast band, and the inverted signature splitting in the yrare band in {sup 115}Rh are reproduced very well. Strong K mixing occurs in {sup 115}Rh at high spin.

Liu, S. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); UNIRIB/Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Brewer, N. T.; Hwang, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Gelberg, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Gu, L.; Yeoh, E. Y.; Zhu, S. J. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Y. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rasmussen, J. O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ma, W. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762 (United States); Daniel, A. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Ter-Akopian, G. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Mt. Baker Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 48.777222222222°, -121.81333333333° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.777222222222,"lon":-121.81333333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

33

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

34

IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l' w&m PadmmmTuJ tmml' aIs~#l!REm m-t, - 188kwxm BYI alahard 0. cr*rrror cy- r' , ' .~ -' - -' ^ , /' cs< 4. .c :' ; *. .h,- ' (z&&y .' ,/ ;f. .* &J >l a. L \' P" ,,,' ,.' I * :{' \ !' l t ..b c&~ tf ~ , r ,, r. ,* .;;;., k J ;, b $y$' Lrmprrw)rlt&tmxJ- a@. Frqrr at t&i8 raoLli:.y SC\ daummiI~Luualndr8rr~lfCUIf@@?~~oy-~ d )I t rq ,i .* 1 Virium~~bUrlJlOgarspvlr at ma rdutw. (500 p-4 3) i" 1 ) ,ip" 2. rt A8 - u %I* mm 4almpa~&rnbM Itrr+@# vbrp a** -y ;I11 ~*~~*- miw&mmwlrrwrbsr* ~rSthLtL,ort' tar,da*pcr¶.florllj pi &8~wl~cm@n-~ t#barwatla~r~tOf~. hwrl'r#tarr,urueunUr .--,U-L BirLl#a ofmml -vom. pe a ,Tjm-&,, i L) cc (. a 41 IA.9 #y7 /.& r*-rc * &ah&L- '2 , p-

35

Anomalous emissions of 103mRh biphoton transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report, the anomalous emissions, centered on the one half transition energy 39.76/2 keV, are observed from the long-lived Mossbauer state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung exposure. Strong coupling with identical nuclei in Rh crystals opens cascade channels for biphoton transitions.

Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt Graham  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......October 2010 research-article Papers Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt Graham...characterization of the vertical distribution of wind speed, V(h), is fundamental for an...many different reasons: (i) the wind speed shear contributes to trigger optical......

S. Hagelin; E. Masciadri; F. Lascaux

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol. A Comparative Study between Co and Rh for Steam Reforming of Ethanol. Abstract: Rh and Co-based catalyst performance was compared...

38

RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-MT-b.6 - Is a Geothermal Resource to Be Developed? If the geothermal fluids are to be produced, the developer must have the proper appropriation rights. 3-MT-b.7 - Initiate...

39

Dilute magnetism and spin-orbital percolation effects in Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used a combination of resonant magnetic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the doped spin-orbital Mott insulator Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4 (0.07?x?0.70). We show that Sr2Ir1?xRhxO4 represents a unique model system for the study of dilute magnetism in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling, and provide evidence of a doping-induced change in magnetic structure and a suppression of magnetic order at xc?0.17. We demonstrate that Rh-doping introduces Rh3+/Ir5+ ions which effectively hole-dope this material. We propose that the magnetic phase diagram for this material can be understood in terms of a novel spin-orbital percolation picture.

J. P. Clancy; A. Lupascu; H. Gretarsson; Z. Islam; Y. F. Hu; D. Casa; C. S. Nelson; S. C. LaMarra; G. Cao; Young-June Kim

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Microsoft Word - MtRichmond_CX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dorie Welch Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Mt. Richmond property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, BPA-007071 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real Property transfers for cultural protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management. Location: Fairdale and Yamhill quadrangles, in Yamhill County, Oregon (near Yamhill, Oregon). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund the Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District's (YSWCD) purchase of the Mt. Richmond property (Property), a 284.66-acre parcel of land located west of the City of Yamhill in Yamhill County Oregon.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mt Peak Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Utility Peak Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Peak Utility Facility Mt Peak Utility Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Mnt Peak Utility Energy Purchaser Mnt Peak Utility Location Midlothian TX Coordinates 32.42144978°, -97.02427357° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.42144978,"lon":-97.02427357,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Mt Poso Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poso Cogeneration Poso Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Poso Cogeneration Place Bakersfield, California Zip 93308 Product California-based project developer for the Mt Poso Cogeneration project near Bakersfield, California. Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Developing Mt. Hope: The megawatt line  

SciTech Connect

After facing numerous obstacles, including opposition and competition, the Mt. Hope pumped-storage project in New Jersey has been licensed by FERC. That license will allow a former iron ore mine site to be used in producing a new resource-hydroelectricity. In early August 1992, after more than seven years of effort, the 2,000-MW Mt. Hope Waterpower Project was licensed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Getting the $1.8 billion pumped-storage project licensed was not an easy task. It involved 54 submittals to FERC, six public meetings, and costs of more than $12 million. Along the way, the project has withstood competing applications, community opposition, and legal battles. Getting a project of this magnitude off the ground is a challenge for even the most experienced developer. The effort was especially challenging for the Halecrest Company, a local family-owned and operated firm with no previous experience in hydroelectric development. When financing became tight, creative ways were found to raise seed capital for the project. When hydroelectric experience was needed, the company developed a world-class corporate team that carried Mt. Hope through the complexities of the licensing process and beyond. With license now in hand, the project developers are ready to move forward with negotiating power sales contracts and securing construction financing. The resulting project will be the second largest pumped-storage facility in the country-second only to the 2,100-MW Bath County project in Virginia. Mt. Hope will take six years to construct and is scheduled to be phased into operation beginning in 1999.

Rodzianko, P.; Fisher, F.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Heat flow analysis. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=388982" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - arvilla mt-2 evidence Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vol. 44 No. 4 Apr. 2003 IBM pSeries690 Regatta 16 SPEC95FP Summary: 2nd layer 3rd layer MTG0 MT3 (BB) (BB) (BB) (BB) (BB) (BB) (SB)(BB) (RB)(SB) MT1MT2 MT1-3 MT1-2 MTG2... MT2-1...

46

I\r'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

r' r' ( g-.] ic' fz .; w .fl ! : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X-~ Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-~n,~-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :. , ::; /. 1 httetii OP J xl-. P, 3. 2gp C+~t~Sil;lsXl t ?~~$Tly~lf .t: GA.3 L?wjpnaJiQn Of p-3&7:2-Liop 9.0";:7~+50 s' , -ir ,.,,3 iashlla+im it i3 our da3irs 20 be rslia-T.73 of _"\L:t&?T --:wzk&ili* of the SC1298 ' _ _ Zj31Wf end i~i3sio~~31.3 rsskeri31ii izxLi.c~~t& S' ;az&;-d -D~YX-C.I o-Ada - 451 g3ac SyT,kd jl-J$; 3.xi.da - 2% p3 I :&at a 1 a azqi?L;3 3 - ' T-44 pi3. 3 ,LS oxid-\ 3aqr1.93 aar9 ~z;cc?33a~jr la 5.x0 st?%zl*hl~iao- ::>a of In'se-3' -J*-y chs=iical r9tag;P,sta d.ili::d fn cm2 sxlgtit3sl -.- -n4A..*

47

NETL: IRS Tax Credit Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solicitations & Business Opportunities IRS Tax Credit Program The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is collaborating with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to evaluate applications for Tax Credits under Section 1307 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, per instruction in the Treasury and IRS Announcement 2010-56, which can be found at: http://www.irs.gov/irb/2010-39_IRB/ar09.html or http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/a-10-56.pdf Specifically, NETL will be evaluating and providing certifications of feasibility for advanced coal and gasification projects consistent with energy policy goals (“DOE certification”). To facilitate the review process, NETL has established this website to receive and respond to questions from prospective applicants regarding the Notices. NETL will post responses to questions or groups of similar questions.

48

RAPID/Roadmap/8-MT-a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agency Montana Department of Environmental Quality Position Environmental Management Bureau Chief Name Warren McCullough Email wmccullough@mt.gov Phone 406.444.6791...

49

RAPID/Roadmap/20-MT-a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contact Information Agency Montana Department of Environmental Quality Position Environmental Management Bureau Chief Name Warren McCullough Email wmccullough@mt.gov Phone...

50

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al.,...

51

Mt Signal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Signal Geothermal Area Signal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Signal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.65,"lon":-115.71,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montana??s vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQ??s wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the state??s university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for July 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

54

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for February 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

55

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

56

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

57

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

58

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for June 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

59

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

60

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for August 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for April 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

62

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

63

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

64

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for November 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

65

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for September 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

66

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for September 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

67

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

68

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

69

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for October 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

70

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for March 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

71

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

72

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for October 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

73

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

74

Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A ground magnetic survey located no anomaly with an amplitude of more than 20 or 30 gammas that could be associated with the thermal anomaly, however the magnetic data did outline the Cretaceous stock in great detail and allow the removal from the gravity field of the effect of the stock. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Magnetics_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=389390"

75

Rh and Pt catalysts activated by UHV treatments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The H2?D2...exchange activity of Rh powder was enhanced by high-temperature UHV treatment accompanied with an enrichment of the...2PtCl66H2O under UHV condition resulted in an extremely active Pt...

S. Nishiyama; K. Yoshioka; S. Matsuura

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-based/SiO2 catalysts: A...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and theoretical modeling study. Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and...

77

RH-TRU Waste Inventory Characterization by AK and Proposed WIPP RH-TRU Waste Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has developed draft documentation to present the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) remote-handled (RH-) transuranic (TRU) waste characterization program to its regulators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department. Compliance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 191 and 194; the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579); and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, as well as the Certificates of Compliance for the 72-B and 10-160B Casks, requires that specific waste parameter limits be imposed on DOE sites disposing of TRU waste at WIPP. The DOE-CBFO must control the sites' compliance with the limits by specifying allowable characterization methods. As with the established WIPP contact handled TRU waste characterization program, the DOE-CBFO has proposed a Remote-Handled TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria (RH-WAC) document consolidating the requirements from various regulatory drivers and proposed allowable characterization methods. These criteria are consistent with the recommendation of a recent National Academy Sciences/National Research Council to develop an RH-TRU waste characterization approach that removes current self imposed requirements that lack a legal or safety basis. As proposed in the draft RH-WAC and other preliminary documents, the DOE-CBFO RH-TRU waste characterization program proposes the use of acceptable knowledge (AK) as the primary method for obtaining required characterization information. The use of AK involves applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or processes used to generate the waste. Documentation, records, or processes providing information about various attributes of a waste stream, such as chemical, physical, and radiological properties, may be used as AK and may be applied to individual waste containers either independently or in conjunction with radiography, visual examination, assay, and other sampling and analytical data. RH-TRU waste cannot be shipped to WIPP on the basis of AK alone if documentation demonstrating that all of the prescribed limits in the RH-WAC are met is not available, discrepancies exist among AK source documents describing the same waste stream and the most conservative assumptions regarding those documents indicates that a limit will not be met, or all required data are not available for a given waste stream.

Most, W. A.; Kehrman, R.; Gist, C.; Biedscheid, J.; Devarakonda, J.; Whitworth, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mt St Helens Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

79

3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: MT and TDEM surveys acquired in 2005 were integrated with existing MT and TDEM data recovered from obsolete formats to characterize the geometry of the geothermal reservoir. An interpretation based on the correlation of the 3D MT resistivity with well properties indicated that most of the previous exploration wells had been tarted close to but not in the center of areas tha appeared most likely to be permeable. Such

80

Definition: Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Controlled Source Audio MT Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Controlled Source Audio MT Controlled Source Audio-Magnetotellurics (CSAMT) is an active source application of a magnetotelluric survey aimed at providing a more reliable signal and rapid acquisition time relative to a natural source MT measurement.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Magnetotellurics (MT) is an electromagnetic geophysical method of imaging the earth's subsurface by measuring natural variations of electrical and magnetic fields at the Earth's surface. Investigation depth ranges from 300m below ground by recording higher frequencies down to 10,000m or deeper with long-period soundings. Developed in Russia and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Area (Blackwell) Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic mapping has outlined a structure which may be a partial control on the high heat flow. The Cretaceous intrusive (outlined by the magnetic data) and the heat flow anomaly occupy a broad dome in the Precambrian rocks, the stock outcropping in the northwest portion of the dome, and the heat flow anomaly restricted to the southwest portion of the dome. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa

82

MT Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saxony, Germany Zip: 27404 Sector: Services Product: MT-Energie provides both turn-key biogas plants and related components and services. Coordinates: 53.295765, 9.27964...

83

RAPID/Roadmap/11-MT-b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 11-MT-b.1 - Cease Operations and Contact County Coroner MCA 22-3-805: (1) A developer who...

84

RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-MT-f Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities 03MTFRightOfWayEasementForUtilitiesProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Permit Overview This flowchart is intended to describe the...

85

?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GE 1 GE 1 ;" qr)-1 s?llq ' p raspy.. c" ifa K. mris I talked with Hr. Wllllm cIF(Iy, Metrllurgist, Wnlon CarbId@ Nuclear cOrp8ny, 08k B&t&$@, Tenne66ee, on April 26, 1961. He informed me th&t the #rtioMl Northern birislon, Ame~ic6.n ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8, la pePfopn1~ lo8lve forming studier for the. ilnion olo)w Wuolem Conpmy "p l7?JHa). The work at National Northern l#rirc.- alon ir under the 6upenl6lon of Ehsll Phillpohuc4~, v of Spealrl Prcbduots. The @ox& to data ha8 been pwfonwd wlth 430 strlnle66 rteel and urma%um metal - both hot snb 0018 wor4c have been performed at pr688u~r fmm 100,000 to 900,000 prl. The shape of the pleu88 na not dlrolored. In 6<lon work ha6 been done with

86

LEED crystallography studies of the structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Ir, Pt and Rh crystal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

There have only been a few Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) intensity analyses carried out to determine the structure of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces; most surface crystallography studies concentrated on the structure of clean unreconstructed or atomic adsorbate-covered transition metal faces. The few molecular adsorption systems already investigated by dynamical LEED are CO on Ni(100), Cu(100) and Pd(100) as well as C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ adsorbed on Pt(111). The emphasis of this thesis research has been to extend the applicability of LEED crystallography to the more complicated unit cells found in molecular overlayers on transition metals or in there constructed surfaces of clean transition metals.

Koestner, R.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hybrid density functional calculations of the defect properties of ZnO:Rh and ZnO:Ir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-type material is essential to be able to manufacture optoelectronic devices with p-n junctions. A new class of p-type zinc oxides with rhodium[5] or iridium[6] has attracted attention recently due to some re- markable features of their electronic structure...

Muoz Ramo, David; Bristowe, Paul D.

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ferromagnetism at the interfaces of antiferromagnetic FeRh epilayers  

SciTech Connect

The nanoscale magnetic structure of FeRh epilayers has been studied by polarized neutron reflectometry. Epitaxial films with a nominal thickness of 500 {angstrom} were grown on MgO (001) substrates via molecular-beam epitaxy and capped with 20 {angstrom} of MgO. The FeRh films show a clear transition from the antiferromagnetic (AF) state to the ferromagnetic (FM) state with increasing temperature. Surprisingly the films possess a FM moment even at a temperature 80 K below the AF-FM transition temperature of the film. We have quantified the magnitude and spatial extent of this FM moment, which is confined to within {approx}60-80 {angstrom} of the FeRh near the top and bottom interfaces. These interfacial FM layers account for the unusual effects previously observed in films with thickness <100 {angstrom}. Given the delicate energy balance between the AF and FM ground states we suggest a metastable FM state resides near to the interface within an AF matrix. The length scale over which the FM region resides is consistent with the strained regions of the film.

Fan, P.; Arena, D.; Kinane, C.J.; Charlton, T.R.; Dorner, R.; Ali, M.; de Vries, A. de.; Brydson, R.M.D.; Marrows, C.H.; Hickey, B.J.; Tanner, B.K.; Nisbet, G.; and Langridge, S.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Low-Energy Nuclear Level Scheme of Rh104  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations of the low-energy level properties (level energies, spins, and parities) of Rh104 have been undertaken from studies of the coincidence relationships existing between the low-energy capture gamma rays produced by thermal neutron capture in Rh103 using NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals as detectors. It is known from the decay scheme of the 4.4-min Rh104m isomer that Rh104 has energy levels at 52, 96, and 129 keV with spins and parities of 2-, 2+, and 5+, respectively. The data obtained in these investigations have been combined with the isomeric level data in order to determine the properties of several additional levels. Additional levels in Rh104 have been determined at the following energies, with the level spin and parity in parenthesis after the energy; 184 keV (1), 192 keV (3+), 269 keV (3), 450 keV, and either 229 keV (3+) or 325 keV (4+). These spin and parity assignments were made on the basis of a K internal conversion coefficient analysis of the coincidence data together with consideration of the relative cascade intensities. On the basis of the possible odd-proton and odd-neutron configurations open to the 184- and 269-keV levels, and considering the transition intensities to the lower levels, it was determined that the negative-parity assignment is most probable for both of these levels, with the levels having configuration assignments of (p32)(d52). The 192-keV level together with the 229- or 325-keV level most probably have either [(g92)5]72(d52)n or (g92)5(d52)n configurations. In fact, if it is the 229-keV level which does exist, as the available evidence might seem to indicate, then, since they both have spins and parities of 3+, the 192-keV level would have one of these configurations while the 229-keV level would have the other.

R. C. Greenwood

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ethanol electro-oxidation on partially alloyed Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ternary Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts of Pt:Sn:Rh=1:0.8:0.2 and 1:1:0.33 atomic ratios were synthesized using the formic acid method and their electrochemical activities were compared for ethanol oxidation with that of binary Pt-Sn/C (1:1) and Pt-Rh/C (1:0.11) catalysts. XRD analysis indicated the presence of Sn in both alloyed and oxide form and suggested the formation of a ternary Pt-Sn-Rh alloy in both catalysts. The particle size by TEM was around 3.5nm for all catalysts. The efficiency for Pt utilization increased with Rh content. Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts exhibited higher catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation than Pt-Rh/C, but lower than Pt-Sn/C. Among ternary catalysts, Pt-Sn-Rh/C (1:0.8:0.2) was the most active. In situ IRRAS showed Rh plays a dual counteracting role during ethanol electro-oxidation on Pt-Sn-Rh/C catalysts, once it promotes C-C bond breaking, thus favouring CO2 formation, but hinders adsorption of ethanol, decreasing the production of acetic acid.

Elson A. de Souza; M.Janete Giz; Giuseppe A. Camara; Ermete Antolini; Raimundo R. Passos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

IR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on several major projects, including current inspection of welds for an oil and gas pipeline company from Italy, welding and inspection system for the National Spent Nuclear...

92

Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power March 14, 2011 - 1:14pm Addthis Mount Wachusett Community College staff Bill Swift, Bob LaBonte, Norm Boudreau, George Couillard and Vestas trainer Bill Fulkerson about to ascend the MWCC north wind turbine | Photo courtesy of GreenOnGreenStreet Mount Wachusett Community College staff Bill Swift, Bob LaBonte, Norm Boudreau, George Couillard and Vestas trainer Bill Fulkerson about to ascend the MWCC north wind turbine | Photo courtesy of GreenOnGreenStreet Mark Higgins Operations Supervisor, Wind & Water Power Technologies Office What will this project do? The turbines are expected to provide an annual savings of approximately $700,000 based on the area's current utility rates.

93

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

94

A Low-Cost Reflectance FT-IR Microscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) microscope combines microscopy with infrared (IR) spectroscopic molecular characterization. IR microspectroscopy presents a...

Jansen, J A J; Van Der Maas, J H; Posthuma De Boer, A

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Basic Reaction Model of Automobile Exhaust Gas Treatment over Pt?Rh Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Basic Reaction Model of Automobile Exhaust Gas Treatment over Pt?Rh Catalyst ... The reactor is heated by a three-section electric furnace. ...

Motoaki Kawase; Hiroyasu Fujitsuka; Hitoshi Nakanishi; Tatsuya Yoshikawa; Kouichi Miura

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

Strategic Planning Notes MT AHEC/MORH Advisory Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

big, complex issues ­ Montana Healthcare Workforce Advisory Committee, HC Workforce Strategic PlanStrategic Planning Notes MT AHEC/MORH Advisory Board February 7, 2014 Strategic Priorities 1. Healthcare Workforce Training and educating the workforce Montana needs o Educational infrastructure o

Dyer, Bill

97

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

K. Baird, F.-J. Decker, M. J. Hogan* , R.H. Iverson, P. Raimondi, R.H. Siemann, D. Walz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 K. Baird, F.-J. Decker, M. J. Hogan* , R.H. Iverson, P. Raimondi, R.H. Siemann, D. Walz Stanford Linear Accelerator Center B.E. Blue, C.E. Clayton, E.S. Dodd, C. Joshi* , K.A. Marsh, W.B. Mori, S. Wang R. Assmann CERN E-162: Positron and Electron Dynamics in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator I

99

Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.  

SciTech Connect

Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product J. I and angular distributions of CO2 produced by CO oxidation on Rh 111 have been measured as a function a fundamental and a practical point of view. CO2 formation serves as a model recombina- tion reaction

Sibener, Steven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Atomic and molecular adsorption on RhMn alloy surface: A first principles study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hydrogen from reforming of natural gas and coal to hydro- carbon Fishcher-Tropsch synthesis and oxygenates- bon and partial oxidation of methane.15 The importance of Rh catalysts on catalytic reactions molecules in terms of the energetics and site preferences on Rh catalysts as well as the effects of Mn added

Li, Weixue

102

High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High density adsorbed oxygen on Rh,,111... and enhanced routes to metallic oxidation using atomic oxygen K. D. Gibson, Mark Viste, Errol C. Sanchez, and S. J. Sibener The James Franck Institute; accepted 30 November 1998 Exposure of Rh 111 to atomic oxygen leads to the facile formation of a full

Sibener, Steven

103

Preparation, characterization, and structural analyses of [Rh(chp)(NBD)]2 and [Rh(chp)(NBD)]2(PF6). Isolation of a paramagnetic d7-d8 binuclear radical and its d8-d8 precursor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Preparation, characterization, and structural analyses of [Rh(chp)(NBD)]2 and [Rh(chp)(NBD)]2(PF6). Isolation of a paramagnetic d7-d8 binuclear radical and its d8-d8 precursor ...

David C. Boyd; Robert. Szalapski; Kent R. Mann

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT, USA Avalanche Path Atlas Erich H. Peitzsch Daniel..................................................................................................................................... 2 Overview of Red Rock Group avalanche paths, Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT................................................................................................................................................... 3 Overview of Lower GTSR group avalanche paths, Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, MT

105

Micro-Earthquake At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Blackwell) Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A seismic ground noise was carried out but the ground noise in the anomaly area (and the surrounding region) was extremely low, approximately 4 orders of magnitude below that observed in the geothermal areas in the Salton Sea between 1-10 Hz (in units of power density). Because of this very low background noise the micro-earthquake survey was possible with instrument gains well in excess of a million. Regional micro-earthquake activity was located within about 15 km of the geothermal area but no micro-earthquakes

106

Mt. Edgecumbe High School Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edgecumbe High School Wind Project Edgecumbe High School Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt. Edgecumbe High School Wind Project Facility Mt. Edgecumbe High School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location AK Coordinates 57.053928°, -135.356903° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.053928,"lon":-135.356903,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

107

File:INL-geothermal-mt.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mt.pdf mt.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Montana Geothermal Resources Size of this preview: 728 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 4,200 pixels, file size: 1.99 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Montana Geothermal Resources Sources Idaho National Laboratory Authors Patrick Laney; Julie Brizzee Related Technologies Geothermal Creation Date 2003-11-01 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Montana File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:41, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:41, 16 December 2010 5,100 × 4,200 (1.99 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

108

Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes No further mention of infrared photography. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_And-Or_Near_Infrared_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=386636" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

110

Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of Rh-based lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores for higher alcohol synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Two lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}; LZ) were prepared by Pechini method and tested for higher alcohols selectivity. In one, Rh was substituted into the pyrochlore lattice (LRZ, 1.7 wt%) while for the second, Rh was supported on an unsubstituted La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R/LZ, 1.8 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results show that the surface reducibility depends on whether the Rh is in (or supported on) the LZ pyrochlore. Rhodium in the LRZ is more reducible than rhodium supported on the R/LZ pyrochlore, likely due to the presence of a perovskite phase (LaRhO{sub 3}; identified by XRD), in which rhodium is more reducible. The formation of the perovskite accompanies that of the pyrochlore. CO hydrogenation results show higher ethanol selectivity for R/LZ than LRZ, possibly due to the strong interaction between Rh and LZ on the R/LZ, forming atomically close Rh{sup +}/Rh{sup 0} sites, which have been suggested to favor ethanol production.

Abdelsayed, Victor; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Poston, James A., Jr.; Spivey, James J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electron spin resonance and electron spin-echo modulation study of paramagnetic Rh species generated in Ca-Y and Na-Y zeolites  

SciTech Connect

Paramagnetic Rh species generated in RhNa-Y and RhCa-Y zeolites after various treatments were characterized by using electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin-echo modulation (ESEM) spectroscopies. Activation in flowing oxygen at 500/sup 0/C ..beta..-hydrogen a considerable amount of Rh(II) located in site I in the hexagonal prism of the zeolite structure for 3 wt % Rh in RhNa-Y zeolite. Samples of 1 wt % Rh in RhNa-Y and RhCa-Y did not show any paramagnetic signals. Adsorption of various adsorbates such as water, ammonia, methanol, carbon monoxide, and oxygen on activated samples induced a considerable increase in the ESR intensities. Adsorption of oxygen and carbon monoxide yields the corresponding adducts which are located in the ..cap alpha..-cage of the zeolite structure. Hydration generated a species which is coordinated to three water molecules. Adsorption of methanol on RhNa-Y generated a species H2 which is also formed after reduction of RhNa-Y with H/sub 2/, suggesting that the methanol molecule undergoes a reaction to generate products which further reduce Rh(III) species in the ..beta..-cage of the zeolite structure to Rh(II). No significant differences were observed between RhNa-Y and RhCa-Y except for the formation of different Rh(II) species after methanol adsorption in RhCa-Y and the generation of a larger amount of Rh(II) in site I in RhNa-Y. These results are compared to previously obtained data in RhNa-X and RhCa-X to account for the effect of the cocations and the Si/Al ratio on the generation of Rh(II) species in zeolites.

Goldfarb, D.; Kevan, L.

1987-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Dissociation and oxidation of carbon monoxide over Rh/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The activity of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts for CO oxidation was investigated by transient isotopic pulse experiments using packed-bed reactor. This transient experimental scheme revealed significant CO dissociation activity during CO oxidation over Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Results indicate that the oxidation of CO proceeds via dissociative oxidation by its own oxygen as well as via direct oxidation by gas-phase oxygen on well-dispersed Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The rate of CO dissociation is on the same order of magnitude as the rate of CO oxidation; under steady-state conditions at 300{degree}C, the rate of CO dissociation is approximately half that of direct oxidation. Differences in CO dissociation activity between single-crystal Rh surfaces and well-dispersed supported Rh particles are explained in terms of the molecular bonding and adsorption characteristics on these two different surfaces. The importance of CO dissociation kinetics in the overall CO oxidation activity of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts is further discussed in view of the reaction lightoff behavior.

Cho, Byong K.; Stock, C.J. (General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To...

114

LNG trningsmanual fr M/T Bit Viking; LNG training manual.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Denna uppsats r gjord p uppdrag av Tarbit Shipping som r 2011 konverterade sin tankbt M/T Bit Viking frn konventionell drift p tjockolja till (more)

Albertsson, Robin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Controlled Source Audio MT At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Pilgrim Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January...

116

Understanding of Ethanol Decomposition on Rh(111) From Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Reaction mechanisms of ethanol decomposition on Rh(1 1 1) were elucidated by means of periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. We propose that the most probable reaction pathway is via CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* on the basis of our mechanistic study: CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* {yields} CH{sub 2}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. In contrast, the contribution from the pathway via CH{sub 3}CHOH* is relatively small, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHOH* {yields} CH{sub 3}CHO* {yields} CH{sub 3}CO* {yields} CH{sub 2}CO* {yields} CHCO* {yields} CH* + CO* {yields} C* + CO*. According to our calculations, one of the slow steps is the formation of the oxametallacycle CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O* species, which leads to the production of CHCO*, the precursor for C-C bond breaking. Finally, the decomposition of ethanol leads to the production of C and CO. Our calculations, for ethanol combustion on Rh, the major obstacle is not C-C bond cleavage, but the C contamination on Rh(1 1 1). The strong C-Rh interaction may deactivate the Rh catalyst. The formation of Rh alloys with Pt and Pd weakens the C-Rh interaction, easing the removal of C, and, as expected, in accordance with the experimental findings, facilitating ethanol combustion.

Liu, P.; Choi, Y.M.

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Mt Wheeler Power, Inc (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Utah Utility Id 13073 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0786/kWh Commercial: $0.0810/kWh Industrial: $0.0610/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Mt Wheeler Power, Inc (Utah). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 11.289 138.131 203 9.256 101.356 114 1.61 12.38 14 22.155 251.867 331

118

Village of Mt Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Horeb Village of Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13036 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

119

Mt Carmel Public Utility Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Utility Co Public Utility Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Carmel Public Utility Co Place Illinois Utility Id 13032 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Electric Service Commercial Commercial Electric Space Heating Service Commercial Large Light and Power Electric Service - Less Than 10 MW Industrial Large Light and Power Electric Service - equal or greater than 10 MW

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - at10 microtelsa-300 mt Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HTC PurEnergy EOR Hydrogen Energy Kern County, CA 308 390 MW 2 MtCO2yr IGCC... CoalPetCoke EOR AEP New Haven, WV 334 235 MW 1.5 Mt CO2yr PCC Chilled NH3 Saline ... Source:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fiber Delivery of mid-IR lasers  

SciTech Connect

Fiber optics for the visible to near infrared (NIR) wavelength regimes (i.e. = 0.42 {mu}m) have proven to be extremely useful for a myriad of applications such as telecommunications, illumination, and sensors because they enable convenient, compact, and remote delivery of laser beams. Similarly, there is a need for fiber optics operating at longer wavelengths. For example, systems operating in the mid-IR regime (i.e., = 314 {mu}m) are being developed to detect trace molecular species with far-reaching applications, such as detecting explosives on surfaces, pollutants in the environment, and biomarkers in the breath of a patient. Furthermore, with the increasing availability of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which are semiconductor lasers that operate in the mid-IR regime additional uses are rapidly being developed. Here, we describe the development of hollow-core fibers for delivery of high-quality mid-IR laser beams across a broad spectral range.

Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, James P.

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

Effect of Li Promoter on titania-supported Rh catalyst for ethanol formation from CO hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

The addition of 0.10wt% Li to Rh/TiO2 more than doubled the CO conversion for CO hydrogenation while increasing ethanol selectivity. The addition of Li also increases formation of C2 oxygenates at the expense of C1 species, methanol and methane. This is attributed to enhanced dispersion of Rh by Li that appears to reduce dissociation of CO, which previous studies have shown requires large ensembles of Rh atoms on the surface. Li promotion appears to increase the associatively adsorbed CO, allowing for increased H2 chemisorption on the surface compared to the dissociative adsorption of the same number of CO atoms. This increases selectivity to ethanol compared to the unpromoted catalysts. CO-TPD shows more reactive adsorbed CO species on the Li-promoted catalyst. FTIR results suggest that Li promotion alters CO bonding at bridged or interfacial sites and its effect is more structural than electronic.

Egbebi, Adefemi [Louisiana State University; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Schwartz, Viviane [ORNL; Spivey, James J [Louisiana State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

CO hydrogenation on Rh/Al-PILC: the effect of the metallic precursor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter describes the preparation of new catalysts for liquid fuel synthesis making use of the molecular sieving effect of pillared clays (PILC) of controlled porosity to limit the size of the hydrocarbons chain, and of the ability of partially oxidized Rh to produce oxygenates, acting on the Rh electronic state by changing the active phase precursor and the dispersion of the metal involved. The nature of the metallic precursor plays a role on the activity and selectivity for CO hydrogenation of Rh-PILC catalysts. Organo compounds seem to give rise to catalysts more active and selective to oxygenate than inorganic precursors, through changes in the oxidation state and the particle size of the metal involved. To select the proper treatment temperature, as to eliminate the organic residue on the support, is a necessary step to obtain the expected improvement of the catalysts.

S. Mendioroz; B. Asenjo; P. Terreros; P. Salerno; V. Muoz

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used to map fracture and fluid flow patterns. References K. Richards, A. Revil, A. Jardani, F. Henderson, M. Batzle, A. Haas (2010) Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Self_Potential_At_Mt_Princeton_Hot_Springs_Area_(Richards,_Et_Al.,_2010)&oldid=388680"

125

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A dipole-dipole resistivity survey of the area was carried out with estimated penetration up to 700 meters and no indication of low values of resistivity were found associated with the thermal anomaly. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Marysville_Mt_Area_(Blackwell)&oldid=510539

126

GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting GRR/Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-MT-a - Energy Facility Siting 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Major Facility Siting Act ARM Title 17 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf 07MTAEnergyFacilitySiting (6).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Montana Major Facility Siting Act governs the siting of energy facilities in Montana. 7-MT-a.1 to 7-MT-a.2 - Does the Power Plant Have a Production Capacity of

127

Cooling effect in emissions of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear characteristic emissions of K alpha, K beta and gamma with a significant triplet splitting at room temperature are observed from the long-lived nuclear state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung irradiation. A pronounced phase-transition-like narrowing of the emission profiles occurs immediately after the sample is cooled down to 77 K. The room temperature profiles reappear again abruptly and almost reversibly as the temperature drifts freely back to approximately the ice point after the filling of liquid nitrogen is stopped. These emission properties at 300 K and at low temperature may indicate that the 103mRh nuclei are in collective states.

Yao Cheng; Bing Xia; Chinping Chen

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

128

CO Oxidation on Rh/SiO2/Mo(112) Model Catalysts at Elevated Pressures Sean M. McClure, M. Lundwall, F. Yang, Z. Zhou, and D. W. Goodman*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) substrate under UHV conditions, in a contiguous high-pressure reactor cell-UHV surface analysis chamber. CO) and Rh coverage (Rh ) 0.25-10 ML), along with measurements on a Rh(111) single crystal for direct comparison. CO desorption measurements on the Rh/SiO2 films and STM measurements of Rh particles on ultrathin

Goodman, Wayne

129

IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program Trial Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program Trial Report Researcher(s): Heiner Lieth, UC Davis PRNumber. The phytotoxicity index values generally averaged less than 2, suggesting very light damage which is probably-4 Ornamental Horticulture Program Trial Report Researcher(s): Heiner Lieth, UC Davis PRNumber

Lieth, J. Heinrich

130

Cosmic IR Backgrounds Ned Wright (UCLA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic IR Backgrounds by Ned Wright (UCLA) http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html See: · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/DIRBE · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CIBR · http

Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

131

Metal segregation in supported bimetallic catalysts:. gamma. -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-supported CO hydrogenation catalysts prepared from RhOs/sub 3/, Rh/sub 4/, and FeOs/sub 3/ clusters  

SciTech Connect

Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-supported metals were prepared from (H/sub 2/RhOs/sub 3/(CO)/sub 10/(acetylacetonate)), (Rh/sub 4/(CO)/sub 12/), and (H/sub 2/FeOs/sub 3/(CO)/sub 13/). The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy after reaction with CO + H/sub 2/ and tested as catalysts for conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ in a flow reactor at 200 and 270/sup 0/C and 10 atm. Used catalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The catalyst lost Os during operation, presumably as a result of formation of volatile carbonyls. The catalytic reaction products were a nearly Schulz-Flory-Anderson distribution of hydrocarbons with small yields of dimethyl ether (formed from methanol). The performance of the catalyst prepared from the RhOs/sub 3/ clusters was closely similar to that of the catalyst prepared from the Rh/sub 4/ cluster. Characterization of the samples after treatment in CO + H/sub 2/ and after catalysis demonstrated that the RhOs/sub 3/ clusters broke apart, first giving triosmium clusters and mononuclear Rh complexes and then, at higher temperatures, giving Rh crystallites and mononuclear Os complexes. The catalytic activity for hydrocarbon synthesis is attributed to the Rh metal; the activity for methanol synthesis is tentatively associated with ionic Rh complexes. The FeOs/sub 3/ catalyst was two orders of magnitude less active than the Rh Os/sub 3/ catalyst, apparently consisting of small iron oxide particles and mononuclear Os complexes. The selectivity of this catalyst for dimethyl ether formation increased markedly with time onstream in the flow reactor; after 55 h, 36 mol% of the organic product was ether. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Budge, J.R.; Lucke, B.F.; Gates, B.C.; Toran, J.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.73166667,"lon":-106.17,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

133

Determination of the proton separation energy of Rh93 from mass measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The proposed ?p process, which occurs in the early time proton-rich neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae, has the potential to resolve the long-standing uncertainty in the production of the light p-nuclei Mo92 and Mo94. A recent study incorporating this ?p process has indicated that the proton separation energy Sp of Rh93 is especially important in determining the relative production of these two isotopes. To reproduce the observed solar Mo92/Mo94 abundance ratio of 1.57 a Sp value for Rh93 of 1.640.1 MeV is required. The previously unknown masses of Ru92 and Rh93 have been measured with the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer resulting in an experimental value for Sp(Rh93) of 2.0070.009 MeV. This implies that with our current understanding of the conditions in core-collapse supernova explosions the ?p process is not solely responsible for the observed solar Mo92/Mo94 abundance ratio.

J. Fallis et al.

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Lateral Interactions and Multi-isotherms:? Nitrogen Recombination from Rh(111)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lateral Interactions and Multi-isotherms:? Nitrogen Recombination from Rh(111) ... There are several families of algorithms to solve the Master Equation; we have used the discrete event simulation algorithm (DES). ... The fitting process then yields parameters that look reasonable, but one has to keep in mind that approximations were made (see previous section) in building the model. ...

C. G. M. Hermse; A. P. van Bavel; B. E. Nieuwenhuys; J. J. Lukkien; R. A. van Santen; A. P. J. Jansen

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

135

MT3D: a 3 dimensional magnetotelluric modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)  

SciTech Connect

MT3D.REV1 is a non-interactive computer program written in FORTRAN to do 3-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. A 3-D volume integral equation has been adapted to simulate the MT response of a 3D body in the earth. An integro-difference scheme has been incorporated to increase the accuracy. This is a user's guide for MT3D.REV1 on the University of Utah Research Institute's (UURI) PRIME 400 computer operating under PRIMOS IV, Rev. 17.

Nutter, C.; Wannamaker, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot  

SciTech Connect

The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to electric energy in a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell was demon- strated. Although hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells): Application to Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Jeremy Kua and William A. Goddard III* Contribution from and designing new catalysts. We find that methanol dehydrogenation is most facile on Pt, with the hydrogens

Goddard III, William A.

138

3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed density model of Mt. Etna and its surrounding areas has been evaluated using a 3-D inversion of the gravimetric data acquired in the 1980's. Several high-density and low-density bodies are found, penetrating from shallow depths as far down as 12 km bsl. A positive correlation (in terms of location, extent, density, and velocity) is established between several anomalies of the density model and features identified in previously published seismic tomographies. A prominent high-density body extending down to 7 km bsl is recognized in the southern

139

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Infrared images acquired through joint US. Department of Energy and U.S. Geological Survey efforts (Kieffer et al., 1982) show a representative pattern of heat emission from the summit area (Fig. 5). References David Frank (1995) Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Rainier, Washington Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_And-Or_Near_Infrared_At_Mt_Ranier_Area_(Frank,_1995)&oldid=386481" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes

140

GRR/Section 6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit 6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-e - Floodplain Development Permit 06MTEFloodplainDevelopmentPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Federal Emergency Management Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTEFloodplainDevelopmentPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Anyone planning new development within a designated Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA). Check with local floodplain [www.mtfloodplain.mt.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Authors Philip E. Wannamaker, William M. Doerner and Derrick P. Hasterok Conference proceedings, 32th workshop on geothermal reservoir Engineering, Stanford University; Stanford University; 2007 Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal

142

A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In view of recent extensive investigation of shallow resistivity structure for active fault studies and geothermal exploration, we developed a portable magnetotelluric (MT) system for the extremely low frequency (ELF) range. The system aims primarily at making real-time analyses of MT data at the so-called Schumann resonance frequencies of ~ 8, 14 and 20 Hz.

143

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mt. Cimone Mt. Cimone Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone graphics Graphics data Data Investigators Tiziano Colombo and Riccardo Santaguida Italian Meteorological Service, Via delle Ville, 100-41029 Sestola (MO), Italy Period of Record 1979-1997 Methods Continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements have been carried out at Mt. Cimone since 1979. Since December 1988, air samples have also been collected approximately once per week in a pair of 2-L, electropolished, stainless steel cylindrical flasks. From 1979 until December 1988, a Hartmann and Braun URAS-2T NDIR gas analyzer was used for CO2 determinations. Currently, CO2 determinations are made through the use of a Siemens Ultramat-5E NDIR gas analyzer. Water vapor is eliminated by passing the air through a U-tube

144

Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - area mt evidence Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search results for: area mt evidence Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 University of St Andrews School of Mathematics and Statistics Summary: ;1 HONOURS PROGRAMME IN MATHEMATICS AND...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator microtron mt-22 Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: accelerator microtron mt-22 Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Nuclear Instruments and Methods in PhysicsResearch A 331 (1993)ABS 21 North-Holland Summary:...

147

A Large Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Large Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Self-potential (SP) surveys were carried out on Mt. Fuji volcano, Japan, and an intense positive anomaly (about 2000 mV) was found in the summit area. The positive SP anomaly was stable on 2001 and 2002, but increased 150 mV in amplitude on September 12, 2003, and suddenly decreased 300 mV two weeks later. This amplitude change coincides with the emergence of the fumaroles, which appeared for the first time in 40 years, on the east-northeast flank 6 km apart from the summit. The SP anomaly is thought

148

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-MT-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685537" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

149

Effect of prostaglandin E? (PGE?) on the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from infundibular explants of cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GnRH neuronal terminals located in the infundibulum of rodents have been shown to release GnRH when stimulated with PGE? in vivo and in vitro. The effect of PGE? on the release of GnRH has not been determined in cattle. Thus, the objective...

Stephens, Tyler Paul

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensors Background IR SENSORS INTERFACE The CEENBoT comes equipped with a Left and Right non-contact bumpMobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors CEENBoTTM Mobile Robotics Platform 1.01 #12;. ( Blank ) #12;Mobile Robotics I ­ Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors Purpose

Farritor, Shane

151

Extreme Galactic-Winds and Starburst in IR Mergers and IR QSOs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report -as a part of a long-term study of mergers and IR QSOs- detailed spectroscopic evidences for outflow (OF) and/or Wolf Rayet features in: (i) low velocity OF in the ongoing mergers NGC 4038/39 and IRAS 23128-5919; (ii) extreme velocity OF (EVOF) in the QSOs IRAS 01003-2238 and IRAS 13218+0552; (iii) OF and EVOF in a complete sample of ultra-luminous IR galaxies/QSOs ("The IRAS 1 Jy MKO-KPNO Survey", of 118 objects). We found EVOF in IRAS 11119+3257, 14394+5332, 15130+1958 and 15462-0450. The OF components detected in these objects were mainly associated to starburst processes: i.e., to galactic-winds generated in multiple type II SN explosions and massive stars. The EVOF were detected in objects with strong starburst plus obscured IR QSOs; which suggest that interaction of both processes could generate EVOF. In addition, we analyze the presence of Wolf Rayet features in the large sample of Bright PG-QSOs (Boroson and Green 1992), and nearby mergers and galactic-wind galaxies. We found clear WR features in the Fe II QSOs (type I): PG 1244+026, 1444+407, 1448+273, 1535+547; and in the IR merger Arp 220. HST archive images of IR+BAL QSOs show in practically all of these objects "arc or shell" features probably associated to galactic-winds (i.e., to multiple type II SN explosions) and/or merger processes. Finally, we discuss the presence of extreme starburst and galactic wind as a possible evolutive link between IR merger and IR QSOs; where the relation between mergers and extreme starburst (with powerful galactic-winds) plays in important role, in the evolution of galaxies.

S. Lipari; D. Sanders; R. Terlevich; S. Veilleux; R. Diaz; Y. Taniguchi; W. Zheng; D. Kim; Z. Tsvetanov; G. Carranza; H. Dottori

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Synthesis and characterization of NaMt biocomposites with corn cob xylan in aqueous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study synthesis and characterization of biopolymer/clay biocomposites was aimed using naturally occurring polysaccharide (xylan) as biopolymer and montmorillonite type clay (NaMt). Xylan was extracted from corn cobs via alkaline oxidative treatment. Maximum solubility of xylan was determined as 1% (w/v) in water at room temperature. Thus synthesis was realized following two routes; first NaMt concentration was kept constant at 2.0נ10?2g/ml and xylan concentration was changed. Latter xylan concentration was kept constant at 1.0נ10?2g/ml and NaMt concentration was changed. Natural xylan, NaMt and biocomposites were examined in terms of their spectral, electrokinetic, rheologic, morphologic and thermal properties. Results showed that lower amounts of xylan interacted with NaMt on the surface, however, when the xylan amount was increased also intercalation of NaMt has occurred. Biocomposites showed better thermal and rheologic behaviors with respect to the starting materials.

Cneyt H. nl; Ebru Gnister; Oya At?c?

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Kinetic study on the catalytic performance of Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at different temperatures in the CO-H/sub 2/ reaction  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic CO-H/sub 2/ reaction on Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at 200, 400, and 500/sup 0/C (Cat-200, -400, -500) for 2 h was kinetically studied at 250/sup 0/C using a circulating reactor and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to determine how Cat-400 exhibited the highest activity. The rate equation distinguished the best catalyst with zero and first orders in CO and H/sub 2/, respectively, from other catalysts with negative order in CO. The adsorption ability of the catalyst at 200/sup 0/C was comparable to that of Cat-200, and two to three times larger than that of Cat-500, although the ability of Cat-200 was much larger at room temperature. Carbon monoxide adsorbed on the catalysts reversibly as well as irreversibly. IR spectroscopy revealed that the major form of irreversibly adsorbed CO was linear on Cat-200, whereas similar amounts of linear and bridge forms were observed on Cat-400 and Cat-500. These latter forms were highly reactive against hydrogen molecules when no carbon monoxide was present in the gas phase. Based on these results, the highest activity of Cat-400 is ascribed to rhodium metal modified by properly reduced TiO/sub 2/ to show the appropriate adsorption ability of carbon monoxide which least retards the activation of hydrogen according to first-order kinetics. Typical strong metal-support interaction decreases the catalytic activity by decreasing the active sites and strengthening the CO adsorption too much.

Fujitsu, H.; Ikeyama, N.; Mochida, I.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Human Mitochondrial Transcription Factor B1 Interacts with the C-Terminal Activation Region of h-mtTFA and Stimulates Transcription Independently of Its RNA Methyltransferase Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...promoter locations and where h-mtTFB proteins bridge an interaction between the...h-mtTFB proteins act to bridge an interaction between h-mtRNA polymerase and a...promoter locations and where h-mtTFB proteins bridge an interaction between the...

Vicki McCulloch; Gerald S. Shadel

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Reactivity of surface carbon deposited on supported Rh catalysts by the disproportionation of CO  

SciTech Connect

Recent investigations on hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H/sub 2/ over Group VIII metals have proposed that the surface carbon formed by the dissociation of CO is an intermediate for hydrocarbon formation. It implies that metals which dissociate CO readily (e.g., Ni, Co, and Ru) are good catalysts for hydrocarbon synthesis unless the surface carbon is bound too strongly. There is a certain controversy in the literature on whether CO undergoes dissociation on Rh surfaces under UHV conditions. In the present work, the authors have investigated the reactivity of surface carbon deposited on TiO/sub 2/- or SiO/sub 2/-supported Rh catalysts in the presence of molecularly adsorbed CO by means of the isotopic tracer technique and have made a direct comparison of the reactivity of adsorbed CO with that of surface carbon. It has been revealed that three forms of carbon are produced by the disproportionation of CO.

Orita, H.; Naito, S.; Tamaru, K.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Chirality in odd-A Rh isotopes within the triaxial particle rotor model  

SciTech Connect

By adopting the fully quantal triaxial particle-rotor model, the candidate chiral doublet bands in odd-A nuclei {sup 103}Rh and {sup 105}Rh with {pi}g{sub 9/2}{sup -1} x {nu}h{sub 11/2}{sup 2} configuration are studied. For the doublet bands in both nuclei, agreement is excellent for the observed energies over the entire spin range and B(M1)/B(E2) at higher spin range. The evolution of the chiral geometry with angular momentum is discussed in detail by using the angular momentum components and their probability distributions. Chirality is found to change from chiral vibration to nearly static chirality at spin I=37/2 and back to another type of chiral vibration at higher spin. The influence of the triaxial deformation {gamma} is also studied.

Qi, B.; Wang, S. Y. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Zhang, S. Q. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Koike, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

Senesac, Larry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL] [ORNL; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Adequacy of a Small Quantity Site RH-TRU Waste Program in Meeting Proposed WIPP Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The first remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste is expected to be permanently disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. The first RH-TRU waste shipments are scheduled from the Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) to WIPP in order to facilitate compliance with BCL Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) milestones. Milestones requiring RH-TRU waste containerization and removal from the site by 2004 in order to meet a 2006 site closure goal, established by Congress in the Defense Facilities Closure Projects account, necessitated the establishment and implementation of a site-specific program to direct the packaging of BCLDP RH-TRU waste prior to the finalization of WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements. The program was designed to collect waste data, including audio and videotape records of waste packaging, such that upon completion of waste packaging, comprehensive data records exist from which compliance with final WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization requirements can be demonstrated. With the BCLDP data records generated to date and the development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) of preliminary documents proposing the WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization program, it is possible to evaluate the adequacy of the BCLDP program with respect to meeting proposed characterization objectives. The BCLDP characterization program uses primarily acceptable knowledge (AK) and visual examination (VE) during waste packaging to characterize RH-TRU waste. These methods are used to estimate physical waste parameters, including weight percentages of metals, cellulosics, plastics, and rubber in the waste, and to determine the absence of prohibited items, including free liquids. AK combined with computer modeling is used to estimate radiological waste parameters, including total activity on a waste container basis, for the majority of BCLDP RH-TRU waste. AK combined with direct analysis is used to characterize radiological parameters for the small populations of the RH-TRU waste generated by the BCLDP. All characterization based on AK is verified. Per its design for comprehensive waste data collection, the BCLDP characterization program using AK and waste packaging procedures, including VE during packaging, meets the proposed WIPP RH-TRU waste characterization objectives. The conservative program design implemented generates certification data that will be adequate to meet any additional program requirements that may be imposed by the CBFO.

Biedscheid, J.; Stahl, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Peters, K.; Eide, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

Colloidally Synthesized Monodisperse Rh Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Size- and Pretreatment-Dependent Studies of CO Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

A particle size dependence for CO oxidation over rhodium nanoparticles of 1.9-11.3 nm has been investigated and determined to be modified by the existence of the capping agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). The particles were prepared using a polyol reduction procedure with PVP as the capping agent. The Rh nanoparticles were subsequently supported on SBA-15 during hydrothermal synthesis to produce Rh/SBA-15 supported catalysts for size-dependent catalytic studies. CO oxidation by O{sub 2} at 40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2} was investigated over two series of Rh/SBA-15 catalysts: as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15 covering the full range of Rh sizes and the same set of catalysts after high temperature calcination and reduction. The turnover frequency at 443 K increases from 0.4 to 1.7 s{sup -1} as the particle size decreases from 11.3 to 1.9 nm for the as-synthesized catalysts. After calcination and reduction, the turnover frequency is between 0.1 and 0.4 s{sup -1} with no particle size dependence. The apparent activation energy for all catalysts is {approx}30 kcal mol{sup -1} and is independent of particle size and thermal treatment. Infrared spectroscopy of CO on the Rh nanoparticles indicates that the heat treatments used influence the mode of CO adsorption. As a result, the particle size dependence for CO oxidation is altered after calcination and reduction of the catalysts. CO adsorbs at two distinct bridge sites on as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15, attributable to metallic Rh(0) and oxidized Rh(I) bridge sites. After calcination and reduction, however, CO adsorbs only at Rh(0) atop sites. The change in adsorption geometry and oxidation activity may be attributable to the interaction between PVP and the Rh surface. This capping agent affect may open new possibilities for the tailoring of metal catalysts using solution nanoparticle synthesis methods.

Grass, Michael E.; Joo, Sang Hoon; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

Metal foam-supported PdRh catalyst for steam methane reforming and its application to SOFC fuel processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract PdRh/metal foam catalyst was studied for steam methane reforming and application to SOFC fuel processing. Performance of 0.068wt% PdRh/metal foam catalyst was compared with 13wt% Ni/Al2O3 and 8wt% Ru/Al2O3 catalysts in a tubular reactor. At 1023K with GHSV 2000h?1 and S/C ratio 2.5, CH4 conversion and H2 yield were 96.7% and 3.16molper mole of CH4 input for PdRh/metal foam, better than the alumina-supported catalysts. In 200h stability test, PdRh/metal foam catalyst exhibited steady activity. PdRh/metal foam catalyst performed efficiently in a heat exchanger platform reactor to be used as prototype SOFC fuel processor: at 983K with GHSV 1200h?1 and S/C ratio 2.5, CH4 conversion was nearly the same as that in the tubular reactor, except for more H2 and CO2 yields. Used PdRh/metal foam catalyst was characterized by SEM, TEM, BET and CO chemisorption measurements, which provided evidence for thermal stability of the catalyst.

Partho Sarothi Roy; No-Kuk Park; Kiseok Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

GRR/Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process GRR/Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-MT-a - State Exploration Process 04MTAStateExplorationProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation Regulations & Policies ARM 17.20.202: Geothermal Exploration Plan ARM 17.20.203: Initial Field Report ARM 17.20.204: Periodic Field Report ARM 17.20.205: Final Field Report ARM 17.20.206: Geological Report MCA 82-1-103: Notice of Intent MCA 82-1-104: Bond MCA 82-1-105: Permit Issuance MCA 82-1-106: NOI Forwarded MCA 82-1-107: Notice to Surface Owner MCA 82-1-108: Record of Work Performed Triggers

162

GRR/Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process GRR/Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-b - MPDES Permitting Process 14MTBMPDESPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-402: Duties of MDEQ MCA 75-5-403: Denial, Modification, Review 75-5-611: Violation, Hearing Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTBMPDESPermittingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

163

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used to map fracture and fluid flow patterns. References K. Richards, A. Revil, A. Jardani, F. Henderson, M. Batzle, A. Haas (2010) Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,

164

GRR/Section 14-MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-e - Groundwater Pollution Control System 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Water Quality Act (Montana Codes Annotated 75-5-101 et seq.) Administrative Rules of Montana 17.30.1001 et seq. Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf 14MTEGroundwaterPollutionControlSystemPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

165

GRR/Section 20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process 20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20-MT-a - Well Abandonment Process 20MTAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Rule 36.21.671 - Abandonment of Flowing Wells Rule 36.21.810 - Abandonment Rule Chapter 36.21 Board of Water Well Contractors Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20MTAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana requires the employment of particular engineering standards when

166

Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Rainier Area Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Rainier Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples collected during field investigations in 1982-1985 (Frank, 1985), whereas

167

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 87-5-501 et seq Montana Stream Protection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana has a policy to preserve fish and wildlife habitat as well as

168

GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit GRR/Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-MT-b - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated Title 75, Chapter 10, Part 4 Administrative Rules of Montana Title 17, Chapter 53 40 CFR 260 through 40 CFR 270 40 CFR 124 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf 18MTBHazardousWasteFacilityPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

169

GRR/Section 8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process 8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 8-MT-a - Transmission Siting Process 08MTATransmission (3).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated Title 75, Chapter 20 Montana Environmental Policy Act MCA 75-20-301 Findings Necessary for Certification ARM 17.20.1606 Electric Transmission Lines, Need Standard ARM 17.20.907 ARM 17.20.920 ARM 17.20.921 ARM 17.20.923 ARM 17.20.1902 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 08MTATransmission (3).pdf 08MTATransmission (3).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

170

GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit GRR/Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-MT-a - Air Quality Permit 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-2 Administrative Rules of Montana 17.8 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf 15MTAAirQualityPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requires a Montana Air Permit to construct and operate a new or modified source of air

171

GRR/Section 3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease 3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-a - State Geothermal Resource Lease 03MTAStateGeothermalResourceLease.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Rule 36.25.404 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTAStateGeothermalResourceLease.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart is intended to document the process behind the geothermal resource lease in Montana. The procedure is outlined in Rule 36.25.404.

172

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-MT-a - Drilling and Well Development 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies MCA 37-43-104: Monitoring Wells MCA 37-43-302: License Requirements MCA 37-43-306: Bonding Requirements Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

173

RECIPIENT:MT DEQ u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT DEQ MT DEQ u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlVIINATION PROJECT TITLE: Montana FormauJ SEP Page 1 of2 STATE: MT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA000643 NT43199 GF0-Q043199-OO1 Based on my review ofthe inrormation concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation

174

GRR/Section 6-MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-b - Construction Storm Water Permit 06MTBConstructionStormWaterPermit (7).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-5 [ARM 17.30.1101] Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTBConstructionStormWaterPermit (7).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana regulates water quality under Montana Code Annotated 75-5. The

175

GRR/Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations GRR/Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-MT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations 12MTAFloraFaunaConsiderations (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies Commercial Use Administrative Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12MTAFloraFaunaConsiderations (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart and the following content outlines the flora and fauna considerations that are specific to Montana and in addition to federal

176

GRR/Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit GRR/Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-a - Montana Overdimensional or Overweight Load Permit 06MTAMontanaOverdimensionalOrOverweightLoadPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 61-10-101 et seq. Administrative Rules of Monatana 18.8 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTAMontanaOverdimensionalOrOverweightLoadPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

177

Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Controlled_Source_Audio_MT_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598122"

178

GRR/Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit GRR/Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-e - Encroachment Permit 03MTEEncroachmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Transportation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTEEncroachmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart is intended to address the permitting requirements for encroachments on Montana Department of Transportation lands.

179

GRR/Section 18-MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-MT-a - Underground Storage Tanks 18MTAUndergroundStorageTanks (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Montana Code Annotated 75-11-501 Administrative Rules of Montana 17-56 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18MTAUndergroundStorageTanks (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A developer must obtain an Underground Storage Tank Installation Permit

180

GRR/Section 14-MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14MTANonpointSourcePollution (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Watershed Coordination Council United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTANonpointSourcePollution (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution is the state's single largest source of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14MTD401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Federal Clean Water Act (33 USC § 1251 et seq.) Montana Codes Annotated 75-5-401 Aministrative Rules of Montana Chapter 30 Administrative Rules of Montana 17.30.101 through 109 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTD401WaterQualityCertification (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

182

Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Fraser Goff (1995) Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Mt_St_Helens_Area_(Shevenell_%26_Goff,_1995)&oldid=389549" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

183

Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Water Sampling At Mt Rainier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Rainier Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples collected during field investigations in 1982-1985 (Frank, 1985), whereas

184

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-318 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

185

GRR/Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview GRR/Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-d - Other Overview 06MTDOtherOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTDOtherOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This overview is intended to direct the developer to additional construction permits. For projects intended near waterways, Montana also provides a joint

186

GRR/Section 3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities 3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-f - Right-of-Way Easement for Utilities 03MTFRightOfWayEasementForUtilitiesProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana State Historic Preservation Office Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTFRightOfWayEasementForUtilitiesProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart is intended to describe the process for obtaining an

187

New Cryogenic Apparatus for FT-IR Spectroscopic Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, being an effective technique in improving the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, is utilized in our group....

Kang, Ning; Xu, Yizhuang; Ferraro, J R; Li, Weihong; Weng, Shifu; Xu, Duanfu; Wu, Jinguang; Soloway, R D; Xu, Guangxian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

High-Field Magnetoresistance of IrO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The monotonic and oscillatory magnetoresistance of IrO2 is reported and found to be consistent with the Fermi-surface model proposed by Graebner.

W. D. Ryden; W. A. Reed; E. S. Greiner

1972-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Experiment operations plan for the MT-4 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for MT-4 - the fourth materials deformation experiment conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. A major objective of MT-4 was to simulate a pressurized water reactor LOCA that could induce fuel rod cladding deformation and rupture due to a short-term adiabatic transient and a peak fuel cladding temperature of 1200K (1700/sup 0/F).

Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Synthesis, structure and properties of Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} has been synthesized at 1000 deg. C from a stoichiometric mix of rhodium and boron and an excess of lithium. Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbam (no. 55, Z=2) with room temperature lattice constants a=5.7712(1) A, b=9.4377(2) A, c=2.8301(1) A and cell volume 154.149(6) A{sup 3}. The structure was solved from single crystal X-ray diffraction yielding the final R indices (all data) R1=2.8% and wR2=4.7%. The structure is a distortion of the CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} structure type, containing a network of Rh{sub 6}B trigonal prisms and short Li-Li contacts of 2.28(2) A. Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} is a diamagnetic metal with a room temperature resistivity of 19 {mu}{omega} cm, as determined by magnetic susceptibility and single crystal transport measurements. The measured diamagnetism and electronic structure calculations show that Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} contains rhodium in a d {sup 10} configuration. - Graphical abstract: Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2}, a diamagnetic metal, has been synthesized from a lithium flux. It adopts a distortion of the CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} structure type and is closely related to the 3 K superconductor, LaRh{sub 3}B{sub 2}. Pairs of lithium ions (white) fill the channels formed by rhodium-boron trigonal prisms (gray)

Bailey, Mark S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: mbailey@anl.gov; Lobkovsky, Emil B. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hinks, David G. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Claus, Helmut [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hor, Yew San [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Schlueter, John A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mitchell, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: mitchell@anl.gov

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste - General Presentation Modular Hot Cell Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Murray Paul Murray Oak Ridge, TN July 29, 2009 Retrieval and Repackaging of RH-TRU Waste- GENERAL PRESENTATION MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AREVA Worldwide Nuclear Lifecycle Transmission & Distribution Renewable Energy AREVA US Nuclear Fuel Services Nuclear Engineering Services AREVA Federal Services, LLC. (AFS) Federal Services Major Projects * MOX-MFFF * Yucca Mountain Project * DUF6 * Plateau Remediation Contract * Washington River Closure Project * SRS Liquid Waste AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES - OAK RIDGE, TN - GENERAL PRESENTATION OF MODULAR HOT CELL TECHNOLOGY - July 29, 2009 ADAPTING AREVA'S TECHNOLOGY AFS Technology Provider

192

Lifetime measurement of candidate chiral doublet bands in the Rh103,104 isotopes with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method in inverse kinematics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lifetimes of chiral candidate structures in Rh103,104 were measured using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The Gammasphere detector array was used in conjunction with the Cologne plunger device. Excited states of Rh103,104 were populated by the 11B(96Zr,4n)103Rh and 11B(96Zr,3n)104Rh fusion-evaporation reactions in inverse kinematics. Three and five lifetimes of levels belonging to the proposed chiral doublet bands are measured in Rh103 and Rh104, respectively. The previously observed even-odd spin dependence of the B(M1)/B(E2) values is caused by the variation in the B(E2) values, whereas the B(M1) values decrease as a function of spin.

T. Suzuki; G. Rainovski; T. Koike; T. Ahn; M. P. Carpenter; A. Costin; M. Danchev; A. Dewald; R. V. F. Janssens; P. Joshi; C. J. Lister; O. Mller; N. Pietralla; T. Shinozuka; J. Timr; R. Wadsworth; C. Vaman; S. Zhu

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

193

Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1 ,, Alpha T. N'Diaye1 §, Martin Engler1 , Carsten Busse a renewed interest as a route towards high quality graphene prepared in a reproducible manner. Here we employ two growth methods for graphene on Ir(111), namely room temperature adsorption and thermal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir(V), Ir(VI), or Ir(VII)?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Which Oxidation State Leads to O-O Bond Formation in Cp*Ir(bpy)Cl-Catalyzed Water Oxidation, Ir: Density functional calculations are used to revisit the reaction mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed oxidation at higher oxidation state even though it can also promote O-O bond formation. Therefore, [(bpy

Liao, Rongzhen

195

IR Vibration-Rotation Spectra of the Ammonia Molecule  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The IR spectrum of the ammonia inversion vibration-rotation normal mode is obtained using Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy and analyzed using Maple, to easily obatin the relation between the N-H bond length and the H-N-H bond angle. As expected, the ...

Carl W. David

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Conflicting patterns of nucleotide diversity between mtDNA and nDNA in the Moorish gecko, Tarentola mauritanica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNA) for 154 specimens, and a total of 1876 bp from three nuclear genes (ACM4, MC1R and Rag2) for 51 specimens- pean clade presents a higher nucleotide diversity for the nuclear genes when compared to the combined mtDNA dataset. These analyses suggest that the low mtDNA variability that characterises the European

Carranza, Salvador

197

Sequence and annotation of the 314-kb MT325 and the 321-kb FR483 viruses that infect Chlorella Pbi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sequence and annotation of the 314-kb MT325 and the 321-kb FR483 viruses that infect Chlorella Pbi of the family Phycodnaviridae, genus Chlorovirus, infect the fresh water, unicellular, eukaryotic, chlorella-like green alga, Chlorella Pbi. The 314,335-bp genome of MT325 and the 321,240-bp genome of FR483

Graves, Michael V.

198

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE 1 Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from Road Surface, validation of a contact model for the prediction of low-speed friction from road surface microtexture the friction ­ speed curve from road- and tire measurable parameters. The model development is briefly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Going Beyond AER: An Extensive Analysis of Word Alignments and Their Impact on MT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Going Beyond AER: An Extensive Analysis of Word Alignments and Their Impact on MT Necip Fazil Ayan (AER)--attempts to balance the precision and recall scores at the level of alignment links (Och and Ney et al., 2002) or METEOR (Banerjee and Lavie, 2005)). However, these studies showed that AER and BLEU

Ayan, Necip Fazil

200

Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...20] Figure 2. For the US standard atmosphere...U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science...windows. J. Direct. Energy 2, 151-161. 42 Fulghum...radiative cooling and energy balance. Here, we describe the development and status of the MT_CKD (MlawerTobinCloughKneizysDavies...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Abrupt contraction flow of magnetorheological fluids , M.T. Lpez-Lpez1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering interest, the MR fluids are very attractive from a purely scientific point of view. The coupling1 Abrupt contraction flow of magnetorheological fluids P. Kuzhir1 , M.T. López-López1,2 and G Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain Abstract Contraction and expansion flows of magnetorheological fluids occur

Boyer, Edmond

202

Interim Storage of RH-TRU 72B Canisters at the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an evaluation performed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) office for potential interim storage of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) 72B waste canisters at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The evaluation included the conceptual design of a devoted canister storage facility and an assessment of the existing RHTRU waste storage facilities for storage of canisters. The concept for the devoted facility used modular concrete silos located on an above-grade storage pad. The assessment of the existing facilities considered the potential methods, facility modifications, and conceptual equipment that might be used for storage of 400 millisievert per hour (mSv/hr) canisters. The results of the evaluation indicated that the initial investment into a devoted facility was relatively high as compared to the certainty that significant storage capacity was necessary prior to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) accepting RH-TRU waste for disposal. As an alternative, the use of individual concrete overpacks provided an incremental method that could be used with the existing storage facilities and outside storage pads. For the concrete overpack concepts considered, the cylindrical design stored in a vertical orientation was determined to be the most effective.

Forrester, T. W.; Hunt, R. A.; Riner, G. L.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

203

The structure and reactivity of adsorbates on stepped Rh and Pt surfaces investigated by LEED, HREELS, TPD, XPS and STM  

SciTech Connect

Defects on surfaces such as steps play an important role in surface chemistry. In order to obtain an understanding of the influence of steps in surface chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of small molecules (O{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}S, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) on atomically stepped surfaces of RH and Pt have been investigated. The detailed structures of CO and oxygen bonded to the Rh(110) surface were determined. The CO molecules bond near the short bridge sites with the CO molecular axis tilted approximately 24{degree} from the surface normal. Oxygen atoms are bound asymmetrically in the 3-fold fcc hollow-sites to the (111) facets of the steps. The interactions of CO and oxygen on the Rh(311) surface were examined. The reaction of CO with the ordered phases of O shows two distinct reaction channels, a low temperature reaction limited channel (200 K) and a high temperature diffusion limited channel (350 K). Models of the reaction geometry and dynamics are proposed. The thermal decomposition of ethylene was examined on the Rh(311) surface. The stable decomposition species (C{sub 2}H, CH and C{sub 2}) are formed near 300 K, approximately 100 K lower on the stepped Rh(311) than on the flatter Rh(111) surface. The formation of these species at lower temperatures is attributed to the stepped nature of the surface. Finally, in situ STM was used to examine surface structural changes of a stepped Pt(111) crystal under coadsorption of sulfur and CO. This is the first direct evidence for a new mechanism by which a surface covered with an unreactive, strongly chemisorbed overlayer can form new sites, for bonding and reactions to occur, by massive surface restructuring at the step edges. This new surface phenomenon answers some of the puzzles of metal surface catalysis and its implications are described. 278 refs.

Batteas, J.D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Science Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Immunohistochemical localization of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) in the brain and infundibulum of the sheep, cow and horse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to hypophysial portal and systemic blood and the release of LH. Endocrinol. 95:18. Bugnon, C. , B. Bloch, . D. Lenys and D. Fellmann. 1977. Ultrastructural study of the LH-RH containing neurons in the human fetus. Brain Res. 137:175. Dreifuss, J. J. , J. T... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction IMMUNOHISTOCKEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF GONADOTROPIN RELEASING HORMONE (GnRH) IN THE BRAIN AND INFUNDIBULUM OF THE SHEEP, COW AND HORSE...

Dees, William Leslie

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Association of intracellular calcium oscillations with release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from GT1-1 neuronal cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GnRH is released from its nerve terminals via a calcium (Ca?)-dependent mechanism. Oscillation in the intercellular Ca? [Ca?][] concentration may encode signals that result in the release of GnRH. The objective of this study was to investigate...

Gilmore, Chrystal Dawn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Peer Reviewed Publications 7 October 2011 41 Chilson, PB, WF Frick, JF Kelly, KW Howard, RP Larkin, RH Diehl, JK Westbrook, TA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peer Reviewed Publications 7 October 2011 41 Chilson, PB, WF Frick, JF Kelly, KW Howard, RP Larkin, RH Diehl, JK Westbrook, TA Kelly, TH Kunz. In Press. Partly cloudy with a chance of migration, MS Bowlin, PB Chilson, RH Diehl, RW Fléron, P Hartl, R Kays, JF Kelly, WD Robinson, M Wikelski. 2011

Kelly, Jeff

207

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has submitted a planned change request to use shielded containers for emplacement of selected remote-handled (RH) transuranic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the use of shielded canisters for these waste streams has an insignificant impact on long-term performance the disruptions from in-the-wall emplacement of RH TRU waste canisters while providing additional storage shielded containers for emplacement of selected remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste streams

208

Ambient-Pressure Bulk Superconductivity Deep in the Magnetic State of CeRhIn5  

SciTech Connect

Specific heat, magnetic susceptibility and electrical transport measurements were performed at ambient pressure on high-quality single crystal specimens of CeRhIn5 down to ultra-low temperatures. We report signatures of an anomaly observed in all measured quantities consistent with a bulk phase transition to a superconducting state at T{sub c}=110 mK. Occurring far below the onset of antiferromagnetism at T{sub N}=3.8 K, this transition appears to involve a significant portion of the available low-temperature density of electronic states, exhibiting an entropy change in line with that found in other members of the 115 family of superconductors tuned away from quantum criticality.

Paglione,J.; Ho, P.; Maple, M.; Tanatar, M.; Taillefer, L.; Lee, Y.; Petrovic, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Application of IR Spectroscopy to the Investigation of Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, the application of IR spectroscopy in mineralogy is reduced to the determination of wavelengths or frequencies of discrete absorption maxima. These values are brought in correspondence with normal ...

Nikita V. Chukanov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

DWEA Webinar: IRS Guidance for Small Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued Notice 2015-4 providing new performance and quality standards of small wind turbines defined as having a nameplate capacity of up to 100 kW in...

211

Gas Analysis with IR-Diode Laser Spectrometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An IR laser diode spectrometer of modular design with micro-processor control is presented. ... It consists of laser source (vibration decoupled refrigerator with temperature control unit and laser power...

Gerhard Schmidtke; Wolfgang Julius Riedel

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gas analysis with IR-diode laser spectrometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An IR laser diode spectrometer of modular design with micro-processor control is presented. ... It consists of laser source (vibration decoupled refrigerator with temperature control unit and laser power...

Gerhard Schmidtke; Wolfgang Julius Riedel

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

IR Spectra of Dense Xenon and Argon Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results are presented of experimental studies of IR radiation spectra of dense Xe and Ar shock compressed plasmas. The radiation cutoff is found at the wavelength ??1?mThe experimental data are interpreted...

V. E. Fortov; M. U. Kulish; V. B. Mintsev; J. Ortner

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

US-LHC IR magnet error analysis and compensation  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the impact of the insertion-region (IR) magnet field errors on LHC collision performance. Compensation schemes including magnet orientation optimization, body-end compensation, tuning shims, and local nonlinear correction are shown to be highly effective.

Wei, J.; Ptitsin, V.; Pilat, F.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gelfand, N.; Wan, W.; Holt, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

US-LHC IR MAGNET ERROR ANALYSIS AND COMPENSATION.  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the impact of the insertion-region (IR) magnet field errors on LHC collision performance. Compensation schemes including magnet orientation optimization, body-end compensation, tuning shims, and local nonlinear correction are shown to be highly effective.

WEI, J.

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To promote economic growth in tribal communities, Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published new guidance on July 18, 2012, allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs). The TEDB program was established under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, and provides Tribes with the authority to issue tax-exempt debt for a wider range of activities to spur job creation and promote economic growth in Indian country. Providing Tribes with the ability to issue tax-exempt debt for a broader scope of activities similar to that available to states and local governments lowers

217

GRR/Section 3-MT-b - State Land Access | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - State Land Access b - State Land Access < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-b - State Land Access 03MTBStateLandAccess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana State Land Board Regulations & Policies Montana Code 77-4-101 et seq Geothermal Resources Natural Resources and Conservation Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTBStateLandAccess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 3-MT-b.1 - Application for Lease, Right-of-Way, or Easement

218

GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-MT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14MTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

219

GRR/Section 11-MT-a - State Cultural Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 11-MT-a - State Cultural Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-MT-a - State Cultural Considerations 11MTAStateCulturalConsiderations (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana State Historic Preservation Office Regulations & Policies MCA 22-3-421: Report of Discovery on State Land MCA 22-3-800: Human Skeletal Remains and Burial Site Protection Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

220

GRR/Section 3-MT-c - Encroachment Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 3-MT-c - Encroachment Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-c - Encroachment Overview 03MTCEncroachmentOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTCEncroachmentOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative There are several individual right of way or encroachment procedures in Montana. This overview is intended to lead the developer to the appropriate

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221

GRR/Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act 09MTAMontanaEnvironmentalPolicyAct.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Environmental Quality Council Regulations & Policies Montana Environmental Policy Act National Environmental Policy Act ARM 36-2-521 et seq ARM 17-4-607 General Requirements for MFWP Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 09MTAMontanaEnvironmentalPolicyAct.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

222

Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towle, 1983) Towle, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The VLF method has proved useful in mapping the crater and central dome of Mount St. Helens. More detailed and extensive VLF investigations as well as other electrical and electromagnetic studies will be useful in determining the electrical structure of Mount St. Helens in more detail. Electrical and electromagnetic methods would be especially useful in determining the actual electrical conductivity of partial melt beneath the dome. The ability of these methods to determine the correlation of surface features

223

GRR/Section 11-MT-b - Human Remains Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Human Remains Process b - Human Remains Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-MT-b - Human Remains Process 11MTBHumanRemainsProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana State Historic Preservation Office Regulations & Policies MCA 22-3-805: Discovery of Human Remains or Burial Material Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11MTBHumanRemainsProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 11-MT-b.1 - Cease Operations and Contact County Coroner MCA 22-3-805: (1) A [developer] who by...construction, or other ground-disturbing

224

GRR/Section 17-MT-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 17-MT-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment 17MTAAestheticResourceAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-7-101 et seq The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 MCA 87-5-501 et seq Montana Stream Protection

225

Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic Sykes, M.T., I.C. Prentice, and W. Cramer. 1996. A bioclimatic model for the potential distributions of north European tree species under present and future climates. Journal of Biogeography 23(2):203- 233. A bioclimatic model based on physiological constraints to plant growth and regeneration is used here in an empirical way to describe the present natural distributions of northern Europe's major trees. Bioclimatic variables were computed from monthly means of temperature, precipitation and sunshine (%) interpolated to a 10' grid taking into account elevation. Minimum values of mean coldest-month temperature (T-c) and 'effective' growing degree days (GDD*) were fitted to species' range limits. GDD* is total annual growing degree days (GDD) minus GDD to budburst (GDD(o)). Each species was assigned to one of the

226

Hydrochemical features of a geothermal test well iin a volcanic caldera, MT. Pinatubo, Phillipines  

SciTech Connect

Mt. Pinatubo is one of several recent-age volcanoes along the west Luzon volcanic arc. A fumarole near the suminit emits gases with magmatic characteristics. Several thermal springs on the east and west flanks yield various fluid typos, including neutral chloride and bicarbonate. Three wellbores probed the Mt. Pinatubo caldera from elevations of +1230 through -1600 mRSL. Trajectories may be described as: central, crossing a boundary wall from the inside, and skirting a wall [probably] on the inside. Brine discharges indicate severe evapo-concentration effects accompanied by other phenomena. Severity of evapo-concentration indicates low fluid mobility near the wellbores. Large variations for ratios of component concentrations were observed, indicating negligible natural circulation (mixing). Implications about fluid movements and heat transfer processes are explored. Three components of steam can be quantified and all are significant: separate entry, adiabatic boiling, and boiling by rock heat.

Michels, D.E.; Clemente, V.C.; Ramos, M.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

RH-TRU Waste Shipments from Battelle Columbus Laboratories to the Hanford Nuclear Facility for Interim Storage  

SciTech Connect

Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds by 2006, as directed by Congress. Most of the resulting waste (approximately 27 cubic meters [m3]) is remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The BCL, under a contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Ohio Field Office, has initiated a plan to ship the TRU waste to the DOE Hanford Nuclear Facility (Hanford) for interim storage pending the authorization of WIPP for the permanent disposal of RH-TRU waste. The first of the BCL RH-TRU waste shipments was successfully completed on December 18, 2002. This BCL shipment of one fully loaded 10-160B Cask was the first shipment of RH-TRU waste in several years. Its successful completion required a complex effort entailing coordination between different contractors and federal agencies to establish necessary supporting agreements. This paper discusses the agreements and funding mechanisms used in support of the BCL shipments of TRU waste to Hanford for interim storage. In addition, this paper presents a summary of the efforts completed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the 10-160B Cask system. Lessons learned during this process are discussed and may be applicable to other TRU waste site shipment plans.

Eide, J.; Baillieul, T. A.; Biedscheid, J.; Forrester, T,; McMillan, B.; Shrader, T.; Richterich, L.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ternary PtSnRhSnO2 nanoclusters: synthesis and electroactivity for ethanol oxidation fuel cell reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ternary PtSnRh­SnO2 nanoclusters: synthesis and electroactivity for ethanol oxidation fuel cell a superior long-term activity and stability towards ethanol oxidation than the commercial Pt catalyst. Our. Ethanol becomes an attractive fuel in the fuel cell reactions compared with methanol and hydrogen, because

Frenkel, Anatoly

229

Applied reaction dynamics: Efficient synthesis gas production via single collision partial oxidation of methane to CO on Rh,,111...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the incident beam's translational energy, and approaches unity for energies greater than 1.3 eV. Comparison for methanol synthesis. One method is the direct partial oxidation of methane, CH4 + 1/2 O2 CO + 2H2. 1 This process has been extensively studied using high surface area supported Rh catalysts in flow reactors

Sibener, Steven

230

GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues 19MTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies MCA Title 85 Water Use MCA 77-4-108 Water Rights in Connection with Geothermal Development MCA 85-2-307 MCA 85-2-308 MCA 85-2-309 MCA 85-2-310 MCA 85-2-311 MCA 85-2-313 MCA 85-2-315 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19MTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

231

Sequence Stratigraphy and Detrital Zircon Geochronology of Middle-Late Ordovician Mt. Wilson Quartzite, British Columbia, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................... viii LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................... ix 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 1 1.1... ............................................................................................................ 9 3.1 Mt. Wilson Measured Sections ............................................................ 9 3.1.1 Wilcox Pass Measured Section ................................................... 9 3.1.2 Morberley Mountain Measured Section...

Hutto, Andrew Paul

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around {sup 192}Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate {sup 192}Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate ({approx}0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a {sup 192}Ir wire source.

Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 55, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Efficacy of rhBMP-2 loaded PCL/PLGA/?-TCP guided bone regeneration membrane fabricated by 3D printing technology for reconstruction of calvaria defects in rabbit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We successfully fabricated a three-dimensional (3D) printing-based PCL/PLGA/?-TCP guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane that slowly released rhBMP-2. To impregnate the GBR membrane with intact rhBMP-2, collagen solution encapsulating rhBMP-2 (5?g?ml?1) was infused into pores of a PCL/PLGA/?-TCP membrane constructed using a 3D printing system with four dispensing heads. In a release profile test, sustained release of rhBMP-2 was observed for up to 28?d. To investigate the efficacy of the GBR membrane on bone regeneration, PCL/PLGA/?-TCP membranes with or without rhBMP-2 were implanted in an 8?mm calvaria defect of rabbits. Bone formation was evaluated at weeks 4 and 8 histologically and histomorphometrically. A space making ability of the GBR membrane was successfully maintained in both groups, and significantly more new bone was formed at post-implantation weeks 4 and 8 by rhBMP-2 loaded GBR membranes. Interestingly, implantation with rhBMP-2 loaded GBR membranes led to almost entire healing of calvaria defects within 8?weeks.

Jin-Hyung Shim; Min-Chul Yoon; Chang-Mo Jeong; Jinah Jang; Sung-In Jeong; Dong-Woo Cho; Jung-Bo Huh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study 2010.12.06 - 2010.12.13 Lead Scientist : Kyle Leesman For data sets, see below. Description During December 2010, a prototype LWIR cloud camera system was deployed at the Southern Great Plains Guest Instrument Facility (SGP-GIF). The system consisted of a microbolometer camera (~7-15 ìm) to capture sky imagery, a blackbody calibration source, and a GPS receiver used to estimate atmospheric column water vapor and constrain atmospheric compensation. The camera system collected calibrated sky radiance images co-incident with the SGP Central Facility with the goal of quantitatively assessing its ability

235

Ternary Pt/Rh/SnO2 Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to CO2  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol, with its high energy density, likely production from renewable sources and ease of storage and transportation, is almost the ideal combustible for fuel cells wherein its chemical energy can be converted directly into electrical energy. However, commercialization of direct ethanol fuel cells has been impeded by ethanol's slow, inefficient oxidation even at the best electrocatalysts. We synthesized a ternary PtRhSnO{sub 2}/C electrocatalyst by depositing platinum and rhodium atoms on carbon-supported tin dioxide nanoparticles that is capable of oxidizing ethanol with high efficiency and holds great promise for resolving the impediments to developing practical direct ethanol fuel cells. This electrocatalyst effectively splits the C-C bond in ethanol at room temperature in acid solutions, facilitating its oxidation at low potentials to CO{sub 2}, which has not been achieved with existing catalysts. Our experiments and density functional theory calculations indicate that the electrocatalyst's activity is due to the specific property of each of its constituents, induced by their interactions. These findings help explain the high activity of Pt-Ru for methanol oxidation and the lack of it for ethanol oxidation, and point to the way to accomplishing the C-C bond splitting in other catalytic processes.

Adzic, R.R.; Kowal, A.; Li, M.; Shao, M.; Sasaki, K.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhang, J.; Marinkovic, N.S. Liu, P.; Frenkel, A.I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ternary Pt/Rh/SnO2 Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to CO2  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol, with its high energy density, likely production from renewable sources and ease of storage and transportation, is almost the ideal combustible for fuel cells wherein its chemical energy can be converted directly into electrical energy. However, commercialization of direct ethanol fuel cells has been impeded by ethanol's slow, inefficient oxidation even at the best electrocatalysts1, 2. We synthesized a ternary PtRhSnO2/C electrocatalyst by depositing platinum and rhodium atoms on carbon-supported tin dioxide nanoparticles that is capable of oxidizing ethanol with high efficiency and holds great promise for resolving the impediments to developing practical direct ethanol fuel cells. This electrocatalyst effectively splits the C-C bond in ethanol at room temperature in acid solutions, facilitating its oxidation at low potentials to CO2, which has not been achieved with existing catalysts. Our experiments and density functional theory calculations indicate that the electrocatalyst's activity is due to the specific property of each of its constituents, induced by their interactions. These findings help explain the high activity of Pt-Ru for methanol oxidation and the lack of it for ethanol oxidation, and point to the way to accomplishing the C-C bond splitting in other catalytic processes.

Kowal, A.; Li, M; Shao, M; Sasaki, K; Vukmirovic, M; Zhang, J; Marinkovic, N; Liu, P; Frenkel, A; Adzic, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Rh i isoelectronic sequence observed from Er[sup 23+] to Pt[sup 33+  

SciTech Connect

The TEXT tokamak was used to obtain spectra of highly ionized Er, Yb, Hf, W, and Pt. Injection of these elements into the plasma was achieved by laser ablation of thin films of metal deposited on glass slides and mounted at the inner wall of the vessel. The spectra were photographed with a 2.2-m grazing-incidence spectrograph set at a grazing angle of 4[degree]. These spectra occur in a very small wavelength interval, for example, [similar to]2 A at 50 A in W. In this spectral range we previously classified lines of the Ag and Pd isoelectronic sequences. We have now classified lines of the Rh isoelectronic sequence 4[ital d][sup 9--4][ital d][sup 84][ital f], which accounts for the remaining strong lines in this dense but well-resolved group. No lines of this array have previously been identified. They were classified by comparison of observed and calculated transition energies along the isoelectronic sequence.

Sugar, J.; Kaufman, V. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)); Rowan, W.L. (Fusion Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature  

SciTech Connect

Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

Yuan, Zhi-Min [Harvard School of Public Health

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

A comparison of LH responses to intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous and intravenous administration of small doses of GnRH in cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to extend special appreciation to my colleagues Curtis J. Dillon and Colleen M. Downey for their cooperation and assistance throughout this endeavor. vi DEDICATION This manuscript is dedicated to my parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rund for their support... demonstrated increased response parameters to GnRH when compared to those that were suckled (Carruthers and Hafs, 1980). The effect of suckling on LH response is believed by many to be linked to prolactin (Prl). However, Prl infusion did not influence...

Rund, Lauretta Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

Smith, R.J.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mid-IR FORCAST/SOFIA Observations of M82  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 75"x75" size maps of M82 at 6.4 micron, 6.6 micron, 7.7 micron, 31.5 micron, and 37.1 micron with a resolution of ~4" that we have obtained with the mid-IR camera FORCAST on SOFIA. We find strong emission from the inner 60" (~1kpc) along the major axis, with the main peak 5" west-southwest of the nucleus and a secondary peak 4" east-northeast of the nucleus. The detailed morphology of the emission differs among the bands, which is likely due to different dust components dominating the continuum emission at short mid-IR wavelengths and long mid-IR wavelengths. We include Spitzer-IRS and Herschel/PACS 70 micron data to fit spectral energy distribution templates at both emission peaks. The best fitting templates have extinctions of A_V = 18 and A_V = 9 toward the main and secondary emission peak and we estimated a color temperature of 68 K at both peaks from the 31 micron and 37 micron measurement. At the emission peaks the estimated dust masses are on the order of 10^{4} M_sun.

Nikola, T; Vacca, W D; Adams, J D; De Buizer, J M; Gull, G E; Henderson, C P; Keller, L D; Morris, M R; Schoenwald, J; Stacey, G; Tielens, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Interference effects in IR photon echo spectroscopy of liquid water  

SciTech Connect

Heterodyne-detected transient grating experiments on the OH-stretch mode of HDO dissolved in D{sub 2}O resolve two distinctly different contributions originating from the initially excited OH stretch and the OD stretch which is thermally activated during the OH population relaxation. It is demonstrated that interference of both contributions greatly affects the outcome of IR photon echo experiments.

Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A. [Ultrafast Laser and Spectroscopy Laboratory, Materials Science Centre, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy T.K. Raab a,*, J.P. Vogel b factors to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, a causative agent of powdery mildew disease. Three genes to pro- liferate when environmental conditions and re- sources are optimum. Cellulose, an abundant

244

WEB QUERY STRUCTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR IR SYSTEM DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WEB QUERY STRUCTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR IR SYSTEM DESIGN Bernard J. Jansen Computer Science Program Military Academy West Point, New York 10996 Please Cite: Jansen, B. J., Spink, A., & Pfaff, A. 2000. Web in the context of the Web (Jansen, Spink, & Saracevic, 2000; Jansen and Pooch (under review), Lawrence & Giles

Jansen, James

245

Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B - A new type of boron stabilized Ti{sub 2}Ni structure  

SciTech Connect

The new magnesium rhodium boron compound Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B has been synthesized by reaction of the metal powders with crystalline or amorphous boron or the RhB precursor. The crystal structure of Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B was solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (space group Fd3-bar m, a=12.1711(4)A, Z=8, 174 reflections, R{sub F}=0.016). The crystal structure can be described as a filled Ti{sub 2}Ni type where the interstitial sites 8b (12,12,12), located at the center of two nested Mg{sub 4}Rh{sub 4} tetrahedra, are occupied by boron atoms. Taking into account the absence of the Ti{sub 2}Ni-type phase in the binary Mg-Rh system, the boron atoms can be considered as stabilizing this structural motif. From the bonding analysis with the electron localization function the crystal structure is described as covalently bonded [Rh{sub 4}B]{sup 3-} anions, embedded in a cationic magnesium matrix.

Alekseeva, A.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany) and Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: alekseev@cpfs.mpg.de; Abakumov, A.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); EMAT, University of Antwerp, Antwerp B-2020 (Belgium); Leithe-Jasper, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Schnelle, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Prots, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Chizhov, P.S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Van Tendeloo, G. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Antwerp B-2020 (Belgium); Antipov, E.V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Structural and functional studies of a phosphatidic acid-binding antifungal plant defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR motif governing fungal cell entry  

SciTech Connect

A highly conserved plant defensin MtDef4 potently inhibits the growth of a filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. MtDef4 is internalized by cells of F. graminearum. To determine its mechanism of fungal cell entry and antifungal action, NMR solution structure of MtDef4 has been determined. The analysis of its structure has revealed a positively charged patch on the surface of the protein consisting of arginine residues in its ?-core signature, a major determinant of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. Here, we report functional analysis of the RGFRRR motif of the ?-core signature of MtDef4. The replacement of RGFRRR to AAAARR or to RGFRAA not only abolishes fungal cell entry but also results in loss of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. MtDef4 binds strongly to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Mutations of RGFRRR which abolish fungal cell entry of MtDef4 also impair its binding to PA. Our results suggest that RGFRRR motif is a translocation signal for entry of MtDef4 into fungal cells and that this positively charged motif likely mediates interaction of this defensin with PA as part of its antifungal action.

Sagaram, Uma S.; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghoottama; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

A COMPARATIVE ASTROCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTELLAR OBJECTS NGC 7538 IRS 9 AND IRS 1  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of a spectroscopic study of the high-mass protostellar object NGC 7538 IRS 9 and compare our observations to published data on the nearby object NGC 7538 IRS 1. Both objects originated in the same molecular cloud and appear to be at different points in their evolutionary histories, offering an unusual opportunity to study the temporal evolution of envelope chemistry in objects sharing a presumably identical starting composition. Observations were made with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, a sensitive, high spectral resolution (R {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx_equal} 100,000) mid-infrared grating spectrometer. Forty-six individual lines in vibrational modes of the molecules C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CO were detected, including two isotopologues ({sup 13}CO, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O) and one combination mode ({nu}{sub 4} + {nu}{sub 5} C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). Fitting synthetic spectra to the data yielded the Doppler shift, excitation temperature, Doppler b parameter, column density, and covering factor for each molecule observed; we also computed column density upper limits for lines and species not detected, such as HNCO and OCS. We find differences among spectra of the two objects likely attributable to their differing radiation and thermal environments. Temperatures and column densities for the two objects are generally consistent, while the larger line widths toward IRS 9 result in less saturated lines than those toward IRS 1. Finally, we compute an upper limit on the size of the continuum-emitting region ({approx}2000 AU) and use this constraint and our spectroscopy results to construct a schematic model of IRS 9.

Barentine, John C.; Lacy, John H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

GRR/Section 17-MT-c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310 c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310 Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310 Permit) 17MTCNaturalStreambedAndLandPreservationAct310Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Local Conservation District Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-7-101 et seq The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTCNaturalStreambedAndLandPreservationAct310Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

249

GRR/Section 17-MT-d - Streamside Management Zone Law | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Streamside Management Zone Law d - Streamside Management Zone Law < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-d - Streamside Management Zone Law 17MTDStreamsideManagementZoneLawProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTDStreamsideManagementZoneLawProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Any landowner or operator conducting a series of commercial forest practices that will access, harvest, or regenerate trees on a defined land

250

GRR/Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use License Process d - Land Use License Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Surface Management Rule 36.25.103 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The land use license is intended to be used for short-term use of state-owned lands. This license may be used for casual use of the lands

251

GRR/Section 11-MT-c - Cultural Resource Discovery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c - Cultural Resource Discovery c - Cultural Resource Discovery < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-MT-c - Cultural Resource Discovery 11MTCCulturalResourceDiscoveryProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana State Historic Preservation Office Regulations & Policies 36 CFR 800.16: NHPA Definitions MCA 22-3-421: Montana Antiquities Definitions MCA 22-3-429: Consultation, Notice, Appeal MCA 22-3-430: Mitigation MCA 22-3-435: Report of Discovery ARM 36.2.801-813: Antiquities Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11MTCCulturalResourceDiscoveryProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

252

Traffic Management Command, ATTN: MT-INFF, 5611 Columbia Pike, Falls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

/ 'Vol 52,-No. 212. !/- Tuesday; November 3, -1987 1 Notices.- . / 'Vol 52,-No. 212. !/- Tuesday; November 3, -1987 1 Notices.- . . and responsibility of that company. This is not intented to prevent a carrier from interchanging equipment to allow for the through movement of traffic. Master- leases which do not meet the requirements of a long-term lease or that depend on other documentation and/or subleases to be complete are viewed as trip-leases. DATE: Comments must be received on or before 1 January 1988. ADDRESS: Comments should be addressed to: Headquarters, Military Traffic Management Command, ATTN: MT-INFF, 5611 Columbia Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041-5050. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Ms. Patricia McCormick, HQMTMC 5611 Columbia Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041- 5050, (202] 756-1887. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Master- leases which do not conform to the

253

MT2 to the Rescue -- Searching for Sleptons in Compressed Spectra at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel method for probing sleptons in compressed spectra at hadron colliders. The process under study is slepton pair production in R-parity conserving supersymmetry, where the slepton decays to a neutralino LSP of mass close to the slepton mass. In order to pass the trigger and obtain large missing energy, an energetic mono-jet is required. Both leptons need to be detected in order to suppress large standard model backgrounds with one charged lepton. We study variables that can be used to distinguish the signal from the remaining major backgrounds, which include tt, WW+jet, Z+jet, and single top production. We find that the dilepton MT2, bound by the mass difference, can be used as an upper bound to efficiently reduce the backgrounds. It is estimated that sleptons with masses up to about 150 GeV can be discovered at the 14 TeV LHC with 100/fb integrated luminosity.

Han, Zhenyu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Calculation ofZ eff from plasma resistivity in IR-T1 tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We estimatedZ eff in the IR-T1 tokamak through anomaly factor. The IR-T1 tokamak is a small air-core transformer tokamak with circular cross section and with out... ...

M. Mahmoodi Darian; M. Ghoranneviss; M. K. Salem

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ir Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE I.: ~ CONTRACT NO. DE-AC04-83AL18796 1. Vicinity Property i: Completion Report i , . Remedial Actions , cContractor 4,. -~'~ ~for the Uranium Mill Tailings ~~~z ~ Remedial Actions Project - MK-FEROUSON COMPANY *C~Ad PEE *CMIWN>tfIOW VICINITY PROPERTY COMPLETION REPORT AT CA-401 MAYERS STREET BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 JUNE 30, 1987 FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT OFFICE ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE, NM BY MK-FERGUSON CC IPANY AND CHEM-NUCLEAR SYSTEMS, INC. MK-Ferguson Company has been granted authorization to perform remedial action under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604. Remedial action was done in accordance to the EPA Standards for

256

The starburst phenomenon from the optical/near-IR perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical/near-IR stellar continuum carries unique information about the stellar population in a galaxy, its mass function and star-formation history. Star-forming regions display rich emission-line spectra from which we can derive the dust and gas distribution, map velocity fields, metallicities and young massive stars and locate shocks and stellar winds. All this information is very useful in the dissection of the starburst phenomenon. We discuss a few of the advantages and limitations of observations in the optical/near-IR region and focus on some results. Special attention is given to the role of interactions and mergers and observations of the relatively dust-free starburst dwarfs. In the future we expect new and refined diagnostic tools to provide us with more detailed information about the IMF, strength and duration of the burst and its triggering mechanisms.

Nils Bergvall; Thomas Marquart; Gran stlin; Erik Zackrisson

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Epitaxial HTS bolometers on silicon for IR detection  

SciTech Connect

Silicon wafers have shown promise for the fabrication of photothermal IR detectors (i.e., bolometers) from epitaxial HTS thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub (7{minus}{delta})} (YBCO). Conventional IC-grade wafers, ultrathin wafers, and micromachined-silicon membrane windows in conventional wafers, are all suitable, but the latter provides considerable advantage for bolometer performance. The high thermal conductivity and strength of silicon make it ideal for submicron-thick window designs. Epitaxy in the HTS film is advantageous, since it reduces granular disorder, the primary cause of dark noise (resistance-fluctuations) in the detector. Mid-to-far-IR transparency of Si at 90 K is unique among those substrates that support high-quality epitaxial YBCO films. This Si transparency to IR can be used for various improvements in the optical design of these devices. The authors review the thermal and optical advantages of silicon substrates, device fabrication issues, and bolometer modeling. Thermal modeling of membrane bolometers indicates that the steady-state temperature-rise profile is nonuniform, but that this does not degrade the response linearity of the bolometer. Certain size limits and trade-offs in the design, will be important in the final device performance. They also discuss applications to FTIR instruments, and extensions of this technology to arrays including a novel on-chip transform spectrometer design.

Fenner, D.B.; Li, Q.; Hamblen, W.D.; Luo, J.; Hamblen, D.G. [AFR, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States). Superconductivity Group; Budnick, J.I. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Understanding the effect of Sm2O3 and CeO2 promoters on the structure and activity of Rh/Al2O3 catalysts in methane steam reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The role of Sm2O3 and CeO2 promoters on the structural properties and catalytic behavior of Rh/xSm2O3yCeO2Al2O3 catalysts during methane steam reforming (MSR) was investigated. Promoted catalysts showed higher reaction rates per surface Rh atom and improved stability compared to Rh/Al2O3. In situ X-ray absorption revealed that the structure of Rh particles in Rh/Al2O3 changes drastically during MSR, while it was stable in the presence of Sm2O3CeO2. Sintering of the active metal phase was the main cause of deactivation. STEM images showed stronger Rh agglomeration of the unpromoted catalyst with time on stream.

R.B. Duarte; M. Nachtegaal; J.M.C. Bueno; J.A. van Bokhoven

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Double Mutant (CA40,82) Barstar Purification pMT643 plasmid in JM109 cells , tac promotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double Mutant (CA40,82) Barstar Purification pMT643 plasmid in JM109 cells , tac promotor last in water to a final concentration of 1mM. With this dilution ratio the cells should start to double

Movileanu, Liviu

260

Fredric W. Pollnac Montana State University, Leon Johnson Hall, Bozeman, MT 59717406-994-5070 fpollnac@montana.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Matt Lavin, and Mark Taper, Weed Science Society of America Annual Meeting poster session, Denver, CO·406-994-5070· fpollnac@montana.edu Education_________________________________________________________________ Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 2008-Present PhD Candidate: Environmental Science and Ecology Montana

Maxwell, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

URF6, last unidentified reading frame of human mtDNA, codes for an NADH dehydrogenase subunit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Unidentified Reading Frame of Human mtDNA, Codes for an NADH Dehy fogenase Subunit ANNE...antiserum to URF6-I1 or from normal serum (NS2), as in the experiments of Fig. 1...49 kD) (31) or from normal serum (NS2). The immunoprecipitates were run in...

A Chomyn; MW Cleeter; CI Ragan; M Riley; RF Doolittle; G Attardi

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

263

II: MOTION in ONE SPACE DIMENSION -Pt IIb 1st year CLASSICAL MECHANICS MT06 PLR from RCED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that this happens for x >> 1/a, then the velocity approaches a limiting value of v0. Why is this ­ no resistance to motion has been included. Indeed what difference would the addition of a resistance term of the form R. To assess the relative importance of the terms one needs the model for M(t) or equivalent data. A linear

Read, Peter L.

264

Mekanisk integration av en IR-detektor i en Stirlingkylare; Mechanical Integration of an IR-detector in a Micro Cooler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The master thesis Mechanical Integration of an IR-detector in a Micro Cooler has been performed at FLIR Systems AB in Danderyd. FLIR Systems is (more)

Gibson, Camilla

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Kinetics of oxygen reduction at IrO{sub 2}-coated titanium electrode in alkaline solution  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen reduction is an industrially important electrochemical reaction, for fuel cells, electrochemical caustic concentrators, air depolarized cathodes, metal-air batteries, and oxidant production. Oxygen reduction at IrO{sub 2}-coated titanium electrodes fabricated by thermal decomposition was investigated by employing cyclic voltammetry and rotating-disk electrode techniques. Cyclic voltammetric results indicated that oxygen reduction begins during the Ir(III)/Ir(IV) transition on an IrO{sub 2} electrode. On the basis of measurements using a rotating disk electrode together with polarization curves, Tafel slopes, and stoichiometric number determinations, a mechanism for oxygen reduction on an IrO{sub 2}-coated titanium electrode is proposed.

Chang, C.C.; Wen, T.C. [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors  

SciTech Connect

A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 15004500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera arrays sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

Relativistic effects in a phosphorescent Ir(III) complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compare high field magnetic circular dichroism, absorption, and photoluminescence spectra for Ir(ptz)3 with time-dependent density functional theory. By gradually turning on the relativistic effects we identify several distinct relativistic effects in the spectra of this complex. We show that relativistic effects must be included to accurately predict the low-temperature spectra. This leads to new insights into the low-lying excitations responsible for the observed phosphorescence, and suggests new avenues to improve the performance of organic light emitting diodes.

A. R. G. Smith; M. J. Riley; S.-C. Lo; P. L. Burn; I. R. Gentle; B. J. Powell

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Plasma polymerization of allylalcohol and propargylalcohol: XPS and IR characterization  

SciTech Connect

Allylalcohol and propargylalcohol, likely to yield oxygen-rich deposits, have been polymerized in a RF plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Infrared (IR) have been used to determine the influence of the applied RF power on the deposited films properties. These characterization techniques show that oxygen-rich polymers are obtained at low power or at high power in post-discharge region. For the films formed from allylalcohol (PAA), oxygen is mainly present as alcohol functions (up to 44% at 20 W in post-discharge region). The proportion of alcohol functions is lower for polypropargylalcohol (PPA) while at higher amount of ketones functions is formed in these polymers.

Fally, F.; Virlet, I.; Riga, J.; Verbist, J.J. [Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix (Belgium)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Efficient Solar to Chemical Conversion: 12% Efficient Photoassisted Electrolysis in the [p-type InP(Ru)]/HCl-KCl/Pt(Rh) Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The photoelectrochemical cell [p-type InP(Ru)]/HCl-KCl/Pt(Rh) converts 12% of the incident solar energy into two useful chemicals, hydrogen and chlorine, by photoassisted electrolysis of aqueous hydrochloric acid. At the threshold for electrolysis, the voltage required is reduced from 1.3 to 0.65 V. Hydrogen evolution takes place at microscopic islands of catalysts such as Rh, Ru, and Pt. The high efficiency of the cell derives from a thin surface oxide on InP, preventing carrier recombination, and from efficient transport of electrons to the catalyst.

Adam Heller and Richard G. Vadimsky

1981-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

270

EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio November 5-7, 2013 DAY 1 - Tuesday, November 5, 2013 8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Cate Alexander, EM SSAB Designated Federal Officer Will Henderson, Chair, Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board William Murphie, Manager, Portsmouth Paducah Project Office, DOE-EM 8:20 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Overview of Meeting Eric Roberts, Facilitator 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. EM Program Update Alice Williams, Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management 9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m. Round Robin (Chairs' Site Reports) 5 minutes each 10:20 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Recognition of Departing Chairs 10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. - 12:00

271

CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

Edward A Whitaker

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

273

FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance  

SciTech Connect

When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A. [Spectra-Tech, Inc., Shelton, CT (United States); Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

LH responses to single doses of exogenous GnRH by social Mashona molerats:a continuum of socially induced infertility in the family Bathyergidae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...presented s.e. (Siegel 1956). (d) Behavioural experiments Reproductive...10 5 0 0 20 RF saline GnRH 0 20 NRF 0 20 RF 0 20 NRF * * plasma LH...Zimbabwe. REFERENCES Abbott, D. H. 1987 Behaviourally mediated...Zool. 213, 455 470. Abbott, D. H., Hodges, J. K. & George...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2005), 131, pp. 353375 doi: 10.1256/qj.04.63 Summer mistral at the exit of the Rh^one valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the absence of convection but also of strong winds prevent PBL development over the sea in the wakes to a severe wind that develops along the Rh^one valley in southern France. This summer mistral event was documented in the framework of the ESCOMPTE field experiment. The dynamical processes driving the circulation

Protat, Alain

276

Infrared study of the behavior of CO, NO, and CO + NO over Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide on a 0.475% Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst. Both CO and NO readily adsorb on a prereduced catalyst surface. NO is not observed spectroscopically on preoxidized catalysts, yet isocyanate is produced during subsequent displacement by CO. The adsorption of CO on a preoxidized catalyst parallels the reduction of the catalyst. At temperatures in excess of 250/sup 0/C and mixed feeds with CO/NO greater than or equal to 1, a large buildup of isocyanate is observed on the support. At temperatures greater than 300/sup 0/C an infrared band attributed to adsorbed cyanide ion is observed near 2150 cm/sup -1/. Experiments involving displacement of NO by CO, displacement of CO by NO, and coadsorption of CO + NO show that contiguous rhodium surfaces are necessary for isocyanate production. Though the rhodium gem-dicarbonyl species, Rh(CO)/sub 2/, was observed, there was no experimental evidence demonstrating the presence of Rh(NO)/sub 2/ or Rh(NO)(CO) complexes.

Dictor, R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The production of higher alcohols from syngas using potassium promoted Co/Mo/A12O3 and Rh/Co/Mo/A12O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optimized compositions K(4.9)/Co(2.7)/Mo(6.4)/A1203(gamma) and K(1.2)/ Rh(1.1)/Co(0.6)/Mo(5.7)/A1203(gamma) are both productive catalysts for higher alcohols. The incorporation of rhodium into the K/Co/Mo/A12

D. A. Storm

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Landau background gauge fixing and the IR properties of Yang-Mills Green functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the complete algebraic structure of the background field method for Yang-Mills theory in the Landau gauge and show several structural simplifications within this approach. In particular, we present a new way to study the IR behavior of Green functions in the Landau gauge and show that there exists a unique Green function whose IR behavior controls the IR properties of the gluon and the ghost propagators.

Pietro A. Grassi; Tobias Hurth; Andrea Quadri

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

The very nearby M/T dwarf binary SCR 1845-6357  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered star SCR 1845-6357 is the first late M/T dwarf binary discovered. SCR 1845 is a particular object due to its tight orbit (currently around 4 AU) and its proximity to the Sun (3.85 pc). We present spatially resolved VLT/NACO images and low resolution spectra of SCR 1845 in the J, H and K near-infrared bands. Since the T dwarf companion, SCR 1845B, is so close to the primary SCR 1845A, orbital motion is evident even within a year. Following the orbital motion, the binary's mass can be measured accurately within a decade, making SCR 1845B a key T-dwarf mass-luminosity calibrator. The NIR spectra allow for accurate determination of spectral type and also for rough estimates of the object's physical parameters. The spectral type of SCR 1845B is determined by direct comparison of the flux calibrated JHK spectra with T dwarf standard template spectra and also by NIR spectral indices obtained from synthetic photometry. Constrained values for surface gravity, effective temperature and metallicity are derived by comparison with model spectra. Our data prove that SCR 1845B is a brown dwarf of spectral type T6 that is co-moving with and therefore gravitationally bound to the M8.5 primary. Fitting the NIR spectrum of SCR 1845B to model spectra yields an effective temperature of about 950K and a surface gravity log(g)=5.1 (cgs) assuming solar metallicity. Mass and age of SCR 1845B are in the range 40 to 50 Jupiter masses and 1.8 to 3.1 Gyr.

Markus Kasper; Beth A. Biller; Adam Burrows; Wolfgang Brandner; Jano Budaj; Laird M. Close

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dark Matter Particle Spectroscopy at the LHC: Generalizing M(T2) to Asymmetric Event Topologies  

SciTech Connect

We consider SUSY-like missing energy events at hadron colliders and critically examine the common assumption that the missing energy is the result of two identical missing particles. In order to experimentally test this hypothesis, we generalize the subsystem M{sub T2} variable to the case of asymmetric event topologies, where the two SUSY decay chains terminate in different 'children' particles. In this more general approach, the endpoint M{sub T2(max)} of the M{sub T2} distribution now gives the mass {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}) of the parent particles as a function of two input children masses {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)} and {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}. We propose two methods for an independent determination of the individual children masses M{sub c}{sup (a)} and M{sub c}{sup (b)}. First, in the presence of upstream transverse momentum PUTM the corresponding function {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}, P{sub UTM}) is independent of P{sub UTM} at precisely the right values of the children masses. Second, the previously discussed MT2 'kink' is now generalized to a 'ridge' on the 2-dimensional surface {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}). As we show in several examples, quite often there is a special point along that ridge which marks the true values of the children masses. Our results allow collider experiments to probe a multi-component dark matter sector directly and without any theoretical prejudice.

Konar, Partha; /Florida U.; Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.; ,

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr. (comps.) [comps.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Stand structure and establishment process of an old-growth stand in the mixed deciduous broadleaf/conifer forest of Mt. Moiwa Forest Reserve, central Hokkaido, Northern Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stand structure of an old-growth forest was studied by tree (?4.0 ... in total) located in the Mt. Moiwa Forest Reserve, central Hokkaido, northern Japan. Major...Acer mono, A. mono var.mayrii, Kalopanax pictus, ...

Kanji Namikawa; Yuki Kawai

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers....

284

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers.

285

High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assessment of coal and graphite electrolysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Electroplated carbon fiber electrodes with noble metals (Pt, Rh, Pt-Rh, Pt-Ir, and Pt-Ir-Rh) are evaluated on a sandwich configuration coal electrolytic cell (CEC) for (more)

Sathe, Nilesh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A fast, simple, and naturally machine-precision algorithm for calculating both symmetric and asymmetric MT2, for any physical inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes a stransverse-mass calculation algorithm that has better numerical stability, and therefore accuracy, than the fastest existing implementations. The new algorithm naturally permits computation of MT2 to machine-precision for any valid set of inputs. In addition to being more accurate than existing fast calculators, the new implementation is arguably simpler to understand, comprises fewer lines of active code, and provides the first fast machine-precision asymmetric-MT2 calculator known to the authors.

Christopher G. Lester; Benjamin Nachman

2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Development of the remote-handled transuranic waste radioassay data quality objectives. An evaluation of RH-TRU waste inventories, characteristics, radioassay methods and capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will accept remote-handled transuranic waste as early as October of 2001. Several tasks must be accomplished to meet this schedule, one of which is the development of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) and corresponding Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the assay of radioisotopes in RH-TRU waste. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was assigned the task of providing to the DOE QAO, information necessary to aide in the development of DQOs for the radioassay of RH-TRU waste. Consistent with the DQO process, information needed and presented in this report includes: identification of RH-TRU generator site radionuclide data that may have potential significance to the performance of the WIPP repository or transportation requirements; evaluation of existing methods to measure the identified isotopic and quantitative radionuclide data; evaluation of existing data as a function of site waste streams using documented site information on fuel burnup, radioisotope processing and reprocessing, special research and development activities, measurement collection efforts, and acceptable knowledge; and the current status of technologies and capabilities at site facilities for the identification and assay of radionuclides in RH-TRU waste streams. This report is intended to provide guidance in developing the RH-TRU waste radioassay DQOs, first by establishing a baseline from which to work, second, by identifying needs to fill in the gaps between what is known and achievable today and that which will be required before DQOs can be formulated, and third, by recommending measures that should be taken to assure that the DQOs in fact balance risk and cost with an achievable degree of certainty.

Meeks, A.M.; Chapman, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Two Semi-Empirical Methods for Determination of Shafranov Shift in IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present two semi-empirical methods for determination of Shafranov shift in IR-T1 tokamak. In the first method, solution of ... on the outer surface of the IR-T1 tokamak chamber and then Shafranov...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss; A. Rahimi Rad

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Rational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-line IR heating system installed on the peeling lathe. Keywords: green wood; heating; infrared; modeling solutions are sought for. Experiments with electric ohmic and microwave heating methods (TorgovnikovRational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments Anna

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

291

January 31, 2014 EITC Awareness Day: IRS Kicks-Off Tax Season Alerting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Income Workers of Significant Tax Benefit IRS YouTube Video: Earned Income Tax Credit: English | Spanish in launching the Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day outreach campaign to ensure that millions of low from the IRS even if they owe no tax. Get the Credit: How to Claim the EITC #12;To get the EITC

Behmer, Spencer T.

292

IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76%  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document provides an overview of how the IRS and MC Realty Group, its property management firm, achieved a 76% reduction in lighting energy use at an IRS facility parking garage in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2 million kWh, annual cost savings of over $122,000, and a simple payback of 2.5 years.

293

ON THE INTEGRATION OF IR AND Arjen P. de Vries and Annita N. Wilschut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE INTEGRATION OF IR AND DATABASES Arjen P. de Vries and Annita N. Wilschut Centre,annita}@cs.utwente.nl Abstract: Integration of information retrieval (IR) in database management systems (DBMSs) has proven difficult. Previous attempts to integration suffered from inherent performance problems, or lacked desirable

de Vries, Arjen P.

294

Total Hydrogenation of Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural over Supported PdIr Alloy Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total Hydrogenation of Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural over Supported PdIr Alloy Catalyst ... Total hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was also possible using PdIr/SiO2 catalyst. ... (8-11) Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are produced from sugars via dehydration and are promising intermediates in biorefinery. ...

Yoshinao Nakagawa; Kana Takada; Masazumi Tamura; Keiichi Tomishige

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

296

The Birmingham-CfA cluster scaling project - I: gas fraction and the M-T relation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have assembled a large sample of virialized systems, comprising 66 galaxy clusters, groups and elliptical galaxies with high quality X-ray data. To each system we have fitted analytical profiles describing the gas density and temperature variation with radius, corrected for the effects of central gas cooling. We present an analysis of the scaling properties of these systems and focus in this paper on the gas distribution and M-T relation. In addition to clusters and groups, our sample includes two early-type galaxies, carefully selected to avoid contamination from group or cluster X-ray emission. We compare the properties of these objects with those of more massive systems and find evidence for a systematic difference between galaxy-sized haloes and groups of a similar temperature. We derive a mean logarithmic slope of the M-T relation within R_200 of 1.84+/-0.06, although there is some evidence of a gradual steepening in the M-T relation, with decreasing mass. We recover a similar slope using two additional methods of calculating the mean temperature. Repeating the analysis with the assumption of isothermality, we find the slope changes only slightly, to 1.89+/-0.04, but the normalization is increased by 30%. Correspondingly, the mean gas fraction within R_200 changes from (0.13+/-0.01)h70^-1.5 to (0.11+/-0.01)h70^-1.5, for the isothermal case, with the smaller fractional change reflecting different behaviour between hot and cool systems. There is a strong correlation between the gas fraction within 0.3*R_200 and temperature. This reflects the strong (5.8 sigma) trend between the gas density slope parameter, beta, and temperature, which has been found in previous work. (abridged)

A. J. R. Sanderson; T. J. Ponman; A. Finoguenov; E. J. Lloyd-Davies; M. Markevitch

2003-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Reactive Oxide Overlayer on Rh Nanoparticles during CO Oxidation and Its Size Dependence Studied by in Situ Ambient Pressure XPS  

SciTech Connect

CO oxidation is one of the most studied heterogeneous reactions, being scientifically and industrially important, particularly for removal of CO from exhaust streams and preferential oxidation for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. The precious metals Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, and Au are most commonly used for this reaction because of their high activity and stability. Despite the wealth of experimental and theoretical data, it remains unclear what is the active surface for CO oxidation under catalytic conditions for these metals. In this communication, we utilize in situ synchrotron ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) to monitor the oxidation state at the surface of Rh nanoparticles during CO oxidation and demonstrate that the active catalyst is a surface oxide, the formation of which is dependent on particle size. The amount of oxide formed and the reaction rate both increase with decreasing particle size.

Grass, Michael E.; Zhang, Yawen; Butcher, Derek R.; Park, Jeong Y.; Li, Yimin; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Zhang, Tianfu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Influence of Sulfur on the Carbon Deposition in Liquid Hydrocarbon Steam Reforming over CeO2-Al2O3 supported Ni and Rh Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to elucidate the influence of sulfur on the carbon deposition in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons over CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported Ni and Rh catalysts at 800 C. The characteristics of the carbon deposits on the used catalysts after the reactions without and with sulfur were investigated by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Though abundant carbon deposits can accumulate on the pure CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support due to fuel thermal cracking, the addition of Ni or Rh metal greatly reduced the carbon deposition in the sulfur-free reaction. The presence of sulfur increased the carbon deposition on both catalysts, which has a much more significant impact for the Ni catalyst. Carbon XANES study on the used catalysts revealed that graphitic carbon was dominant in the presence of sulfur, while oxidized carbon species (quinone-like carbon, carboxyl and carbonate) prevailed without sulfur. Meanwhile, the formation of carboxyl and carbonate more dramatically dropped on the Ni catalyst than that on the Rh catalyst. Our results strongly suggest that (I) the presence of sulfur can suppress carbon gasification and promote the formation of graphitic carbon on reforming catalysts due mainly to its poisoning effect on metals, and (II) Rh catalyst possesses stronger capability to maintain carbon gasification activity than Ni catalyst in the presence of sulfur.

C Xie; Y Chen; Y Li; X Wang; C Song

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sharpening $m_{T2}$ cusps: the mass determination of semi-invisibly decaying particles from a resonance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit mass determination techniques for the minimum symmetric event topology, namely $X$ pair production followed by $X \\to \\ell N$, where $X$ and $N$ are unknown particles with the masses to be measured, and $N$ is an invisible particle, concentrating on the case where $X$ is pair produced from a resonance. We consider separate scenarios, with different initial constraints on the invisible particle momenta, and present a systematic method to identify the kinematically allowed mass regions in the $(m_N, m_X)$ plane. These allowed regions exhibit a cusp structure at the true mass point, which is equivalent to the one observed in the $m_{T2}$ endpoints in certain cases. By considering the boundary of the allowed mass region we systematically define kinematical variables which can be used in measuring the unknown masses, and find a new expression for the $m_{T2}$ variable as well as its inverse. We explicitly apply our method to the case that $X$ is pair produced from a resonance, and as a case study, we consider the process $pp \\to A \\to \\tilde \\chi_1^+ \\tilde \\chi_1^-$, followed by $\\tilde \\chi_1^\\pm \\to \\ell^{\\pm} \\, \\tilde \

Lucian A. Harland-Lang; Chun-Hay Kom; Kazuki Sakurai; Marco Tonini

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

300

Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.  

SciTech Connect

Monodisperse rhodium (Rh) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as small as {approx}1 nm were synthesized within a fourth generation polyaminoamide (PAMAM) dendrimer, a hyperbranched polymer, in aqueous solution and immobilized by depositing onto a high-surface-area SBA-15 mesoporous support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the as-synthesized Rh and Pt nanoparticles were mostly oxidized. Catalytic activity of the SBA-15 supported Rh and Pt nanoparticles was studied with ethylene hydrogenation at 273 and 293 K in 10 torr of ethylene and 100 torr of H{sub 2} after reduction (76 torr of H{sub 2} mixed with 690 torr of He) at different temperatures. Catalysts were active without removing the dendrimer capping but reached their highest activity after hydrogen reduction at a moderate temperature (423 K). When treated at a higher temperature (473, 573, and 673 K) in hydrogen, catalytic activity decreased. By using the same treatment that led to maximum ethylene hydrogenation activity, catalytic activity was also evaluated for pyrrole hydrogenation.

Huang, Wenyu; Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Zhang, Yawen; Habas, Susan E.; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cluster size effects on sintering, CO adsorption, and implantation in Ir/SiO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

A series of planar model catalysts have been prepared via deposition of Ir{sub n}{sup +} on thermally grown amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) and ion scattering spectroscopy was used to probe surface structure as a function of cluster size, impact energy, and surface temperature. Deposition of Ir{sub 2} or Ir{sub 10} at low energies and room temperature results in stable clusters forming one- or two-dimensional single layer islands on the oxide surface. Heating the samples to 750 K leads to agglomeration, forming multilayer structures on the surface. Ir{sub 1} deposited under similar conditions sinters into large clusters at room temperature. Deposition at 110 K at least partially stabilizes the Ir atoms with respect to diffusion and sintering. At higher deposition energies, partial implantation into the surface is observed, but this appears to be insufficient to stabilize the clusters against sintering at elevated temperature. At low temperatures, substrate-mediated adsorption of CO is found to be highly efficient, leading to near saturation coverages of CO bound atop the Ir{sub n} clusters. The CO can be removed by careful He{sup +} sputtering. The deposition/binding behavior of Ir{sub n} on SiO{sub 2} is quite different from Ir{sub n}/TiO{sub 2}(110), for which the clusters bind in three-dimensional morphology, starting at Ir{sub 5}. That system also shows substrate-mediated adsorption of CO, but the CO preferentially binds at the periphery of the clusters rather than on top.

Kaden, W. E.; Kunkel, W. A.; Anderson, Scott L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E. RM 2020, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COUNTRY INSTITUTION DATE WEB ADDRESS IRAN University of Art Isfahn 08.03.2007 http://www.aui.ac.ir IRAN Isfahn University of Technology 08.03.2007 http://www.iut.ac.ir IRAN The University of Isfahn 15/03/2011 http://www.ui.ac.ir IRAN Shahid Bahonar University of Kermn 06.06.2005 http

Di Pillo, Gianni

304

Temperature-jump 2D IR spectroscopy to study protein conformational dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature-jump (T-jump) two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) is developed, characterized, and applied to the study of protein folding and association. In solution, protein conformational changes span a wide range ...

Jones, Kevin C. (Kevin Chapman)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effects of Resonant Helical Field on Plasma Internal Inductance in IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of plasma internal inductance is important in tokamak plasma experiments (plasma internal inductance relates to ... on the plasma internal inductance in IR-T1 tokamak. For this purpose, four magnetic ...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Plasma Magnetic Fluctuations Measurement on the Outer Surface of IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present an experimental investigation of effects of external rotating helical field (RHF) on magnetic field fluctuations around the IR-T1 tokamak chamber. For this purpose, two magnetic ... on th...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Near-IR Solar Coronal Observations with New-Technology Reflecting Coronographs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission-line and K-coronal observations in the IR have the significant advantage of reduced sky brightness compared with the visible, while the effects of seeing are also reduced. Moreover, strong lines are a...

Raymond N. Smartt; Serge Koutchmy; Jacques-Clair Nons

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

B&W IR-CFB: Operating Experience and New Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper provides an update on B&W Internal Recirculation (IR) CFB boiler operating experience, new commercial projects, ... of in-furnace heat absorption in higher capacity CFB boilers, a new B&W development is...

M. Maryamchik; D. L. Wietzke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Interlayer proton transfer in brucite under pressure by polarized IR spectroscopy to 5.3?GPa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to investigate the behaviour of proton in brucite under pressure, polarized IR absorption spectra and ... ) and (110) oriented single crystal of brucite under high pressure were measured by Fourier...?1....

Keiji Shinoda; Nobuyuki Aikawa

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Inexpensive Near-IR Sun Photometer for Measuring Total Column Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An inexpensive two-channel near-IR sun photometer for measuring total atmospheric column water vapor (precipitable water) has been developed for use by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) environmental science ...

David R. Brooks; Forrest M. Mims III; Richard Roettger

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Spectral Broadening of Femtosecond Mid-IR Pulses Coupled Into Quantum Cascade Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Femtosecond 4.72 ?m Mid-IR pulses are coupled into a pulsed biased, room temperature 4.72 ?m QCL, resulting in 2X spectra broadening of the input pulses.

Liu, Sheng; Cai, Hong; Lalanne, Elaine; Liu, Peter Q; Cheng, Xiaojun; Gmachl, Claire; Johnson, Anthony M

312

Design and Fabrication of Efficient Collimation and Focusing Optics for Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of germanium aspheric collimating and focusing optics designed for mid-IR QCLs having an emission wavelength of 8.77 microns.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

315

BNL-73700-2005-IR ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PRE-INJECTOR PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BNL-73700-2005-IR ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PRE-INJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT J.2. THE EBIS SOURCE .........................................................................................14 4.2. DEMONSTRATION OF HIGH CURRENT ELECTRON BEAM FORMATION AND PROPAGATION

316

Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organelle in a cell, the membrane sets the information and energy gradients necessary for life. Car- bonyl of the carbonyl absorption can be attributed to electric field fluctuations. 2D IR techniques are femtosecond

Mukamel, Shaul

317

Temperature dependence of IR absorption spectra of water in aromatic hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of the temperature of a medium on the IR absorption spectra of water dissolved in aromatic hydrocarbons was studied. It was found that the ... of the determination of the quantity of dissolved water

Sh. I. Seidov; L. I. Prokhvatilova

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Compact IR Quadrupoles for Linear Colliders Based on Rutherford-type Cable  

SciTech Connect

The upcoming and disrupted beams in the interaction region (IR) of a linear collider are focused by doublets consisting of two small-aperture superconducting quadrupoles. These magnets need an effective compact magnetic shielding to minimize magnetic coupling between the two channels and sufficient temperature margin to withstand radiation-induced heat depositions in the coil. This paper presents conceptual designs of IR quadrupoles for linear colliders based on NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn Rutherford-type cables.

Lopes, M.L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

HCl Oxidation on IrO2-Based Catalysts: From Fundamentals to Scale-Up  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HCl Oxidation on IrO2-Based Catalysts: From Fundamentals to Scale-Up ... (ii) Geometric and electronic effects of TiO2-rutile are predicted not to lead to improved HCl oxidation activity for 1 and 2 epilayers of IrO2 over the carrier. ... From a fundamental viewpoint, it would be interesting to assess whether rutile-type oxides exhibit similar Deacon chemistry. ...

Maximilian Moser; Cecilia Mondelli; Amol P. Amrute; Atsushi Tazawa; Detre Teschner; Manfred E. Schuster; Achim Klein-Hoffman; Nria Lpez; Timm Schmidt; Javier Prez-Ramrez

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

High PEMFC performance by applying Ir-V nanoparticles as a cathode catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Very active catalysts Ir-V/C, as a novel suitable cathode catalyst in \\{PEMFCs\\} was synthesized using IrCl3 and NH4VO3 as the Ir and V precursors. By applying the ethylene glycol (EG) method, a well dispersion of Ir-V/C catalysts with mean particle size of 2nm was obtained. The membraneelectrode assembly (MEA) fabricated with Ir-V nanoparticles exhibited the excellent catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and, reached 517mWcm?2 at 0.43V and 210mWcm?2 at 0.30V in a real fuel cell environment, H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. In particular, promising results were obtained based on a low metal (Ir) loading of 0.4mgcm?2 on the cathode which achieved 100h durability at a constant current density of 1200mAcm?2. The electrocatalytic effect related to a change in the electro-catalyst structure was discussed based on the XRD and TEM data. Also, for the first time, the electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques were used to assess the kinetics of oxygen reduction on the produced samples and the enhancement effect of V in-situ of fuel cells.

Jinli Qiao; Bing Li; Daijun Yang; Jianxin Ma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nanostructured F doped IrO2 electro-catalyst powders for PEM based water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluorine doped iridium oxide (IrO2:F) powders with varying F content ranging from 0 to 20wt.% has been synthesized by using a modification of the Adams fusion method. The precursors (IrCl4 and NH4F) are mixed with NaNO3 and heated to elevated temperatures to form high surface area nanomaterials as electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis. The catalysts were then coated on a porous Ti substrate and have been studied for the oxygen evolution reaction in PEM based water electrolysis. The IrO2:F with an optimum composition of IrO2:10wt.% F shows remarkably superior electrochemical activity and chemical stability compared to pure IrO2. The results have also been supported via kinetic studies by conducting rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments. The RDE studies confirm that the electro-catalysts follow the two electron transfer reaction for electrolysis with calculated activation energy of ?25kJmol?1. Single full cell tests conducted also validate the superior electrochemical activity of the 10wt.% F doped IrO2.

Karan Sandeep Kadakia; Prashanth H. Jampani; Oleg I. Velikokhatnyi; Moni Kanchan Datta; Sung Kyoo Park; Dae Ho Hong; Sung Jae Chung; Prashant N. Kumta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Attenuated degradation of a PEMFC cathode during fuel starvation by using carbon-supported IrO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IrO2, a water electrolysis catalyst, has been known to be effective in preventing corrosion of the carbon support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Particulate IrO2 can agglomerate easily, which can decrease substantially the catalytic surface area required for oxygen evolution reaction, causing the loss of catalytic efficiency. Furthermore, agglomerated IrO2 nanoparticles can have an adverse effect on the oxygen reduction reaction by covering the active surface area of the Pt/C cathode catalyst, which is a damaging factor for the intrinsic performance of PEMFC. Carbon-supported iridium oxide, IrO2/C, which can prevent the agglomeration of Ir nanoparticles more effectively, was synthesized to overcome these problems. Compared to the cell with the Pt/C cathode only, the cell with 10wt.% IrO2 particles and Pt/C cathode showed stronger durability during fuel starvation but the cell performance at normal operation decreased severely by 35%. The cell with the same amount of IrO2 dispersed on a carbon support, 10wt.% IrO2/C, showed similar durability during fuel starvation maintaining the cell performance comparable to the cell using a Pt/C cathode only. Carbon-supported IrO2, IrO2/C, was more effective than IrO2 particles in both maintaining the intrinsic performance and improving the cell durability during fuel starvation.

Injoon Jang; Imgon Hwang; Yongsug Tak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Microsoft Word - ORNL RH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

move this waste out of Oak Ridge and place it in a permanent repository," said Gerald Boyd, Manager of DOE's Oak Ridge Office. "We have kept our commitment to the State of...

324

Comment on ``A modified leapfrog scheme for shallow water equations'' by Wen-Yih Sun and Oliver M.T. Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commentary Comment on ``A modified leapfrog scheme for shallow water equations'' by Wen-Yih Sun and Oliver M.T. Sun Paul D. Williams Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK a r t i c l e i n f integration of the shallow-water equa- tions using the leapfrog time-stepping scheme [Sun Wen-Yih, Sun Oliver

Williams, Paul

325

A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface  

SciTech Connect

We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75?ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between IrC and IrIr interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

Erikat, I. A., E-mail: ihsanas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Jerash University, Jerash-26150 (Jordan); Hamad, B. A. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)] [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ultralow platinum-loading PtPdRu@PtRuIr/C catalyst with excellent CO tolerance and high performance for the methanol oxidation reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Catalysts of Pd4%Pt10%Ru5%Ir2%/C, Pd4%@Pt10%Ru5%Ir2%/C, Pd4%Pt2%@Pt8%Ru5%Ir2%/C, and Pd4%Pt2%Ru2%@Pt8%Ru3%Ir2%/C were referred to as PDRI, D@PRI, PD@PRI, and PDR...

Yan-Ni Wu; Shi-Jun Liao; Hai-Fu Guo; Xiang-Ying Hao; Zhen-Xing Liang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Low dose IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of the IR stimulation of TGF-β1 in vivo and downstream activation of the IGF-1-sCLU pro-survival expression axis: A bystander and adaptive survival mechanism in vivo David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Over the past few years our laboratory has elucidated the regulatory mechanisms governing the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) - secretory clusterin (sCLU) expression axis, which can be induced by >2 cGy in vivo and in vitro with the same dose-response kinetics. IGF-1-sCLU expression can be induced by (A) TGF-β1 and (B) IR, but is suppressed by the p53 and Klotho tumor suppressors. Interestingly, there is a substantial difference between the regulatory mechanisms of IGF-1-sCLU induction after TGF-β1 and IR exposures, where p53 suppresses IR responses but does not suppress after

328

Integration of microfluidics and FT-IR microscopy for label-free study of enzyme kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article we report on the integration of microfluidics with FT-IR microscopy for the label-free study of enzyme kinetics. The IR compatible microfluidic chip was fabricated by standard photolithography processes using a photopatternable PDMS and infrared transparent materials (Si and CaF2). Chip characterization was performed with an imaging focal plane array (FPA) detector. The enzymatic oxidation of glucose catalyzed by glucose oxidase, which served as a model system, was monitored on-chip in real time in a label-free manner using FT-IR microscopy. The reference FT-IR measurements were carried out using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) accessory. MichaelisMenten parameters for glucose-oxidase were estimated from the spectral measurements both on-chip and off-chip. The proposed microfluidic approach for enzyme reaction monitoring serves as a novel strategy for FT-IR microscopy allowing for minimal reaction volumes, measurement automation and flexibility in terms of spatial, spectral and temporal data acquisition and offers new opportunities in kinetics studies of various bio(chemical) reactions.

Evgeny Polshin; Bert Verbruggen; Daan Witters; Bert Sels; Dirk De Vos; Bart Nicola; Jeroen Lammertyn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site exhibited less than Rayleigh magnitude. Remarking that this is a physical impossibility, the obvious conclusion forwarded by the authors was that there was some problem with the ARM SGP diffuse SW data. Shortly thereafter, the problem of infrared (IR) loss from thermopile-based single black detector

330

Structure and Magnetic Properties of the Pyrochlore Iridate Y2Ir2O7  

SciTech Connect

Neutron powder diraction and inelastic measurements were performed examining the 5d py- rochlore Y2Ir2O7. Temperature dependent measurements were performed between 3.4 K and 290 K, spanning the magnetic transition at 155 K. No sign of any structural or disorder induced phase transition were observed over the entire temperature range. In addition, no sign of magnetic long- range order was observed to within the sensitivity of the instrumentation. These measurements do not rule out long range magnetic order, but the neutron powder diraction structural renements do put an upper bound for the ordered iridium moment of 0.2 B=Ir (for a magnetic structure with wave vector Q 6= 0) or 0.5 B=Ir (for Q = 0).

Shapiro, Max C [Stanford University; Riggs, Scott [Stanford University; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Dela Cruz, Clarina R [ORNL; Chi, Songxue [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Fisher, Ian R [Stanford University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Microsoft Word - Responses for IRS Notices 2006-24, 25 May 5 2006.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

questions related to: questions related to: IRS Notice 2006-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, IRS Notice 2006-25, Qualifying Gasification Program May 5, 2006 DOE is answering questions related only to DOE certifications. Other questions should be directed to the IRS by calling Doug Kim or Kathy Reed at (202) 622-3110, or by faxing the questions to them at (202) 622-4779. 36. Independent Financial Analyst a. Will a duly licensed CPA or CPA firm, which is independent of the applicant under the profession's promulgated rules on independence, meet the definition of "Independent Financial Analyst"? If so, will they still be required to state, in the report, their qualifications and experience that establishes their competence to evaluate project financing?

332

Near-IR [Fe II] emission diagnostics applied to cold disk winds in young stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the emissivity properties of the main near-IR transitions of the Fe+ ion in the conditions prevailing in the inner regions of jets from young stars, based on a simplified 16-level atom model. We present new diagnostic diagrams involving prominent near-IR line ratios that allow us to constrain the electronic density, temperature, and Fe gas phase abundance ratio, independently of the heating process. Comparison with recent near-IR observations of a sample of HH objects indicates gas phase Fe abundances ranging from 15-50 % up to 100 % of the solar value in agreement with the moderate depletions previously derived from optical line ratios or shock models. Hence, it appears that Fe-bearing dust is efficiently destroyed in stellar jets. We then use our Fe+ emissivity model to predict near-IR [Fe II] emission maps for self-similar, cold MHD disk wind models. We show that observations in [Fe II] with AMBER on the VLTI could severely constrain the MHD solution and the inner launch radius of the jet. We also compare theoretical predictions with recent observations in the near-IR [Fe II] lines of the L1551-IRS5 and DG Tau jets. The cold disk wind model reproduces quite well the two velocity components observed at -100 and -300 km/s, although the high velocity component appears overestimated by a factor of 1.5 in the DG Tau jet. However, the model predicts too little emission at intermediate-velocity and insufficient densities. Denser disk winds with stronger heating at the jet base, which have been invoked for optical jets, also appear needed in younger, embedded Class I jet sources.

N. Pesenti; C. Dougados; S. Cabrit; D. O'Brien; P. Garcia; J. Ferreira

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Radial Electric Field and its Influence on Poloidal Magnetic Field Oscillations in the IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radial electric field has been investigated in the edge plasma of IR-T1 tokamak by movable sets of single Langmuir probes....

Hamid Bolourian; Pejman Khorshid; Mahmoud Ghoranneviss

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Mechanism of Efficient Anti-Markovnikov Olefin Hydroarylation Catalyzed by Homogeneous Ir(III) Complexes  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism of the hydroarylation reaction between unactivated olefins (ethylene, propylene, and styrene) and benzene catalyzed by [(R)Ir(?-acac-O,O,C{sup 3})-(acac-O,O){sub 2}]{sub 2} and [R-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}(L)] (R = acetylacetonato, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ph, or CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, and L = H{sub 2}O or pyridine) Ir(III) complexes was studied by experimental methods. The system is selective for generating the anti-Markovnikov product of linear alkylarenes (61:39 for benzene + propylene and 98:2 for benzene + styrene). The reaction mechanism was found to follow a rate law with first-order dependence on benzene and catalyst, but a non-linear dependence on olefin. {sup 13}C-labelling studies with CH{sub 3}{sup 13}CH{sub 2}-Ir-Py showed that reversible ?-hydride elimination is facile, but unproductive, giving exclusively saturated alkylarene products. The migration of the {sup 13}C-label from the ? to ?-positions was found to be slower than the CH activation of benzene (and thus formation of ethane and Ph-d{sub 5}-Ir-Py). Kinetic analysis under steady state conditions gave a ratio of the rate constants for CH activation and ?-hydride elimination (k{sub CH}: k{sub ?}) of ~0.5. The comparable magnitude of these rates suggests a common rate determining transition state/intermediate, which has been shown previously with B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Overall, the mechanism of hydroarylation proceeds through a series of pre-equilibrium dissociative steps involving rupture of the dinuclear species or the loss of L from Ph-Ir-L to the solvento, 16-electron species, Ph-Ir(acac-O,O){sub 2}-Sol (where Sol refers to coordinated solvent). This species then undergoes trans to cisisomerization of the acetylacetonato ligand to yield the pseudo octahedral species cis-Ph-Ir-Sol, which is followed by olefin insertion (the regioselective and rate determining step), and then activation of the CH bond of an incoming benzene to generate the product and regenerate the catalyst.

Bhalla, Gaurav; Bischof, Steven M; Ganesh, Somesh K; Liu, Xiang Y; Jones, C J; Borzenko, Andrey; Tenn, William J; Ess, Daniel H; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Lokare, Kapil S; Leung, Chin Hin; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ELSEVIER International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 17 (1996) 285-290 Ir~ernattonatlournalc~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 17 (1996) 285-290 Ir~ernattonatlournalc~ Industrial Ergonomics Short communication A new method for extending the range of conductive polymer sensors measurement instruments are important for providing ergonomics practitioners with a quantitative means

Radwin, Robert G.

336

Near-IR [Fe II] emission diagnostics applied to cold disk winds in young stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the emissivity properties of the main near-IR transitions of the Fe+ ion in the conditions prevailing in the inner regions of jets from young stars, based on a simplified 16-level atom model. We present new diagnostic diagrams involving prominent near-IR line ratios that allow us to constrain the electronic density, temperature, and Fe gas phase abundance ratio, independently of the heating process. Comparison with recent near-IR observations of a sample of HH objects indicates gas phase Fe abundances ranging from 15-50 % up to 100 % of the solar value in agreement with the moderate depletions previously derived from optical line ratios or shock models. Hence, it appears that Fe-bearing dust is efficiently destroyed in stellar jets. We then use our Fe+ emissivity model to predict near-IR [Fe II] emission maps for self-similar, cold MHD disk wind models. We show that observations in [Fe II] with AMBER on the VLTI could severely constrain the MHD solution and the inner launch radius of the jet. W...

Pesenti, N; Cabrit, S; O'Brien, D; Garca, P; Ferreira, J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Royalty Payments & Tax Treaty Procedures Information and IRS forms for MIT Press authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Royalty Payments & Tax Treaty Procedures Information and IRS forms for MIT Press authors Forms the forms. Royalty Payment Schedule Royalty statements and payments will be made for each royalty year will not be returned. Please see page 3 of the W-7 application for complete details. Tax Treaty Claim on Royalty

Jackson, Daniel

338

Structure-property relations in negative permittivity reststrahlen materials for IR metamaterial applications.  

SciTech Connect

We will present a study of the structure-property relations in Reststrahlen materials that possess a band of negative permittivities in the infrared. It will be shown that sub-micron defects strongly affect the optical response, resulting in significantly diminished permittivities. This work has implications on the use of ionic materials in IR-metamaterials.

Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Shelton, David J. (University of Central Florida); Carroll, James F., III; Boreman, Glenn D. (University of Central Florida); Sinclair, Michael B.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Matias, Vladimir (Los Alamos National Laboratory)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Magnetic and crystal structures of Sr2IrO4: A neutron diffraction study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report a single-crystal neutron diffraction study of the layered Sr2IrO4. This work unambiguously determines the magnetic structure of the system and reveals that the spin orientation rigidly tracks the staggered rotation of the IrO6 octahedra in Sr2IrO4. The long-range antiferromagnetic order has a canted spin configuration with an ordered moment of 0.208(3) ?B/Ir site within the basal plane; a detailed examination of the spin canting yields 0.202(3) and 0.049(2) ?B/site for the a axis and the b axis, respectively. It is intriguing that forbidden nuclear reflections of space group I41/acd are also observed in a wide temperature range from 4 K to 600 K, which suggests a reduced crystal structure symmetry. This neutron-scattering work provides a direct, well-refined experimental characterization of the magnetic and crystal structures that are crucial to the understanding of the unconventional magnetism exhibited in this unusual magnetic insulator.

Feng Ye, Songxue Chi, Bryan C. Chakoumakos, Jaime A. Fernandez-Baca, Tongfei Qi, and G. Cao

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

On Linear Independence of Generators of FSI Distribution Spaces on IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Linear Independence of Generators of FSI Distribution Spaces on IR Jianzhong Wang Abstract. A distribution space is called finitely shift invariant (FSI) if it is generated by a vector-valued distribution of an FSI distribution space and presents a way to find the generators with linear independent shifts

Wang, Jianzhong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

IR Spectroscopy Spectroscopy: Branch of science in which light or other electromagnetic radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is resolved into its component wavelengths to produce spectra, which are graphs of intensity vs. wavelength or frequency of radiation. Current usage broadens this definition to include some methods that don't involve the energy difference of 2 quantum levels of the sample of matter. hE = IR Spectroscopy Tool for examining

Sherrill, David

342

Nonlinear Retrieval of Atmospheric Profiles from MetOp-IASI and MTG-IRS Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear Retrieval of Atmospheric Profiles from MetOp-IASI and MTG-IRS Data Gustavo Camps-Vallsa , Luis Guanterb , Jordi Mu~noz-Mar´ia , Luis G´omez-Chovaa and Xavier Calbetc a Image Processing retrieval methods to derive cloud, surface and atmospheric properties from hyperspectral MetOp-IASI and MTG

Camps-Valls, Gustavo

343

IR Principles for Content-based Indexing and Retrieval of Functional Brain Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR Principles for Content-based Indexing and Retrieval of Functional Brain Images Bing Bai, Paul cornea, silver@ece.rutgers.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we explore the concept of a "library of brain images", which implies not only a repository of brain images, but also efficient search and retrieval

344

IR Principles for Content-based Indexing and Retrieval of Functional Brain Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR Principles for Content-based Indexing and Retrieval of Functional Brain Images Bing Bai, Paul of a "library of brain images", which implies not only a repository of brain images, but also efficient search worked with a collection of functional MRI brain images assembled in the study of several distinct cogni

345

Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical Exchange Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Bond Migration between Molecular Sites Observed with Ultrafast 2D IR Chemical ExchangeVed: January 12, 2010 Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution

Fayer, Michael D.

346

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Dynamics in Salt Solutions Studied with Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Infrared (2D IR RECEIVED ON FEBRUARY 3, 2009 C O N S P E C T U S Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species

Fayer, Michael D.

347

The Influence of Word Detection Variability on IR Performance in Automatic Audio Indexing of Course Lectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

audio lectures for an under- graduate level engineering course at McGill University. The taskThe Influence of Word Detection Variability on IR Performance in Automatic Audio Indexing of Course Lectures Renato Rispoli, Richard Rose, and Jon Arrowood* Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Mc

Rose, Richard

348

Chiral RKKY interaction in Pr[subscript 2]Ir[subscript 2]O[subscript 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the potential chiral spin liquid in the metallic spin ice Pr[subscript 2]Ir[subscript 2]O[subscript 7], we consider how such a chiral state might be selected from the spin-ice manifold. We propose that chiral ...

Flint, Rebecca

349

Analysis of the IR-spectral behavior of adsorbed CO formed in H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ surface interaction over supported rhodium  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide has been investigated by means of infrared spectroscopy on alumina-supported Rh of different crystallite sizes produced by reduction at 573-1173 K with a view to explaining the infrared spectrum of the adsorbed CO produced which is basically different from that observed following CO adsorption on the same samples. It appeared that the adsorbed CO formed on CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ adsorption did not lead to the formation of gem-dicarbonyl, i.e., to disruption of the Rh-Rh bond. This behavior is attributed to the presence of adsorbed hydrogen and to the formation of Rh carbonyl hydride, which prevents the disruptive effect of adsorbed CO.

Solymosi, F.; Pasztor, M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Magnetically polarized Ir dopant atoms in superconducting Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the magnetic polarization of the Ir 5d dopant states in the pnictide superconductor Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2 with x=0.027(2) using Ir L3 edge x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS). Despite the fact that doping partially suppresses the antiferromagnetic transition, we find that magnetic order survives around the Ir dopant sites. The Ir states are magnetically polarized with commensurate stripe-like antiferromagnetic order and long correlations lengths, ?mag>2800 and >850 , in the ab plane and along the c axis, respectively, driven by their interaction with the Fe spins. This Ir magnetic order persists up to the Nel transition of the majority Fe spins at TN=74(2) K. At 5 K we find that magnetic order coexists microscopically with superconductivity in Ba(Fe1?xIrx)2As2. The energy dependence of the XRMS through the Ir L3 edge shows a non-Lorentzian line shape, which we explain in terms of interference between Ir resonant scattering and Fe nonresonant magnetic scattering.

Dean, M.P.M.; Kim, M.G.; Kreyssig, A.; Kim, J.W.; Liu, X.; Ryan, P.J.; Thaler, A.; Budko, S.L.; Strassheim, W.; Canfield, P.C.; Hill, J.P.; Goldman, A.I.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

A link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ link between stem cells and the EMT phenotype induced by IR and TGFβ Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia New York University School of Medicine Abstract Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) occurs as key developmental program but is also often activated during cancer progression. EMT is characterized by loss of epithelial cell polarity, loss of cell-cell contacts, and acquisition of mesenchymal markers and phenotypic traits that include increased cell motility1. Approximately 18% of breast cancers exhibit evidence of EMT. We have shown that the progeny of irradiated human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) undergo EMT when exposed to transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ). Additionally, recent publication from Weinberg and colleagues showed that induction of EMT through engineered expression of

352

About EffectiveŽ Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in "Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range V. N. Uzhegov, D. M. Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important factors affecting the radiation budget of the space - atmosphere - underlying surface system in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges. It is extremely important to take into account the contribution of this component into the extinction of solar radiation under cloudless sky conditions. Sometimes it is important to know not only the total value of the aerosol component of extinction, but also to have the possibility to estimate the "effective" height of

353

Microsoft Word - Responses for IRS Notices 2006 24 and 25 May 4 2006.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, 6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, IRS Notice 2006-25, Qualifying Gasification Program May 4, 2006 DOE is answering questions related only to DOE certifications. Other questions should be directed to the IRS by calling Doug Kim or Kathy Reed at (202) 622-3110, or by faxing the questions to them at (202) 622-4779. 21. Waste Coal. Is it correct that a low-cost anthracite culm (i.e., culm is defined as coal waste that consists of coal and rock with varying amounts of carbon material remaining after removal of a higher-quality saleable coal) qualifies for clean coal investment tax credits under sections 48A and 48B? Kindly assume that the producer procured the culm from a culm bank (i.e., ubiquitous piles or other depository of culm on

354

Improved ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR ARM-SGP TOA OLR Fluxes from GOES-8 IR Radiances Based on CERES Data D. R. Doelling and M. M. Khaiyer Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction The radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is a quantity of fundamental importance to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Thus, it is necessary to measure the radiation budget components, broadband shortwave albedo and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), as accurately as possible. Measurement of OLR over the ARM surface sites has only been possible since the advent of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES; Wielicki et al. 1998) in 1998. Prior to

355

To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7, 19% 7, 19% To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§ Subject: Extrusion of Billets, Titus Metals, Inc., Waterloo, Iowa A grpup of ANL aqloyees consisting of LE. Walker and S. Matsas (MET), E. Leverens (SSE), I(. C.~Buffy'(SPM), and G. T. Lonergan (IRS), traveled to Waterloo, Iowa, on June 29 where they accomplished the extrusion of U308 billets into fuel plates for Argonaut. Prior to beginning the extrusion operation, the floor area around the press, run-out table, stretch straightener, and all accessible portions of the press were surveyed. No activity was detected. The floor area from the furnace (uhere the billets were heated) to the press was coveredwith a layer of vinyl approximately 48fl wide and topped

356

Prospects and merits of metal-clad semiconductor lasers from nearly UV to far IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using metal-clad (or plasmonic) waveguide structures in semiconductor lasers carries a promise of reduced size, threshold, and power consumption. This promise is put to a rigorous theoretical test, that takes into account increased waveguide loss, Auger recombination, and Purcell enhancement of spontaneous recombination. The conclusion is that purported benefits of metal waveguides are small to nonexistent for all the band-to-band and intersubband lasers operating from UV to Mid-IR range, with a prominent exception of far-IR and THz quantum cascade lasers. For these devices, however, metal waveguides already represent the state of the art, and the guiding mechanism in them has far more in common with a ubiquitous transmission line than with plasmonics.

Khurgin, Jacob B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

Stoerzinger, Kelsey [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Qiao, Liang [ORNL] [ORNL; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL] [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL] [ORNL; Shao-Horn, Yang [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Sorption properties of technical lignins. III. IR-spectral investigation of the sorption capacity of technical lignins and their derivatives in relation to bile acids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been established by IR-spectral investigations that the sorption of bile acids by technical lignins takes...

G. N. Dalimova; . L. Kristallovich

359

The near-IR luminosity-metallicity relationship for dwarf irregular galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly describe our on-going investigation of the near-IR luminosity-metallicity relationship for dwarf irregular galaxies in nearby groups of galaxies. The motivations of the project and the observational databases are introduced, and a preliminary result is presented. The 12+log(O/H) vs.H plane must be populated with more low-luminosity galaxies before a definite conclusion can be drawn.

Saviane, I; Held, E V; Ivanov, V; Alloin, D; Bresolin, F; Momany, Y; Rich, R M; Rizzi, L; Saviane, Ivo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

FREE TAX FILING VITA is a program sponsored by the IRS offering income tax preparation for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FREE TAX FILING VITA is a program sponsored by the IRS offering income tax preparation for families with income less than $58,000 for FREE. WALK-IN ONLY (at least 1 hour before closing) MORE INFO: csufvita@gmail.com / 657-278-8681 Free tax filing starts from Jan 31 to Apr 12 We are closed on Feb 1, Apr 3, 4 & 5

de Lijser, Peter

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361

First law of thermodynamics in IR modified Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the first law of thermodynamics in IR modified Ho?ava-Lifshitz spacetime. Based on the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, we obtain the integral formula and the differential formula of the first law of thermodynamics for the Kehagias-Sfetsos black hole by treating ? as a new state parameter and redefining a mass that is just equal to MADM obtained by Myung [32] if we take ?=3?/8.

Mengjie Wang; Jiliang Jing; Chikun Ding; Songbai Chen

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

First law of thermodynamics in IR modified Horava-Lifshitz gravity  

SciTech Connect

We study the first law of thermodynamics in IR modified Horava-Lifshitz spacetime. Based on the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, we obtain the integral formula and the differential formula of the first law of thermodynamics for the Kehagias-Sfetsos black hole by treating {omega} as a new state parameter and redefining a mass that is just equal to M{sub ADM} obtained by Myung [32] if we take {alpha}=3{pi}/8.

Wang Mengjie; Jing Jiliang; Ding Chikun; Chen Songbai [Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China) and Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

IR Researchers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

robotics systems. Mr. Larsen is the chief architect of software integration for the Yucca Mountain Waste Package Closure Welding and Inspection System. He has seven U.S....

364

IR Accomplishments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inside Diameter Creeping Wave Sizing Methodology," in 5th International Conference on NDE in Relation to Structural Integrity for Nuclear and Pressurized Components, pp....

365

ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variables GY Cnc, IR Com and HT Cas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variables GY Cnc, IR Com and HT Cas. We find that the sharp eclipses in GY Cnc and IR Com are due to eclipses of the white dwarf. There is some evidence for a bright spot on the edge of the accretion disc in GY Cnc, but not in IR Com. Eclipse mapping of HT Cas is presented which shows changes in the structure of the quiescent accretion disc. Observations in 2002 show the accretion disc to be invisible except for the presence of a bright spot at the disc edge. 2003 observations, however, clearly show a bright inner disc and the bright spot to be much fainter than in 2002. Although no outburst was associated with either set of quiescent observations, the system was ~0.6 mJy brighter in 2003, mainly due to the enhanced emission from the inner disc. We propose that these changes are due to variations in the mass transfer rate from the secondary star and through the disc. The disc colours indicate that it is optically thin in both its inner and outer regions. We estimate the white dwarf temperature of HT Cas to be 15 000 +/- 1000 K in 2002 and 14 000 +/- 1000 K in 2003.

W. J. Feline; V. S. Dhillon; T. R. Marsh; C. A. Watson; S. P. Littlefair

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reaction properties of NO and CO over an Ir(211) surface  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption and thermal reactivity of NO and CO over an Ir(211) surface were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption. NO adsorbed on the atop site of the (111) terrace and the bridge site of the (100) step at 273 K. In contrast, CO adsorbed only on the atop site at 273 K, initially on the (111) terrace and then on the (100) step. Both atop NO and bridge NO decomposed to N{sub 2} through the recombination of atomic nitrogen, indicating that the Ir(211) surface provides high NO dissociation activity. When NO and CO were coadsorbed, the preadsorption of atop CO on the terrace sites selectively inhibited the adsorption of atop NO on the terrace sites, while preadsorption of atop CO on the step sites significantly inhibited the adsorption of bridge NO on the step sites. These results indicate that NO may be selectively reduced by CO in the presence of O{sub 2} when Ir(211) is used as the catalyst.

Nakamura, I.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, A.; Haneda, M.; Hamada, H.; Fujitani, T. [Research Institute for Innovation in Sustainable Chemistry, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler  

SciTech Connect

This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Influence of Resonance Helical Field on the Z eff and Impurity Radiation in IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of resonant helical field, RHF, on effective ion charge, Z eff, and impurity radiations on IR-T1 tokamak discharges was studied. The theoretical calculation of...Z ef...

M. Mahmoodi Darian; A. Hojabri; M. K. Salem; M. Ghoranneviss

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Measurement of Plasma Energy Confinement Time in Presence of Resonant Helical Field in IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma energy confinement time is one of the main parameters of tokamak plasma and Lawson criterion. In this paper ... resonance helical field (RHF) in IR-T1 tokamak. For this purpose a diamagnetic loop with...L...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Microspectroscopic Census of Single Starch Granules for Octenyl Succinate Ester Modification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy was used to investigate reaction homogeneity of octenyl succinic anhydride modification on waxy maize starch and detect uniformity of blends of modified and native starches. For the first time, the ...

Yanjie Bai; Yong-Cheng Shi; David L. Wetzel

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

How do vibrations change their composition upon electronic excitation? EXSY-T2D-IR measurements challenge DFT calculations.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The composition of excited state vibrations can be disentangled by projecting ground state vibrations on them using exchange transient two-dimensional IR spectroscopy. The results challenge excited state DFT c...

Andreas Messmer; Ana-Maria Blanco Rodrguez; Jakub ebera

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation by Ir oxide Clusters Coupledto Single Cr Centers in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect

Visible light-induced water oxidation has been demonstrated at an Ir oxide nanocluster coupled to a single Cr{sup VI} site on the pore surface of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The photocatalytic unit was assembled by the reaction of surface Cr=O groups with Ir(acac){sub 3} precursor followed by calcination at 300 C and bond formation monitored by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. High-resolution Z-contrast electron micrographs of the calcined material combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis confirmed the occlusion of Ir oxide nanoparticles inside the mesopores. Oxygen evolution of an aqueous suspension of the Ir{sub x}O{sub y}-CrMCM-41 upon visible light irradiation of the Cr{sup VI}-O ligand-to-metal charge-transfer absorption was monitored mass-spectrometrically. Comparison of the product yields for samples with low Cr content (Cr/Si {le} 0.02) and high Cr content (Cr/Si = 0.05) indicates that only isolated Cr centers are capable of extracting electrons from Ir oxide clusters, while di- or polychromate species are not. Water oxidation at a multielectron-transfer catalyst coupled to a single metal center has not been demonstrated before. The ability to drive water oxidation with a single metal center as electron pump offers opportunities for coupling the oxygen-evolving photocatalytic unit to reducing sites in the nanoporous scaffold.

Nakamura, Ryuhei; Frei, Heinz

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Properties of transition metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals for tunable IR laser radiation  

SciTech Connect

The spectroscopic properties of Cr{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+}-doped single crystals of ZnS, ZnSe, and ZnTe have been investigated to understand their potential application as mid-IR tunable solid-state laser media. The spectroscopy indicated divalent Cr was the most favorable candidate for efficient room temperature lasing, and accordingly, a laser-pumped laser demonstration of Cr:ZnS and Cr:ZnSe has been performed. The lasers` output were peaked at {approximately} 2.35 {mu}m and the highest measured slope efficiencies were {approximately} 20% in both cases.

DeLoach, L.D.; Page, R.H.; Wilke, G.D. [and others

1995-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Bismuth-doped optical fibres: A new breakthrough in near-IR lasing media  

SciTech Connect

Recent results demonstrate that bismuth-doped optical fibres have considerable potential as near-IR active lasing media. This paper examines bismuth-doped fibres intended for the fabrication of fibre lasers and optical amplifiers and reviews recent results on the luminescence properties of various types of bismuth-doped fibres and the performance of bismuth-doped fibre lasers and optical amplifiers for the spectral range 1150 - 1550 nm. Problems are discussed that have yet to be solved in order to improve the efficiency of the bismuth lasers and optical amplifiers. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Observations of the 6 Centimeter Lines of OH in Evolved (OH/IR) Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observational and theoretical advances have called into question traditional OH maser pumping models in evolved (OH/IR) stars. The detection of excited-state OH lines would provide additional constraints to discriminate amongst these theoretical models. In this Letter, we report on VLA observations of the 4750 MHz and 4765 MHz lines of OH toward 45 sources, mostly evolved stars. We detect 4765 MHz emission in the star forming regions Mon R2 and LDN 1084, but we do not detect excited-state emission in any evolved stars. The flux density and velocity of the 4765 MHz detection in Mon R2 suggests that a new flaring event has begun.

Vincent L. Fish; Laura K. Zschaechner; Lornt O. Sjouwerman; Ylva M. Pihlstrm; Mark J. Claussen

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effects of dispersion and partial reduction on the catalytic properties of Rh/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalysts in the steam reforming of mono- and bicyclic aromatics  

SciTech Connect

The steam reforming of toluene, cumene, and methyl-1-naphthalene was studied on well-reduced Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts of different dispersions and on partially reduced catalysts in which the dispersion of the metallic phase was maintained at 25 {plus minus} 2%. The principal reactions were dehydrogenation DH (cumene {yields} {alpha}-methylstyrene), dealkylation DA (for instance, toluene {yields} benzene), naphthalene ring opening NRO (methylnaphthalene {yields} benzene + toluene), and degradations DN (total gasification of the molecules). Dispersion and partial reduction effects are shown to occur and can be summarized as follows: a partially reduced sample behaves catalytically as would dispersed and well-reduced catalysts. In this case, DN reactions are much inhibited, whereas DA and, to a lesser extent, NRO are relatively less affected by partial reduction. Moreover, DH is quite unaffected by these factors. The results may be expressed in terms of either electronic (DN favored on particles where the metal is more capable of donating electrons) or geometric effects (DN favored on a large ensemble of adjacent sites). These models are discussed on the basis of kinetic and XPS results, particularly those obtained on partially reduced Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst samples. Alloy effects (selectivities modified by the presence of RhAl alloy) could also occur on a catalyst calcined and reduced at high temperatures.

Delahay, G.; Duprez, D. (Universite de Poitiers (France))

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Probing IrTe2 crystal symmetry by polarized Raman scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polarized Raman scattering measurements on IrTe2 single crystals carried out over the 15640 K temperature range, and across the structural phase transition, reveal different insights regarding the crystal symmetry. In the high temperature regime three Raman active modes are observed at all of the studied temperatures above the structural phase transition, rather than two as predicted by the factor group analysis for the assumed P3m1 symmetry. This indicates that the actual symmetry of the high temperature phase is lower than previously thought. The observation of an additional Eg mode at high temperature can be explained by doubling of the original trigonal unit cell along the c axis and within the P3c1 symmetry. In the low temperature regime (below 245 K) the other Raman modes appear as a consequence of the symmetry lowering phase transition and the corresponding increase of the primitive cell. All of the modes observed below the phase transition temperature can be assigned within the monoclinic crystal symmetry. The temperature dependence of the Raman active phonons in both phases is mainly driven by anharmonicity effects. The results call for reconsideration of the crystallographic phases of IrTe2.

N. Lazarevi?; E. S. Bozin; M. ?epanovi?; M. Opa?i?; Hechang Lei (???); C. Petrovic; Z. V. Popovi?

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

A SPITZER IRS SURVEY OF NGC 1333: INSIGHTS INTO DISK EVOLUTION FROM A VERY YOUNG CLUSTER  

SciTech Connect

We report on the {lambda} = 5-36 {mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of 79 young stellar objects in the very young nearby cluster NGC 1333. NGC 1333's youth enables the study of early protoplanetary disk properties, such as the degree of settling and the formation of gaps and clearings. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using our IRS data as well as published photometry and classify our sample into SED classes. Using 'extinction-free' spectral indices, we determine whether the disk, envelope, or photosphere dominates the spectrum. We analyze the dereddened spectra of objects that show disk-dominated emission using spectral indices and properties of silicate features in order to study the vertical and radial structure of protoplanetary disks in NGC 1333. At least nine objects in our sample of NGC 1333 show signs of large (several AU) radial gaps or clearings in their inner disk. Disks with radial gaps in NGC 1333 show more nearly pristine silicate dust than their radially continuous counterparts. We compare properties of disks in NGC 1333 to those in three other well-studied regions, Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon I, and find no difference in their degree of sedimentation and dust processing.

Arnold, L. A.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Manoj, P.; Remming, I.; Sheehan, P.; Forrest, W. J.; Mamajek, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Adame, L.; McClure, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 264-723, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ausfeld, K.; Rapson, V. A., E-mail: laa@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Laser separation of nitrogen isotopes by the IR+UV dissociation of ammonia molecules  

SciTech Connect

The separation of nitrogen isotopes is studied upon successive single-photon IR excitation and UV dissociation of ammonia molecules. The excitation selectivity was provided by tuning a CO{sub 2} laser to resonance with {sup 14}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(30) laser line] or with {sup 15}NH{sub 3} molecules [the 9R(10) laser line]. Isotopic mixtures containing 4.8% and 0.37% (natural content) of the {sup 15}NH isotope were investigated. The dependences of the selectivity and the dissociation yield for each isotopic component on the buffer gas pressure (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, Ar) and the ammonia pressure were obtained. In the limit of low NH{sub 3} pressures (0.5-2 Torr), the dissociation selectivity {alpha}(15/14) for {sup 15}N was 17. The selectivity mechanism of the IR+UV dissociation is discussed and the outlook is considered for the development of the nitrogen isotope separation process based on this approach. (laser isotope separation)

Apatin, V M; Klimin, S A; Laptev, V B; Lokhman, V N; Ogurok, D D; Pigul'skii, S V; Ryabov, E A [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OH/IR stars and their superwinds as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aim : In order to study the history of mass loss in extreme OH/IR stars, we observed a number of these objects using CO as a tracer of the density and temperature structure of their circumstellar envelopes. Method : Combining CO observations from the Herschel Space Observatory with those from the ground, we trace mass loss rates as a function of radius in five extreme OH/IR stars. Using radiative transfer modelling, we modelled the dusty envelope as well as the CO emission. The high-rotational transitions of CO indicate that they originate in a dense superwind region close to the star while the lower transitions tend to come from a more tenuous outer wind which is a result of the mass loss since the early AGB phase. Result : The models of the circumstellar envelopes around these stars suggest that they have entered a superwind phase in the past 200 - 500 years. The low 18O/17O (~ 0.1 compared to the solar abundance ratio of ~ 5) and 12C/13C (3-30 cf. the solar value of 89) ratios derived from our study suppor...

Justtanont, K; Barlow, M J; Matsuura, M; Swinyard, B; Waters, L B F M; Yates, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Using Optical and Near-IR Photometry to Test MACHO Lens Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtained new VLT/ISAAC H-band observations for five MACHO LMC source stars and adjacent LMC field regions. After combining our near-IR photometry with HST/PC BVRI optical photometry, we compared the MACHO objects to the adjacent field stars in a variety of color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. These diagnostic diagrams were chosen to be sensitive to our hypothesis that at least some of the MACHO lenses were foreground Galactic disk or thick disk M dwarfs. For the five lensed objects we studied, our hypothesis could be ruled out for main sequence lens masses >= 0.1 Mo for distances out to 4 kpc. On the other hand, the fact that LMC-MACHO-5, an object not in our study, has been recently found to have just such a foreground lens, highlights that the remainder of the LMC MACHO objects should be searched for the signature of their lenses using our photometric technique, or via near-IR spectroscopy. We also constructed diagnostic color-color diagrams sensitive to determining reddening for the individual MACHO source stars and found that these five objects did not show evidence for significant additional reddening. At least these five MACHO objects are thus also inconsistent with the LMC self-lensing hypothesis.

Ted von Hippel; Ata Sarajedini; Maria Teresa Ruiz

2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ab initio Structure Determination of Mg10Ir19B16  

SciTech Connect

The ab initio structure determination of a novel unconventional noncentro-symmetric superconductor Mg{sub 10}Ir{sub 19}B{sub 16} (T{sub c} = 5 K) has been performed using a method that involves a combination of experimental data and calculations. Electron diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction, phase estimation routines, quantum mechanical calculations, high-resolution electron microscopy, and structural chemistry arguments are used. With the strengths of different methods used to eliminate the ambiguities encountered in others, the complete structure, including a very light B atom, has been determined with a high accuracy from impure polycrystalline powder samples, which suggests that the type of analysis described may be used to successfully address other similar intractable problems. The solved structure of Mg{sub 10}Ir{sub 19}B{sub 16} shows a complex nature that irregular coordination environments preclude a conversional description of compact packing of coordination polyhedra; however, it can be easier understood as ordered in an onion-skin-like series of nested polyhedra.

Xu, Qiang [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Klimczuk, T. [Princeton University; Gortenmulder, T. [Universitate Amsterdam; Jansen, J. [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Cava, R. J. [Princeton University; Zandbergen, H [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

"Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) Herschel Observations of GSS30-IRS1 in Ophiuchus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a part of the "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) key program on Herschel, we observed GSS30-IRS1, a Class I protostar located in Ophiuchus (d = 120 pc), with Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). More than 70 lines were detected within a wavelength range from 50 micron to 200 micron, including CO, H2O, OH, and two atomic [O I] lines at 63 and 145 micron. The [C II] line, known as a tracer of externally heated gas by the interstellar radiation field, is also detected at 158 micron. All lines, except [O I] and [C II], are detected only at the central spaxel of 9.4" X 9.4". The [O I] emissions are extended along a NE-SW orientation, and the [C II] line is detected over all spaxels, indicative of external PDR. The total [C II] intensity around GSS30 reveals that the far-ultraviolet radiation field is in the range of 3 to 20 G0, where G0 is in units of the Habing Field, 1.6 X 10^{-3} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. This enhanced external radiation field heats the envelope of GSS30-IRS1, causing the...

Je, Hyerin; Lee, Seokho; Green, Joel D; Evans, Neal J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High Hydrogen Concentrations Detected In The Underground Vaults For RH-TRU Waste At INEEL Compared With Calculated Values Using The INEEL-Developed Computer Code  

SciTech Connect

About 700 remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste drums are stored in about 144 underground vaults at the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratorys (INEELs) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These drums were shipped to the INEEL from 1976 through 1996. During recent monitoring, concentrations of hydrogen were found to be in excess of lower explosive limits. The hydrogen concentration in one vault was detected to be as high as 18% (by volume). This condition required evaluation of the safety basis for the facility. The INEEL has developed a computer program to estimate the hydrogen gas generation as a function of time and diffusion through a series of layers (volumes), with a maximum five layers plus a sink/environment. The program solves the first-order diffusion equations as a function of time. The current version of the code is more flexible in terms of user input. The program allows the user to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the different layers of a configuration and then change the configuration after a given time; e.g.; installation of a filter on an unvented drum or placed in a vault or in a shipping cask. The code has been used to predict vault concentrations and to identify potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. The code has generally predicted higher hydrogen concentrations than the measured values, particularly for the drums older than 20 year, which could be due to uncertainty and conservative assumptions in drum age, heat generation rate, hydrogen generation rate, Geff, and diffusion rates through the layers.

Rajiv Bhatt; Soli Khericha

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Impact of IrRu Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalysts on Pt Nanostructured Thin Films under Start-Up/Shutdown Cycling  

SciTech Connect

Electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods have been utilized to study the role of oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in mitigating degradation arising from start-up/shutdown events. Pt nanostructured thin films (NSTF) were coated with a Ru0.1Ir0.9 OER catalyst at loadings ranging from 1 to 10 g/cm2 and submitted to 5,000 potential cycles within a membrane electrode assembly. Analysis of the as-deposited catalyst showed that Ir and Ru coating is primarily metallic, and further evidence is provided to support the previously reported interaction between Ru and the perylene-red support. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to observe the impact of the OER catalysts on Pt dissolution and migration through the membrane. Elemental mapping showed a high percentage of the Ir catalyst was maintained on the NSTF whisker surfaces following testing. The presence of the OER catalysts greatly reduced the smoothing of the Pt NSTF whiskers, which has been correlated with Pt dissolution and losses in electrochemically active surface area. The dissolution of both Ir and Pt led to the formation of IrPt nanoparticle clusters in the membrane close to the cathode, as well as the formation of a Pt band deeper in the membrane.

Cullen, David A [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Atanasoska, Liliana [3M, Industrial Mineral Products Division; Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M, Industrial Mineral Products Division

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A variable for measuring masses at hadron colliders when missing energy is expected; mT2: the truth behind the glamour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AMSB-like points discussed in section 4.2. The hadronic branching ratios can be found in [10]. m?+1 #7;M?1 Point (GeV) (MeV) ?+1 ? ?01 e+?e ?+1 ? ?01 +? SPS-300 165 886 17.0% 15.9% SPS-250 159 1798 21.9% 21.5% A-250 101 766 15.4% 13.9% A-200 97 1603... natural way. Readers who would prefer a top down description of mT 2, i.e. a description which starts with a definition and then works towards its consequences, are directed to skip to section 3 where this approach is taken. The concrete example which...

Barr, Alan; Lester, Christopher G; Stephens, Phil

388

In Situ Real-Time Diffuse Reflection Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) Study of Hydrogen Adsorption and Desorption on Ir/SiO2 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on Ir/SiO2 catalyst were studied by using in situ diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) combined with...

Hu, Gengshen; Zhu, Lin; Jia, Aiping; Hu, Xin; Xie, Guanqun; Lu, Jiqing; Luo, Mengfei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Microsoft Word - PSEG Companies Comments in OE Docket No RRTT-IR-001.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K. Richter K. Richter Assistant General Regulatory Counsel Regulatory Department 80 Park Plaza, T5C, Newark, NJ 07102-4194 tel: 973.430.6451 fax: 973.802.1267 email: david.richter@pseg.com March 28, 2012 VIA ELECTRONIC FILING Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW. Washington, DC 20585 RE: DOE's Request for Information OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson, Public Service Electric and Gas Company ("PSE&G") 1 , PSEG Power LLC ("PSEG Power") and PSEG Energy Resources & Trade LLC ("PSEG ER&T") (collectively referred to herein as the "PSEG Companies") respectfully submit the following comments in response to the Department of Energy's ("DOE") Request for

390

Microsoft Word - Cover letter to RRTT-IR-001 Comments.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2012 8, 2012 via electronic mail to: Lamont.Jackson@hq.doe.gov Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Rapid Response Team for Transmission OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson: Pursuant to the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's February 21, 2012 Request for Information in the above-referenced docket, attached please find American Electric Power's comments. Respectfully submitted, /s/ Amanda Riggs Conner Amanda Riggs Conner American Electric Power Service Corporation 801 Pennsylvania Ave, N.W. Suite 320 Washington, DC 20004 Telephone: (202) 383-3436

391

Finite-size scaling in thin Fe/Ir(100) layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The critical temperature of thin Fe layers on Ir(100) is measured through M\\"o{\\ss}bauer spectroscopy as a function of the layer thickness. From a phenomenological finite-size scaling analysis, we find an effective shift exponent lambda = 3.15 +/- 0.15, which is twice as large as the value expected from the conventional finite-size scaling prediction lambda=1/nu, where nu is the correlation length critical exponent. Taking corrections to finite-size scaling into account, we derive the effective shift exponent lambda=(1+2\\Delta_1)/nu, where Delta_1 describes the leading corrections to scaling. For the 3D Heisenberg universality class, this leads to lambda = 3.0 +/- 0.1, in agreement with the experimental data. Earlier data by Ambrose and Chien on the effective shift exponent in CoO films are also explained.

Malte Henkel; Stphane Andrieu; Philippe Bauer; Michel Piecuch

1998-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

Structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Li2Ir1?xRuxO3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structure, resistivity, and magnetic susceptibility of the Li2Ir1?xRuxO3 (x=01) polycrystals have been investigated. We found that the parent antiferromagnetic phase disappears for x>0.2 and bond dimers appear in the averaged structure for x>0.5 and likely fluctuate for much smaller x. Unexpectedly, this system remains insulating for all the doping levels, contrary to the predictions based on the one-band jeff=1/2 Kitaev-Heisenberg model. These results suggest that the honeycomb iridates doped with ruthenium are a unique 5d-orbital-based platform for studying the interplay of the charge, orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom.

Hechang Lei (???); Wei-Guo Yin (???); Zhicheng Zhong (???); Hideo Hosono

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Neon Abundance in the Ejecta of QU Vul From Late-Epoch IR Spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ground-based SpectroCam-10 mid-infrared, MMT optical, and Spitzer Space Telescope IRS mid-infrared spectra taken 7.62, 18.75, and 19.38 years respectively after the outburst of the old classical nova QU Vulpeculae (Nova Vul 1984 #2). The spectra of the ejecta are dominated by forbidden line emission from neon and oxygen. Our analysis shows that neon was, at the first and last epochs respectively, more than 76 and 168 times overabundant by number with respect to hydrogen compared to the solar value. These high lower limits to the neon abundance confirm that QU Vul involved a thermonuclear runaway on an ONeMg white dwarf and approach the yields predicted by models of the nucleosynthesis in such events.

Robert D. Gehrz; Charles E. Woodward; L. Andrew Helton; Elisha F. Polomski; Thomas L. Hayward; James R. Houck; A. Evans; Joachim Krautter; Steven N. Shore; Sumner Starrfield; James Truran; G. J. Schwarz; R. Mark Wagner

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Study by IR-spectroscopy and adsorption of platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese  

SciTech Connect

Additions of Re are widely employed for modifying platinum-alumina catalysts (PAC). The effect of Mn on the catalysis of and the physicochemical properties of PAC has been less studied. It is only known that adding <0.2 wt. % Mn has no effect on the dispersity of the Pt crystallites. In this work the authors have studied the state of Pt in unmodified PAC by IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO and by the adsorption of H/sub 2/ at elevated temperatures. The state of the metallic platinum in platinum-alumina catalysts modified by Mn is more heterogeneous than in the unmodified sample. When manganese is added, platinum crystallites with stronger electron-donor properties form on the surface of the catalyst. In platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese, there is an increase in the number of sites for the high-temperature dissociative adsorption of hydrogen located on the surface of the Mn-modified carrier.

Zaitsev, A.V.; Barkova, A.P.; Borovkov, B.Yu.; Sterligov, O.D.; Isagulyants, G.V.; Kazanskii, V.B.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Properties of polyacetylene doped with I, Br, IrCl6, and FeCl3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the temperature dependence of the resistivity of polyacetylene doped with I, Br, IrCl6, and FeCl3. The roles of dopant molecule size, doping technique, doping speed, and isomerization state in determining the mechanism of electrical conduction are discussed. Evidence for dopant-induced disorder is presented from x-ray and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies. We suggest that the dopant molecule size determines whether the dopant is dispersed molecularly or whether the dopant molecules aggregate. In addition, we find significant differences in the activation energy, kBT0, between CH(Br)y and CH(I)y, although the characteristic temperature dependence of the resistivity is the same.

E. K. Sichel; M. F. Rubner; S. K. Tripathy

1982-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Al-doped ZnO powdered materials: Al solubility limit and IR absorption properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Al-doped ZnO powder was synthesized via the Pechini route with a doping rate varying from 1 to 4mol.%. A solubility limit has been estimated under 0.3mol.% of Al using X-ray diffraction refinements. The incorporation of aluminium into the ZnO lattice was investigated by 27Al NMR, which suggests an extremely low amount of Al in a distribution of sites in ZnO. In order to assess the impact of such a low dopant amount, diffuse reflection experiments were performed for a wavelength range from 200 to 2500nm. If the effect of doping was negligible for samples prepared at 850C, annealing at 1200C clearly reveals enhanced IR absorption properties for the doped samples, which are similar whatever be the nominal Al content.

Hlne Serier; Manuel Gaudon; Michel Mntrier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Solar system constraints on asymptotically flat IR modified Horava gravity through light deflection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the motion of photons around a Kehagias-Sfetsos (KS) black hole and obtain constraints on IR modified Ho$\\check{r}$ava gravity without cosmological constant ($\\sim \\Lambda_{W}$). An analytic formula for the light deflection angle is obtained. For a propagating photon, the deflection angle $\\delta \\phi$ increases with large values of the Ho$\\check{r}$ava gravity parameter $\\omega$. Under the UV limit $\\omega \\longrightarrow \\infty$, deflection angle reduces to the result of usual Schwarzschild case, $4GM/R$. It is also found that with increasing scale of astronomical observation system the Ho$\\check{r}$ava-Lifshitz gravity should satisfy $|\\omega M^2|>1.1725 \\times10^{-16}$ with 12% precision for Earth system, $|\\omega M^2| > 8.27649 \\times 10^{-17}$ with 17% precision for Jupiter system and $|\\omega M^2| > 8.27650\\times 10^{-15}$ with 0.17% precision for solar system.

Molin Liu; Junwang Lu; Benhai Yu; Jianbo Lu

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Express quality analysis of coal concentrates by diffuse reflection IR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing quality monitoring of coal concentrates is important today on account of instability in the raw materials for coking at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK) and the variable composition of the coal batch for enrichment plants. Currently, numerous standardized methods permit the determination of the classificational and quality characteristics of coal and batch. These methods are slow, laborious, and relatively ineffective in industrial conditions. In May 2005, an automated Spektrotest express-analysis system developed by ECCI was installed in the coke laboratory at ZAO RMK in order to determine the quality of the coal concentrate and batch. The basic equipment is an IR spectrometer with a unit for Fourier transformation and a special optical module yielding the reflect on spectra of the pulverized coal. A control station based on a high-speed computer runs an algorithm for information analysis and storage and for printing out the test protocol. The Spektrotest system includes complex algorithms and software specially developed at ECCI.

V.N. Egorov; I.I. Mel'nikov; N.A. Tarasov; V.I. Butakova; Y.M. Posokhov [ZAO RMK (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation  

SciTech Connect

While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in?process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Determining Transition State Geometries in Liquids Using 2D-IR  

SciTech Connect

Many properties of chemical reactions are determined by the transition state connecting reactant and product, yet it is difficult to directly obtain any information about these short-lived structures in liquids. We show that two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy can provide direct information about transition states by tracking the transformation of vibrational modes as a molecule crossed a transition state. We successfully monitored a simple chemical reaction, the fluxional rearrangement of Fe(CO)5, in which the exchange of axial and equatorial CO ligands causes an exchange of vibrational energy between the normal modes of the molecule. This energy transfer provides direct evidence regarding the time scale, transition state, and mechanism of the reaction.

Harris, Charles; Cahoon, James F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Harris, Charles B.

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

402

Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organci molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)  

SciTech Connect

Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on ?-alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto ?-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

Joan Thomas; Michael Kelley

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Progress of the ITER equatorial vis/IR wide angle viewing system optical design  

SciTech Connect

The equatorial vis/IR wide angle viewing system is present in four ITER diagnostic equatorial ports. This instrument will cover a large field of view with high spatial and temporal resolutions, to provide real time temperature measurements of plasma facing components, spectral data in the visible range, information on runaway electrons, and pellet tracking. This diagnostic needs to be reliable, precise, and long lasting. Its design is driven by both the tokamak severe environment and the high performances required for machine protection. The preliminary design phase is ongoing. Paramount issues are being tackled, relative to wide spectral band optical design, material choice, and optomechanical difficulties due to the limited space available for this instrument in the ports, since many other diagnostics and services are also present. Recent progress of the diagnostic optical design and status of associated R and D are presented.

Davi, M.; Corre, Y.; Guilhem, D.; Jullien, F.; Reichle, R.; Salasca, S.; Travere, J. M. [Association Euratom CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Cal, E. de la; Manzanares, A.; Pablos, J. L. de [Association Euratom CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Migozzi, J. B. [JBM Optique, 11 Av. de la division Leclerc, 92310 Sevres (France)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

EPR and IR studies of [Ru(NH?)?]+-Y and [Ru(NH?)?N?]+-Y type zeolites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH ) ] -Y 3 6 AND [Ru(NE ) N ] -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia1 fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Chemistry EPR AND IR STUDIES OF [Ru(NH3) ] -Y 3+ AND [Ru(NH3) N ) -Y TYPE ZEOLITES 2+ 3&2 A Thesis by RAYMOND LEON LEUBNER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ (Head of Department) (Memb...

Leubner, Raymond Leon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Radiochromic film dosimetry of HDR {sup 192}Ir source radiation fields  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A radiochromic film based dosimetry system for high dose rate (HDR) Iridium-192 brachytherapy source was described. A comparison between calibration curves established in water and Solid Water was provided. Methods: Pieces of EBT-2 model GAFCHROMIC film were irradiated in both water and Solid Water with HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source in a dose range from 0 to 50 Gy. Responses of EBT-2 GAFCHROMIC film were compared for irradiations in water and Solid Water by scaling the dose between media through Monte Carlo calculated conversion factor for both setups. To decrease uncertainty in dose delivery due to positioning of the film piece with respect to the radiation source, traceable calibration irradiations were performed in a parallel-opposed beam setup. Results: The EBT-2 GAFCHROMIC film based dosimetry system described in this work can provide an overall one-sigma dose uncertainty of 4.12% for doses above 1 Gy. The ratio of dose delivered to the sensitive layer of the film in water to the dose delivered to the sensitive layer of the film in Solid Water was calculated using Monte Carlo simulations to be 0.9941 {+-} 0.0007. Conclusions: A radiochromic film based dosimetry system using only the green color channel of a flatbed document scanner showed superior precision if used alone in a dose range that extends up to 50 Gy, which greatly decreases the complexity of work. In addition, Solid Water material was shown to be a viable alternative to water in performing radiochromic film based dosimetry with HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources.

Aldelaijan, Saad; Mohammed, Huriyyah; Tomic, Nada; Liang Liheng; DeBlois, Francois; Sarfehnia, Arman; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Faraday Discuss., 1994,97,35-41 Far-IR Vibration-Rotation-Tunnelling Spectroscopy of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The theoretical equi- librium geometry of the water trimer is a hydrogen-bonded ring in which each water acts' is accomplished by rotating one water monomer (shaded) about its donated hydrogen bond. The pathway connectsFaraday Discuss., 1994,97,35-41 Far-IR Vibration-Rotation-Tunnelling Spectroscopy of the Water

Cohen, Ronald C.

407

Conformational Switching between Protein Substates Studied with 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conformational Switching between Protein Substates Studied with 2D IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy. Three conformational substates have been identified for the carbonmonoxy form of myoglobin (Mb vibrational echo chemical exchange experiments are used to observed switching between two of these substates

Fayer, Michael D.

408

Free Tax Filing! VITA is a free program sponsored by the IRS which can prepare simple or low  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Tax Filing! VITA is a free program sponsored by the IRS which can prepare simple or low income (under $58,000 per household) tax returns for FREE! Free tax filing starts on February 27th and ends our free tax filing events, please call 657-278-8681 or email csufvita@gmail.com to verify that you

de Lijser, Peter

409

PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes_020312  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes in their work. The data entry team searched for photos/videos of music faculty online and found a few about PRO and will use the PRO website user guide and FAQs to respond to questions. Returning

410

Integrating IR and RDBMS Using Cooperative Indexing Samuel DeFazio, Amjad Daoud, Lisa Ann Smith, and Jagannathan Srinivasan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integration we mean: i) support for document storage, indexing, retrieval, and update, ii) transaction for the integrated offering to exhibit scaleable performance for document indexing and retrieval processes IR system and a DBMS with the integration mainly occurring in a common interface. In this approach

Callan, Jamie

411

Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational@stanford.edu Abstract: Weak hydrogen-bonded solute/solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen-bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen

Fayer, Michael D.

412

Magnetic order in the frustrated Ising-like chain compound Sr3NiIrO6 E. Lefranois,1, 2, 3,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic order in the frustrated Ising-like chain compound Sr3NiIrO6 E. Lefrançois,1, 2, 3, L. C and temperature dependence of the magnetization of single crystals of Sr3NiIrO6. These measurements evidence the presence of an easy axis of anisotropy and two anomalies in the magnetic susceptibility. Neutron powder

Boyer, Edmond

413

Zelftest chemie voor 1 Ba Bio-ir, Chemie, Fysica en sterrenkunde Voor meer informatie: contacteer csb.etterbeek@vub.ac.be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zelftest chemie voor 1 Ba Bio-ir, Chemie, Fysica en sterrenkunde Voor meer informatie: contacteer opgenomen in het bijhorend overzicht van de verwachte voorkennis chemie. 1. Elementaire chemie en chemisch, whisky, fruitsap met pulp, keukenzout #12;Zelftest chemie voor 1 Ba Bio-ir, Chemie, Fysica en

Einmahl, Uwe

414

WATER ABSORPTION FROM GAS VERY NEAR THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR AFGL 2136 IRS 1  

SciTech Connect

We present ground-based observations of the ?{sub 1} and ?{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 2}O toward the massive protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1, identifying absorption features due to 47 different ro-vibrational transitions between 2.468 ?m and 2.561 ?m. Analysis of these features indicates the absorption arises in warm (T = 506 25 K), very dense (n(H{sub 2}) > 5 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3}) gas, suggesting an origin close to the central protostar. The total column density of warm water is estimated to be N(H{sub 2}O) = (1.02 0.02) 10{sup 19} cm{sup 2}, giving a relative abundance of N(H{sub 2}O)/N(H{sub 2}) ? 10{sup 4}. Our study represents the first extensive use of water vapor absorption lines in the near infrared, and demonstrates the utility of such observations in deriving physical parameters.

Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seifahrt, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Richter, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluation of IR techniques for detection of wall thinning in service water piping  

SciTech Connect

Service water piping systems at electric power plants provide cooling for a variety of safety and non-safety related components and systems. Assessing integrity of the service water piping system includes detection and analysis of pipe wall thinning. Conventional inspection techniques usually involve the time-intensive process of ultrasonic thickness measurements, based on a grid system, of the entire pipe length. An alternative to this process may lie in the use of active infrared thermography techniques for detection of thin wall areas in the pipe. The EPRI NDE Center participated in a preliminary evaluation of this technology at Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant. Based on the promising results of the Vermont Yankee activity, the Center worked with Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc. (TWI) in an effort to optimize the IR thermal injection technique for service water piping applications. The primary goals of this effort were to determine the practical depth resolution capabilities of the thermal injection method in carbon steel, and also to minimize the effects of pipe curvature on detection capabilities. Both of these efforts were subject to the constraint that the system be sufficiently portable for use in an electrical power plant, where space and access to the pipe surface is often limited.

Zayicek, P. [EPRI NDE Center, Charlotte, NC (United States); Shepard, S.M. [Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc., Lathrup Village, MI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Investigation of calcium aluminates by IR spectroscopy in diffusely scattered light  

SciTech Connect

The hydroxyl covering and the adsorption sites for CO and H/sub 2/O on aluminum-calcium catalysts and supports with developed surfaces have been studied by IR spectroscopy in diffusely scattered light. The presence of several types of surface OH groups, viz., terminal groups bonded to calcium ions with different types of coordination, bridging OH groups, and groups appearing in (CaOH)/sup +/ groupings, which perform the role of compensating cations in the zeolite-like structure of calcium aluminates, has been established. The shifts of the bands of the OH groups upon the adsorption of C/sub 6/H/sub 6/ and cyclo-C/sub 6/H/sub 12/ point out their weakly acidic or basic character. When calcium aluminates are dehydroxylated, aprotic sites appear on their surfaces, and the rehydration of such surfaces is accompanied by the formation of OH groups and the weakening of the Al-O-M bonds (M = Al, Ca) with the appearance of additional sites for the strong adsorption of water.

Medin, A.S.; Borovkov, V.Yu.; Nissenbaum, V.D.; Yakerson, V.I.; Kazanskii, V.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Late-Time IR Line Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the imprint of magnetic fields B on late-time IR line profiles and light curves of Type Ia Supernovae. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass M_{Ch White Dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 1E9G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 mu can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. Subsequently, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. By day 500, the profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B and directional dependent for dipole fields. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. After about 200 days, persistent broad-line, flat-topped or stumpy profiles require high density burning which is the signature of a WD close to M_Ch. Narrow peaked profiles are a signature of chemical mixing or sub-...

Penney, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes  

SciTech Connect

Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

DOE/EIS-0026-SA-4: Supplement Analysis for Use of the 10-160B Transportation Cask for RH-TRU Waste Shipments to WIPP (12/17/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH 1-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH ID,5052347038 PAGE 3/15 [TX/RX NO 6044] 141003 08/31/2004 TOE 15:22 PAGE 4/15 IC,5052347038 AUG-31-04 15,22 FROM,L AND M TECH PAGE 1 of 9 Supplement Analysis for USE OF THE IO-160B TRANSPORTATION CASK FOR RH-TRUWASTE SHIPMENTS TO WIPP 1.0 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is propo~ing to use the CNS lO-160B, Type B Shipping Cask (referred to in this document simply as the lO-160B) to transport remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE originally examined the impacts ofWlPP operations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-OO26-S-2, (SEIS~II). This Supplement Analysis (SA) discusses environmental impacts associated with

420

The role of the (111) texture on the exchange bias and interlayer coupling effects observed in sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic properties of sputtered NiFe/IrMn/Co trilayers grown on different seed layers (Cu or Ta) deposited on Si (100) substrates were investigated by magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. Exchange bias effect and magnetic spring behavior have been studied by changing the IrMn thickness. As shown by X-ray diffraction, Ta and Cu seed layers provoke different degrees of (111) fcc-texture that directly affect the exchange bias and indirectly modify the exchange spring coupling behavior. Increasing the IrMn thickness, it was observed that the coupling angle between the Co and NiFe ferromagnetic layers increases for the Cu seed system, but it reduces for the Ta case. The results were explained considering (i) different anisotropies of the Co and IrMn layers induced by the different degree of the (111) texture and (ii) the distinct exchange bias set at the NiFe/IrMn and IrMn/Co interfaces in both systems. The NiFe and Co interlayer coupling angle is strongly correlated with both exchange bias and exchange magnetic spring phenomena. It was also shown that the highest exchange bias field occurs when an unstressed L1{sub 2} IrMn structure is stabilized.

Castro, I. L.; Nascimento, V. P.; Passamani, E. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Larica, C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES 29075-910 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES 29075-910 (Brazil); Tafur, M. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Campus Itabira, Itabira, MG 37500-903 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Campus Itabira, Itabira, MG 37500-903 (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Universidade Federal de Goias, Goiania, GO 74001-970 (Brazil)] [Universidade Federal de Goias, Goiania, GO 74001-970 (Brazil)

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure Julio C. Morales 1 , Amy Rommel 1 , Konstantin Leskov 2 , Walter M. Hittelman 3 , David A. Boothman 1# 1 Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. 3 Department of Experimental Therapeutics, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. # To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: David.Boothman@utsouthwestern.edu Eukaryotic cells can respond to DNA double strand breaks created by low doses of IR by activating homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end- joining (NHEJ) pathways to repair DNA. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Ku70 as

422

Jeff=12 Mott spin-orbit insulating state close to the cubic limit in Ca4IrO6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Jeff=12 state is manifested in systems with large cubic crystal field splitting and spin-orbit coupling that are comparable to the on-site Coulomb interaction, U. 5d transition-metal oxides host parameters in this regime and strong evidence for this state in Sr2IrO4, and additional iridates, has been presented. All the candidates, however, deviate from the cubic crystal field required to provide an unmixed canonical Jeff=12 state, impacting the development of a robust model of this novel insulating and magnetic state. We present experimental and theoretical results that not only show Ca4IrO6 hosts the state, but furthermore uniquely resides in the limit required for a canonical unmixed Jeff=12 state.

S. Calder; G.-X. Cao; S. Okamoto; J. W. Kim; V. R. Cooper; Z. Gai; B. C. Sales; M. D. Lumsden; D. Mandrus; A. D. Christianson

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over Ir/SiO/sub 2/. An in situ infrared and kinetic study  

SciTech Connect

The oxidation of CO on a highly dispersed Ir/SiO/sub 2/ catalyst has been studied both in a Pyrex microreactor and by using an in situ infrared cell-reactor. Multiple steady states obtained under conditions of increasing and decreasing CO partial pressure were observed to lead to reaction rate hysteresis. The area under the hysteresis loop is strongly dependent on reaction temperature. This is explained by invoking competitive adsorption between CO and O/sub 2/ as a function of temperature. Self-sustained oscillations were obtained when certain conditions of partial pressure and temperature were met. Quantitative estimates of fluctuations in surface coverage and temperature during these oscillations were 10% and 3K, respectively. CO islands of reactivity were not observed under the conditions of this study. The presence of higher oxidation states of IR could not be unequivocally determined by using infrared spectroscopy. 29 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

Saymeh, R.A.; Gonzalez, R.D.

1986-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

Novel Magnetism of Ir5+(5d4) Ions in the Double Perovskite Sr2YIrO6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We synthesize and study single crystals of a new double-perovskite Sr2YIrO6. Despite two strongly unfavorable conditions for magnetic order, namely, pentavalent Ir5+(5d4) ions which are anticipated to have Jeff=0 singlet ground states in the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) limit and geometric frustration in a face-centered cubic structure formed by the Ir5+ ions, we observe this iridate to undergo a novel magnetic transition at temperatures below 1.3K. We provide compelling experimental and theoretical evidence that the origin of magnetism is in an unusual interplay between strong noncubic crystal fields, local exchange interactions, and intermediate-strength SOC. Sr2YIrO6 provides a rare example of the failed dominance of SOC in the iridates.

G. Cao, T.?F. Qi, L. Li, J. Terzic, S.?J. Yuan, L.?E. DeLong, G. Murthy, and R.?K. Kaul

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

425

Interstitial BiO molecule as a broadband IR luminescence centre in bismuth-doped silica glass  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data on absorption and luminescence in optical fibres with a Bi : SiO{sub 2} glass core are compared to experimentally determined and calculated spectroscopic properties of the BiO molecule. The results suggest that the IR luminescence of Bi : SiO{sub 2} glass is due to interstitial BiO molecules. This assumption is supported by quantum-chemical simulation results for a BiO molecule in a ring interstice of the silica glass network.

Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Multi-Dimensional Broadband IR Radiative Forcing of Marine Stratocumulus in a Large Eddy Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect

In order to address the interactive and evolutionary nature of the cloud-radiation interaction, we have coupled to a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model the sophisticated multi-dimensional radiative transfer (MDRT) scheme of Evans (Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method; 1998). Because of computational expense, we are at this time only able to run 2D experiments. Preliminary runs consider only the broadband longwave component, in large part because IR cloud top cooling is the significant forcing mechanism for marine stratocumulus. Little difference is noted in the evolution of unbroken stratocumulus between three-hour runs using MDRT and independent pixel approximation (IPA) for 2D domains of 50 km in the horizontal and 1.5 km in the vertical. Local heating rates differ slightly near undulating regions of cloud top, and a slight bias in mean heating rate from 1 to 3 h is present, yet the differences are never strong enough to result in a pronounced evolutionary bias in typical boundary layer metrics (e.g. inversion height, vertical velocity variance, TKE). Longer integration times may eventually produce a physical response to the bias in radiative cooling rates. A low-CCN case, designed to produce significant drizzle and induce cloud breakup does show subtle differences between MDRT and IPA. Over the course of the 6 hour simulations, entrainment is slightly less in the MDRT case, and the transition to the surface-based trade cumulus regime is delayed. Mean cooling rates appear systematically weaker in the MDRT case, indicative of a less energetic PBL and reflected in profiles of vertical velocity variance and TKE.

Mechem, David B.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Kogan, Y. L.; Davis, Anthony B; Cahalan, Robert F.; Takara, Ezra E.; Ellingson, Robert G.

2002-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Probing photochemical transformations at TiO{sub 2}/Pt and TiO{sub 2}/Ir interfaces using x-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Structural transformations at the TiO{sub 2}/Pt and TiO{sub 2}/Ir interfaces during UV-irradiation have been probed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Oxidation by the photogenerated holes results in the intercalation of Pt and Ir into the Titania matrix. The structural transformations observed with Pt and Ir nanoparticles anchored on TiO{sub 2} is different than the clustering of gold atoms observed in the TiO{sub 2}/Au system. Implications of such structural transformations on the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalyts are discussed.

Lahiri, Debdutta; Subramanian, V.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kamat, Prashant V. [Synchrotron Radiation Section, Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Crystallization, crystal-structure refinement, and IR spectroscopy of a synthetic hexahydroborite analog  

SciTech Connect

The crystal structure of the hexahydroborite analog Ca[B(OH){sub 4}]{sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O (a = 7.9941(3) Angstrom-Sign , b = 6.6321(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 7.9871(3) Angstrom-Sign , {beta} = 104.166(4) Degree-Sign , V = 410.58(3) Angstrom-Sign {sup 3}, sp. gr. P2/c, Z = 2, {rho}{sub calc} = 1.891 g/cm{sup 3}; Xcalibur S CCD automated diffractometer, 1196 reflections with I > 2{sigma}(I), {lambda}MoK{sub {alpha}}), which was synthesized by the hydrothermal method via the recrystallization of calciborite CaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M) in the M - B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - H{sub 2}O system (t = 250 Degree-Sign C and P = 70-80 atm), was refined by the least-squares method with anisotropic displacement parameters (H atoms were located; R{sub 1} = 0.0260). The structure of synthetic hexahydroborite consists of infinite columns running along the c axis. The columns are formed by Ca polyhedra linked together and to [B(OH){sub 4}] orthotetrahedra by sharing edges. Along the two other axes, the translationally equivalent columns are linked only by hydrogen bonds. The presence of a stronger bond between the discrete (Ca-B-O) columns along the shortest (b = 6.6 Angstrom-Sign ) axis accounts for the possibility of the shift of the columns by 1/2T{sub b} and the formation of the second modification of Ca[B(OH){sub 4}]{sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O. The crystals of synthetic hexahydroborite were studied by IR spectroscopy. A crystal-chemical analysis was performed for a series of natural metaborates with the general formula CaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O (CaO: B{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 1: 1, n = 0-6), including calciborite CaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} and hexahydroborite CaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O as the end members.

Yamnova, N. A., E-mail: natalia-yamnova@yandex.ru; Borovikova, E. Yu.; Dimitrova, O. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Geology (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Miniature MT optical assembly (MMTOA)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical assembly (10) includes a rigid mount (12) with a recess (26) proximate a first side thereof, a substrate (14), and an optical die (16) flip-chip bonded to the substrate (14). The substrate (14) is secured to the first side of the mount and includes a plurality of die bonding elements (40), a plurality of optical apertures (32), and a plurality of external bonding elements (42). A plurality of traces (44) interconnect the die bonding elements (40) and the external bonding elements (42). The optical die (16) includes a plurality of optical elements, each element including an optical signal interface (48), the die being bonded to the plurality of die bonding elements (40) such that the optical signal interface (48) of each element is in registry with an optical aperture (32) of the substrate (14) and the die (16) is at least partially enclosed by the recess (26).

Laughlin, Daric (Overland Park, KS); Abel, Phillip (Overland Park, KS)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Superconductivity in Ban+2Ir4nGe12n+4 (n=1,2) with cage structure and softening of low-lying localized mode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on new superconductors Ban+2Ir4nGe12n+4 (n= 1, 2) with critical temperatures Tc= 6.1 and 3.2K, respectively, along with their crystal structures, electron transport, and specific heat. The compounds are composed of alternating Ba@Ir8Ge16 and Ba@Ir2Ge16 cages, both of which are larger in the n= 1 sample than in the n= 2 sample. The normal-state heat capacity reveals two low-lying vibration modes associated with guest Ba cations, and both characteristic temperatures in Ba3Ir4Ge16 are smaller than those in Ba4Ir8Ge28. Meanwhile, the density functional theory calculations reveal that the Ge-4p bands dominated the Fermi level in both samples. We propose that the softening of localized phonons due to expansion of the cage strengthens the electron-phonon coupling between Ba cations and Ge anions, leading to the higher Tc in Ba3Ir4Ge16.

Jiangang Guo, Jun-ichi Yamaura, Hechang Lei, Satoru Matsuishi, Yanpeng Qi, and Hideo Hosono

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

On the LINER nuclear obscuration, Compton-thickness and the existence of the dusty torus; Clues from Spitzer/IRS spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the optically classified low ionisation narrow emission-line regions (LINERs) nuclei host an active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, how they fit into the unified model (UM) of AGN is still an open question. The aims of this work are to study at mid-infrared (mid-IR) (1) the Compton-thick nature of LINERs; and (2) the disappearance of the dusty torus in LINERs predicted from theoretical arguments. We have compiled all the available low spectral resolution mid-IR spectra of LINERs from the IRS/Spitzer (40 LINERs). We have complemented this sample with Spitzer/IRS spectra of PGQSOs, S1s, S2s, and SBs nuclei. We have studied the AGN versus the starburst content in our sample using different indicators: the EW(PAH 6.2um), the strength of the silicate feature at 9.7um, and the steepness of the mid-IR spectra. In 25 out of the 40 LINERs (i.e., 62.5%) the mid-IR spectra are not SB-dominated, similar to the comparison S2 sample (67.7%). The average spectra of both SB-dominated LINERs and S2s are very similar t...

Gonzalez-Martin, O; Marquez, I; Rodrguez-Espinosa, J M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Ramos-Almeida, C; Dultzin, D; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Ruschel-Dutra, D; Alonso-Herrero, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

New Limits to the IR Background: Bounds on Radiative Neutrino Decay and on VMO Contributions to the Dark Matter Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From considering the effect of gamma-gamma interactions on recently observed TeV gamma-ray spectra, improved limits are set to the density of extragalactic infrared (IR) photons which are robust and essentially model-independent. The resulting limits are up to two orders of magnitude more restrictive than direct observations in the 0.025-0.3eV regime. These limits are used to improve constraints on radiative neutrino decay in the mass range above 0.05eV and on Very Massive Objects (VMOs) as providing the dark matter needed to explain galaxy rotation curves.

S. D. Biller; J. Buckley; A. Burdett; J. Bussons Gordo; D. A. Carter-Lewis; D. J. Fegan; J. Findley; J. A. Gaidos; A. M. Hillas; F. Krennrich; R. C. Lamb; R. Lessard; J. E. McEnery; G. Mohanty; J. Quinn; A. J. Rodgers; H. J. Rose; F. Samuelson; G. Sembroski; P. Skelton; T. C. Weekes; J; Zweerink

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

Features of gadolinium and ytterbium extraction by tributyl phosphate from concentrated nitric acid solutions. II. IR spectra of lanthanide extracts  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium organic phases in extraction systems consisting of tributyl phosphate (TBP) (neat or 1.8 M in CCl{sub 4}) and 8-12 M nitric acid containing Gd or Yb or lanthanide-free have been studied by IR spectroscopy. It was shown that under these conditions lanthanides are extracted as complex trisolvates Ln(NO{sub 3})9{sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP with m = 3-6. Nitric acid molecules are H-bonded to oxygen atoms of coordinated nitrate ions and do not substitute TBP molecules in coordination sphere of the metal ion.

Nikitina, G.P.; Seredkina, N.V.; Kistopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Epitaxial strain effect on the Jeff = 1/2 moment orientation in Sr2IrO4 thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have grown Sr2IrO4 (SIO) epitaxial thin films on SrTiO3 (STO) and NdGaO3 (NGO) substrates by a pulsed laser deposition method and characterized their structures and magnetic properties. We find that SIO films grown on STO substrates display tetragonal structure with a tensile strain of 0.13%, while SIO films grown on NGO substrates exhibit slightly orthorhombic structure with anisotropic biaxial tensile strains of 0.39% and 0.51% along the in-plane crystallographic axes. Although both films display insulating properties as bulk SIO does, their magnetic properties are distinct from that of bulk SIO. The ferromagnetic (FM) component of the Jeff=1/2 canted antiferromagnetic order, which emerges below ?240 K in bulk SIO, is significantly weakened in both films, with a greater weakening appearing in the SIO/NGO film. From structural and magnetoresistance anisotropy analyses for both films, we reveal that the weak FM component in SIO films is dependent on the epitaxial strain. The greater tensile strain leads to a smaller octahedral rotation: The rotation angle is ?9.7(1) for the SIO/NGO film and ?10.7(2) for the SIO/STO film. These findings indicate that the Jeff = 1/2 moment orientation in SIO follows the IrO6 octahedral rotation due to strong spin-orbit interaction.

Ludi Miao; Hong Xu; Z. Q. Mao

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS  

SciTech Connect

Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ?SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (?SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Cop; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energetic mid-IR femtosecond pulse generation by self-defocusing soliton-induced dispersive waves in a bulk quadratic nonlinear crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating energetic femtosecond mid-IR pulses is crucial for ultrafast spectroscopy, and currently relies on parametric processes that, while efficient, are also complex. Here we experimentally show a simple alternative that uses a single pump wavelength without any pump synchronization and without critical phase-matching requirements. Pumping a bulk quadratic nonlinear crystal (unpoled LiNbO$_3$ cut for noncritical phase-mismatched interaction) with sub-mJ near-IR 50-fs pulses, tunable and broadband ($\\sim 1,000$ cm$^{-1}$) mid-IR pulses around $3.0~\\mu\\rm m$ are generated with excellent spatio-temporal pulse quality, having up to 10.5 $\\mu$J energy (6.3% conversion). The mid-IR pulses are dispersive waves phase-matched to near-IR self-defocusing solitons created by the induced self-defocusing cascaded nonlinearity. This process is filament-free and the input pulse energy can therefore be scaled arbitrarily by using large-aperture crystals. The technique can readily be implemented with other crystals and la...

Zhou, B B; Bache, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - arcuate y4 receptors Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

question is whether GnRH neurons express insulin receptors (IRs) in vivo Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

438

Crystal structure of brucite-type cobalt hydroxide ?-Co{O(H,D)}2 neutron diffraction, IR and Raman spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structure of brucite-type Co(OD)2 (space group P3?ml, Z = 1, a = 317.79(4) pm and c = 464.2(1) pm, RI = 5.89%) has been refined by neutron powder diffraction studies on the basis of 671 observations and 44 reflections. Infrared and Raman spectra of cobalt hydroxide at different degrees of deuteration are presented and assigned to the internal, librational and translational modes. The D?O distance of 252.8 pm and the wavenumbers of the OH and OD stretching modes (3604 and 2665 cm?1, 90 K, mean values of the unit-cell group modes) do not exclude the formation of weak trifurcated hydrogen bonds. The librational and translational vibrations of Eu species are strongly coupled as shown by the respective isotopic shifts. A reassignment of the IR-allowed librations and lattice vibrations of transition metal brucite-type hydroxides is given.

Ch. Mockenhaupt; Th. Zeiske; H.D. Lutz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Adsorbate effects on a mixed-valence compound: Carbon monoxide chemisorption on CeIr/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effects of stoichiometry change and CO chemisorption on the surface electronic structure of the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/. We show that the surface iridium to cerium ratio can be varied by changing sample temperature while sputtering. Carbon monoxide is found to adsorb 80% molecularly on the surface and cause a mild surface oxidation which induces a shift of electron density into available cerium f orbitals. Peaks due to the 4sigma, 1..pi.., and 5sigma CO molecular orbitals appear at different binding energies than those due to molecular CO on the pure iridium surface. This binding-energy shift as well as the high percentage of molecular CO on the surface (CO adsorption on pure cerium is completely dissociative) points toward a surface which has lost much of the elemental character of its two constituents upon compound formation.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.; Lawrence, J.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Adsorbate effects on a mixed-valence compound: carbon monoxide chemisorption on CeIr/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

The authors studied the effects of stoichiometry change and CO chemisorption on the surface electronic structure of the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/. It is shown that the surface iridium to cerium ratio can be varied by changing sample temperature while sputtering. Carbon monoxide is found to adsorb 80% molecularly on the surface and cause a mild surface oxidation which induces a shift of electron density into available cerium f orbitals. Peaks due to the 4 sigma, 1 pi, and 5 sigma CO molecular orbitals appear at different binding energies than those due to molecular CO on the pure iridium surface. This binding-energy shift as well as the high percentage of molecular CO on the surface (CO adsorption on pure cerium is completely dissociative) points toward a surface which has lost much of the elemental character of its two constituents upon compound formation.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Transition-metal (Au, Pt, Ir, Re) bonding to Al,Si,Ge: X-ray-absorption studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report transition-metal (T) L2 and L3 near-edge x-ray-absorption spectroscopy measurements on more than a score of T-X compounds with T=Au, Pt, Ir, and Re and X=Al, Si, and Ge. We correlate the strength of the (2p?5d)-related white line feature at these edges to the degree of chemical-bonding-induced 5d-orbital charge transfer in these materials. Similar bonding trends are shown to be present in 1:2:2 compounds involving these T and X elements. Finally, the bonding-induced charge-transfer effects in such T-X compounds are discussed along with the Pauling electronegativity scale. [L. Pauling, The Nature of the Chemical Bond (Cornell University Press, New York, 1960), p. 93.

Y. Jeon, Boyun Qi, F. Lu, and M. Croft

1989-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Measurements of forbidden line radiation of Ar II (6. 99. mu. m) in W3 IRS 1  

SciTech Connect

Observations of the (Ar II) (6.99 ..mu..m) line flux in W3 IRS 1 are combined with previously obtained measurements of the (Ar III) (8.99 ..mu..m) line flux. The observed ratio of (Ar II)/(Ar III) is inconsistent with the calculated ratio for an H II region with the densities required by radio observations and with a central 40,000--45,000 K star with atmosphere as described by a Mihalas model. A solar effective UV radiation field is required; a dusty model we had previously invoked fits the observations. In addition we determine that the argon abundance is n(Ar)/n(H)roughly-equal8 x 10/sup -6/, a value about twice that usually adopted for normal solar abundance; however, there are uncertainties in the extinction and the model which do not allow us to preclude solar abundance.

Herter, T.; Pipher, J.L.; Helfer, H.L.; Willner, S.P.; Puetter, R.C.; Rudy, R.J.; Soifer, B.T.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Theoretical study of the magnetic x-ray dichroism of Os, Ir, Pt, and Au impurities in Fe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of the 5d impurities Os, Ir, Pt, and Au in ferromagnetic Fe has been studied by the spin-polarized, relativistic version of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Greens-function method. This approach simultaneously treats spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling and naturally allows for a theoretical investigation of effects arising from an interplay of both. Here the polarization dependence of x-ray absorption (magnetic x-ray dichroism) is considered. For all the impurities studied, the agreement with recent experimental L2 and L3 absorption spectra is very satisfactory. For Pt in Fe, a decomposition of the spectra into various absorption channels is presented and the applicability of a simplified model is discussed that interprets the spectra in terms of a spin-polarized band structure alone.

H. Ebert and R. Zeller

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Oxygen evolution reaction on IrO2-based DSA type electrodes: kinetics analysis of Tafel lines and EIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2Ta2O5 mixed oxide electrodes in H2SO4 solution was studied by performing quasi-stationary current-potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The uncompensated resistance corrected Tafel lines displayed two distinct linear regions, with one of the slope close to 60mVdec?1 in the low potential region and the other close to 130mVdec?1 in the high potential region. The kinetics equations based on the proposed OER mechanism were derived and were used to simulate the current-potential curve. A mathematical deduction of EIS data was also carried out based on one state-variable theory. Both the polarization curve and impedance spectra were well approximated by kinetics analysis.

Ji-Ming Hu; Jian-Qing Zhang; Chu-Nan Cao

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Ordered vs. disordered perovskites; structural studies of Fe-doped SrIrO{sub 3} and SrRuO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

The structures of the two Fe containing perovskites Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} and SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} have been established using a combination of synchrotron and neutron diffraction methods. Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} and SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} are shown to be monoclinic I2/m and tetragonal I4/mcm respectively The former exhibits a rock-salt like ordering of the Fe and Ir cations and displays a sequence of phase transitions associated with the loss of the octahedral tilts upon heating; 12/m?I4/m?Fm3{sup }m. The Fe and Ru cations are disordered in SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} and this shows a single structural phase transition upon heating due to the loss of the in-phase tilts, viz. I4/mcm?Pm3{sup }m. In both cases XANES measurements show partial oxidation of the Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 4+}. The difference in the structures between the two is remarkable given the similar size of Ir{sup 5+} and Ru{sup 5+}, and this is reflected in their magnetic properties. - Graphical abstract: Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} and SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} are shown, using a combination of synchrotron and neutron diffraction, to be monoclinic I2/m with cation ordering and tetragonal I4/mcm with disordered Fe and Ir, respectively. Both undergo phase transitions upon heating due to the loss of the octahedral tilts. Display Omitted - Highlights: Sr{sub 2}IrFeO{sub 6} shown to be monoclinic and shows the transitions upon heating I2/m?I4/m? Fm3{sup }m. SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} is tetragonal and shows a single I4/mcm?Pm3m transition upon heating. The Fe and Ru cations are disordered in SrRu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} but ordered in Sr{sub 2}FeIrO{sub 6}. XANES measurements show partial oxidation of the Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 4+}.

Qasim, Ilyas; Blanchard, Peter E.R.; Liu, Samuel; Tang, Chunguang [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kennedy, Brendan J., E-mail: B.Kennedy@chem.usyd.edu.au [School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Avdeev, Maxim [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Kimpton, Justin A. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol. Due to the simple but accurate assembly, the sandwich measurement method is useful for daily dose management of {sup 192}Ir sources.

Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan); Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Kawamura, Shinji [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Identifying silicate-absorbed ULIRGs at z~1-2 in the Bootes Field using Spitzer/IRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the 16$\\mu$m peakup imager on the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on Spitzer, we present a serendipitous survey of 0.0392 deg$^{2}$ within the area of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey in Bootes. Combining our results with the available Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24$\\mu$m survey of this area, we produce a catalog of 150 16$\\mu$m sources brighter than 0.18 mJy (3$\\sigma$) for which we derive measures or limits on the 16/24$\\mu$m colors. Such colors are especially useful in determining redshifts for sources whose mid infrared spectra contain strong emission or absorption features that characterize these colors as a function of redshift. We find that the 9.7$\\mu$m silicate absorption feature in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) results in sources brighter at 16$\\mu$m than at 24$\\mu$m at z $\\sim$ 1--1.8 by at least 20%. With a threshold flux ratio of 1.2, restricting our analysis to $>5\\sigma$ detections at 16$\\mu$m, and using a $3\\sigma$ limit on 24$\\mu$m non-detections, the number of silicate-absorbed ULIRG candidates is 36. This defines a strong upper limit of $\\sim$920 sources deg$^{-2}$, on the population of silicate-absorbed ULIRGs at z $\\sim$ 1--1.8. This source count is about half of the total number of sources predicted at z $\\sim$ 1--2 by various phenomenological models. We note that the high 16/24$\\mu$m colors measured cannot be reproduced by any of the mid-IR spectral energy distributions assumed by these models, which points to the strong limitations currently affecting our phenomenological and theoretical understanding of infrared galaxy evolution.

M. M. Kasliwal; V. Charmandaris; D. Weedman; J. R. Houck; E. Le Floc'h; S. J. U. Higdon; L. Armus; H. I. Teplitz

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

High-pressure phase transition and behavior of protons in brucite Mg(OH)2: a high-pressuretemperature study using IR synchrotron radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Infrared absorption spectra of brucite Mg (OH)2...were measured under high pressure and high temperature from 0.1?MPa 25?C to 16?GPa 360?C using infrared synchrotron radiation at BL43IR of Spring-8 and a high-...

K. Shinoda; M. Yamakata; T. Nanba; H. Kimura

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Voorkennis chemie voor 1 Ba Bio-ir, Chemie, Fysica en sterrenkunde Voor meer informatie: contacteer csb.etterbeek@vub.ac.be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voorkennis chemie voor 1 Ba Bio-ir, Chemie, Fysica en sterrenkunde Voor meer informatie: contacteer verwacht wordt bij aanvang van een studie bachelor Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen, Chemie of Fysica en, telkens geïllustreerd met een of meerdere voorbeeldopgaven. 1. Elementaire chemie en chemisch rekenen 1

Einmahl, Uwe

450

Precise measurement of alpha(K) for the M4 transition from Ir-193(m): A test of internal-conversion theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 10.5-day isomer in Ir-193 decays by a single 80.2-keV M4 transition directly to the ground state of that nucleus. We have measured the total intensity of K x rays relative to 80.2-keV gamma rays for this transition to be 98.7(6). With the K...

Nica, N.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, VE; Raman, S.; Nestor, CW; Trzhaskovskaya, MB.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Growth of Dome-Shaped Carbon Nanoislands on Ir(111): The Intermediate between Carbidic Clusters and Quasi-Free-Standing Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrocarbon dissociation on transition metal (TM) sur- faces represents a challenging way to its synthesisGrowth of Dome-Shaped Carbon Nanoislands on Ir(111): The Intermediate between Carbidic Clusters coupled carbidic carbon and a quasi-free-standing graphene layer, can provide information for a rational

Alfè, Dario

452

CO chemisorption effect on cerium initial and final states in the core level photoelectron spectrum of CeIr  

SciTech Connect

Carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption on the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/ has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. CO adsorption on this surface is predominantly molecular. They show that changes in the cerium 3d spectrum upon CO chemisorption may be separated into initial- and final-state effects. In the initial state, stabilization of the (Xe)(5d6s)/sup 3/4f/sup 1/ configuration occurs due to an increase in effective nuclear charge on the cerium atom. This leads to a decrease in f/sup 0/ intensity in the recorded spectrum. Increased f-electron repulsion in the final state raises the energy of the f/sup 2/ final-state configuration and causes a 2.2-eV shift to higher binding energy of the 3d/sub 5/2/f/sup 2/ peak. The 0.5-eV binding energy shifts of the 3d/sub 5/2/f/sup 1/ and 3d/sub 3/2/f/sup 1/ peaks along with the 2.2-eV shift of the 3d/sub 5/2/f/sup 2/ peak indicate that the f orbitals are quite sensitive indicators of the surface oxidation state in this compound.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.

1987-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

Mid-IR Spectra of Type Ia SN 2014J in M82 Spanning the First Four Months  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a time series of 8 - 13 $\\mu$m spectra and photometry for SN 2014J obtained 57, 81, 108, and 137 days after the explosion using CanariCam on the Gran Telescopio Canarias. These mid-IR spectra and their evolution can be understood within the framework of the delayed detonation model and the production of $\\sim$0.6 M$_{\\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni, a value also consistent with the observed brightness, the brightness decline relation, and the $\\gamma$-ray fluxes. The [Co III] line at 11.888 $\\mu$m, which must be emitted predominantly in regions where the density is below the critical value for collisional de-excitation, is particularly useful for evaluating the time evolution of the photosphere and measuring the amount of $^{56}$Ni and, thus, the mass of the ejecta. Late-time line profiles of SN 2014J are rather symmetric and not shifted in the rest frame. We see Argon emission, which provides a unique probe of mixing in the transition layer between incomplete burning and nuclear statistical equilibrium. In t...

Telesco, Charles M; Li, Dan; lvarez, Carlos; Wright, Christopher M; Barnes, Peter J; Fernndez, Sergio; Hough, James H; Levenson, N A; Marias, Naib; Packham, Christopher; Pantin, Eric; Rebolo, Rafael; Roche, Patrick; Zhang, Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

IPP RH-TRU Waste Study - Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for evaluation: releases by gas generation, groundwater transport, human intrusion and heat generation. Study Findings A summary of the important findings of the Remote-Handled...

455

Epitaxial Ba{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} thin-films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect

We have synthesized epitaxial Ba{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} (BIO) thin-films on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition and studied their electronic structure by dc-transport and optical spectroscopic experiments. We have observed that BIO thin-films are insulating but close to the metal-insulator transition boundary with significantly smaller transport and optical gap energies than its sister compound, Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}. Moreover, BIO thin-films have both an enhanced electronic bandwidth and electronic-correlation energy. Our results suggest that BIO thin-films have great potential for realizing the interesting physical properties predicted in layered iridates.

Nichols, J., E-mail: john.nichols@uky.edu; Korneta, O. B.; Terzic, J.; Cao, G.; Brill, J. W.; Seo, S. S. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

Jeff=1/2 Mott spin-orbit insulating state close to the cubic limit in Ca4IrO6  

SciTech Connect

The J_eff=1/2 state is manifested in systems with large cubic crystal field splitting and spin-orbit coupling that are comparable to the on-site Coulomb interaction, U. 5d transition metal oxides host parameters in this regime and strong evidence for this state in Sr2IrO4, and additional iridates, has been presented. All the candidates, however, deviate from the cubic crystal field required to provide an unmixed canonical J_eff=1/2 state, impacting the development of a robust model of this novel insulating and magnetic state. We present experimental and theoretical results that not only show Ca4IrO6 hosts the state, but furthermore uniquely resides in the limit required for a canonical unmixed J_eff=1/2 state.

Calder, Stuart A [ORNL] [ORNL; Cao, Guixin [ORNL] [ORNL; Okamoto, Satoshi [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Jong-Woo [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL] [ORNL; Gai, Zheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Mandrus, D. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

States of cobalt and iron in catalysts supported in TiO{sub 2} from data of diffuse reflectance IR spectra of adsorbed carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect

The variations in the oxidation states of cobalt and iron atoms in pure and mixed Co- and Fe-containing catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2} as a function of the conditions in which the catalysts were prepared and preliminarily treated were studied by analysis of the IR spectra of carbon monoxide adsorbed on these catalysts. A mutual influence of the components was discovered; iron was found to promote reduction of cobalt.

Davydov, A.A. [G.K. Boreskov Inst. of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Coville, N. [Univ. of the Wiswatersrand Wits, Johannesburg (South Africa)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Emission intensity in the visible and IR spectral ranges from Si-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with erbium (Er) and europium (Eu)  

SciTech Connect

The photo- and electroluminescence spectra of silicon-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with rare-earth metals are studied. It is shown that emission in the visible and IR spectral ranges can be obtained from n-Si:Er/p-Si and n-Si:Eu/p-Si structures fabricated by the method suggested in the study. The results obtained make this method promising for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

Mezdrogina, M. M., E-mail: margaret.m@mail.ioffe.ru; Kostina, L. S.; Beliakova, E. I.; Kuzmin, R. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

THE HST EXTREME DEEP FIELD (XDF): COMBINING ALL ACS AND WFC3/IR DATA ON THE HUDF REGION INTO THE DEEPEST FIELD EVER  

SciTech Connect

The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from 10 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernovae follow-up, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12, have contributed additional imaging data across this region. However, these images have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep image dataset. We combine them now with the XDF program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3/IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths, ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5? in a 0.''35 diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The combined image therefore reaches to 31.2 AB mag 5? (32.9 at 1?) for a flat f {sub ?} source. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ?130 to ?240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ?0.1 mag. Our 5? (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14,140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF.

Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P. A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Labb, I.; Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Gonzalez, V., E-mail: gdi@ucolick.org [University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Ir I L  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF FIGURES 1 2 General location of the Granite City Steel Facility' Granite City, Illinois . . . View of the betatron building, looking south . ' ' 3 View o[ the betatron building, looking west . ' ' ' ' ' 11 4 Diagram of the ground floor of the betatron building ' 5 Photo showing the larger of the two betatrons (no. 1, Fig. ) 6 View of transformer storage area inside the betatron building 7 Directly measured radiation levels inside the betatron building, first level 8 Results of directly measured radiation levels taken in the betatron building, second level . Industrial vacuum cleaner having elevated radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations . I-ocations of smears, and indoor dust and debris samples Results of direct radiation measurements and locations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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461

Ir I L  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

*- -I ..' -I I... "- II .- (1 "^ 1 6 7 8 9 10 11 LIST O F FIGURES General location of the Granite City Steel Facility , Granite City , Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 View of the betatron building, look ing south . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 View of the betatron building, look ing west . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Diagram of the ground floor of the betatron building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Photo showing the larger of the two betatrons (no. 1, Fig. 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 View of transformer s torage area ins ide the betatron building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

462

IR DIAL performance modeling  

SciTech Connect

We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

Sharlemann, E.T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Hf-irJ  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

F, Lodi, New Jersey, is not being authorized because it does not meet the 100-square meter criteria as denoted in 40 CFR 192. *c If there are any questions, please call Arthur...

464

Scattering IR SNOM | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raschke at the University of Colorado-Boulder. It is designed to provide spectroscopic infrared vibrational near-field nanoimaging that provides ultrahigh spatial resolution...

465

Variation of the metal-insulator transition and formation of bipolarons by Cd doping in the thiospinel system Cu1-xCdxIr2S4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pseudobinary thiospinel system Cu1-xCdxIr2S4 was investigated by the x-ray-diffraction, electrical resistivity, magnetic-susceptibility, and specific-heat measurements. It was shown that the system exhibits a miscibility-gap behavior for the Cd substitution, however, nearly monophasic samples were obtained by quenching at 1373 K, except for 0.4Cd concentration, the room-temperature electrical conductivity and Pauli susceptibility decrease monotonically, consistent with the hole-filling picture. The first-order metal-insulator transition at about 230 K in the parent compound CuIr2S4 is changed into a second-order transition around 185 K when x?0.25, whereafter the second-order transition disappears at x?0.8. No superconductivity was observed down to 1.8 K. The end-member compound CdIr2S4 is shown as an insulator with a band gap of 0.3 eV. Analysis for the data of magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity suggests the formation of bipolarons below 185 K for 0.25

Guanghan Cao; Hideaki Kitazawa; Takehiko Matsumoto; Chunmu Feng

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Technical Note: Removing the stem effect when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors: A relevant and necessary step  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not a stem effect removal technique is necessary when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using a scintillation detector. Methods: A red-green-blue photodiode connected to a multichannel electrometer was used to detect the light emitted from a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) during irradiation with an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source. Accuracy in dose measurement was compared with and without the use of stem effect removal techniques. Monochromatic and polychromatic filtration techniques were studied. An in-house template was built for accurate positioning of catheters in which the source and the PSD were inserted. Dose distribution was measured up to 5 cm from source to detector in the radial and longitudinal directions. Results: The authors found the stem effect to be particularly important when the source was close to the optical fiber guide and far from the scintillation component of the detector. It can account for up to (72{+-}3)% of the signal under clinically relevant conditions. The polychromatic filtration outperformed the monochromatic filtration as well as the absence of filtration in regard to dose measurement accuracy. Conclusions: It is necessary to implement a stem effect removal technique when building a PSD for in vivo dosimetry during Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. The PSD that the authors have developed for this study would be suitable for such an application.

Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina M.; Archambault, Louis; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Ho circumflex tel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Investigation of Compositional, Structural, and Dynamical Changes of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures on a Rat Brain by FT-IR Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An epileptic seizure originating from the activation of a group of neurons at the same time is a sudden onset of symptoms and clinical manifestations caused by an abnormal, excessive, hypersynchronous burst of electrical activity that disrupts brain functions. ... Additionally, we performed deconvolution only in the CH region covering 30502800 cm1 with 0.7 gamma factor. ... The neural networks (NNs) were first trained using FT-IR spectra of 18 water-soluble proteins whose secondary structures are known from X-ray crystallographic analysis. ...

Sevgi Turker; Gul Ilbay; Mete Severcan; Feride Severcan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

IR and UV Galaxies at z=0.6 -- Evolution of Dust Attenuation and Stellar Mass as Revealed by SWIRE and GALEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study dust attenuation and stellar mass of $\\rm z\\sim 0.6$ star-forming galaxies using new SWIRE observations in IR and GALEX observations in UV. Two samples are selected from the SWIRE and GALEX source catalogs in the SWIRE/GALEX field ELAIS-N1-00 ($\\Omega = 0.8$ deg$^2$). The UV selected sample has 600 galaxies with photometric redshift (hereafter photo-z) $0.5 \\leq z \\leq 0.7$ and NUV$\\leq 23.5$ (corresponding to $\\rm L_{FUV} \\geq 10^{9.6} L_\\sun$). The IR selected sample contains 430 galaxies with $f_{24\\mu m} \\geq 0.2$ mJy ($\\rm L_{dust} \\geq 10^{10.8} L_\\sun$) in the same photo-z range. It is found that the mean $\\rm L_{dust}/L_{FUV}$ ratios of the z=0.6 UV galaxies are consistent with that of their z=0 counterparts of the same $\\rm L_{FUV}$. For IR galaxies, the mean $\\rm L_{dust}/L_{FUV}$ ratios of the z=0.6 LIRGs ($\\rm L_{dust} \\sim 10^{11} L_\\sun$) are about a factor of 2 lower than local LIRGs, whereas z=0.6 ULIRGs ($\\rm L_{dust} \\sim 10^{12} L_\\sun$) have the same mean $\\rm L_{dust}/L_{FUV}$ ratios as their local counterparts. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the dominant component of LIRG population has changed from large, gas rich spirals at z$>0.5$ to major-mergers at z=0. The stellar mass of z=0.6 UV galaxies of $\\rm L_{FUV} \\leq 10^{10.2} L_\\sun$ is about a factor 2 less than their local counterparts of the same luminosity, indicating growth of these galaxies. The mass of z=0.6 UV lunmous galaxies (UVLGs: $\\rm L_{FUV} > 10^{10.2} L_\\sun$) and IR selected galaxies, which are nearly exclusively LIRGs and ULIRGs, is the same as their local counterparts.

C. Kevin Xu; David Shupe; Veronique Buat; Michael Rowan-Robinson; Jorge Iglesias-Pramo; Tsutomu T. Takeuchi; Tom A. Barlow; Tim Conrow; Fan Fang; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Eduardo Gonzales-Solares; Carol Lonsdale; D. Christopher Martin; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Mark Seibert; Todd Small; Gene Smith; Jason Surace; Ted Wyder

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Diode laser-based sensor system for long-path absorption measurements of atmospheric concentration and near-IR molecular spectral parameters  

SciTech Connect

Line-locked near-IR diode lasers and a simple retroreflector/telescope system were used for remote sensing of atmospheric constituents over long atmospheric paths. The experimental configuration used in preliminary measurements of atmospheric water vapor and oxygen with AlGaAs diode lasers is presented. A prototype field sensor system currently under development shares the same basic configuration but incorporates interchangeable AlGaAs and InGaAsP diode-laser modules for monitoring a variety of atmospheric gases.

Goldstein, N.; Lee, J.; Adler-Golden, S.M.; Bien, F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Electron-doped Sr2IrO4?? (0???0.04): Evolution of a disordered Jeff=12 Mott insulator into an exotic metallic state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stoichiometric Sr2IrO4 is a ferromagnetic Jeff=12 Mott insulator driven by strong spin-orbit coupling. Introduction of very dilute oxygen vacancies into single-crystal Sr2IrO4?? with ??0.04 leads to significant changes in lattice parameters and an insulator-to-metal transition at TMI=105?K. The highly anisotropic electrical resistivity of the low-temperature metallic state for ??0.04 exhibits anomalous properties characterized by non-Ohmic behavior and an abrupt current-induced transition in the resistivity at T?=52?K, which separates two regimes of resistive switching in the nonlinear I-V characteristics. The novel behavior illustrates an exotic ground state and constitutes a new paradigm for devices structures in which electrical resistivity is manipulated via low-level current densities ?10?mA/cm2 (compared to higher spin-torque currents ?107108?A/cm2) or magnetic inductions ?0.11.0?T.

O. B. Korneta, Tongfei Qi, S. Chikara, S. Parkin, L. E. De Long, P. Schlottmann, and G. Cao

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

In-situ Spectroscopy of Water Oxidation at Ir Oxide Nanocluster Drivenby Visible TiOCr Charge-Transfer Chromophore in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect

An all-inorganic photocatalytic unit consisting of a binuclear TiOCr charge-transfer chromophore coupled to an Ir oxide nanocluster has been assembled on the pore surface of mesoporous silica AlMCM-41. In situ FT-Raman and EPR spectroscopy of an aqueous suspension of the resulting IrxOy-TiCr-AlMCM-41 powder reveal the formation of superoxide species when exciting the Ti(IV)OCr(III) --> Ti(III)OCr(IV) metal-to-metal charge-transfer chromophore with visible light. Use of H218O confirms that the superoxide species originates from oxidation of water. Photolysis in the absence of persulfate acceptor leads to accumulation of Ti(III) instead. The results are explained by photocatalytic oxidation of water at Ir oxide nanoclusters followed by trapping of the evolving O2 by transient Ti(III) centers to yield superoxide. Given the flexibility to select donor metals with appropriate redox potential, photocatalytic units consisting of a binuclear charge-transfer chromophore coupled to a water oxidation catalyst shown here constitute a step towards thermodynamically efficient visible light water oxidation units.

Frei, Heinz; Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

472

Small-volume, ultrahigh-vacuum-compatible high-pressure reaction cell for combined kinetic and in situ IR spectroscopic measurements on planar model catalysts  

SciTech Connect

We describe the design and performance of a high-pressure reaction cell for simultaneous kinetic and in situ infrared reflection (IR) spectroscopic measurements on model catalysts at elevated pressures, between 10{sup -3} and 10{sup 3} mbars, which can be operated both as batch reactor and as flow reactor with defined gas flow. The cell is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) system, which is used for sample preparation and also contains facilities for sample characterization. Specific for this design is the combination of a small cell volume, which allows kinetic measurements with high sensitivity under batch or continuous flow conditions, the complete isolation of the cell from the UHV part during UHV measurements, continuous temperature control during both UHV and high-pressure operation, and rapid transfer between UHV and high-pressure stage. Gas dosing is performed by a designed gas-handling system, which allows operation as flow reactor with calibrated gas flows at adjustable pressures. To study the kinetics of reactions on the model catalysts, a quadrupole mass spectrometer is connected to the high-pressure cell. IR measurements are possible in situ by polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, which also allows measurements at elevated pressures. The performance of the setup is demonstrated by test measurements on the kinetics for CO oxidation and the CO adsorption on a Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ru(0001) model catalyst film at 1-50 mbar total pressure.

Zhao, Z.; Diemant, T.; Haering, T.; Rauscher, H.; Behm, R.J. [Department Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, University of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

The Decay of Rh104m (4.3 Min) and Rh104 (44 Sec)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiations of neutron-activated rhodium are studied with 180 constant field conversion electron spectrometers and a gamma-ray scintillation spectrometer. Internal conversion electrons are observed to be associated with the 4.3-minute activity. These are interpreted as arising from two isomeric transitions of 51.10.2 and 77.20.2 kev in rhodium. By coincidence studies these two transitions are shown to be in cascade. The character of the radiations, as determined from the KL ratios and lifetime considerations, appears to be M1 and E3, respectively. Additional gamma-rays of energy 55010 kev and ?1.2 Mev (weak) are observed with the scintillation spectrometer. The 550-kev transition is associated with both the 44-second and the 4.3-minute periods and is assumed to follow the beta-decay and hence be in Pd104.

W. C. Jordan; J. M. Cork; S. B. Burson

1953-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

IMpRH Server: an RH mapping server available on the Web  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......tools on the Web is a crucial point for a wide use of these panels. In humans for instance, the Stanford web site (http://shgc-www. stanford.edu) provides on line tools to map a new marker, whereas the RHdb web site (http://corba.ebi.ac......

Denis Milan; Rachel Hawken; Cdric Cabau; Sophie Leroux; Carine Genet; Yvette Lahbib; Gwenola Tosser; Annie Robic; Francois Hatey; Lee Alexander; Craig Beattie; Larry Schook; Martine Yerle; Jol Gellin

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Determination of absorbed dose to water around a clinical HDR {sup 192}Ir source using LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs demonstrates an LET dependence of detector response  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Experimental radiation dosimetry with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), calibrated in a {sup 60}Co or megavoltage (MV) photon beam, is recommended by AAPM TG-43U1for verification of Monte Carlo calculated absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources. However, it has been shown by Carlsson Tedgren et al.[Med. Phys. 38, 5539-5550 (2011)] that for TLDs of LiF:Mg,Ti, detector response was 4% higher in a {sup 137}Cs beam than in a {sup 60}Co one. The aim of this work was to investigate if similar over-response exists when measuring absorbed dose to water around {sup 192}Ir sources, using LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters calibrated in a 6 MV photon beam. Methods: LiF dosimeters were calibrated to measure absorbed dose to water in a 6 MV photon beam and used to measure absorbed dose to water at distances of 3, 5, and 7 cm from a clinical high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. Measured values were compared to values of absorbed dose to water calculated using a treatment planning system (TPS) including corrections for the difference in energy absorption properties between calibration quality and the quality in the users'{sup 192}Ir beam and for the use of a PMMA phantom instead of the water phantom underlying dose calculations in the TPS. Results: Measured absorbed doses to water around the {sup 192}Ir source were overestimated by 5% compared to those calculated by the TPS. Corresponding absorbed doses to water measured in a previous work with lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters by Antonovic et al. [Med. Phys. 36, 2236-2247 (2009)], using the same irradiation setup and calibration procedure as in this work, were 2% lower than those calculated by the TPS. The results obtained in the measurements in this work and those obtained using the EPR lithium formate dosimeters were, within the expanded (k = 2) uncertainty, in agreement with the values derived by the TPS. The discrepancy between the results using LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs and the EPR lithium formate dosimeters was, however, statistically significant and in agreement with the difference in relative detector responses found for the two detector systems by Carlsson Tedgren et al. [Med. Phys. 38, 5539-5550 (2011)] and by Adolfsson et al.[Med. Phys. 37, 4946-4959 (2010)]. Conclusions: When calibrated in {sup 60}Co or MV photon beams, correction for the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti detector response will be needed as to measure absorbed doses to water in a {sup 192}Ir beam with highest accuracy. Such corrections will depend on the manufacturing process (MTS-N Poland or Harshaw TLD-100) and details of the annealing and read-out schemes used.

Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa; Elia, Rouba; Hedtjaern, Haakan; Olsson, Sara; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun [Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE 581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden) and Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE 171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE 581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE 581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden) and Department of Radiation Physics UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, SE 581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE 581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

MT paper-2 column.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GT2005-68203 INSERTION OF SHOCK WAVE COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY INTO MICRO TURBINES FOR INCREASED EFFICIENCY AND REDUCED COSTS ABSTRACT The following analysis is presented to serve as a preliminary design guide for micro turbine engine designers to consider the potential advantages of incorporating the Rampressor into their recuperated engine designs. It is shown that the increase in compressor efficiency and the shift in optimum pressure will increase the efficiency of the engine and lower the recuperator inlet temperature and specific cost. This also provides the opportunity to increase the turbine inlet temperature and specific power without incorporating more costly air-cooled metal or ceramic components into the turbine design.

477

Mt Wheeler Power, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Utility Id 13073 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GS (Small General Service) Commercial H-1(Metered Residential or Commercial Electric Heat) Residential H-2 (Unmetered Residential Electric Heat Rate) Residential Irrigation Rate (Annual Charge) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Demand Charge) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Kilowatt Hour Rate) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Load Factor Rate) Commercial Irrigation Rate (Off-Peak Rate) Commercial

478

Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt. Graham  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of the wind speed vertical distribution V(h) is fundamental for an astronomical site for many different reasons: (1) the wind speed shear contributes to trigger optical turbulence in the whole troposphere, (2) a few of the astroclimatic parameters such as the wavefront coherence time (tau_0) depends directly on V(h), (3) the equivalent velocity V_0, controlling the frequency at which the adaptive optics systems have to run to work properly, depends on the vertical distribution of the wind speed and optical turbulence. Also, a too strong wind speed near the ground can introduce vibrations in the telescope structures. The wind speed at a precise pressure (200 hPa) has frequently been used to retrieve indications concerning the tau_0 and the frequency limits imposed to all instrumentation based on adaptive optics systems, but more recently it has been proved that V_200 (wind speed at 200 hPa) alone is not sufficient to provide exhaustive elements concerning this topic and that the vertical d...

Hagelin, S; Lascaux, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Mt Rainier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow Rate: "af" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. The given value was not understood. Flow Test...

480

WIND DATA REPORT Ragged Mt Maine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions........................................................................................................... 9 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rh ir mt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

AtomicNuclear Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HTML_PAGES HTML_PAGES This AtomicNuclearProperties page is under intermittent development. Suggestions and comments are welcome. Please report errors. Chemical elements: For entries in red, a pull-down menu permits selection of the physical state. Cryogenic liquid densties are at the boiling point at 1 atm. 0n 1Ps 1H 2He 3Li 4Be 5B 6C 7N 8O 9F 10Ne 11Na 12Mg 13Al 14Si 15P 16S 17Cl 18Ar 19K 20Ca 21Sc 22Ti 23V 24Cr 25Mn 26Fe 27Co 28Ni 29Cu 30Zn 31Ga 32Ge 33As 34Se 35Br 36Kr 37Rb 38Sr 39Y 40Zr 41Nb 42Mo 43Tc 44Ru 45Rh 46Pd 47Ag 48Cd 49In 50Sn 51Sb 52Te 53I 54Xe 55Cs 56Ba 57La 72Hf 73Ta 74W 75Re 76Os 77Ir 78Pt 79Au 80Hg 81Tl 82Pb 83Bi 84Po 85At 86Rn 87Fr 88Ra 89Ac 104Rf 105Db 106Sg 107Bh 108Hs 109Mt 110Ds 111Rg 112 113 114 115 116 mt 118

482

Fuel Cells Catalyst for Start-up and Shutdown Conditions: Electrochemical, XPS, and TEM Evaluation of Sputter-Deposited Ru, Ir, and Ti on Pt-Nano-Structured Thin Film (NSTF) Support  

SciTech Connect

Minute amounts of Ru, Ir and Ti (2 and 10 g/cm2) sputter-deposited over 3M Pt-coated nano-structured thin film (NSTF) substrate were evaluated as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) environment. The purpose of the study was to explore the suitability of these elements for modifying both the anode and the cathode catalysts in order to lower the overpotential for the oxidation of water during transient conditions. By keeping the electrode potential as close as possible to the thermodynamic potential for OER, other components in the fuel cell, such as platinum, the gas diffusion layer and the bipolar plates, will be less prone to degradation. While Ru and Ir were chosen due to their high OER activity in aqueous environment, Ti was also included due to its ability to stabilize the OER catalysts. The 3M Pt-NSTF was selected as a stable, carbon-free substrate. The surface chemistry and the morphology of OER catalysts on Pt-NSTF were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The OER catalytic activity of Ru and Ir in PEMs compares well with their behavior in aqueous environment. It was found that Ru is more active than Ir, that Ir is considerably more stable, while the mass activity of both is higher in comparison with similar OER catalyst.

Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Atanasoska, Liliana [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Vernstrom, George [3M Industrial Mineral Products; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Haugen, Gregory [3M Industrial Mineral Products

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Absolute measurements of nitric acid by kilometer pathlength FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and their intercomparison with other measurement methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of ambient nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) and ammonia (NH/sub 3/) concentrations were conducted using a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer interfaced to an open-path, multiple-reflection optical system. These measurements provided benchmark data for gaseous HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ during a field study, held at Claremont, California, September 11-19, 1985, which compared current analytical methods for determining nitrogenous species concentrations in the atmosphere. Hourly average concentrations of HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ are reported, along with the calculated average concentrations for the sampling periods designated for the majority of the other measurement methods.

Winer, A.M.; Tuazon, E.C.; Biermann, H.W.; Wallington, T.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

On the possibility of designing a high-resolution heterodyne spectrometer for near-IR range on the basis of a tunable diode laser  

SciTech Connect

The results of heterodyning of broadband radiation in the near-IR range are presented. A stabilised DFB laser was used as a local oscillator, while the role of a broadband radiation source was played by another DFB laser, excited by the pump current below its threshold value. A fibre-optical Y-coupler based on the single-mode silica fibre served as a diplexer. The radiation mixed in the singlemode fibre was incident on the photodetector, the role of which was played by a p - i - n photodiode. The signal from the photodiode was amplified by the preamplifier with the feedback resistance 240 k{Omega} and the bandwidth {approx}1 MHz and then digitised using a 16-digit ADC. The frequency scanning was implemented via the variation of the local oscillator frequency. The developed registration system provides the sensitivity {approx}1.4 % of the shot noise value at the acquisition time {approx}40 min.

Klimchuk, A Yu; Nadezhdinskii, Aleksandr I; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Shapovalov, Yu P; Rodin, A V

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. III. IR spectra of scandium extracts from concentrated nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium organic phases in extraction systems consisting of tributyl phosphate (TBP) (neat or 1 M in CCl{sub 4}) and 8-12 M nitric acid containing scandium or scandium-free have been studied by IR spectroscopy. Extracted complex contains 3, 4, or 5 nitric acid molecules per Sc atom in the case of extraction from 8.3, 10.9, and 12.2 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively, and corresponds to the formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP. Nitric acid molecules are incorporated into extracted complex via H-bond between oxygen atom of coordinated nitrate ion and acid proton.

Nikitina, G.P.; Egorova, V.P.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z